I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 20 September 2022

1.00pm

This will be a hybrid meeting held at this link over

Microsoft Teams, and in the Waitematā Local Board Office at 52 Swanson Street.

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

Deputy Chairperson

Alexandra Bonham

 

Members

Glenda Fryer

 

 

Graeme Gunthorp

 

 

Kerrin Leoni

 

 

Genevieve Sage

 

 

Julie Sandilands

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Gabriel Ford

Democracy Advisor

 

15 September 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: Gabriel.ford@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     Luke Niue, Parnell Community Committee                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                            6

10        Extraordinary Business                                       6

11        Ward Councillor's report                                     7

12        Approval of concept design for Heard Park at 186 Parnell Rd                                                     27

13        Future Occupancy Arrangement for the Grey Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau                            95

14        Concept design options for the heritage restoration, seismic remediation, and modernisation of Leys Institute                      103

15        Waitematā Local Grant Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2022/2023 grant allocations                                                         127

16        Waitemata Event Partnership Reallocation Report                                                                249

17        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Four, 2021-22                        253

18        Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022           299

19        Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management         315

20        Local board feedback on Community Bike Hubs - Te Poka Pū Paihikara i tēnei Hapori   387

21        Revoke previous local board resolution and grant new community leases at Francis Reserve, 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn.         395

22        Urgent decision to approve Waitematā Local Board feedback to be included in Auckland Council's feedback on the Reshaping Streets regulatory package                                           421

23        2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations                  447

24        Chairperson's report                                        451

25        Board member reports                                     469

26        Waitematā Local Board workshop records   485

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Chair Northey will open the meeting with a karakia.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 August 2022, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

The Waitematā Local Board acknowledges the recent passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, and the proclamation and ascension of King Charles III to the throne.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.


 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Luke Niue, Parnell Community Committee

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak to the board about the Heard Park concept plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Representatives from the Parnell Community Committee will be in attendance to speak to the local board about the Heard Park concept plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Luke Niue from the Parnell Community Committee for his presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 5 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Ward Councillor's report

File No.: CP2022/13849

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom, Ōrākei Ward Councillor Desley Simpson and Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey to update the local board on regional issues that they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waitematā Local Board’s Standing Orders clauses 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board, or on any matter the Governing Body member wishes to raise with the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written report from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward Councillor P Coom Report September 2022

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gabriel Ford - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Approval of concept design for Heard Park at 186 Parnell Rd

File No.: CP2022/14124

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the concept design for Heard Park at 186 Parnell Road, Parnell.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The renewal of Heard Park was identified via strategic assessment to review service provision and understand community needs in 2017. The local board requested that staff undertake the development of a concept plan for Heard Park, to align proposed renewal works and level of service upgrades that would ensure improved recreational facilities for the local community to enjoy.

3.       The local board allocated $15,000 of Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) capital funding towards the community consultation and development of a concept design, in 2019/2020, with a further $27,000 in renewals capital expenditure funding in 2020/2021.

4.       During the 2021/2022 financial year, minor renewals and capital works were undertaken as part of the ‘Quick Wins’ previously identified in the concept design. These were delivered from existing budgets, noting that financial constraints prevented the entirety of the concept design from being delivered.

5.       Works delivered to date in Heard Park as part of the concept design include:

·        hedge removal and replanting of garden areas with roses to better open up space for events

·        renewal of timber seating

·        root barriers created for tree plantings along with repairs to uneven sections of pavement where trip hazards present

·        under-seat LED lighting installed

·        garden beds planted beneath trees

·        power supply installed to accommodate future events

·        lights installed in the garden beds to provide better visibility.

 

6.       The project will deliver on Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020 Outcomes 2, 3 and 4 and was approved by the local board as part of the 2019/2020 Customer and Community Services Work Programme (18 June 2019, resolution number WTM/2019/1).

7.       Strategic assessment, community consultation, iwi engagement, and stakeholder input has been sought. A concept design has been developed, incorporating the recommendations and feedback from community engagement.

8.       A strategic assessment was carried out in October 2017, followed by iwi engagement in March/April 2021 and community consultation in April 2021.  A concept design has been developed which incorporates changes as a result of feedback from both the Waitematā Local Board and community consultation.

9.       Staff now seek approval of the concept design, which sets out the long-term vision for the park. Longer term elements of the concept plan will be delivered as funding becomes available.

10.     There is a risk following consultation that there will be expectations of time frames for delivery from the public, however this is being managed through careful communications regarding funding availability with key stakeholders.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the concept design for Heard Park at 186 Parnell Road as per Attachment A (220712_Heard Park Concept Doc AW) of the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Heard Park is located at the heart of Parnell Town Centre halfway up Parnell Road, well connected to both public and private transport links, it is a civic space that provides for visitors, residents and workers to recreate as well as a venue for events.

Location of Heard Park (marked in red), 186 Parnell Rd, Parnell

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12.     As a part of the Waitematā Local Board FY2019/2020 Customer and Community Services Work Programme, the local board approved a project to develop a long-term aspirational concept plan for Heard Park.

13.     Mana whenua were involved in the consultation process, and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei collaborated throughout the process.

 


Local Board workshop 25 May 2021 – workshop notes

14.     Staff sought local board input on consultation materials. The local board generally supported the draft concept plan, with the following feedback:

·        Mixed views regarding the addition of water and sand play.

·        Changes were suggested to the seating. Backrests and arm rests were made to seating on the top of retaining walls.  The stairs leading down to Ruskin Street were modified to allow for more informal seating

·        Requests for drinking fountains to be included

·        Make the space more suitable for markets and events, as the area has previously been used for market and trading events

Local Board workshop 3 August 2021 – workshop notes

15.     Staff presented consultation feedback and sought direction on subsequent changes to concept plan.

·        noted that people wished to retain the existing swings

·        believe the park needs to be revitalised

·        suggested including the story of the Heard family

16.     Staff noted the feedback would be incorporated into the final concept plan.

Local Board workshop October 2021 – workshop notes

17.     Staff presented the final concept plan and ‘Quick Wins’ for local board direction.

18.     The following strategic documents were considered when seeking direction for inclusion of the project into the Community Facilities work programme and when considering requirements for concept plan development:

·        Parnell Plan

·        Auckland's Urban Ngahere (Forest) Strategy

·        The Waitematā Play Network Gap Analysis (June 2019) provides the following guidance:

“High priority rating from its location within the heart of Parnell’s historic town centre (a high population growth area) and its network position adjacent to Parnell’s geographic gaps. The Parnell Plan (June 2019) identifies opportunities for recreational and play improvements within a transformed Heard Park. As part of these upgrades, consider potential inclusion of sound and water play experiences, alongside other creative and standard play experience improvements.”

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The local board endorsed the community consultation document at the Community Facilities workshop (11 December 2021), following meetings with iwi/mana whenua and key stakeholders and requested that it was shared with the local community, and that feedback be sought.

20.     A meeting was held with key stakeholders in December 2020 attendees were:

·        Local Board Chair

·        Local Board advisors

·        Parnell Community Committee

·        Parnell Heritage Society 

·        St John the Baptist Parish

·        Parnell Business Association

·        Plunkett

·        council staff

21.     A further consultation meeting was held 11 May 2021, attendees gave the following feedback:

·        open lawn is good, it allows for more flexibility

·        art installations, markets

·        Seating is important

·        amphitheatre/stage

·        better play area

·        with more families moving into Parnell, the park should be for local residents

·        emphasis on playground, strongly oppose sand and water play

·        the water feature at Stonefields is a good example of what they would like

·        interactive play

·        there should be a place to sit and relax and be more open

·        tree planting in front of building was discussed

·        art and style of play ties in young and old – The character of the area

·        most supported removal of the hedges

·        activate Ruskin Street

·        woodpecker space to be returned to public space

·        keep alfresco dining option open

·        would like to see more colour in park

·        some sort of acknowledgement for the Heard family (three copper urns available for use)

·        too much clutter in park.

22.     Mana whenua were involved in the consultation process, and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei collaborated throughout the process.

Table 1: Mana whenua feedback:

Mana whenua feedback

Markets and events

Support for Heard Park being used for market and events as it has links to the historical use of the area as trading site from Mechanics Bay through to the Domain

Whenua

Celebrate whenua (land) and the natural environment

Awa and tuna

Reference the streams in the area and tuna that inhabit them

 

23.     Consultation with the local community took place in June and July 2021 through the Auckland Council Have Your Say webpage, the Local Board Facebook page and via email.

24.     Consultation feedback is attached to the report as Attachment B (Heard Park Concept Plan Survey Feedback Reports), however some key feedback insights include:

Table 2: Key consultation feedback

Key feedback

Concept plan

Generally, everyone was happy with the proposed Concept Plan, and thought that it provided the flexibility that was needed (events, lunching/relaxing/passive recreation, markets), and provided a range of seating options

 

Play

There was opposition to sand and water play, largely due to the mess children get themselves in. Some support for a manipulative water element (dams etc). Support for art/sculpture play where children can make their own play and it could become and iconic feature of Parnell. Requirement for the play element to accommodate a number of children at the same time. Opposition to traditional coloured plastic play units.

 

Heritage

Suggestion that a Pou be included. There was discussion around working with Mana whenua to include and interpret the cultural context of the site. The Heard Family expressed a desire for a reference to their family, they will provide a ‘story’/ piece of history that could be interpreted in the design (they have copper urns that they would be willing to donate).

 

Aesthetic

General support for a terracotta/warm colour palette that is already in Parnell. Discussion around using bright colours, there was some support and some opposition.

 

Other items

Alfresco dining on the park, some support some opposition. There was agreement that the area needs to be de cluttered, particularly at the intersection on Ruskin and Parnell Road. There was support for the removal of the hedges. Suggestion that the plan have clearer links to the ‘play opportunities’, so play does not appear as an under whelming space. Suggestion to reduce the stairs entering the building at the rear of the park and prioritise this area for seating.

Consultation / Engagement

25.     The local board provided support-in principle for the concept design at the workshop in May 2021 and requested that the concept design was shared with the local community and iwi / mana whenua, and that feedback be sought. Feedback was received from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

26.     Consultation with the local community took place in June and July 2021 through the Auckland Council Have Your Say webpage, drop-in events, the Local Board Facebook page and via email.

