I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Whau Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 28 September 2022

6.00pm

Chamber Civic Building L2 1 Smythe Road, Henderson

 

Whau Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kay Thomas

 

Deputy Chairperson

Fasitua Amosa

 

Members

Catherine Farmer

 

 

Ulalemamae Te'eva Matafai

 

 

Warren Piper

 

 

Jessica Rose

 

 

Susan Zhu

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rodica Chelaru

Democracy Advisor

 

20 September 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 02185527

Email: rodica.chelaru@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Whau Ward Councillor's update                                                                                  7

12        Adoption of the name Te Hono for the new Avondale library and community hub                                                                                                                                       13

13        Eastdale Reserve Service Outcomes Plan                                                               19

14        Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022                                                                      45

15        Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets – Auckland Transport                      63

16        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Four, 2021/2022   69

17        Whau Local Board Plan 2020: Year two review                                                       93

18        Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 101

19        2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations                                                                171

20        Valedictory reflections: end of term address                                                         175

21        Reporting back decisions made under delegation                                                177

22        Whau Local Board Workshop Records                                                                   185

23        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      199

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have. Specifically, members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

 

The following are declared interests of the Whau Local Board:

 

Member

Organisation

Position

Kay Thomas

·         New Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau

·         Friends of Arataki

·         Western Quilters

·         Citizens Advice Bureau
Waitākere Board

·         Literacy Waitākere

·         West Auckland Heritage Conference

Volunteer

Committee member

Member

Chair

Board member

Committee member

Susan Zhu

·         Chinese Oral History Foundation

·         The Chinese Garden Steering Committee of Auckland

·         Chinese Medicine Council of New Zealand

Committee member

Board member


Board member

Fasitua Amosa

·         Equity NZ

·         Massive Theatre Company

·         Avondale Business Association

Vice President

Board member

A family member is the Chair

Catherine Farmer

·         Avondale-Waterview Historical Society

·         Blockhouse Bay Historical Society

·         Portage Licensing Trust

·         Blockhouse Bay Bowls

·         Forest and Bird organisation

·         Grey Power

Member

 

Member

Trustee

Patron

Member

Member

Te’eva Matafai

·         Pacific Events and Entertainment Trust

·         Miss Samoa NZ

·         Malu Measina Samoan Dance Group

·         Aspire Events

Co-Founder

 

Director


Director/Founder

 

Director

Warren Piper

·         New Lynn RSA

·         New Lynn Business Association

Associate member

Member

Jessica Rose

·         Women in Urbanism-Aotearoa, Auckland Branch

·         Forest and Bird

·         Big Feels Club

·         Frocks on Bikes

·         Bike Auckland

·         Department of Conservation

Committee member


Member

Patron

Former co-chair

Former committee member

Employee

Member appointments

Local board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the local board members represent Auckland Council.

External organisation

Leads

Alternate

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Warren Piper

Catherine Farmer

Avondale Business Association

Kay Thomas

Warren Piper

Blockhouse Bay Business Association

Warren Piper

Fasitua Amosa

New Lynn Business Association

Susan Zhu

Kay Thomas
Warren Piper

Rosebank Business Association

Fasitua Amosa

Warren Piper

Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust

Fasitua Amosa

Jessica Rose

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Whau Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting, held on Wednesday, 24 August 2022, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Whau Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Whau Ward Councillor's update

File No.: CP2022/09398

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from Whau Ward Councillor, Tracy Mulholland.

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Whau Ward Councillor to have an opportunity to update the Whau Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the report and thank Whau Ward Councillor, Tracy Mulholland, for her update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Ward Councillor Report - September 2022

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Adoption of the name Te Hono for the new Avondale library and community hub

File No.: CP2022/14071

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the name Te Hono for the new Avondale library and community hub.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mana whenua representatives have been involved in the new Avondale library and community hub project (currently in design) since 2019.

3.       Through regular hui and involvement in the design process, mana whenua representatives from Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei have gifted the name Te Hono to the new facility. The Whau Local Board holds the decision-making authority to adopt the name.

4.       Te Hono is ‘the connection’ and recognises that the new facility connects place, people and purpose as expressed by the whakataukī (proverb) ‘He hono tangata e kore e motu; ka pa he taura waka e motu’ (unlike a canoe rope, a human bond cannot be severed).

5.       Te Hono reinforces the mana whenua vision from the design brief for the new facility to celebrate the local and wider cultural landscape, express cultural identity and sense of place and provide for culturally welcoming processes and protocols.

6.       Naming the new facility early allows for the name to influence the design narrative, including mahi toi (art), and strengthens the cultural and community connection to the facility.

7.       Adopting the name Te Hono aligns to the Whau Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome Two, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau and the council’s Māori Language Policy. It increases the visibility of te reo Māori in the Avondale area, contributing to a bilingual city where te reo Māori is seen, heard, spoken and learned.

8.       There are no climate impact or financial implications of adopting the name Te Hono for the new facility.

9.       There is a risk of differing views in the community to the naming of the facility as community feedback will not be sought on the koha (gift) from mana whenua representatives. This will be mitigated through communication to build understanding. If Te Hono is not adopted by the local board, there is a risk that relationships with mana whenua representatives may be impacted.

10.     If the name Te Hono is adopted, it will be shared with the community and used in all future communications, internally and with the community.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      adopt the name Te Hono for the new Avondale library and community hub.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The new Avondale library and community hub is currently in the design phase with preliminary design complete. Mana whenua representatives have been involved in the project since May 2019 and were key to the development of the design brief, concept and preliminary designs.

12.     Thirteen iwi and hapū are listed on the council resource consents website as having an interest in the Avondale area.  All thirteen iwi and hapū were invited to be involved in the project:

·    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust

·    Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board

·    Ngāti Tamaterā

·    Ngaati Te Ata

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·    Te Ahiwaru- Waiohua

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki

·    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·    Waikato -Tainui.

Five representatives from Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki attended the first hui in May 2019.

13.     Mana whenua representatives have changed over the course of the project, however, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Ākitai Waiohua and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei have been involved since the first hui in May 2019. Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki and Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua were involved early in the project and Ngaati Te Ata has been involved more recently.

14.     Project communications, hui invites and minutes continue to be sent to eleven mana whenua representatives.

15.     The mana whenua vision for the new Avondale library and community hub is included in the design brief (WH/2019/107). Key to the vision is the underlying principle of hononga – connection, relationship and bond. Hononga underpins the project in its entirety, from how we work together, the services and design of the facility through to how the facility is operated when it opens.

16.     The vision also outlines the desire for the project to:

·    remember and celebrate the local and wider cultural landscape

·    express cultural identity and sense of place

·    provide for cultural welcoming processes and protocol.

17.     The Whau Local Board has decision making authority to name the new Avondale library and community hub.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Mana whenua representatives first expressed their desire to name the new facility in May 2019.  Through subsequent hui and involvement in the design process, mana whenua representatives gifted the name Te Hono to the new facility.

19.     Representatives from Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei were present when the name was decided in caucus and other interested iwi and hapū were included in the circulation of hui minutes.

Te Hono ‘the connection’

20.     Te Hono is ‘the connection’ – connecting place, people and purpose. It relates to the underlying principle in the design brief of hononga – connection, relationship and bond and ‘a place where people of all ages, abilities and interests can come together for meaningful social interaction and connection’.

21.     The following whakataukī (proverb) was shared as part of the naming:

He hono tangata e kore e motu; ka pa he taura waka e motu.

 

Unlike a canoe rope, a human bond cannot be severed.

22.     Te Hono reinforces the mana whenua vision from the design brief for the new facility to celebrate the local and wider cultural landscape, express cultural identity and sense of place and provide for culturally welcoming processes and protocols.

Benefits of early naming

23.     Mana whenua representatives clearly articulated the benefits of naming the new facility early in the design process, to allow for the name to influence the design narrative and themes, and to strengthen the cultural and community connection to the name and facility.

24.     The next phase of design will start to detail mahi toi (art) opportunities. An adopted name will help with further definition of the narratives to be expressed artistically through the facility and public realm.

25.     Consistent use of the name Te Hono in all communications going forward will help ensure wider community awareness of the name, what it means and the desire for the new facility to be a place of connection for all. It allows for deeper connection to the purpose of the new facility than references to ‘multipurpose community facility’ or ‘library and community hub’.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     There is no climate impact from the naming of the new facility.

27.     The new facility has a climate impact including operational emissions and greenhouse gas emissions through construction activity and use of materials. These will be mitigated as much as possible through the design of the building and choice of construction materials.