27.     Community drop-in events were held on Tuesday 11 May 2021 at The Parnell Community Centre. Several local board members also attended these sessions.

28.     Consultation feedback is attached to the report as (Attachment C, Heard Park_LB Workshop_May 2021 Consultation Feedback). 

29.     Of the 78 submissions received, 53 per cent were in favour of the concept design, while 26 per cent had a contrary view, and 11 percent were not sure.

Preferred option

30.     A revised concept design was developed using feedback from stakeholders, as well as including key aspects highlighted through the community engagement process.

31.     The revised design includes:

·        flexibility for how the park could be used was one of the biggest aspirations for the park. Maximizing areas of grass enables this flexibility, whilst also providing a green space within the building dominated landscape.

·        the biggest change was to the retaining wall seating at the rear of the park, adjacent to the building.  In the draft Concept plan this retaining wall was a straight line of seating, the final Concept plan shows bays created by retaining.  Bays of seating create more intimate/comfortable spaces for small groups and individuals, reducing the area of the stairs to the building at rear of site to enable more seating options.

·        the park is constrained for space so reducing the stairs into the building leaves more space for recreation.  The manipulation of levels and use of retaining walls creates an abundance of formal and informal seating, and also creates spaces for different uses (whilst retaining a sense of openness). 

·        the feedback during stakeholder engagement and community consultation was overwhelmingly in support of the swing and a playful art piece.  The playful art piece will help create a ‘heart’ that is uniquely Parnell.

32.     It is recommended that the local board approve the concept design, as attached to this agenda report (Attachment A 220712_Heard Park Concept Doc AW).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

34.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emission from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as far as possible when delivering the project. 

35.     Maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material, aligned with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle), will also be prioritised to ensure minimum impact.

36.     The concept design has incorporated the use natural play with native plants where practical.

37.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options (including sourcing materials locally) and the use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services and the former Parks, Sports and Recreation teams have been consulted. They are supportive of the renewal and concept design as it will improve the quality of the park, provide enhanced recreational and play opportunities, and reduce the cost of maintenance.

39.     The project, once active, will deliver amenity improvements to Heard Park and play provision in the general area, and better meet the needs of community and visitors to Parnell.

40.     Collaboration with department staff will be ongoing to ensure that the development of the park is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     The park is located at 186 Parnell Road and is considered the Heart of Parnell. The project will deliver a gathering space for the community in a central location providing a sense of belonging.

42.     The revised concept design, incorporating changes requested by the local board and feedback received from stakeholders, iwi, and community, was presented to the local board at a workshop on 26 October 2021. The local board indicated support for the revised concept design at that workshop.

43.     The project aligns with the following Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020 outcome/s and objectives:

Table 3: Local Board Plan outcomes

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 2:  Connected communities that are inclusive, accessible and equitable.

Everyone has a place to call home and be connected to their communities. There are abundant opportunities to participate in decision making and activities regardless of age, gender, culture or ability

Outcome 3: High quality urban development that has accessible, versatile, and sustainable public and private spaces

We have a wide variety of community places and open spaces that are safe, accessible and versatile. Our city centre and town centres are well designed, family friendly and are easy to move around. Our shared spaces and buildings showcase sustainable living

Outcome 4 Waitematā is future-focused, green and resilient to climate change

Our natural environment is healthy with rich biodiversity, clean waterways and increasing urban forest. Our communities and businesses have the tools they need to thrive as we work towards a low carbon future

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

45.     The development discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through continued consultation and the weaving of historical narratives into the detailed design.

46.     Engagement with mana whenua on this project has been undertaken as part of the consultation process. Iwi groups deferred to Ngati Whatua Orakei to provide guidance.

47.     Ngati Whatua Orakei have provided ongoing guidance to the design team throughout the development of the concept plan. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei will continue to be included in the detailed design phase.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Additional funding of $700,000 capex is estimated to be required in future to ensure delivery of all aspects of the project as per the preferred concept design. Prioritisation of this work will be discussed with the local board during future work programme development.

49.     High-level indicative cost estimates for the design and construction of the already completed ‘quick wins’ is included below.

Table 4: High-level indicative cost estimates

‘Quick wins’

Renewal of timber seating

Under-seat LED lighting installed

Power supply installed to accommodate future events

Lights installed in the garden beds to provide better visibility

Urgent Minor Capex

Capex Lighting Renewals

LDI Capex
Response Budget Opex

 

$85,278.42

 

Hedge removal and replanting of garden areas

Root barriers created for tree plantings along with repairs to uneven sections of pavement

 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     When funding becomes available a resource consent / building consent is required, and the preparation and processing of this consent may have an impact on the time frame for construction.

51.     Additional engagement with external stakeholders, iwi and the community will be undertaken as part of the resource consenting phase. There is a risk that individuals within the community may not be supportive of the concept plan. This may delay the project and result in additional costs through the resource consent and engagement stages, however this may be mitigated by the strong consultation undertaken to date with both Mana Whenua and the local community.

52.     The table below outlines risks and mitigations which have been considered:
Table 5: Risks and mitigations

Risks identified

Mitigation

Market impact

 

Cost Increases

The cost of construction continues to increase due to limited availability of materials.  This project will only be tendered to companies who can demonstrate they have the material supply and capacity to undertake this work within the specified timeframes.

 

Timing

 

Consents

Preparation and processing of the consent may have an impact on the time frame for construction. Staff will endeavour to meet the deadlines.

Health & Safety

 

Public are exposed to unsafe conditions during construction phase

Access will be restricted to the construction site and regularly monitored.

Budget

 

Budget availability

There is currently no budget allocated to complete this project, a phased approach is considered for construction over subsequent financial years

Cost Increases

The cost of construction continues to increase due to limited availability of materials.  This project will only be tendered to companies who can demonstrate they have the material supply and capacity to undertake this work within the specified timeframes.

 

Construction

 

Poor weather during construction may hold up delivery

Construction methodology and programme will allow for wet weather.

Damage to existing paths due to construction works

If damage were to occur, this would have to be remedied at a cost to the project and all reinstatement to the site will be the responsibility of the nominated contractor. The nominated contractor is also responsible for site maintenance for a 12-month period post practical completion.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     The estimated timeframes assume financial investment in order to deliver the entire concept plan and will impact the successful and timely completion of each identified project step.

Unforeseen delays in the procurement of a design and / or build partner or the resource consent process have the potential to delay completion of the project beyond the identified timeframe. 

Table 6: Project phasing and timelines

Project phase

Planned completion timeframe

Once funding for delivery is ascertained through the work programme process, detailed design and the consent processing will be followed by procurement for the physical works contractor/build partner for long term outcomes and physical works.

 Accurate commencement and duration of the physical works is not known at this time and will be confirmed at a later stage but is envisaged between the dates specified.

FY24/25 – FY25/26

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Heard Park Concept Design

37

b

Heard Park Concept Plan Survey Feedback Reports

81

c

Heard Park - LB Workshop May 2021 Consultation  Feedback

87

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cath Duncan – Project Manager, Parks and Community Facilities

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager, Parks and Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Future Occupancy Arrangement for the Grey Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau

File No.: CP2022/11867

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the future occupancy arrangement for the Grey Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The community lease that Citizen’s Advice Bureau Auckland City (CABAC) has with Auckland Council for its Citizen’s Advice Bureau (CAB) premises at Grey Lynn Community Centre has expired.

3.       The current lease arrangement is unusual, it provides exclusive use within a building that is run as a whole. The Grey Lynn Community Centre is a council-owned, but partner-led venue. Partners who operate venues on behalf of Auckland Council are accountable for the utilisation of their spaces, including oversight and management of their occupants.

4.       Under the current arrangement, the Grey Lynn Community Centre are not taken into consideration in the lease for the Grey Lynn CAB, nor does it receive contributions to overhead costs from it.

5.       There is an opportunity to establish a new occupancy arrangement that better aligns with accountabilities and best practice for partner-operated venues.

6.       This report outlines options for a future occupancy arrangement at the Grey Lynn Community Centre.

7.       Staff recommend option four, approving Grey Lynn Community Centre to arrange a long-term hire agreement with Auckland Citizen’s Advice Bureaux Incorporated (ACAB) for its Grey Lynn CAB site, for the following reasons: 

·    it assures the continuity of CAB service for the Grey Lynn community

·    it aligns with existing accountabilities and best practice for partner-operated venues

·    it will help foster a more direct and collaborative relationship between the Grey Lynn CAB and Grey Lynn Community Centre

·    Grey Lynn Community Centre can receive a fair contribution to their overhead costs.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve option four – table three:

·    approve a long-term hire agreement between Grey Lynn Community Centre and Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Incorporated for the Grey Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau that is for a minimum term of three years and a maximum annual charge of $5000.00.

Horopaki

Context

The Grey Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB)

8.       The Grey Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) is located in two of the rooms at Grey Lynn Community Centre where it currently has exclusive use of the space.

9.       This arrangement was formalised through a legacy lease agreement between Citizen’s Advice Bureau Auckland City (CABAC), which oversaw all the branches in the Auckland City area, and Auckland Council.

10.     The lease commenced on 1 July 1996 and expired on 30 June 2020. The lease had two right of renewals during this time. There are no more right of renewals.

11.     The expired lease rolls over monthly on the same terms and conditions until the lease is terminated or a new occupancy arrangement is granted.

12.     The subsidised community lease charges were $500 plus GST per annum, based on previous community leasing terms and conditions. This historic lease arrangement did not factor in paying for overhead costs. The Grey Lynn Community Centre currently cover the overhead costs of the CAB’s presence in the building.

13.     Any new occupancy arrangement would be signed by the umbrella organisation Auckland Citizen’s Advice Bureaux Incorporated (ACAB), which now pays for leases on behalf of individual bureaux from the regional funding it receives from Auckland Council.

14.     The Grey Lynn CAB is open to the public 26 hours per week. The below table summarises contact with the community over the last three financial years (note: Auckland was at various COVID-19 Alert Level settings during this period).

Table One: Summary of Grey Lynn CAB client interactions by mode of interaction (face-to-face, electronic, and phone)

Financial year

Percentage of client engagement face-to-face*

Percentage of client engagement electronic

Percentage of client engagement via phone

Total number of client engagements

2019/2020

15%

3%

82%

3274

2020/2021

17%

4%

79%

2597

2021/2022

10%

12%

78%

1580

* Percentages have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

The Grey Lynn Community Centre

15.     The Grey Lynn Community Centre is an Auckland Council owned, partner-led venue currently managed by Grey Lynn Community Centre Incorporated under a Community Centre Management Agreement (CCMA). Under a typical CCMA, partners are accountable for their own occupancy arrangements and rental agreements and receive all income from rental arrangements.

16.     The CCMA requires Grey Lynn Community Centre Incorporated to provide fair, easy, and affordable access to a safe and welcoming venue, and to enable and coordinate a wide range of activities that cater to the diversity of the local community.

17.     The table below outlines the local board funding that the Grey Lynn Community Centre receives for managing access and activating the venue. Venue partners such as Grey Lynn Community Centre are also responsible for paying for utilities and other overhead costs.

 

Table Two: Summary of approved local board funding for Grey Lynn Community Centre for 2022/2023

Type of funding

Amount ($) per annum (excluding annual CPI adjustment)

Asset-based services (ABS)

50,377.00

Locally driven initiatives (LDI) top up

20,000.00

 

18.     The Grey Lynn Community Centre began receiving a $20,000 LDI top up in 2018, after the local board received a request for additional funding to help the Grey Lynn Community Centre maintain its level of service. The managers of the Grey Lynn Community Centre had struggled to operate the building as a community centre with the amount of Asset Based Services (ABS) funding provided.

19.     The Grey Lynn Community Centre Incorporated took over the operation with the current CAB arrangement in place. It does not receive any contributions to its overhead costs from ACAB for the Grey Lynn CAB site. Instead, all income from the Grey Lynn CAB lease goes directly to the council.

20.     The old lease arrangement between Auckland Council and the Grey Lynn CAB had terms and conditions that were typical of a stand-alone community lease, rather than a lease embedded in a community centre operated by a partner, like the Grey Lynn Community Centre.

21.     The CCMA gives Grey Lynn Community Centre Incorporated the authority to manage the entire footprint of the community centre premises. This is in conflict with the lease arrangement between the CAB and Auckland Council. There is an opportunity to simplify the relationship to a streamlined, site-specific offer and to support good relations between the two parties.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.     The occupancy arrangement is due for reconsideration. Staff have developed options for the future occupancy at the Grey Lynn Community Centre (GLCC).

Table Three: Table of options

 

Detail

Benefits

Risks

Option 1

Status quo

·     The lease for the Grey Lynn CAB is expired and rolling over monthly

·     The lease and GLCC’s Community Centre Management Agreement (CCMA) are in conflict

·     GLCC and CAB do not have a formal relationship

·     There have been no charges for the Grey Lynn CAB site since the lease expired in June 2020

·     Continuity of CAB service

·     No additional occupancy cost to ACAB for the Grey Lynn CAB site

·     GLCC do not have full oversight of the use of the venue, which is in contradiction to their CCMA

·     It is financially unsustainable for the GLCC to cover the overhead costs of the CAB’s presence 

·     It does not follow best practice to not have a current, formalised occupancy arrangement in place

Option 2

Auckland Council renews direct lease arrangement with ACAB for Grey Lynn CAB

 

 

·     Auckland Council establishes new lease with ACAB for the Grey Lynn CAB, with a subsidised operation fee of $25 per square metre, per annum

·     The leased space is 29.4m2 so ACAB would pay at least $737.50 per annum. The Grey Lynn CAB currently occupy a larger space, so this will need to be negotiated

·     Income generated from the Grey Lynn CAB lease should be given to GLCC to contribute to their overhead costs

·     This option would require an amendment to GLCC’s CCMA, so that the leased space is not part of their responsibility

·     ACAB continue to be charged subsidised, community lease rates for the Grey Lynn CAB site

·     GLCC receives a small contribution to their overhead costs 

·     GLCC does not have full oversight of the venue and cannot fully curate the space to the needs of the community

·     The overhead costs of the CAB’s presence would be only partially covered

·     GLCC and CAB do not have a direct relationship, and are not supported to collaborate for community outcomes

Option 3

Auckland Council takes the lease back out to market through an Expressions of Interest (EOI) process

·     Because the lease has expired with no more right of renewal, Auckland Council’s best practice is to take the lease back out to market through an EOI process

·     ACAB would be able to submit an EOI to stay in the lease

·     This option would require an amendment to GLCC’s CCMA, so that the leased space is not part of their responsibility

·     This follows procurement best practice and ensures the lease is servicing the needs and opportunities that exist in the community

·     This provides an opportunity to learn about other community groups operating in the area who have interest in the space

·     This option does not ensure continuity of the Grey Lynn CAB service

·     It does not foster a formal relationship between CAB and GLCC, and does not simplify the venue’s accountabilities

·     It does not address the issue of GLCC’s overhead costs

Option 4

Grey Lynn Community Centre manages a long-term hire agreement with ACAB for their Grey Lynn CAB

 

Recommended

·     GLCC formalise a long-term hire agreement with ACAB for the Grey Lynn CAB space

·     The local board can approve this on the basis that the long-term hire agreement is for a minimum term of three years and an annual charge that does not exceed $5000

·     GLCC receives the revenue generated from the arrangement and oversees the space instead of Auckland Council

·     Auckland Council can better align to best practice for venue partners and GLCC have full oversight of the venue

·     Grey Lynn CAB and GLCC have a formal and direct relationship to enable better working relations

·     The Grey Lynn CAB and GLCC can collaborate and align their activities for better community outcomes

·     The Grey Lynn CAB’s occupancy becomes more sustainable for GLCC

 

·     GLCC’s occupancy fees will be higher than the council’s subsidised rates

 

 

23.     Staff have investigated other potential premises for the location of the CAB in the area. No alternative venues have been identified, and this has not been considered as an option.

24.     Staff recommend option four for the following reasons:

·    This aligns to accountabilities and best practice for partner-operated venues. Auckland Council holds a CCMA with the Grey Lynn Community Centre, which empowers a partner organisation to oversee the utilisation of a venue and make decisions for the benefit of the community on behalf of the council.

·    This will enable good working relations between the two parties under a formal and direct arrangement. At present, the CAB defers to the council on matters regarding their occupancy at Grey Lynn Community Centre.

·    Grey Lynn Community Centre can receive a fair contribution to their overhead costs. At present, they are not receiving any contributions for the CAB’s presence. Under a direct and formal occupancy arrangement, the Grey Lynn Community Centre will be able to set a fair fee that is agreeable to ACAB with set limits by the Waitematā Local Board.

25.     Under a CCMA, venue partners generally negotiate rental agreements with their user groups and tenants without oversight from local boards. Staff would not typically set parameters around long-term hire agreements such as minimum terms and maximum costs under a CCMA. However, in this case, a transition from a lease arrangement with Auckland Council to a rental agreement with Grey Lynn Community Centre poses high risk of significant change.

26.     To mitigate this, staff advise the local board to approve a long-term hire agreement between the Grey Lynn Community Centre and ACAB for the Grey Lynn CAB site with a minimum term of three years and a maximum annual charge of $5000.00 to ensure the CAB service remains available to the Grey Lynn community. These limits allow the two parties to negotiate within reasonable expectations set by the local board.

27.     Staff also recommend that this occupancy arrangement be reviewed periodically to ensure the arrangement continues to work for both parties.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     The recommended option will have no impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

29.     Local community services and venues create a stronger sense of place and belonging and foster localism and place-based approaches. This has a positive impact on communities’ resilience to the impacts of climate change. 

30.     The council is committed to supporting the Grey Lynn CAB to remain in the Grey Lynn Community Centre, as having multiple services in one location reduces travel and our carbon footprint.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The Connected Communities department is responsible for holding the relationships with partners who operate venues such as the Grey Lynn Community Centre on behalf of the council. Connected Communities has a remit to enables partners to lead and build capacity in their communities, and to foster relationships between community groups. 

32.     The Community Facilities department oversees community leases, including the Grey Lynn CAB lease. The advice and recommendations in this report were co-written by Connected Communities and Community Facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     In August 2022, staff workshopped the options with the local board. The local board had differing views on the preferred future Grey Lynn CAB occupancy option. 

34.     At a local board workshop on 2 August 2022, staff incorrectly updated the local board that Grey Lynn CAB had been charged approximately $1,100 per annum for their premises at Grey Lynn Community Centre. Staff had estimated the lease cost based on current community leasing rates, but staff have since confirmed the Grey Lynn CAB had been under an older lease with a charge of $500 plus GST per annum.

35.     ACAB has expressed an interest in maintaining a direct lease arrangement with Auckland Council but has also expressed a willingness to enter into an occupancy arrangement directly with the Grey Lynn Community Centre if this is preferred by the local board.

36.     Grey Lynn Community Centre has expressed a preference for managing the CAB’s occupancy themselves, to enable better coordination of activity at the venue and to receive a fair contribution to their overhead costs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     As part of their kaupapa (principles), the CAB aims to ensure that Māori can participate in all aspects on their service, that their service reaches and is effective for all Māori who need it, and that they form effective partnerships with Māori organisations and communities locally and nationally.

38.     Under the CCMA, Grey Lynn Community Centre are required to provide a wide range of activities meeting the wider community needs and interest, including the needs and interests of Māori. They report on their diversity of activity on a quarterly basis.

39.     A direct relationship between the Grey Lynn CAB and Grey Lynn Community Centre would enable a more coordinated approach to community outreach and Māori outcomes from the venue.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     If option four is approved, Auckland Council would not receive the revenue generated from a new Grey Lynn CAB lease, instead it would be received by the Grey Lynn Community Centre under their long-term hire agreement.

41.     The Waitematā Local Board used to receive $500 plus GST per annum from the Grey Lynn CAB lease and would have received at least $737.50 per annum from a renewed lease for the Grey Lynn CAB.  