28.     The project aims to minimise transport emissions through the town centre location of the facility and proximity to active and public transport connections.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Adopting the name Te Hono delivers on Auckland Council’s Māori Language Policy and Kia Ora Te Reo, which is a priority within Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, the council’s Māori Outcome Performance Management Framework. It also delivers on Kia Ora Te Ahurea (the Māori culture and identity outcomes) as it helps to reclaim Māori identity and our unique point of difference in the world.

30.     It aligns with the aspirations of the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), as articulated in the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2017, Māori Plan.

31.     Adopting the name gifted by mana whenua representatives is supported by the teams involved in the project from Eke Panuku, Parks and Community Facilities, Connected Communities, and Regional Services and Strategy.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.       Through partnering with mana whenua on this project, it is envisaged that the relationship between mana whenua and the local board will be strengthened.

33.     Adopting the name Te Hono is aligned to Outcome Two of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020:

Māori aspirations are advanced and prioritised, and Māori history and identity are valued and reflected in our community spaces.

34.     It is also aligned to the objective “Māori principles and traditions are considered early in our major projects and planning processes” and initiative “Encourage the use of Māori place names across the Whau and consider advocating to formalise these, in partnership with mana whenua”.

35.     As Te Hono is a koha (gift) from mana whenua representatives, community feedback will not be sought on the name. However, Te Hono expresses the key sentiments we have heard from the community regarding the new facility as a place for all and is strongly aligned with the vision, provisions and values in the design brief which was developed together with the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     It is anticipated that the new facility will meet Māori outcomes through the services provided, design and contribution to sense of place and identity.

37.     The new facility and name Te Hono will deliver on the mana whenua vision of a place to:

·    remember and celebrate the local and wider cultural landscape

·    express cultural identity and sense of place

·    provide for cultural welcoming processes and protocol.

38.     Adopting the name Te Hono will increase the visibility of te reo Māori in the Avondale area, contributing to a bilingual city where te reo Māori is seen, heard, spoken and learned.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     There are no financial implications of adopting the name Te Hono for the facility. All costs related to signage and communications would be present regardless of the name and are included in the overall project budget.

40.     Mana whenua representatives are reimbursed for their time as part of the overall project budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     There may be a risk of differing views in the community on the name and the naming process. This will be mitigated through communicating the meaning of the name and the koha (gift) of the name from mana whenua representatives.

42.     If the local board chooses not to adopt Te Hono, the relationship with mana whenua representatives may be impacted. The local board would need to hui with mana whenua representatives to discuss the decision and way forward.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     If the local board choose to adopt Te Hono for the new Avondale library and community hub, the name will be shared with the community. It will then be used consistently in all future communications, internally and with the community.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nicola Terry - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Eastdale Reserve Service Outcomes Plan

File No.: CP2022/13346

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the service outcomes plan for Eastdale Reserve in Avondale (Attachment A to this report) and provide support for next steps.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Eastdale Reserve is a significant park located within the northern extent of the suburb of Avondale, in the Whau local board area. The park provides opportunities for both passive and active recreation, and is a key hub for community activities and events. It also holds importance across the wider area as a key organised sport complex.

3.       The importance of this park to the Avondale community is likely to increase in future as the area goes through a period of forecast rapid population growth.

4.       With several projects already proposed within the reserve, and in the context of rapid growth, the development of an updated and holistic parks plan for the reserve was flagged as a requirement, to help guide development within the park in the short and long term.

5.       In financial year 2020/2021 the Whau Local Board funded the Eastdale Reserve Service Outcomes Plan (WH/2020/94). Delays related to COVID-19 meant the project was deferred to financial year 2021/2022.

6.       The attached service outcomes plan provides a vision to guide improvements to Eastdale Reserve over both the short and long term. It will consolidate projects as well as identify future opportunities and ensure a holistic approach to development in this park which meets the needs and aspirations of the local community and mana whenua.

7.       Consultation with mana whenua, key stakeholders, the local community, the Whau Local Board and other Council departments was undertaken to shape the development of this plan. All those engaged in this process were supportive of the final plan as per attachment A to this report.

8.       Several projects are already underway within the reserve, including renewal of the play space and potential removal of the residential property on site. Staff will provide updates to the local board as part of regular workshops and quarterly reporting.

9.       All funding requirements to deliver the remaining identified improvements in the proposed plan will be discussed with the local board as part of future Customer and Community Services work programme approval processes.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      adopt the final service outcomes plan for Eastdale Reserve in Avondale (Attachment A to this report).

b)      approve deconstruction / demolition of the residential property at Eastdale Reserve at 33 Eastdale Road.

c)      request that the project be considered for inclusion in a future regional Operational Renewals and Demolitions Work Programme, which is funded through regional operational budget.

Horopaki

Context

10.     Eastdale Reserve is a large sports park located in Avondale at the base of the Rosebank Peninsula in the Whau local board area. The park is significant in both its size (as a suburb park) and importance to the local community, used frequently for events and for passive and active recreation.

11.     The park has a rich history, home in the late 1800s and early 1900s to market gardens and temporarily used as a US Naval Hospital during the Second World War. It subsequently was developed as a public reserve by the Auckland City Council and is now governed by the Whau Local Board.

12.     Today the park is an important sporting facility, home to football, cricket and athletics. A soon to be renovated playground, basketball half court, picnic and barbeque area and outdoor exercise equipment provide further opportunities for users to enjoy the park. A largely accessible looped perimeter path provides access to all park facilities and is used frequently for recreation and by students of the adjacent Avondale school campus.

13.     The park is also a hub for community activity, used for events both large and small, and containing an old depot/storage building which is under partial community lease as well as a tenanted residential property, managed by Community Facilities.

14.     Avondale is forecasted for significant population growth over the next decade, particularly due to redevelopment of the town centre and likely future development of the Avondale Racecourse. As a result, suburb scale parks such as Eastdale Reserve will become even more important to local and wider area.

15.     With several possible projects already proposed for within the park, including renewal of the playspace, carpark and basketball hardcourts, and discussions surrounding the old buildings on the site, the development of an updated and holistic parks plan was required. This will ensure that future development of the park will be targeted to ensure value for money and that it responds appropriately to the forecasted growth.

16.     In the financial year 2020/2021, the Whau Local Board allocated $15,000 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) Operating Expenditure (Opex) towards the Eastdale Reserve Service Outcomes Plan project (WH/2020/94). This would enable holistic long-term planning for Eastdale Reserve. The project was subsequently delayed to financial year 2021/2022 because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

17.     The service outcomes plan attempts to:

·    identify the needs and aspirations of the community and mana whenua

·    establish design principles to guide existing and future investment

·    recommend and prioritise projects for future investigation, design and delivery.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Spatial Plan

18.     Parks Services staff identified possible improvements to park services within Eastdale Reserve that could be delivered soon, as well as more aspirational improvements. To enable analysis over both time scales, a spatial plan was developed for both the short and long-term future of the park.

19.     Site specific design principles were developed to provide the basis for opportunities proposed within the reserve. Detailed on page 11 of the plan, these principles are:

·    Relationships

·    Recreation and Parks Use

·    Native Biodiversity and Kaitiakitanga

·    Access and Connections.

20.     Numerous actions to improve the reserve were identified, falling under each of the above principles, split into both short-term (0-5 years) and long-term (5-10+ years) spatial plans. These are outlined in more detail on pages 12-15 of the plan.

21.     Short-term actions include:

·    improvements to the playspace, including accessible and nature play

·    native tree planting to enhance the urban ngahere (forest)

·    widen existing pathways and improve accessibility of the perimeter path

·    repurposing of existing hardstand courts

·    demolition of the existing leased house to improve connections between carpark and playspace and improve safety

·    improve accessible carparking within the carpark.

 

22.     Long-term actions include:

·    construction of a new multi-purpose community hub to replace the depot and sheds

·    provision of new basketball / multi-purpose courts in site of old residential property

·    improved passive open space areas, including picnic and barbeque space

·    construction of new shared path along Eastdale Road boundary

·    provision of new group fitness area

·    reconfiguration of the carpark.

 

23.     As part of the development of the plan, input was sought from various Council departments, including working closely with Community Facilities to ensure alignment with proposed projects within the reserve. These included discussions related to the future of both the old depot and storage sheds, as well as the residential property being managed on the site.

24.     Outcomes related to accessibility were extracted directly from the 2018 site investigation into accessibility, also funded by the local board.

25.     Mana whenua engagement and public consultation was undertaken as part of the concept plan development. Engagement was focused online due to pandemic restrictions. However, key stakeholders Sport Waitākere and I Love Avondale were able to seek additional feedback on behalf of Council during an in-person session at the neighbouring school. Overall, the proposed concept plan was well-supported by key stakeholders, mana whenua and the public.

26.     The park service outcomes plan (Attachment A to this report) proposes upgrades to existing assets and development of new assets on the site. Some of these identified improvements can be incorporated within existing planned projects for the park, including the playspace renewal project, and proposed removal of the residential property.

27.     Staff recommend adoption of the parks service outcomes plan as it will enable delivery of the improvements identified in this report.

28.     All future budget allocations to deliver the full scope of the plan and progress certain actions into feasibility, investigation and design will be discussed with the local board as part of future Customer and Community Services work programme development processes.

Residential Property

29.     Removal of the existing residential property is a priority short term action within the plan, necessary to improve connections between the carpark and playspace, open up sightlines to improve safety and security for park users, and enable future delivery of new multi-purpose courts and a community hub.

30.     The building is also in poor condition and does not meet all the requirements of the healthy home standards to enable continued use as a residential property. Following the amendments to the Residential Tenancies Act 1986, all residential occupancies entered into prior to 1 July 2021 must comply with the Healthy Homes standards by 1 July 2024.

31.     While the property meets some of the healthy home standards, it does not meet the heating, ventilation, moisture ingress and drainage requirements under the standard. However, as this property is earmarked for deconstruction / demolition, it would not warrant the work required to bring the property up to the required standard.

32.     The current occupancy is subject to a periodic tenancy which commenced in July 2013. Any notice to terminate the occupancy will need to accord with statutory requirements outlined within the Residential Tenancies Act 1986.

33.     The deconstruction/demolition of the asset is contingent on the prioritisation of the asset within the Operational Renewals and Demolitions Work Programme, approved annually by the Governing Body. The timing of this project within the programme is yet to be determined. Consequently, the occupancy will need to be terminated prior to 1 July 2024, when residential properties need to comply with the standards, if the deconstruction / demolition is not progressed sooner than June 2024.

34.     Note that following deconstruction / demolition:

·    the asset will be removed from the Council’s asset database

·    local renewals budget will not be able to be used to replace the asset or the service it provided in the future under Council’s financial policies and guidelines, and reinstating the asset will require new development funding.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     In June 2019, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and a commitment to the community to look at ways on how we can consider climate implications in everything that we do.

36.     Any formal development of parks infrastructure will contribute to climate change through carbon emissions, particularly during construction and renewal phases, and to a lesser extent through ongoing maintenance. This needs to be carefully considered when creating new parks assets.

37.     This strategic approach to identifying opportunities for future development within this park will ensure that if progressed, actions would provide greatest value to local communities and the wider network. This ensures investment is targeted appropriately and therefore minimises impact on the climate and environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     The proposed plan was designed in collaboration with staff in various departments within Council and will assist towards delivery of a holistic development of the park. Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that the development of the park is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     This project aligns directly to Outcome Three in the Whau Local Board Plan 2020:

Outcome 3: Quality urban development and community facilities to meet the needs of our growing and changing population

The Whau has community assets and open spaces that can accommodate future growth and increased housing density; progress upgrades to key parks and reserves.

Everyone in the Whau has opportunities for active and passive recreation in our parks and open spaces; advance implementation of the Open Space Network Plan, with a view to increasing tree cover in parks and spaces where appropriate.

40.     The PSR 2020/2021 Work Programme was approved by the Whau Local Board in July 2020 (WH/2020/94), including the Eastdale Reserve Service Outcomes Plan. Delays related to COVID-19 meant the project was deferred to financial year 2021/2022.

41.     Workshops were held with the local board to discuss this project in February 2021 to confirm the project scope and discuss initial findings, in July 2021 to update the board on progress, in November 2021 to agree consultation approach and seek feedback on the 80 per cent draft document, and again in May 2022 to discuss consultation results and seek feedback on the final draft plan.

42.     The Whau Local Board was supportive of the plan at each opportunity to provide feedback. The local board supported a four-week extension to the public consultation which was requested by community stakeholders in April 2022. The final draft concept plan was presented to the local board at a workshop in May 2022. The local board indicated in principle support for the final plan.

43.     At a separate workshop held in 2022 with Community Facilities staff, the local board expressed support for the action to deconstruct and remove the residential property from the site, in response to actions identified within the draft plan, as well as significant maintenance issues with the building which would require large investment to remedy.

44.     Community feedback was very positive, with 90 per cent of respondents supportive of most or all the design principles. Actions were also prioritised by the community, as outlined on page nine of the plan. Several community groups provided full written submissions to support their feedback on the plan, including Sport Waitākere and Avondale Community Action. Community feedback helped to shape the final plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     Mana whenua were engaged throughout the development of the concept plan at several stages. Initially the project was discussed with the Parks, Sport and Recreation North-West Mana Whenua Forum in late 2020. Following this, two hui were held with representatives from Te Kawerau a Maki and Te Akitai Waiohua in 2021 and 2022 to discuss and develop the plan for this park as well as wider Avondale. Both mana whenua representatives indicated support for the final plan in July 2022.

46.     The proposed concept plan for Eastdale Reserve references the importance of mana whenua as kaitiaki (guardians) of the whenua (land) and reflects Auckland Council’s desire to deliver the vision of a world class city, including a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world.

47.     Te Aranga Design Principles of Mana (Rangatiratanga/Authority), Whakapapa (names and naming), Tohu (the wider cultural landscape), Taiao (the natural environment), Mauri Tu (environmental health), Mahi Toi (creative expression) and Ahi Ka (the living presence) were taken into consideration during the overall development of the concept plan.

48.     Mana Whenua will be engaged to provide input when future projects are initiated. Specific opportunities for input have already been identified related to the incorporation of mara hupara in the playspace.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     Funding is already in place for the renewal of the playground in financial year 2021/2022 as part of the Customer and Community Services work programme. The playground renewal is funded by the local board’s capital local renewal budget, as well as additional funding from the local board's Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) capital expenditure (Opex) funding budget.

50.     Funding for deconstruction and removal of the residential property is proposed for allocation as part of the regional Community Facilities Opex Renewals and Demolitions Programme 2023 budget, approved by the governing body. The timing of this project within the programme is yet to be determined.

51.     Additional funding will be sought in future Customer and Community Services work programmes to enable further delivery of outcomes identified within the parks service outcomes plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     The plan may require amendment in the short-term should feasibility assessment indicate that certain actions are unable to be delivered or require alteration. Staff will work to ensure that overall improvements to park services will not be impacted by any such changes.

53.     There is a risk that the asset will remain vacant between the period that the tenancy is terminated and when the asset is deconstructed / demolished should this progress after June 2024. This will be carefully managed in collaboration with the current tenant.

54.     Given the current financial constraints that Auckland Council faces, there may be insufficient budget to deliver on actions identified within the plan. To mitigate this, it is suggested that the local board consider funding implementation of the plan over a period of ten or more years, prioritizing deliverables over this time.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Subject to the local board’s adoption of the park service outcomes plan, staff will progress outcomes within the current approved projects. Progress updates on the projects will be provided to the local board as part of quarterly reports.

56.     If adopted, the park service outcomes plan will enable future work programme development with the local board. All funding requirements to deliver the remaining identified improvements in the plan will be discussed with the local board as part of future Customer and Community Services work programme approval processes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Eastdale Service Outcomes Plan July 2022

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Thomas Dixon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/12533

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2021/2022 Annual Report for the Whau Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2021/2022 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 29 September 2022. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2021/2022 Whau Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

4.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area – projects and improvements

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Our performance explained

Highlights of the local board’s work programme which contributed to a performance outcome.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

6.       The Council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.       Council departments and Council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

8.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the local board chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.       The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.     The annual report provides a retrospective view on both the financial and service performance in each local board area for the financial year 2021/2022.

11.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that Council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2021/2022 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit New Zealand review during August and September 2022

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 29 September 2022

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 30 September 2022

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, Council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2021/2022 Annual Report for the Whau Local Board

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Rose – Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Financial Advisory

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina – Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets – Auckland Transport

File No.: CP2022/13770

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Whau Local Board on its successful application to the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme and to seek formal support from the local board for the Avondale Open Streets Activation project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau programme is a newly established $3 million fund to be delivered by Auckland Transport (AT) over the first three years of Auckland Council’s 10-year climate action package. The programme aims to deliver trials and tactical urbanism interventions across the region, outside of the city centre, to reduce emissions through encouraging mode shift to walking, cycling and micromobility.

3.       The Whau Local Board made a successful application to the fund to develop a project called Avondale Open Streets Activation. This project aims to deliver a series of events, activations and night markets with an 'open streets' element by making part(s) of the Avondale town centre temporarily car-free.