42.     If another option other than option four is approved, it would be within the Grey Lynn Community Centre’s right to request the council to contribute financially as the council pays for all utilities in other shared community buildings.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     There is a risk that the recommended occupancy agreement could be unfavourable to either Grey Lynn Community Centre or ACAB. To mitigate the risk:

·    council staff have recommended certain limits on a long-term hire agreement between the two parties to ensure it is a workable arrangement. This is a minimum term of three years and a maximum annual charge of $5000.00

·    council staff will support the Grey Lynn Community Centre and ACAB to review this arrangement periodically, to ensure it remains workable for both parties.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Below are the next steps if the local board approve recommended option four:

When

Action

September 2022

·    Following the local board decision, staff will update ACAB, who oversee the Grey Lynn CAB, and Grey Lynn Community Centre of the outcome.

October 2022

·    After fulfilling the one month notice period required under the current lease, staff will support Grey Lynn Community Centre and ACAB to formalise a long-term hire agreement with a minimum term of three years and maximum annual charge of $5000.00.

November 2022 onwards

·    Staff will support Grey Lynn Community Centre and ACAB to periodically review the occupancy arrangement for the Grey Lynn CAB site to understand its efficacy and staff can provide the local board with updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Julia Craig - Place & Partner Specialist

Phillipa Carroll - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Concept design options for the heritage restoration, seismic remediation, and modernisation of Leys Institute

File No.: CP2022/13179

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the concept design options for the heritage restoration, seismic remediation, and modernisation of Leys Institute for approval for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To enable a decision on the restoration, modernisation, and seismic remediation of Leys Institute, staff are undertaking a detailed business case assessment (as approved by the Waitematā Local Board resolution WTM/2019/168).

3.       Two concept designs have been developed as part of the ongoing preparation of the detailed business case. The concept designs have been developed in consultation with a rōpū of community leaders and mana whenua. 

4.       The concept designs provide for different levels of library and community service. Concept design 1 meets current and future requirements, concept design 2 meets some current requirements.

5.       Staff recommend that both concept designs proceed to public consultation. The consultation material will include the level of investment required and potential funding sources for both options. Feedback, through this community engagement, will help the local board understand how much local residents are willing to contribute towards the refurbishment and reopening of a community taonga.

6.       Staff will continue to investigate potential funding sources throughout this phase of the project to inform the detailed business case.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      endorse concept design options for the heritage restoration, seismic remediation, and modernisation of Leys Institute

b)      approve the use of the Leys Institute Preliminary Concept Plans (Attachment A), dated August 2022, for public consultation. 

 

Horopaki

Context

The restoration of Leys Institute is a priority for the Waitematā Local Board 

7.       In 2015, the council’s Regional Strategy and Policy Committee prioritised action 107 of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan ‘to investigate provision of library facilities in Ponsonby and Grey Lynn areas considering both facility condition and suitability’.

8.       The Waitematā Local Board approved delivery of action 107 through their 2018/2019 and 2019/2020 work programmes (WTM/2018/77; WTM/2019/126).

9.       In 2018, an investigation (as documented in the West Waitematā Current State Analysis report) identified an ongoing need for local library services and that the poor condition of Leys Library building constrained delivery of these services.  

10.     In August 2019, the local board approved the development of an indicative business case to understand service and facility investment options for the restoration of Leys Institute (WTM/2019/168).

11.     Due to the whare being earthquake-prone and the subsequent risk to public and staff, Leys Institute was closed in December 2019 and library services have since been delivered from a small (150m2) temporary library space in Jervois Road called Little Leys. Venue for hire customers have been directed to other nearby facilities. 

12.     In September 2020, staff reported the outcomes of the indicative business case to the local board (WTM/2020/204). High-level findings included:

·    Auckland Council (council) has obligations under the Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Act 2016 to ensure Leys Institute is not earthquake prone.

·    Council has obligations under the Resource Management Act (1991) and the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 for Leys Institute to be protected from destruction (partial or total), demolition, or relocation beyond the site.

·    Council has obligations under the 1904 deed of agreement to operate Leys Institute as a library in perpetuity.

·    Change is required for continuation of library service provision in the Ponsonby area.

·    Seismic remediation, heritage restoration, and extension of Leys Institute Library into the gymnasium space will deliver a fit-for-purpose space that provides for an increasing population.

13.     Upon receiving the information above, the local board directed the development of a detailed business case for the restoration, modernisation, and seismic remediation of Leys Institute. The purpose of a detailed business case is to:

·    determine strategic, economic, financial, and commercial feasibility

·    consider design options and provide cost benefit analysis

·    provide assurance that the preferred option identified is the right approach to deliver the desired outcomes, and is an effective and sustainable long-term solution

·    confirm the case for change and investment to enable delivery.

Two concept design options have been developed  

14.     A Project Advisory Group was established to determine a design brief and drive the development of concept designs with a contracted architect. Membership of the advisory group included representatives from the Leys family, community groups (Friends of Leys Institute, Herne Bay Residents Association, St Marys Bay Association, Freemans Bay Residents Association) Ponsonby Community Centre, Te Poari ā-Rohe o Waitematā, NZ Historic Places Trust, and subject-matter specialists from council.

15.     Mana whenua groups were consulted and Ngāti Te Ata and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei inputted separately to the advisory rōpū. 

16.     Over a series of hui from December 2021 to June 2022 the Project Advisory Group learned about the whakapapa of the site, the heritage value of the buildings, and current drivers and trends that are shaping the future of library and community services.

17.     This mahi led to high-level requirements for spaces and services, within Leys Institute, being defined and two initial concept designs were developed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Two concept designs have been developed as part of the ongoing preparation of the detailed business case for the restoration, modernisation, and seismic remediation of Leys Institute. These concept designs are provided in Attachment A and outlined below.

Concept design 1 – full delivery  

19.     Concept design 1 connects the separate library and gymnasium buildings by a three-level addition (lower level shown in yellow on the plan – Attachment A) that integrates the buildings to the courtyard and outside environment. This design extends the facility footprint providing additional service spaces as well as creating a strong link to the whenua/land. 

20.     Concept design 1 has a central entry/exit pathway from St Marys Road through to Dedwood Terrace that links the library and gymnasium, providing a line-of-sight from the front end of the facility to the back. This design aspect is considered a good CPTED outcome and an important feature that links the building to the streetscape. 

21.     The provision of a lift in this concept design makes all levels accessible. New bathrooms are provided on all levels including accessible facilities which means there will be one accessible bathroom on each floor. 

22.     In providing a large extension and building footprint, Concept design 1 enables new spaces for full library and community service delivery now and into the future (designed to 100 years).. This includes a parent’s room, flexible use gymnasium space, a community kitchen, library workspace, storage facilities, a first-floor breakout space containing kitchen and bathroom facilities, as well as a business hub for local groups to meet or work remotely.

Concept design 2 – partial delivery  

23.     Concept design 2 provides a smaller building extension by replacing and extending out the space of the existing 1938 Lending Library Room, while retaining the library and gymnasium as two separate buildings (with their own remaining access entry/exit points). 

24.     The primary feature of Concept design 2 is that the 1938 Lending Library Room is replaced with a new two-level addition to extend the library service space which has an internal staircase providing access to the lower level. There is no lift connection to the lower level, unlike in concept design 1.

25.     The new library space provides additional service capability which enables partial delivery of library and community service provision requirements for another 20 years.

26.     There is no change to the upper floor of the original library space which retains the main lecture hall, smaller supper room, toilets, and lift. The gymnasium space remains generally unchanged, but provision has been allowed for new accessible bathroom on the main ground level.

Concept design comparison

27.     The concept designs deliver on the current and future library and community service requirements, as well as the initial scope for heritage restoration, modernisation, and seismic remediation, to differing degrees. Some of the design functions are outlined in Table 1.

Table 1: Design functions included in concept design options 

Design function 

Option 1 – full delivery 

Option 2 – partial delivery 

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles incorporated 

A central entry/exit pathway from St Marys Road through to Dedwood Terrace, that links the library and gymnasium, provides line-of-sight from the front end of the facility to the back. 

Back of facility remains concealed from front of facility. 

Drop in and informal space 

Community kitchen is provided on ground floor. 

No community kitchen, but the collections space remains available. 

Extends facility footprint providing additional service spaces 

A large extension enables new spaces for library and community services for an increasing population.  

A small whare extension replaces the existing 1939 Lending Library Room. 

Flexible layout providing for different collections and activities 

Includes flexible, bookable gymnasium space, library workspace, storage facilities, a shared working space. 

Gymnasium space, library workspace, storage facilities and a shared working space are not flexible spaces

Heritage preservation 

First floor is restored to original design with full lecture room and supper room. 

Special heritage collection area provided on basement floor. 

No change to first floor. 

Library and gymnasium remain separate.  

Increase useable space 

Connects library and gymnasium over three levels. 

Footprint is extended through connection and back of gymnasium. 

Children's play space added. 

Does not connect buildings. 

Does not extend footprint. 

Integration with the outside environment 

Integration is through a double-storey outlook and bi-fold doors onto the courtyard. 

Creates a strong link to te whenua / the land. 

Some integration through bi-fold doors onto the courtyard. 

Kitchen facility 

A breakout space containing a kitchen is included on the first floor. 

Kitchen on first floor remains the same. 

Modernised and prepared for future change in technology and community 

Prepared for changing technologies. 

Enlarged to meet future provision requirements for our growing community. 

Minimal technology upgrades.  

Smaller, does not meet future provision requirements. 

Preliminary cost estimate 

$18,800,000 

$13,800,000 

Relocation of Michael Joseph Savage memorial drinking fountain from 19 Jervois Road  

Fountain is installed on Dedwood side of Leys Institute. 

Fountain is installed on Dedwood side of Leys Institute. 

Seismic remediation1 

Seismic strengthening to 67% NBS. 

Seismic strengthening to 67% NBS. 

Universal design principles incorporated 

All levels are accessible through the provision of a lift. 

Accessible bathroom available on each floor. 

Parents’ room is provided. 

Accessible entrances included at both front and back of whare. 

Top two levels remain accessible through the current lift.  

Basement library collection accessible only by stairs or through Dedwood Terrace entrance. 

Accessible bathroom added to ground floor of gymnasium. 

Parents’ room is provided. 