4.       To be part of the Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme, the local board must meet 10 per cent of the costs of the project. Initially this contribution will be met by the allocation of dedicated staff time.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      endorse the Avondale Open Streets Activation project in the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau programme is a newly established $3 million fund, to be delivered by Auckland Transport over the first three years of Auckland Council’s 10-year climate action package. The programme aims to deliver trials and tactical urbanism interventions across the region, outside of the city centre, to reduce emissions through encouraging mode shift to walking, cycling and micromobility.

6.       The programme was open to applications from local boards, Auckland Council and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs). This opportunity was also extended to Mana Whenua through AT’s engagement hui.

7.       Applications that met the eligibility criteria were assessed against the primary and secondary objectives for the programme.

8.       The primary objectives for the programme are to:

·    reduce transport emissions and improve air quality co-benefits outside of the city centre by encouraging mode shift to walking and cycling through the creation of more people-friendly streets

·    respond to local enthusiasm for people-friendly streets through undertaking interventions in areas where there is strong local board and community support.

9.       The secondary objectives for the programme are to:

·    encourage the use of tactical urbanism techniques / initiatives that can be rolled out rapidly and at relatively low cost, with a linkage to an existing funding stream to fund a permanent solution if the trial is successful (e.g. projects included for funding in the Regional Land Transport Plan)

·    support Māori outcomes, for example by encouraging active Māori participation, and improving low carbon access to marae, kura, kohanga, employment and services.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Whau Local Board made a successful application to the fund with Avondale Open Streets Activation. This project aims to see Council-family staff and community organisations working together to deliver a summer series of events, activations and night markets with an 'open streets' element by making part(s) of the Avondale town centre temporarily car-free.

11.     The proposal includes a dedicated resource:

·    to host community shaping sessions with the goal of developing ideas for these events.

·    to assist with the coordination of events while adhering to AT and Council’s rules and regulations

·    to monitor and evaluate the events and the project process.

12.     There is extensive community feedback supporting Avondale as Ngā Ara Whau – the gateway to the Whau – that is safe, friendly and easy to get around.

13.     There is very strong backing for supporting local businesses, activation of local streets, creative and community themed events and activations, low-carbon initiatives, and anything to bring the Avondale community together.

14.     These include insights from the recent Whau Local Board Plan 2020 that stated a community desire for:

·    Making town centres vibrant, safe and accessible; to supporting local businesses; to improving walking and cycling connections; to making roads and footpaths safe for pedestrians; and to create better connections between town centres and key destinations via walking, cycling and public transport. Safe spaces for our children to grow and play.

15.     This project supports the Auckland Plan 2050 and the Auckland Climate Action Plan and its priorities and supports AT’s role in promoting active travel.

16.     Te Taruke a Tawhiri Auckland's Climate Plan - sets goals for modal shift of 7 per cent of trips being by bike, 6 per cent of trips being by walking, and 24.5 per cent being by public transport by 2030.

17.     Auckland Plan 2050 - Focus Area 4 - make walking and cycling a preferred choice.

18.     Auckland Transport Future Connect - Avondale is a key link in the AT Future Public transport current strategic network (via Avondale Train Station) and strategies around walking, cycling and micromobility.

19.     Avondale Open Streets Activation aligns with and fulfils actions in the Whau Local Board Plan 2020.

·    Outcomes 4: Improved and expanded opportunities for walking, cycling and public transport.

·    Outcomes 6: Thriving town centres a strong local economy and neighbourhoods that are supportive and connected.

20.     Whau Neighbourhood Greenways Plan - The Plan details a network of neighbourhood greenways within the Whau local board area which will provide safe and enjoyable ways for people to get around, get active and get engaged with their community, their environment and their history and heritage. The potential route within the project area, along Great North Road, was identified as a connector route within the Auckland Cycling Network in the Plan.

21.     Our Future Avondale - Also known as the "Avondale visioning document" Our Future Avondale sets out community desires and expectations around accessible and multi-generational use of spaces, as well as multi-experience destinations that can attract visitors for play, commerce, entertainment, sport and creative experiences.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities. This project supports those outcomes.

23.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     This project is led by Auckland Transport (AT) but involves significant co-operation across the Auckland Council Group. The project team includes staff from Auckland Council’s Local Board Services, Connected Communities and Events departments. There has also been early engagement with staff from Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) who indicated a willingness to share information and collaborate informally, where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The project is the result of a successful expression of interest from the Whau Local Board through the Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau (Vibrant Streets) Programme.

26.     Staff directly supporting the Whau Local Board have been involved in project planning from the start and are part of the project team.

27.     The project was workshopped with the Whau Local Board on 7 September 2022, enabling board members to meet the project team.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The 2020 Whau Local Board Plan indicates that Māori make up 10 per cent of the total population of 79,365 or 7,936 individuals.

29.     The Ministry of Education July 2021 school roll data for the local kura Avondale Primary School indicates that Māori make up 23 per cent of the student population.

30.     The kura is in close proximity to the project area, the Greenways network, and the New Lynn to Avondale Path. The project will look to work closely with the kura as part of the co-design process.

31.     The project supports the Whau Local Board Plan 2020-2023:

·   Outcome 2: Māori aspirations are advanced and prioritized, and Māori history and identity are valued and reflected in our community spaces.

32.     The project would also look to establish and support a Māori Engagement Advisor to support Māori enagement in the project and its benefits.

33.     The Whau Local Board has a formal relationship with Te Kawerau a Maki, and this partnership also has a strong focus on environmental protection. This project supports increasing access and use of the Greenways. Project staff will work closely in partnership with the iwi to ensure the project stays in keeping with Te Kawerau a Maki’s aspirations for the area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     To be part of the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme the local board must meet 10 per cent of the costs of the project.

35.     The initial contribution from the Whau Local Board for Avondale Open Streets Activation will be met by the allocation of dedicated staff time from the Connected Communities team.

36.     There is no expectation that this project will impact on LDI budgets in the 2022/2023 financial year. Any proposal to allocate budget towards this project in the 2023/2024 financial year would be brought to the local board for consideration as part of the integrated work programme process, and would require advice from Auckland Council Finance.

37.     There are no additional financial implications for the local board as this project is funded by Auckland Council’s 10-year climate action package.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There are no risks identified with the local board endorsing this project, noting that the project was initiated through a proposal from the local board.

39.    Any future risks and mitigations in planning and delivery of the project will be notified to the local board through any regular meeting updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Stakeholder and community information mapping is currently underway, this will provide the project team with a clear understanding of the environment the programme will be delivered in.

41.    The process for co-design sessions with the community are currently being developed.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tiffany Robinson - Senior Active Modes Specialist, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Allyn Sims - Programme Manager, Business Performance, Auckland Transport

Stephen Rainbow - Head of Community Engagement, Central Hub, Auckland Transport

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Four, 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/13768

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Whau Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) work programme items in its area, along with updates to the Whau Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2022.

3.       Updates will be provided to local boards each quarter to show both changes to the plan itself, and to provide updates on the work programme items included in the attachments to the plan.

4.       An updated version of the engagement plan is provided as Attachment A to this report.

5.       Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and WaterCare are provided as Attachments B-E to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter Four 2021/2022.

b)      receive updates to the Joint Council-controlled Organisations Engagement Plan 2022/2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2022/2023 local work programme.

7.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.       This update may include the following types of changes:

·    Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement.

10.     In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Updates from Local Board Services

11.     There has been no change to the team of Local Board Services staff directly supporting the Whau Local Board in this quarter.

Auckland Transport

12.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment B to this report. Internet links are provided within the attachment for further information.

13.     All listings on the work programme were reported as being in progress during quarter four and no signal has been given for proposed changes.

14.     Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets Programme- Avondale Streets – has involved the Whau Local Board Senior Advisor and the Strategic Broker in the planning process.

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

15.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment C to this report.

16.     The work programme activities in are regionally focused, and internet links are provided within the attachment for further information. In Quarter Four, there were no screen productions in the Whau Local Board area.

17.     Three projects on the work programme were marked for Whau Local Board consultation. However, two of these were tagged as “subject to funding”. The third project, FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023, directly impact the Whau in that the Bay Olympic sports fields, located in the local board area, will potentially be used as a training facility for the international event.

·    Supporting a resilient and regenerative Māori economy Taki Hua economic strategy – Consult – Subject to funding

·    Rangatahi youth enterprise summit – Consult –  Subject to funding

·    FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 – Consult – In progress. Olympic Park home of Bay Olympic FC shortlisted as a training venue. Final selection due by end of 2022. Capital development programme for field and lighting upgrades to be confirmed September 2022, subject to resolution of programme funding. Resource consent application for lights lodged.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

18.     Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment D to this report. Key projects in the work programme have the following updates:

·    Avondale Library and Community Hub and Public Realm Consult – In progress. A contractor is on board for early involvement in the planning for delivery for this new community hub to offer buildability and constructability advice.

·    28 Racecourse Parade, Avondale (car park construction) Consult In progress Wet weather has created some delays, but time is being caught up through works being undertaken on some Saturdays. The drainage works around the ‘Learn to ride course’ is complete and is open for use. The subbase of the car park area has been compacted and the concrete pour is underway.

WaterCare

19.     WaterCare’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment E to this report. Internet links are provided within the attachment for further information.

20.     All six projects outlined in the attached WaterCare work programme are major projects being undertaken on council property. They have the potential of affecting the immediate or passing-by community. As such, WaterCare has communicated via email and newsletters as the projects have been progressed.

·    Central Interceptor: Open Space Restoration Plans (OSRP) – Collaborate

·    Huia no.1 Watermain replacement Consult

·    Central Interceptor: Miranda Reserve (Blockhouse Bay Rd) construction siteCollaborate

·    Central Interceptor: Miranda Reserve (PS25) construction siteCollaborate

·    Upgrades to New Lynn Water Pump Station in Manawa Reserve – Collaborate

·    Central Interceptor: Dundale Ave construction site Inform.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

22.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Approving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the Council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

24.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give Council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCOs work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

26.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

28.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

30.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the local board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     A newly elected Whau Local Board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter One of the 2022/2023 financial year.

33.     A workshop will be held in early 2023 to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2022/2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2022-2023 Whau Local Board - Joint CCO Engagement Plan

73

b

2021-2022 Whau Local Board - Auckland Transport Quarter Four Report

79

c

2021-2022 Whau Local Board - Eke Panuku Quarter Four Report

83

d

2021-2022 Whau Local Board - Tātaki Auckland Unlimited Quarter Four Report

85

e

2021-2022 Whau Local Board - Watercare Quarter Four Report

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacob van der Poel - Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Whau Local Board Plan 2020: Year two review

File No.: CP2022/12195

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Whau Local Board with a year-two update on implementation of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Auckland Council Act 2009 requires that each of Auckland’s 21 local boards adopt a local board plan within a year of a triennial local government election. In 2020, an extension was provided to this timeframe in light of the disruption caused by the COVID-19 global pandemic and its associated impacts.

3.       A local board plan is the key strategic document for a local board; it forms the basis of its accountability to its communities and is required to reflect those communities’ needs and preferences.

4.       On 4 November 2020, the Whau Local Board adopted its local board plan for the period 2020-2023.

5.       COVID-19 has also impacted on delivery of initiatives in this plan, but implementation in this first year has nevertheless been strong, with increased delivery evident in year two (relative to year one) in all areas of the plan.

6.       In 2021, a year-one review was undertaken by Local Board Services Department staff, and this was presented to the local board on 8 December 2021.

7.       Due to local government elections taking place on 8 October 2022, staff have opted to provide a year-two update in a different format, and slightly earlier than the previous year. The content was presented to the Whau Local Board in a workshop on 10 August 2022 and will be available to the incoming local board to inform the development of 2023/2024 work programmes.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the year-two update on implementation of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Local Government Auckland Council Act 2009 requires that each of Auckland’s 21 local boards adopt a local board plan within a year of a triennial local government election. In 2020, an extension was provided to this timeframe in light of the disruption caused by the COVID-19 global pandemic and its associated impacts.

9.       A local board plan is the key strategic document for a local board; it forms the basis of its accountability to its communities and is required to reflect those communities’ needs and preferences.

10.     On 4 November 2020, the Whau Local Board adopted its local board plan for the period 2020-2023.

11.     COVID-19 has also impacted on delivery of initiatives in this plan, but implementation in this first year has nevertheless been strong, with increased delivery evident in year two (relative to year one) in all areas of the plan.

12.     The Whau Local Board Plan 2020 contains six outcomes (high-level strategic direction) as follows:

·    Outcome 1: Strong, resilient and inclusive communities where local identity, diversity and creativity are nurtured

·    Outcome 2: Māori aspirations are advanced and prioritised, and Māori history and identity are valued and reflected in our community spaces

·    Outcome 3: Quality urban development and community facilities to meet the needs of our growing and changing population

·    Outcome 4: Improved and expanded opportunities for walking, cycling and public transport

·    Outcome 5: Our natural environment is protected and enhanced

·    Outcome 6: Thriving town centres, a strong local economy and neighbourhoods that are supportive and connected.

13.     Each of the plan’s outcomes contains four objectives (aspirational statements representing a desired future state), and underneath the objectives sit 127 initiatives in total).

14.     Since 2016, local boards have had the Integrated Work Programme process which has made a significant change in the local boards’ ability to develop, refine, adopt and monitor their departmental work programmes at a granular level.

15.     It is noted that some local board plan initiatives are directly implemented as activity lines in local board work programmes, while others may be indirectly delivered or partially correspond to one or more work programme activity lines. This introduces an inevitable degree of ambiguity in respect of local board plan implementation monitoring and reporting, and potentially duplication.

16.     Auckland Council quarterly and annual financial reporting provides formal and detailed reporting on delivery via local board work programmes (and through local board-controlled budgets). This report does not seek to duplicate that reporting and, in the interests of avoiding any such duplication or ambiguity, it is focused at the more strategic level of outcomes and objectives and does not refer in any detail to initiatives.

17.     The one component of local board plans that are not reported on in work programme reporting is advocacy. However, advocacy is resolved each year as part of the Long-term Plan (or Annual Budget) and is reported on through annual reporting and other mechanisms.

18.     Therefore, individual advocacy initiatives will also not be addressed here in detail, other than to note that, broadly, an advocacy initiative is considered as being implemented or in delivery if the local board has actively taken opportunities to pursue it. There are several objectives within the plan that sit exclusively in the advocacy space and staff’s assessment of their progress rests solely on the local board’s willingness to take up formal (and informal) advocacy on these initiatives.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Outcome 1: Strong, resilient and inclusive communities where local identity, diversity and creativity are nurtured

19.     Outcome 1 is largely delivered by staff in Connected Communities (this includes libraries, community centres, arts and culture, community development, and community events, among others). It has always been a strong space for the Whau Local Board.

20.     Delivery of the four objectives associated with Outcome 1 in year two of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020 is as follows:

21.     Progress on delivery of Outcome 1 was very strong in year one and has continued with this strong delivery in year two. It is noted that a disproportionately large number of initiatives in the Whau Local Board work programmes are identified by operational staff as delivering on Outcome 1 when many of these deliver on other (or multiple) outcomes.

Outcome 2: Māori aspirations are advanced and prioritised, and Māori history and identity are valued and reflected in our community spaces

22.     Outcome 2 is delivered in different ways through many (if not all) the staff who report to the local board. The Local Board Services team has also played a significant role here on the governance and mana whenua relationships side.

23.     Delivery of the four objectives associated with Outcome 2 in year two of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020 is as follows:

24.     Progress on delivery of Outcome 2 was limited in year one, with a number of initiatives stalled. In year two there has been significant progress towards a number of initiatives, including advocacy around Māori place names and more investment in initiatives to support Māori in the Whau.

25.     It should also be noted that the relatively slow lack of progress noted above regarding mana whenua relationships is due to the inclusion of some initiatives in the local board plan that were aspirational in nature. In practice, there has been significant improvement in the frequency and scope of governance-level mana whenua engagement across the three western local boards.

Outcome 3: Quality urban development and community facilities to meet the needs of our growing and changing population

26.     Outcome 3 is largely delivered by staff in Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation, and through several of the Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs).

27.     Delivery of the four objectives associated with Outcome 3 in year two of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020 is as follows:

28.     Progress on delivery of Outcome 3 was extremely strong in year one and this has continued in year two.

Outcome 4: Improved and expanded opportunities for walking, cycling and public transport

29.     Outcome 4 is largely advocacy, but there is some delivery via staff in Auckland Transport, Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation, and Infrastructure and Environmental Services.

30.     Delivery of the four objectives associated with Outcome 4 in year two of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020 is as follows:

31.     Progress on delivery of Outcome 4 would always be challenging insofar as it is largely dependent on advocacy, with limited opportunities to deliver operationally. Due to constant delays and deferrals of funding through the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, it has been difficult to achieve a great deal of delivery that might have been anticipated. However, completion of the New Lynn to Avondale shared path and significant progress on Te Whau Pathway have been significant achievements.