 

Concept design 1 aligns with council plans and strategies 

28.     Staff have identified that both concept designs address the current library services provision shortfall, seismic strengthening requirements, and the Leys Institute Deed of Trust obligations (e.g. council’s requirement to protect Leys Institute from destruction and to operate as a library in perpetuity). 

29.     Only concept design 1 addresses future service requirements.

30.     The provision of more flexible space will positively impact how library services can be delivered to a growing and changing local population.

31.     The concept designs have differing alignment with council plans and strategies as outlined in Table 2.

Table 2: Design option alignment with strategic plans 

Key 
üü           Strongly aligns             
ü Aligns  
û Does not align 

Plan 

Objective/outcome 

Design 1 

Design 2 

Investment proposal 

Seismic remediation 

üü 

üü 

Heritage restoration 

üü 

ü 

Extension of Leys Institute making facilities fit-for-service 

üü 

ü 

Local Board Plan 

Provide spaces and places that enable our diverse communities to connect and feel welcome 

üü 

ü 

Identify and protect places with heritage and distinctive character 

üü 

ü 

Auckland Plan 2050 

All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential 

üü 

ü 

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau 

Support te reo Māori to be seen, heard, spoken and learned throughout Tāmaki Makaurau 

ü 

ü 

Reflect and promote Māori culture and identity within the environment, and value mātauranga Māori 

üü 

ü 

Enable whānau Māori to experience relevant and welcoming public facilities and services. 

üü 

ü 

Ngā Hapori Momoho Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032 

Improve health outcomes through ‘Te Whare Tapa Whā’ approach to hauora 

ü 

ü 

Increase access and participation through universal design and ensuring spaces are welcoming and culturally appropriate 

üü 

ü 

Enable local leadership and innovation by providing local space to support community leadership and innovation 

üü 

ü 

Community Facilities Network Plan 

Respond to population growth 

üü 

û 

Maximise existing facilities to create a fit-for-purpose network 

üü 

û 

Public consultation on the two concept designs is the next step  

32.     To further develop the detailed business case for the restoration, modernisation, and seismic remediation of Leys Institute, staff need to understand the community’s perspective on the two proposed concept designs. This will enable staff to determine the feasibility of each option and provide advice to the local board on the future of Leys Institute (in meeting the library and community service provision needs of the local community). 

33.     Staff are requesting the local board’s approval to make the two concept design options for Leys Institute available to the public and to undertake a public consultation process with local residents. The consultation process will allow staff to gain a better understanding of: 

·    the types of services the community need most to be provided within Leys Institute

·    the preferred concept design that will best meet community need

·    practical design application issues, gaps, or improvements identified in the concept designs from a user perspective

·    potential funding sources (including Ponsonby residents’ appetite for a targeted rate to fund the project).

34.     The consultation process is expected to take place before the end of the calendar year, from November to December 2022.

35.     Information gained by the public consultation process will contribute to the development of the detailed business case that is expected to be brought to the local board in February or March 2023.

36.     It is recommended that the two concept designs are presented to the community for consultation and that staff continue to investigate funding options.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     Adaptive reuse is the technique of preserving the building’s heritage character while accommodating changes in demand, technology, and uses. Reuse is increasingly seen as an alternative to building new because of the closer alignment to sustainability, a circular economy, and sustainable urban environments.

38.     Rehabilitation of a heritage facility reduces council’s impact on climate through the reuse of materials and reduced transportation (as materials are already produced and were transported onto site over 100 years ago).

39.     The location of Leys Institute enables the use of active and public transport. The building is located along key bus routes and adjacent to a town centre.

40.     The sustainability of the restoration has been considered in the development of the concept designs and will be further refined in the detailed design / business case. As the Leys Institute functions as a library, it offers a great opportunity to teach about the importance of sustainability through its design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     Staff throughout the council family have contributed to the concept design and detailed business case development including Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Connected Communities, Finance and Business Performance, Heritage, Regional Services and Strategy, and Parks and Community Facilities. 

42.     The allocation of decision-making on investment in local community facilities has recently transferred to local boards (GB/2021/137 and GB2022/53). Local board decisions will adhere to the budget and minimum service level parameters set by the Governing Body. Significant decisions under this new direction will be implemented in a phased manner through the upcoming local board plans and the next Long-term Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     Community support for restoring and reopening Leys Institute was expressed through the council’s emergency budget consultation process carried out in June 2020. Friends of Leys Institute and members of the Leys family have also expressed support for this direction and worked as integral members of the Project Advisory Group to develop the concept designs. 

44.     The local board have previously shown support for the restoration of Leys Institute at their September 2020 business meeting when they directed the development of a detailed business case (WTM/2020/204).

45.     Progress on the development of a detailed business case, including the two concept designs, was presented to the Waitematā Local Board at a workshop on 9 August 2022. The local board showed support for the concept designs to proceed to public consultation and requested the following actions: 

·    Present the concept designs in a business report for ratification (which this report accomplishes) 

·    Undertake public consultation on the two concept designs following approval of this business report 

·    Investigate the optimisation of properties held by the Leys Institute Trust as a possible revenue source to part-fund the project, in particular 10 Fremlin Place

·    Provide the board with specific details regarding a targeted rate as a potential project funding source as part of the detailed business case. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     The Māori population in the Leys Institute catchment area is seven per cent of the Ponsonby population and expected to be stable at seven per cent until 2038.

47.     Two per cent of Leys Institute Library’s active members are Māori compared to 13 per cent of Auckland Māori visiting libraries in the Auckland region each month.

48.     The restoration of the Leys Institute provides an opportunity to celebrate mana whenua significance, with reference to Leys Institute’s place on Te Rimutahi ridgeline and history as a traditional transport route from Maungawhau to Te Too (Three Lamps). 

49.     The two concept designs were developed with significant input from mana whenua. 

50.     Mana whenua rōpū Ngāti Te Ata and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei provided key advice to the concept design process including that: 

·    a name is required for the whare that joins the past to the future and shows us moving forward together

·    we use landscape architecture and ‘view shafts’ to recognise traditional cultural stories that are hugely significant to Māori

·    that the whare must be whanau-centric

·    hauora is most important and must inform the renovation design. The four pillars of hauora (te whare tapa whā) are important to bring Te Ao Māori to the space and that colour can be used to create links between the pillars and between cultural stories.

51.     Māori will benefit from the opportunity to increase Te Ao Māori at Leys Institute and mana whenua will continue to be engaged throughout the design and build processes in alignment with the outcomes sought by Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     The impact of COVID-19 and the resulting economic slow-down has had a significant impact on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity. 

53.     The local board requested certain financial parameters be considered in the development of a detailed business case. These are: 

·    that costs remain within the range outlined in the indicative business case of $15.3 to $21.2 million

·    the inclusion of service property optimisation and sale proceeds from identified endowment properties

·    a ring-fence of council funds as a source of funding up to $7.4 million

·    that alternative sources of funding be investigated (such as community fundraising, philanthropic donations, and targeted rates).

54.     Independent specialists have identified preliminary costs for the delivery of each of the two concept designs presented in Table 3.

Table 3: Preliminary costs for design options 

Option 

Current identified funding  

Preliminary costs 

Variance 

Design 1 

$15,650,000

$18,800,000

($3,150,000)

Design 2 

$13,800,000

$1,850,000

 

55.     Currently, two funding sources have been confirmed:

·    Council’s regional seismic budget has been committed, from financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025, to covering seismic remediation costs.

·    Sale proceeds from 3 Ponsonby Rd and 19 Jervois Road have been approved, by Te Poari ā-Rohe o Waitematā, as funding sources. Both properties are currently being processed for sale.

56.     Preliminary cost estimates on the two concept designs were developed in August 2022. These are based on previous seismic remediation and retrofit building projects and should be considered preliminary at this stage for reference and comparison of the two design concepts only. Following public consultation and final approval of the preferred concept option by the local board more detailed costs associated with the concept designs and project delivery will be provided in the detailed business case.

57.     The potential of a targeted rate is also being explored as a source of project funding. Targeted rates pay for specific services or projects and can be set generally across all ratepayers or to certain ratepayers in certain areas. For example, to raise $3,000,000, with around 6,200 households in the Ponsonby area, a targeted rate to recover the costs of the Institute’s preservation would mean targeted rate of approximately $160 per household per annum over three years, or spread over 10 years, $50 per annum.

58.     Information gained by the public consultation process will contribute to further establishing project funding sources. Staff will also continue to investigate the sale of properties held by Leys Institute Trust (in particular 10 Fremlin Place), community and/or corporate fundraising, and the potential of a targeted rate as sources of investment. This information will contribute to the development of the detailed business case.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

59.     Table 4 outlines the main risks and mitigations associated with the recommendation in this report.

Table 4: Project risks and mitigations

Type of risk 

Risk 

Risk level 

Mitigation 

Reputational 

If communication is not clear and regular, then community may feel isolated and lose trust in the council. 

Medium 

Establish clear lines of communication. 

Develop and implement an agreed communication and engagement strategy. 

Ensure all project status information is accurate and up to date. 

Reputational  

If the financial implications of each concept are not clearly presented, then there may be a reduction in trust and confidence in the council. 

Medium 

This risk is mitigated by: 

·             obtaining detailed costings from a quantity surveyor 

·             including a construction contingency 

·             ensuring all project status information is accurate and up to date 

·              maintaining clear lines of communication.   

Reputational 

If assumptions prove incorrect, then there may be a reduction in trust and confidence. 

Low 

Assumptions around population and service requirements can be managed by keeping Leys Institute innovative, flexible, and dynamic in response to changing needs.  

Financial 

If potential contributions from proposed funding sources are less than anticipated, then alternative funding may be needed. 

Low 

This risk is mitigated by: 

·             gaining an early understanding of the revenue that could generated from the proposed funding sources 

·             consulting with the public to understand support for alternative funding.  

Financial 

If public consultation highlights the concept designs do not meet community service needs, then alternative designs may be needed. 

Low 

This risk is mitigated by: 

·             gaining an early understanding of the community needs through research and co-design with the Project Advisory Group and mana whenua 

·             concept designs keep Leys Institute innovative, flexible, and dynamic in response to changing needs.  

Business Disruption 

If there is a major event such as a lockdown, then there may be a reduction in ability to consult with public. 

Low 

Design and implement a consultation strategy that can be carried out both online and in person. 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

60.     Based on the decision from this report, staff will make the two concept designs for Leys Institute available to the public and undertake a public consultation process of local Ponsonby residents. The consultation process is expected to take place before the end of the calendar year (from November to December 2022).

61.     Information gained by the public consultation process will contribute to the development of the detailed business case.  

62.     As requested by local board members, staff will also be investigating the opportunity to use sale proceeds from properties held by Leys Institute Trust (in particular 10 Fremlin Place) and the potential of a targeted rate as sources of investment. This information will also contribute to the development of the detailed business case.

63.     It is expected that the outcomes of the public consultation and the assessment of potential funding sources will be presented to the local board through a workshop in February or March 2023.

64.     The overall timeframe for reopening Leys Institute will depend on a range of factors including:

·    how long it takes to develop and obtain approval for a detailed business case

·    the time required to raise funding for the development.

65.     Next steps and estimated timeframes are summarised in Table 5.

Table 5: Next steps and estimated timeframes  

Timeframe 

Action 

November 2022 to December 2022 

Public consultation on concept designs 

August 2022 to February 2023 

Development of detailed business case 

March 2023 to March 2024 

Developed and detailed design and consents 

April 2024 to June 2025 

Procurement of contractor and building construction 

July 2025 

Operationalisation 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Leys Institute Preliminary Concept Plans

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ash Richards - Service and Asset Planning Specailist

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 



Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 













Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Waitematā Local Grant Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2022/2023 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/11453

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Waitematā Local Grant round one and Multi-board Grant round one 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Waitematā Local Grant round one (Attachment A), and Multi-board Grant round one 2022/2023 (Attachment B).

3.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted the Waitematā Community Grant Programme 2022/2023 on 17 May 2022. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants (Attachment C).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $134,007 for the 2022/2023 financial year.

5.       Sixteen applications have been received for the Local Grant round one 2022/2023 requesting a total of $98,869.02 and eleven applications received for Multi-board Grant round one 2022/2023 requesting a total of $382,684.00.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received for the Waitematā Local Grant round one, listed in the following table

Table One: Waitematā Local Grant round one 2022/2023 grant applications

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2320-136

2021 Softball Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of kit bags and bus fees Softball World Cup Schools Programme

$2,999.98

Eligible

LG2320-131

Aaiotanga Peace Place Trust

Community

Towards production costs of the "Vertical Voice" newsletter

$8,160.00

Eligible

LG2320-117

Auckland and District Pipe Band Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of a new drum set for the Auckland and District Pipe Band

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2320-118

Auckland Indian Sports Club Incorporated

Community

Towards publication costs of the 75th jubilee historical book

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2320-125

Body Positive - New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of aon-site HIV/Syphilis test administer

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2320-132

Campus Radio BFM Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of DJ audio equipment

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2320-110

Claire Atherstone

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of venue hire and salsa instructors

$1,000.00

Ineligible

LG2320-111

Doughnut Economics Advocates New Zealand

Community

Towards the costs of the cleaning of space at Une-Deux Cafe, bike repair materials, electrical supplies, Wilson parking costs, digital advertising and colour printing

$2,915.74

Eligible

LG2320-122

Mass Sport Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of six port-a-goals

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2320-114

RAINBOW PRIDE (WHAKAHIHI) AUCKLAND INCORPORATED

Events

Towards funding for "pre-entertainment", kids activities and music set-up at Auckland Rainbow Parade

$7,652.30

Eligible

LG2320-106

Social Change Collective

Community

Towards the cost of venue hire, Facebook and Instagram advertising, audio visual hire and gratuity

$4,190.00

Eligible

LG2320-116

The Actor's Program

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of a lighting rig

$2,451.00

Eligible

LG2320-123

The Helping Paws Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards the cost of Kitten food for the "Waitemata Community Desexing Project"

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2320-126

Toi Ora Live Art Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of a communications and de-escalation training consultant

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2320-113

The Basement Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards artists fees

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2320-115

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the Waitematā share to put towards volunteer clinical supervision and training services for Youthline

$7,500.00

 

Total

 

 

 

$98,869.02

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received for the Waitematā Multi-board Grant round one, listed in the following table.

Table Two: Waitematā Local Grant round one 2022/2023 grant applications

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2223-115

African Film Festival New Zealand Trust

Arts and culture

Towards film rights, website, and marketing of the African Film Festival online and in Rialto Cinemas Newmarket (September 2022 – December 2022)

$45,800.00

Eligible

MB2223-114

Auckland Events Company T/A Food Truck Collective

Events

Towards live music, face painting, and waste collection for the Food Truck Collective – Street Food Summer Series all over Auckland (October 2022 – May 2023)

$82,750.00

Eligible

MB2223-106

Belinda Ulberg

Environment

Towards plants, trees, and structure to be planted at Candia Road Swanson (August 2022 – December 2022)

$4,000.00

Ineligible

MB2223-122

Body Positive Incorporated

Community

Towards costs to run the Body Positive Men’s Wellness Retreat in Vaughan Park Anglican Retreat Centre (March 2023)

$20,064.00

Eligible

MB2223-123

Charlotte Museum Trust

Community

Towards project lead researcher and project collection technician to capture history of LGBTIQ+ Community Places & Spaces in New Lynn (October 2022 – May 2023)

$20,668.00

Eligible

MB2223-137

CNSST Foundation

Community

Towards costs for coordination and implementation of five social work counseling cases, five social media publishing, three community workshops, and 10 community cultural days at the CNSST Head Office and Jubilee Building (November 2022 – June 2023)

$20,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-128

Nightsong

Arts and culture

Towards costs to present 30 performances of The Worm – 2023 Auckland Regional Tour in Bruce Mason Centre, Hawkins Theatre, Vodafone Events Centre, Māngere Arts Centre, Glen Eden Playhouse Theatre, and Herald Theatre (October 2022 – June 2023)

$62,500.00

Eligible

MB2223-130

Pregnancy Help Incorporated Auckland

Community

Towards operational costs to run the Pregnancy Help programme in Auckland Central (October 2022 – September 2023)

$15,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-142

Rainbow Youth Incorporated

Community

Towards costs to run Rainbow Youth Peer Support Groups in multiple locations across Auckland (October 2022 – September 2023)

$27,352.00

Eligible

MB2223-120

Shager Ethiopian Entertainment NZ Inc

Arts and culture

Towards weekly workshop hiring for dance practices, decorations, volunteer costs, and venue hire of Mt Roskill War Memorial Hall (January 2023 – June 2023)

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-111

The Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Community

Towards free or ubsidized classes of Community Upcycling DIY Workshops in various locations in Auckland from October 2022 to May 2023.

$79,550.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$382,684.00

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city

7.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     Higher priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted the Community Grant Programme for 2022/2023 on 17 May 2022 and will operate two Quick Response and two Local Grant rounds for this financial year.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

12.     In addition to the eligibility criteria outlined in the Community Grants Policy, the Waitematā Local Board have indicated in the Local Board Grants Programme that they will not fund groups who request funding over the maximum amount set.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement 

13.     The Local Board Community Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way.

14.     Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; decreasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waitematā Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

19.     A summary of each application received through Waitematā Local Grant round one and Multi-board Grant round one 2022/2023 is provided (refer Attachment A and B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $134,007 for the 2022/2023 financial year.

23.     Sixteen applications have been received for the Local Grant round one 2022/2023 requesting a total of $98,869.02 and eleven applications received for Multi-board Grant round one 2022/2023 requesting a total of $382,684.00.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified that a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

26.     Staff recommend that due to the ongoing impacts of COVID19, if an applicant is unable to carry out the project in this financial year, then a clause is added to the recommendation, that the applicant can retain the funds to carry out the event in the next financial year or postpone the event date, to when alert levels have reduced, and the event can be conducted safely.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Following the Waitematā Local Board allocation of funding for the Local Grant round one and Multi-board Grant round one, staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Grant round one 2022/2023 - application summary

137

b

Waitematā Multi-board Grant round one 2022/2023 - application summary

199

c

Waitematā Community Grant Programme 2022/2023

241

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Arna Casey - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Waitemata Event Partnership Reallocation Report

File No.: CP2022/13180

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To reallocate funds within the 2022/2023 Waitematā Local Board Event Partnership Fund (work programme line #428) from Artweek Auckland Limited towards supporting the Franklin Road Christmas Lights 2023 event to increase their display to include an Angus Muir lighting installation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitematā Local Board approved $63,000 for the Event Partnership Fund 2022/2023 as part of the Waitematā Local Board Customer and Community Services Work Programme on 21 June 2022.  $20,000 of the total $63,000 budget was allocated towards Artweek Auckland Limited.

3.       Artweek Auckland Limited advised Auckland Council on 15 August 2022 that they will not require their allocated funding for this financial year due to the event not taking place and the trust disestablishing.

4.       Franklin Road Christmas Lights uplifted their funding of $7,000 from the 2021/2022 Event Partnership Fund (WTM/2022/123) but did not utilise it due to COVID19 restrictions. This amount will be utilised for the 2022/2023 event instead, meaning no allocation was provided to them within the 2022/2023 Event Partnership Fund budget.

5.       The Franklin Road event organiser has since requested an additional $7,000 for the Franklin Christmas Lights 2022, as they plan to run an additional light installation for the month of December, as part of the annual Christmas lights event.

6.       Staff recommend that $7,000 is reallocated from the Artweek Auckland Limited savings towards the Franklin Road Christmas lights as a one off for 2022, within the Event Partnership Fund work programme line.

7.       Staff recommend that the remaining $13,000 from the $20,000 allocation is moved into the Community Grants funding pool (work programme line 483).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board;

a)      approve the reallocation of $7,000 from within the 2022/2023 Waitematā Local Board Event Partnership Fund (#428) from Artweek Auckland Limited to the Franklin Road Christmas Lights event to fund an Angus Muir lighting installation.

b)      approve the remaining $13,000 to be reallocated into the Community Grants funding pool.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The 2022/2023 work programme line 482 Event Partnership Fund has an allocated budget of $63,000 and includes a budget of $20,000 for Auckland Artweek Limited and $0 allocated to Franklin Road Christmas Lights.