Outcome 5: Our natural environment is protected and enhanced

32.     Outcome 5 is delivered by staff in Infrastructure and Environmental Services, and Parks, Sport and Recreation, though there are elements of it in other work programmes.

33.     Delivery of the four objectives associated with Outcome 5 in year two of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020 is as follows:

34.     Progress on delivery of Outcome 5 was strong in year one and this has continued in year two. It is noted that a number of Whau Local Board Plan initiatives are delivered through the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme in ways that are not always immediately visible through financial reporting.

Outcome 6: Thriving town centres, a strong local economy and neighbourhoods that are supportive and connected

35.     Outcome 6 has been the most challenging outcome to deliver, and this has remained the case in year two. Staff note that, with the exception of placemaking and town centre activations, most parts of this outcome area are and will remain challenging for local boards. There is limited ability for local boards to deliver economic development or built heritage for their communities.

36.     Outcome 6 is largely delivered by staff in Connected Communities (placemaking, in particular). Other staff from throughout the organisation and the Council group also contribute, though it is noted that Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s ability to deliver local economic development outcomes in the Whau area has been limited. Community and Social innovation (including the Western Initiative) are increasingly involved in delivery in this space.

37.     Delivery of the four objectives associated with Outcome 6 in year two of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020 is as follows:

38.     Progress on delivery of Outcome 6 was relatively weak in year one and has shown some improvement in year two, thanks in part to local board advocacy, and to investment in public art and youth employment initiatives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     This report has no impacts on climate change, other than to reflect progress of local board advocacy (in particular) in urban development, infrastructure and emissions reduction.

40.     The Whau Local Board plan 2020 has a strong focus on climate change – both in terms of preparedness and resilience for communities and infrastructure, and in terms of mitigation of carbon emissions. Outcomes 3 and 5 both have particular focuses on climate change. Both these outcome areas have seen strong delivery in year two of this local board plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     This report has no impacts on the Council group. A number of initiatives in the Whau Local Board Plan 2020 are delivered by CCOs, and many of the advocacy initiatives are directed towards CCOs. However, CCOs’ response to the local board’s advocacy is not reflected in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     This is the second progress report presented to the Whau Local Board on the Whau Local Board Plan 2020. In 2021, a year-one review was undertaken by Local Board Services Department staff, and this was presented to the local board at its business meeting of 8 December 2021.

43.     Due to local government elections taking place on 8 October 2022, staff have opted to provide a year-two update slightly earlier. The content was presented to the Whau Local Board in a workshop on 10 August 2022 and will be available to the incoming local board to inform the development of 2023/2024 work programmes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     The Whau Local Board plan 2020 has a very strong focus on meeting commitments to Māori and on responsiveness to, and achieving positive outcomes for, Māori communities and reflecting the Whau’s Māori heritage. This is the first Whau Local Board plan to have a stand-alone outcome focusing on Māori responsiveness.

45.     Outcome 2 – “Māori aspirations are advanced and prioritised, and Māori history and identity are valued and reflected in our community spaces” is the area that has seen the most improvement in delivery and focus from year one to year two.

46.     This report has no particular impacts on Māori other than to highlight the potential for progress and continuous improvement in this space.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     This report is for information only and has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     There is a risk that reporting this information at the end of the electoral term will lessen its impact for incoming elected members. Staff will ensure that the incoming Whau Local Board has this information available to input into its development of and decision-making around 2023/2024 work programmes.

49.     This information will also be available for consideration in the early stages of development of the Whau Local Board Plan 2023, though it is noted that refreshed community engagement is likely to be the highest priority in determining the direction of a new plan.

50.     There is a risk that this reporting will be interpreted as a duplication or contradiction of the Whau Local Board’s quarterly or annual financial reporting. Staff note that reporting on local board plans at the initiative level (i.e., at a similar of granular detail to work programme quarterly reporting) does have potential to cause some confusion as the content being covered is largely the same or similar (with the exception of advocacy and CCO-delivered initiatives). For this reason, this report has been kept at the objective (rather than imitative) level of detail.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Due to local government elections taking place on 8 October 2022, staff have opted to provide a year-two update in a different format, and slightly earlier than the previous year. The content was presented to the Whau Local Board in a workshop on 10 August 2022 and will be available to the incoming local board to inform the development of 2023/2024 work programmes.

52.     Staff will ensure that the incoming Whau Local Board has this information available to input into its development of and decision-making around 2023/2024 work programmes. It will also be available for consideration in the early stages of development of the Whau Local Board Plan 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Binney - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

File No.: CP2022/13490

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek high-level input from local boards on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPS-FM) 2020. This includes:

·    long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

2.       This report also provides an overview of the feedback received through the first stage of the National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement that ran from 13 June to 17 July 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management 2020 provides national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991. The fundamental concept of the National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management 2020 is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and wellbeing of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

4.       Auckland Council is required to change the Auckland Unitary Plan to give full effect to Te Mana o te Wai, which must be reflected in all decisions made under the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan must be notified by December 2024. Action plans must also be prepared and published as soon as practicable to achieve environmental outcomes and freshwater management objectives.

5.       The National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management 2020 sets the National Objectives Framework and steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow when implementing the National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management 2020. Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland.

6.       The first stage of National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value and use freshwater bodies and the environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

7.       Feedback from the first stage engagement will be used, along with existing information and further research and analysis, to develop freshwater management options that will be brought back for a second stage of engagement in the second half of 2023.

8.       There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the engagement period.

9.       Local boards are now invited to provide input to the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Local boards can view the feedback form provided during consultation to assist in preparation of feedback at Attachment A to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      note the feedback received from communities through the first stage of public engagement with the National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management 2020, in Attachment D, Attachment E and Attachment F to this report.

b)      provide feedback on the National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management 2020 values including the:

i)        long-term visions for freshwater management

ii)       proposed Freshwater Management Units

iii)      values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM) is a mandatory national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA).  The Policy Statement applies to all freshwater (including groundwater) and, to the extent they are affected by freshwater, to receiving environments (which may include estuaries and the wider coastal marine area).

11.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing

12.     Regional councils and unitary authorities are required to change regional policy statements and regional plans to give effect to the requirements of the NPS-FM, including Te Mana o te Wai.

13.     Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland. A plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) is required for the NPS-FM implementation. The AUP plan change must be notified by December 2024. The NPS-FM also requires the preparation of action plans to manage the effects of the use and development of land, freshwater and on receiving environments. Action plans must be prepared and published as soon as practicable.

14.     Every council must develop long-term visions for freshwater in its region and include those long-term visions as objectives in its regional policy statement. Long-term visions:

a)   may be set by Freshwater management Units (FMU), be part of a FMU, or at a catchment level; and

b)   must set goals that are ambitious but reasonable (that is, difficult to achieve but not impossible); and

c)   identify a timeframe to achieve those goals that is ambitious and reasonable (for example, 30 years after the commencement date).

15.     The National Objectives Framework (NOF) is a core part of the NPS-FM, and includes a series of steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow on implementation, including to:

·    identify FMU in the region

·    identify values for each FMU

·    set environmental outcomes for each value and include them as objectives in regional plans

·    identify attributes for each value and set a baseline for those attributes

·    set target attribute states, environmental flows and levels, and other criteria to support the achievement of environmental outcomes

·    set limits as rules and prepare action plans (as appropriate) to achieve environmental outcomes.

16.     FMUs are essentially the spatial arrangements adopted by council for the management of freshwater. All fresh waterbodies and their related catchments must be within an FMU. While the NPS-FM is primarily concerned with the management of freshwater, it does also require an integrated management approach – ki uta ki tai – including consideration of the relationship of freshwater and its management to the coastal receiving environment.

17.     A public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022 through AK Have Your Say and other engagement activities including library events and online webinars. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value freshwater in FMUs and environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for these values.

18.     The public engagement on AK Have Your Say comprised the following:

·    the NPS-FM 2020

·    an overview of the NPS-FM implementation programme

·    NPS-FM implementation timeline

·    the proposed Auckland FMU map

·    the map of the Pukekohe specified vegetable growing area (when implementing the NPS-FM, the council must have regard to the importance of this area for domestic vegetables and food security, and may temporarily have a less stringent approach to water quality issues to ensure this is appropriately recognised)

·    an online feedback form with consultation questions and opportunity to provide comments on the proposed FMUs (also translated into numerous languages)

·    a social pinpoint map allowing people to provide feedback to a water body or within an area

·    Ministry for the Environment factsheets, infographics, and videos on freshwater management

·    access to freshwater planning enquiry service for questions and further information.