9.       Franklin Road Christmas Lights uplifted their funding of $7,000 from the 2021/2022 Event Partnership Fund (WTM/2022/123) but did not utilise it due to COVID19 restrictions. This amount will be utilised for the 2022/2023 event instead, meaning no allocation was provided to them within the 2022/2023 Event Partnership Fund budget.

10.     Franklin Road Christmas Lights has been an annual event on the Auckland calendar for decades and is enjoyed by families all over Auckland. Unfortunately, due to COVID 2020 and 2021 the event did not happen, so they are looking to return in 2022 with a new additional attraction.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The event organiser has been planning with Angus Muir to do a lighting installation in Franklin Road over the month of December, as an extra push for the event and as a “welcome back” after the COVID hiatus.

12.     Angus Muir is a successful lighting installation artist. He recently did all the lighting installations for “Light up Ponsonby” 28 July-7 August, Takapuna Winter Lights 28-31 July, and several Matariki displays.

13.     The initial idea is to install an art piece at the top of Franklin Road and the bottom of Franklin Road as ‘gateways’ to the event. The art piece hardware created by Angus will become the property of the Street and will be used in subsequent years, so the intention is that this will be a “one off cost.”

14.     The additional funding would mean that no further sponsorship would need to be sought in a tight market and thus continue the event to be a non-sponsored and commercial-free family event supported by Waitematā Local Board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     Minimising the potential climate impact of this event is a key consideration within the event facilitation process.

16.     Waste management and traffic minimisation specifically will be worked through with the event organiser to ensure they minimise the impact and are working towards the event becoming more sustainability.    

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and local board views guidance

17.     The Waitematā Local Board have supported the Franklin Road event for the past ten plus years.

18.     The Event Facilitation team will consult with Auckland Transport, as required by the event facilitation process, to ensure management of the space is adequate to support the activity and minimise displacement of public and nearby residents, business, and services.

19.     As part of the wider facilitation process, staff will seek feedback from the Waitematā Local Board, Auckland Transport, and other relevant stakeholders.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Staff have not currently identified any significant impact for Māori in the event permit request for this event.

21.     The event organiser will be required to consult with mana whenua through the facilitation process where required.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The event facilitation process allows the council to recover costs for remedial works that maybe required following an event.

23.     Staff recommend reallocating $7,000 from the Artweek Auckland savings to the Franklin Road Christmas lights as a one off for the 2022/2023 Event Partnership Fund (#482) work programme line. Table 1 outlines the financial implications associated with this budget reallocation.

Table 1 – 2022/2023 work programme budget reallocation

Work programme line item

Current allocation

Reallocation

Total after reallocation

482 Event Partnership Fund – Artweek Auckland Limited

$20,000

Less $7,000

$13,000

482 Event Partnership Fund – Franklin Road Christmas Lights

$0

Increase $7,000

$7,000

483 - Community Grants

$134,007

Increase $13,000

$147,007

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The event facilitation process is designed to mitigate the risk of having events in public open space. Although the local board may approve the additional funding, further stakeholder consultation is required under the Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022. Event Facilitation staff will work with stakeholders to meet the requirements, however if one or more stakeholders’ requirements cannot be met the event may not be able to proceed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Staff will update the local board 2022/2023 work programme to reflect the approved budget reallocations and progress the funding agreement.

26.     As part of the Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022 all events in public open space are required to have an event permit. Following receipt of all required relevant approvals the Event Facilitation team will issue a permit for the event.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lisa Kent - Team Leader Event Facilitation (Central)

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Four, 2021-22

File No.: CP2022/13443

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waitematā Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation work programme items in its area for quarter 4, along with updates to the 2022/2023 Waitematā Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2022. However, this quarter four update is for the 2021/2022 CCO Engagement Plan.

3.       Updates will be provided to local boards each quarter to show both changes to the plan itself, and to provide updates on the work programme items included in the attachments to the plan.

4.       An updated version of the engagement plan is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachment B-E. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter Four 2021/2022

b)      receive updates to the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2022/2023 local work programme. 

7.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.       This update may include the following types of changes:

·    Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

10.     In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Updates from Local Board Services

11.     Updates have been made where there have been staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

12.     These changes are reflected in Attachment A – Waitematā Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023.

Auckland Transport

13.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment B.

Updates to the Auckland Transport work programme

a.   MOTAT Shared Paths is complete

b.   Parking Strategy is on hold at the request of the Planning Committee until after the election.

c.   Interim Speed Management Plan – feedback to come to local boards after the election.

d.   Phase 2 of Safe Speeds Programme was completed on 28 July 2022.

e.   Engagement re Connected Communities Great North Rd has been undertaken and was mostly positive. Some concerns were raised by Bike Grey Lynn and Bike Auckland around the new layout of Bond Street which removes the direct connection through to Grosvenor Street. The Grey Lynn Business Association have agreed to the offer of a further meeting to go through their concerns in more detail, with a member of the design team present. 

f.    Connected Communities New North Rd – engagement on the shortlist of three approaches with local board feedback and Community completed in April and is being assessed. AT is currently working on a recommended option to present to Community Collaboration Panels, local boards and community by end of 2022.

g.   Safety - Grey Lynn and Westmere Improvements – public consultation is complete.

h.   Safety – David Cres crossing – postponed due the supply chain issue of pavers.

i.    Safety – Collingwood St – four different phases of traffic calming solution has been trialled

j.    Safety – Brighton Rd – investigation complete, no action required

k.   Multiple Modes - Northwestern dual path – last section of cycle lane at Takau St end held up due to collapsed pavement.

l.    Multiple Modes – Davis Cres – Postponed.

Projects on hold due to budget constraints

m.  Rose Rd Plaza is deferred due to budget constraints.

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

14.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment C.

Updates to the Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme

a.   103 film permits were granted – 37 in April, 29 in May and 37 in June

b.   Two youth forums have been hosted – 28 April and 26 May

c.   Implementation of paid parking at Western Springs Precinct is delayed due to infrastructure delays.

Additional activities

a.   These activities have been added since the last update, and are provided alongside the suggested engagement approach:

a.   Supporting local boards’ economic work programmes – Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI), specifically:

i. ID1273 Young Enterprise Scheme

ii. ID1373 Small Business Mentors Programme

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

15.     Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment D.

Updates to the Eke Panuku work programme

a.   Expressions of interest received for a design consortium for Te Ara Tukutuku, negotiations are currently underway with the preferred applicant.

b.   The Eke Panuku and Kāinga Ora team are working on indicative business cases for the development sites and the public realm/infrastructure requirements for the Maungawhau area. These indicative business cases will be worked on over the next six months.

Additions to the Eke Panuku work programme

c.   City Centre Establishment Plan is complete, the priorities are:

1. Represent areas of focus for working better together

2. Build on the work that is already underway and planned

3. Integration of existing work and areas of opportunity

4. Recognise that in 12 months we will know more and priorities could change

Next steps are for the plan to be endorsed by the City Centre Executive Steering Committee.

Watercare

16.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment E.

Updates to the Watercare work programme

a.   The original location of Westhaven Pump Station in Westhaven reserve cannot be used. Watercare is in the process of reviewing locations for the facility. 

b.   Current works on targeted asset renewals in Newmarket are focused near Ayr Street near Newmarket Park. A lot of these works involve access onto private residential properties. No works will happen through Broadway.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on the climate, however the projects it refers to will.

18.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Receiving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 addresses key elements of recommendations made by the CCO Review, including ensuring the communication of clear, up to date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

20.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

22.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

25.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter One in late 2022.

28.     A workshop will be held in early 2023 to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2023/2024.     

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2022-23 Waitematā Local Board - Joint CCO Engagement Plan

259

b

Auckland Transport Quarter Four 2021-22 Report - Waitematā Local Board

265

c

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited Quarter Four 2021-22 Report - Waitematā Local Board

275

d

Eke Panuku Quarter Four 2021-22 Report - Waitematā Local Board

291

e

Watercare work programme Quarter Four 2021-22 Report - Waitematā Local Board

297

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrea Webley – Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/12435

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2021/2022 Annual Report for the Waitematā Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2021/2022 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 29 September 2022. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2021/2022 Waitematā Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

4.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area – projects and improvements

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Our performance explained

Highlights of the local board’s work programme which contributed to a performance outcome

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

6.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

8.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the local board chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.       The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.     The annual report provides a retrospective view on both the financial and service performance in each local board area for the financial year 2021/2022.

11.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2021/2022 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2022

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 29 September 2022

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 30 September 2022

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Waitematā Local Board Annual Report (2021/2022)

303

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Purdie – Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

File No.: CP2022/13492

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek high-level input from local boards on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020. This includes:

·    long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

2.       This report also provides an overview of the feedback received through the first stage of the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement that ran from 13 June to 17 July 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 provides national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991. The fundamental concept of the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

4.       Auckland Council is required to change the Auckland Unitary Plan to give full effect to Te Mana o te Wai, which must be reflected in all decisions made under the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020.  Changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan must be notified by December 2024. Action plans must also be prepared and published as soon as practicable to achieve environmental outcomes and freshwater management objectives.

5.       The National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 sets the National Objectives Framework and steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow when implementing the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland.

6.       The first stage of National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value and use freshwater bodies and the environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

7.       Feedback from the first stage engagement will be used, along with existing information and further research and analysis, to develop freshwater management options that will be brought back for a second stage of engagement in the second half of 2023.

8.       There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the engagement period.

9.       Local boards are now invited to provide input to the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Local boards can view the feedback form provided during consultation to assist in preparation of feedback at Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the feedback received from communities through the first stage of public engagement with the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020, in Attachment D, Attachment E and Attachment F

b)      provide feedback on the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 values including the:

i)       long-term visions for freshwater management

ii)       proposed Freshwater Management Units

iii)      values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM) is a mandatory national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA).  The Policy Statement applies to all freshwater (including groundwater) and, to the extent they are affected by freshwater, to receiving environments (which may include estuaries and the wider coastal marine area).

11.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing

12.     Regional councils and unitary authorities are required to change regional policy statements and regional plans to give effect to the requirements of the NPS-FM, including Te Mana o te Wai.