19.     Two online webinars and six library drop-in events were undertaken through the engagement period. These engagement activities introduced Auckland Council’s NPS-FM implementation programme and provided opportunities to the public to ask questions and to provide feedback directly.

20.     There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the consultation period, including:

·    128 online feedback forms

·    343 site-specific comments (from 84 submitters) via the Social Pinpoint mapping tool

·    12 hard copy feedback forms

·    23 emails

·    120 comments via library displays where feedback could be provided on post-it notes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     The NPS-FM has a focus on the identification and management of freshwater values. It includes four compulsory values (ecosystem health, human contact, threatened species, and mahinga kai) that must be applied and managed in each FMU. There are also other values that must be considered in managing freshwater if they are relevant to Auckland. The list of compulsory values and other values are provided in Attachment C to this report (and are identified as Appendices 1A and 1B of the NPS-FM). Additionally, the Council must identify any other relevant values (i.e. additional to those specifically identified in the NPS-FM) including any additional Māori Freshwater Values as identified by mana whenua.

22.     Overall, submitters raised over 200 individual sites of value to them, while many talked more generally about particular types of, or all, freshwater bodies. The sites named were most commonly located in the Franklin, Rodney, Waitākere Ranges, and Waitematā local board areas.

23.     The values most commonly raised in relation to how submitters use, and would like to use, those freshwater bodies related to:

·    ecosystem health – including water quality and habitat (both generally and for threatened species) in particular

·    natural form and character

·    drinking water supply

·    human contact (that is, for recreational purposes such as swimming, boating, or fishing).

24.     Given the importance of the coastal environment in Auckland, and the impacts from key freshwater issues, such as sediment and E. coli, three FMUs have been proposed for freshwater management based on the three coastal receiving environments for catchments: the Kaipara Harbour, the Manukau Harbour and the Hauraki Gulf (map provided in Attachment B). This proposed approach provides the opportunity to both address the management of freshwater for its own sake, while also explicitly considering its relationship to the coastal environment.

25.     While submitters were not asked directly whether they supported the Freshwater Management Units or not, comments were provided on a range of matters, including suggestions around amending the proposed boundaries, or rationale behind the boundaries, having more or less FMUs, more location specific detail, and having the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area as a separate FMU.

26.     Other submitters commented on non-FMU specific matters including wetlands, the need for more transparency and action, concern about water quality, the need to prioritise ecosystem health, farming/vegetable growing, and flooding.

27.     The NPS-FM provides for a specified vegetable growing area in Pukekohe that sits within the Manukau FMU. Some comments related to the provision for horticultural land use in Pukekohe.

·        3 supported the provision for continued horticultural use, including irrigation.

·        3 expressed concerns about the impact of horticultural activities on water quality (streams, and aquifers) particularly from fertiliser and nitrates.

28.     Demographic information from those submitters who provided it is detailed in Attachment D to this report.

29.     Data tables naming sites, and their number of mentions by local board area is provided in Attachment E. A full Summary of Feedback report is provided in Attachment F to this report.

30.     Staff are currently undertaking data analysis and a summary report of feedback will be published on AK Have Your Say.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM Te Mana o te Wai is about restoring and preserving the balance between the water, the wider environment, and the community. This concept is in line with the natural environment priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which sets the goal:

Oranga taiao, oranga tāngata: a healthy and connected natural environment supports healthy and connected Aucklanders. The mauri (life essence) of Tāmaki Makaurau is restored”.

32.     The NPS-FM includes the following policy direction in response to climate change:

Policy 4: Freshwater is managed as part of New Zealand’s integrated response to climate change.

33.     Every council must have regard to the foreseeable impact of climate change in following areas:

·    when setting limits on resource use, every regional council must:

3.14(2)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when setting environmental flows and levels, every regional council must:

3.16(4)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when assessing and reporting, as part of each review required by section 35(2A) of the RMA, every regional council must prepare and publish:

3.30(2)(g) predictions of changes, including the foreseeable effects of climate change, that are likely to affect water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in the region.

34.     The implementation of the NPS-FM will help to promote the resilience of freshwater ecosystems to the effects of climate change. The development of freshwater action plans will require sustainable land and water management practices to enhance the mauri and health of waterways, which is in line with actions prioritised in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The NPS-FM is relevant to all of the Council’s functions. All relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) are involved in the NPS-FM implementation, including participation in a Steering Committee overseeing the development and implementation of the programme. This includes having an ongoing role in supporting the NPS-FM engagement, and providing input and review of responses developed to give effect to the NPS-FM.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Under the Local Government Act 2002, local boards are responsible for identifying and communicating to Auckland Council the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the content of council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards have a detailed understanding of their areas including freshwater values and issues and are in a position to provide important input to the development of NPS-FM responses, including in relation to the matters covered by this round of public engagement.

37.     Prior to the public engagement a memo titled “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland” was provided to all local boards on 26 May 2022. The memo advised the key principles, consultation and timeframe requirements of implementing the NPS-FM, and the opportunities for local board input through the process (attached in Attachment G to this report).

38.     A webinar presentation titled “National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020” was also presented to local boards in the meeting on 3 June 2022. In response to feedback from elected members, the period for providing input had been extended for local boards to September 2022 to allow local boards time to provide feedback following the close of public engagement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The NPS-FM says the Council must “actively involve tangata whenua (to the extent they wish to be involved) in freshwater management” including in identifying Māori values and decision-making processes relating to Māori freshwater values.

40.     Engagement with mana whenua in Auckland is being undertaken through an on-going process, directly with mana whenua entities throughout the preparation of a plan change and development of action plans.

41.     Engagement with the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau about the NPS-FM has also been undertaken in the broader context of Three Waters Reform and the development and implementation of the Council’s Water Strategy, to enable mana whenua to provide a more holistic consideration of the management of water.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The first stage of the NPS-FM engagement was undertaken within the business-as-usual planning budget. This budget covers primarily staff time and the public engagement.

43.     The budget required for NPS-FM engagement in 2023, and for implementation of the project through to 2026 is presently under discussion.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The government has set a deadline of December 2024 for the Council to publicly notify the AUP plan change in response to the provisions of the NPS-UD. Given the scale and complexity of the work, and limited resources, there is a risk that the Council may not receive sufficient quality feedback from a wide range of interests. There is also a risk that Aucklanders and key stakeholders are unclear about the mandatory requirements of the NPS-FM and how the NPS-FM engagement links to previous water related engagements, for example the Auckland Water Strategy engagement and the Three Waters Reform engagement.

45.     These risks have been mitigated to date by communicating communications with communities and stakeholders during the engagement period, through meetings, emails, and online Question & Answer sessions. There will be further and ongoing communication to obtain quality engagement results to progress the NPS-FM implementation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     The feedback received from the first stage engagement on the values and the environmental outcomes sought, together with the NPS-FM requirements, will inform the development of objectives and proposed management options to achieve the objectives.

47.     A second phase of public engagement will be undertaken to seek feedback on the proposed objectives and management approaches for FMUs and water bodies. This will be undertaken in the second half of 2023 to provide opportunity for communities and stakeholders, and local boards for further involvement.

48.     The feedback received from the second phase of engagement will further inform the development of a proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan and the development of action plans.

49.     Elected representatives will have opportunities to review the proposed plan change and action plans as they evolve, and before the plan change is approved for public notification in the second half of 2024 to meet the NPS-FM deadline of notification before December 2024.

50.     Submissions to the plan change will be heard by an independent Freshwater Hearing Panel who will make recommendations back to council by 2026.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback Form

109

b

Map of Proposed Freshwater Management Units

117

c

National Policy Statement-Freshwater Management: Freshwater Values

119

d

Who we heard from

121

e

Local Board breakdowns

123

f

Summary of Feedback Report

133

g

Memo to local boards on 26 May 2022: Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland

163

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monica Xu - Senior Policy Planner, Regional planning team, Plans and Places

Jenny Fuller - Team Leader Planning, Regional planning team, Plans and Places

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - Manager Planning, Regional, North, West and Islands

John Duguid - General Manager Plans and Places

Lesley Jenkins - Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations

File No.: CP2022/12593

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide for appropriate arrangements for decision-making between the final local board meeting of the current electoral term and the inaugural meeting of the new local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The last meeting of the Whau Local Board in this current term is scheduled for 28 September 2022. Between that meeting and the first meeting of the local board in the new term decisions may be needed from the local board. As for each of the previous terms, temporary arrangements for making these decisions need to be confirmed.

3.       The term of office of the current local board members ends the day following the official declaration of election results. Following the declaration, which is expected to be Friday 14 October 2022, the term of office for members elected to the local board will commence.

4.       For the period from the commencement of their term of office until their inaugural meeting where members are sworn in (interregnum), decisions may be made by the Auckland Council Chief Executive under existing delegations.

5.       The existing local boards delegation to the Chief Executive requires, amongst other things, that staff consult with the allocated local board portfolio holder/lead on certain decisions. As a temporary measure, this report seeks to allow staff to make decisions without complying with the requirement for consultation during the interregnum.

6.       Staff also seek confirmation of arrangements for making decisions at the local board level in the period between the final local board meeting and the official end of term. The urgent decision delegations and process that is already in place adequately caters for this scenario.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      confirm that the local board’s existing urgent decisions delegations process will be utilised where decisions are required from the local board between the final local board business meeting (28 September 2022) and the end of term (15 October 2022).

b)      note that from the commencement of the term of office of new members until the inaugural meeting of the incoming local board (interregnum), all decision-making will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under current delegations.

c)      note that the Chief Executive will not be required to comply with consultation requirements in the local boards’ delegation protocols when making decisions during the interregnum.

d)      request that the Chief Executive exercise restraint when making decisions during the interregnum and to consider referring significant decisions to the first meeting of the incoming local board.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Current elected members remain in office until the new members’ term of office commences, which is the day after the declaration of election results (Sections 115 and 116, Local Electoral Act 2001). The declaration will be publicly notified on 14 October 2022, with the term of office of current members ending and the term of office of new members commencing on 15 October 2022.

8.       The new members cannot act as members of the local board until they have made their statutory declaration at the inaugural local board meeting (Clause 14, Schedule 7, Local Government Act 2002).

9.       Following the last local board meeting of the current electoral term, decisions may be needed on urgent matters or routine business as usual that cannot wait until the incoming local board’s first business meeting in the new electoral term.

10.     As with each of the previous electoral terms, temporary arrangements need to be made and/or confirmed for:

·    making urgent decisions before the end of term

·    making decisions that require consultation with local board/local board members during the interregnum.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urgent decisions – arrangement for remainder of the term

11.     Between the last business meeting and the declaration of results expected around 14 October 2022, current local board members are still in office and can use their existing urgent decisions delegations to make decisions that are required from the local board during this time.

12.     The urgent decisions process includes a delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson that enables them to make decisions on behalf of the local board where it is not practical to call the full board together.

13.     All requests for an urgent decision will need to be supported by adequate staff advice and information and clear recommendations.

Decision-making during the interregnum

14.     All local boards have made a general delegation to the Chief Executive. During the interregnum, any decisions that will be required from the local board, and which cannot wait until a local board meeting, will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under his existing delegations.

15.     The delegation to the Chief Executive is subject to a requirement to comply with the delegation protocols, which require consulting with the local board on some decisions that are made by staff under delegated authority. Consultation is often done through a local board lead (referred to as a portfolio holder in the delegation protocols). The most common area requiring consultation is landowner consents relating to local parks. Parks staff receive a large number of landowner consent requests each month that relate to local parks across Auckland.

16.     During the current term, while the elected members remain in office, staff will continue to consult with leads/portfolio holders as required by the delegation protocols (or chairperson where there is no portfolio holder). However, during the interregnum, staff will be unable to comply with this requirement due to the absence of appointed portfolio holders/lead/chairpersons to consult with.

17.     As a temporary measure, it is recommended that staff continue to process business as usual decisions that cannot wait until the local board’s first business meeting without consultation. Following the election of chairpersons at the inaugural meetings, staff will consult with the chairperson when and if required and can resume consultation with appointed representatives once new arrangements for leads/portfolio holders are in place.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     This report relates to procedural matters and has no quantifiable climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The arrangements proposed in this report enable the Council to proceed with necessary business during the election period. During the interregnum, staff will exercise restraint and ensure that any significant decisions are deferred to the incoming local board.

20.     These arrangements apply only to local boards. The reduced political decision-making will be communicated to the wider Council group.

21.     The Governing Body has made its own arrangements to cover the election period, including delegating the power to make urgent decisions between the last Governing Body meeting of the term and the day the current term ends, to any two of the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and a Chairperson of a committee of the whole. From the commencement of the term of office of the new local board members until the Governing Body’s inaugural meeting, the Chief Executive will carry out decision-making under his current delegations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This is a report to all local boards that proposes arrangements to enable the Council to process routine local matters during the election period. This will enable the Council to meet timeframes and provide good customer service.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report and decision being sought relates to a procedural matter and does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a risk that unforeseen decisions will arise during this period, such as a decision that is politically significant or a decision that exceeds the Chief Executive’s financial delegations.

26.     This risk has been mitigated by scheduling meetings as late as possible in the current term and communicating to reporting staff that significant decisions should not be made during October 2022.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The decision of the local board will be communicated to senior staff so that they are aware of the arrangements for the month of October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor, Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Valedictory reflections: end of term address

File No.: CP2022/12594

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide retiring Whau Local Board member/s the opportunity to comment on their time in local government and share valedictory reflections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an opportunity for retiring Whau Local Board member/s to share valedictory reflections or an end of term address, prior to the 2022 Local Board Elections.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive valedictory reflections from Member Te’eva Matafai.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Reporting back decisions made under delegation

File No.: CP2022/11863

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report back two decisions of the Whau Local Board made under delegation to provide feedback to inform Auckland Council submissions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 28 April 2021, the Whau Local Board resolved (resolution number WH/2021/38) as follows:

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils.

b)      note that the local board can continue to use its urgent decision process to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, if the Chair and Deputy Chair choose not to exercise the delegation sought in recommendation (a).

c)      note that this delegation will only be exercised where the timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting.

d)      note all local input approved and submitted for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission is to be included on the next local board meeting agenda for the public record

3.       On 15 August 2022, the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson signed off under delegation feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Smokefree Environments and Regulated Products (Smoked Tobacco) Amendment Bill.

4.       This feedback is appended as Attachment A. More information on the overall Three Waters reform programme is available on the Parliament website.

5.       On 7 September 2022, the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson signed off under delegation feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Reshaping Streets Regulatory Package.

6.       This feedback is appended as Attachment B. More information is available on the Waka Kotahi website: https://www.nzta.govt.nz/about-us/consultations/reshaping-streets-consultation/.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the decision made under delegation on 15 July 2022 providing feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Smokefree Environments and Regulated Products (Smoked Tobacco) Amendment Bill.

b)      receive the decision made under delegation on 7 September 2022 providing feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Reshaping Streets Regulatory Package.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board feedback of 15 August 2022 on the Smokefree Environments and Regulated Products Amendment Bill

179

b

Whau Local Board feedback of 7 September 2022 on the Reshaping Streets Regulatory Package

183

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Binney - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Whau Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2022/09443

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the records of the workshop held by the Whau Local Board on 3, 10, 17 and 31 August, and 7 September 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshop were as follows:

3 August 2022 (Attachment A)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Community Facilities: Update

·    Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR): Bellgrove pocket park landswap

·    WaterCare Services: Central Interceptor Public Art (CIP) – Update

·    Healthy Waters Regionwide Network Discharge Consent Feedback

·    Welcoming Communities Scoping Project

 

10 August 2022 (Attachment B)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Auckland Transport: monthly update

·    Local Board Plan 2020 Year Two review

 

17  August 2022 (Attachment C)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Community and Social Innovation update - Youth Empowerment, Youth Economy and The Western Initiative (TWI)

·    Whau Quick Response Round One 2022/2023

31 August (Attachment D)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Te Whau Pathway: Update

·    The Wildlink Programme: Update (Infrastructure and Environmental Services – I&ES

 

7 September (Attachment E)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Connected Communities: Update

·    Community Facilities (CF): Update

·    Waitākere Ki Tua Kai Whakaawe Draft Work Plan

·    Eke Panuku Development

·    Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau Avondale Open Streets (Auckland Transport – AT).



 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)   note the records of the workshops held on 3, 10, 17 and 31 August, and 7 September 2022.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board workshop records - 3 August 2022

187

b

Whau Local Board workshop records - 10 August 2022

189

c

Whau Local Board workshop records - 17 August 2022

191

d

Whau Local Board workshop records - 31 August 2022

193

e

Whau Local Board workshop records - 7 September 2022

195

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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28 September 2022

 

 

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28 September 2022

 

 

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28 September 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/09446

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the local board the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Whau Local Board is appended as Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars are part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar for September 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - September 2022

201

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

28 September 2022

 

 

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