13.     Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland. A plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) is required for the NPS-FM implementation. The AUP plan change must be notified by December 2024.  The NPS-FM also requires the preparation of action plans to manage the effects of the use and development of land, freshwater and on receiving environments. Action plans must be prepared and published as soon as practicable.

14.     Every council must develop long-term visions for freshwater in its region and include those long-term visions as objectives in its regional policy statement. Long-term visions:

a)   may be set by Freshwater management Units (FMU), be part of a FMU, or at a catchment level; and

b)   must set goals that are ambitious but reasonable (that is, difficult to achieve but not impossible); and

c)   identify a timeframe to achieve those goals that is ambitious and reasonable (for example, 30 years after the commencement date).

15.     The National Objectives Framework (NOF) is a core part of the NPS-FM, and includes a series of steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow on implementation, including to:

·    identify FMU in the region

·    identify values for each FMU

·    set environmental outcomes for each value and include them as objectives in regional plans

·    identify attributes for each value and set a baseline for those attributes

·    set target attribute states, environmental flows and levels, and other criteria to support the achievement of environmental outcomes

·    set limits as rules and prepare action plans (as appropriate) to achieve environmental outcomes.

16.     FMUs are essentially the spatial arrangements adopted by council for the management of freshwater.  All fresh waterbodies and their related catchments must be within an FMU.  While the NPS-FM is primarily concerned with the management of freshwater, it does also require an integrated management approach – ki uta ki tai – including consideration of the relationship of freshwater and its management to the coastal receiving environment. 

17.     A public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022 through AK Have Your Say and other engagement activities including library events and online webinars. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value freshwater in FMUs and environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for these values.

18.     The public engagement on AK Have Your Say comprised the following:

·    the NPS-FM 2020

·    an overview of the NPS-FM implementation programme

·    NPS-FM implementation timeline

·    the proposed Auckland FMU map

·    the map of the Pukekohe specified vegetable growing area (when implementing the NPS-FM, the council must have regard to the importance of this area for domestic vegetables and food security, and may temporarily have a less stringent approach to water quality issues to ensure this is appropriately recognised)

·    an online feedback form with consultation questions and opportunity to provide comments on the proposed FMUs (also translated into numerous languages)

·    a social pinpoint map allowing people to provide feedback to a water body or within an area

·    Ministry for the Environment factsheets, infographics, and videos on freshwater management

·    access to freshwater planning enquiry service for questions and further information.

19.     Two online webinars and six library drop-in events were undertaken through the engagement period. These engagement activities introduced Auckland Council’s NPS-FM implementation programme and provided opportunities to the public to ask questions and to provide feedback directly.

20.     There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the consultation period, including:

·    128 online feedback forms

·    343 site-specific comments (from 84 submitters) via the Social Pinpoint mapping tool

·    12 hard copy feedback forms

·    23 emails

·    120 comments via library displays where feedback could be provided on post-it notes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     The NPS-FM has a focus on the identification and management of freshwater values.  It includes four compulsory values (ecosystem health, human contact, threatened species, and mahinga kai) that must be applied and managed in each FMU. There are also other values that must be considered in managing freshwater if they are relevant to Auckland. The list of compulsory values and other values are provided in Attachment C to this report (and are identified as Appendices 1A and 1B of the NPS-FM).  Additionally, the council must identify any other relevant values (i.e. additional to those specifically identified in the NPS-FM) including any additional Māori Freshwater Values as identified by mana whenua.

22.     Overall, submitters raised over 200 individual sites of value to them, while many talked more generally about particular types of, or all, freshwater bodies. The sites named were most commonly located in the Franklin, Rodney, Waitākere Ranges, and Waitematā local board areas.

23.     The values most commonly raised in relation to how submitters use, and would like to use, those freshwater bodies related to:

·    ecosystem health – including water quality and habitat (both generally and for threatened species) in particular

·    natural form and character

·    drinking water supply

·    human contact (that is, for recreational purposes such as swimming, boating, or fishing).

24.     Given the importance of the coastal environment in Auckland, and the impacts from key freshwater issues, such as sediment and E. coli, three FMUs have been proposed for freshwater management based on the three coastal receiving environments for catchments: the Kaipara Harbour, the Manukau Harbour and the Hauraki Gulf (map provided in Attachment B).  This proposed approach provides the opportunity to both address the management of freshwater for its own sake, while also explicitly considering its relationship to the coastal environment.

25.     While submitters were not asked directly whether they supported the Freshwater Management Units or not, comments were provided on a range of matters, including suggestions around amending the proposed boundaries, or rationale behind the boundaries, having more or less FMUs, more location specific detail, and having the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area as a separate FMU.

26.     Other submitters commented on non-FMU specific matters including wetlands, the need for more transparency and action, concern about water quality, the need to prioritise ecosystem health, farming/vegetable growing, and flooding.

27.     The NPS-FM provides for a specified vegetable growing area in Pukekohe that sits within the Manukau FMU. Some comments related to the provision for horticultural land use in Pukekohe.

·        3 supported the provision for continued horticultural use, including irrigation.

·        3 expressed concerns about the impact of horticultural activities on water quality (streams, and aquifers) particularly from fertiliser and nitrates.

28.     Demographic information from those submitters who provided it is detailed in Attachment D.

29.     Data tables naming sites, and their number of mentions by local board area is provided in Attachment E. A full Summary of Feedback report is provided in Attachment F.

30.     Staff are currently undertaking data analysis and a summary report of feedback will be published on AK Have Your Say.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM Te Mana o te Wai is about restoring and preserving the balance between the water, the wider environment, and the community. This concept is in line with the natural environment priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which sets the goal:

Oranga taiao, oranga tāngata: a healthy and connected natural environment supports healthy and connected Aucklanders. The mauri (life essence) of Tāmaki Makaurau is restored”.

32.     The NPS-FM includes the following policy direction in response to climate change:

Policy 4: Freshwater is managed as part of New Zealand’s integrated response to climate change.

33.     Every council must have regard to the foreseeable impact of climate change in following areas:

·    when setting limits on resource use, every regional council must:

3.14(2)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when setting environmental flows and levels, every regional council must:

3.16(4)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when assessing and reporting, as part of each review required by section 35(2A) of the RMA, every regional council must prepare and publish:

3.30(2)(g) predictions of changes, including the foreseeable effects of climate change, that are likely to affect water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in the region.

34.     The implementation of the NPS-FM will help to promote the resilience of freshwater ecosystems to the effects of climate change.  The development of freshwater action plans will require sustainable land and water management practices to enhance the mauri and health of waterways, which is in line with actions prioritised in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The NPS-FM is relevant to all of the council’s functions. All relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) are involved in the NPS-FM implementation, including participation in aa Steering Committee overseeing the development and implementation of the programme. This includes having an ongoing role in supporting the NPS-FM engagement, and providing input and review of responses developed to give effect to the NPS-FM.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Under the Local Government Act 2002, local boards are responsible for identifying and communicating to Auckland Council the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the content of council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws.  Local boards have a detailed understanding of their areas including freshwater values and issues and are in a position to provide important input to the development of NPS-FM responses, including in relation to the matters covered by this round of public engagement. 

37.     Prior to the public engagement a memo titled “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland” was provided to all local boards on 26 May 2022. The memo advised the key principles, consultation and timeframe requirements of implementing the NPS-FM, and the opportunities for local board input through the process (attached in Attachment G).

38.     A webinar presentation titled “National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020” was also presented to local boards in the meeting on 3 June 2022.  In response to feedback from elected members, the period for providing input had been extended for local boards to September 2022 to allow local boards time to provide feedback following the close of public engagement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The NPS-FM says the council must “actively involve tangata whenua (to the extent they wish to be involved) in freshwater management” including in identifying Māori values and decision-making processes relating to Māori freshwater values.

40.     Engagement with mana whenua in Auckland is being undertaken through an on-going process, directly with mana whenua entities throughout the preparation of a plan change and development of action plans.

41.     Engagement with the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau about the NPS-FM has also been undertaken in the broader context of Three Waters Reform and the development and implementation of the council’s Water Strategy, to enable mana whenua to provide a more holistic consideration of the management of water.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The first stage of the NPS-FM engagement was undertaken within the business-as-usual planning budget. This budget covers primarily staff time and the public engagement.

43.     The budget required for NPS-FM engagement in 2023, and for implementation of the project through to 2026 is presently under discussion.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The government has set a deadline of December 2024 for the council to publicly notify the AUP plan change in response to the provisions of the NPS-UD. Given the scale and complexity of the work, and limited resources, there is a risk that the council may not receive sufficient quality feedback from a wide range of interests. There is also a risk that Aucklanders and key stakeholders are unclear about the mandatory requirements of the NPS-FM and how the NPS-FM engagement links to previous water related engagements, for example the Auckland Water Strategy engagement and the Three Waters Reform engagement.

45.     These risks have been mitigated to date by communicating communications with communities and stakeholders during the engagement period, through meetings, emails, and online Question & Answer sessions. There will be further and ongoing communication to obtain quality engagement results to progress the NPS-FM implementation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     The feedback received from the first stage engagement on the values and the environmental outcomes sought, together with the NPS-FM requirements, will inform the development of objectives and proposed management options to achieve the objectives.

47.     A second phase of public engagement will be undertaken to seek feedback on the proposed objectives and management approaches for FMUs and water bodies. This will be undertaken in the second half of 2023 to provide opportunity for communities and stakeholders, and local boards for further involvement.  

48.     The feedback received from the second phase of engagement will further inform the development of a proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan and the development of action plans.

49.     Elected representatives will have opportunities to review the proposed plan change and action plans as they evolve, and before the plan change is approved for public notification in the second half of 2024 to meet the NPS-FM deadline of notification before December 2024.

50.     Submissions to the plan change will be heard by an independent Freshwater Hearing Panel who will make recommendations back to council by 2026.

 

Authors

Monica Xu - Senior Policy Planner, Regional Planning, Plans and Places

Jenny Fuller - Team Leader Planning

Approvers

Warren Maclennan, Manager Planning – Regional, North, West & Islands, Plans and Places

John Duguid, General Manager, Plans and Places

Lesley Jenkins – Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback Form

323

b

Map of Proposed Freshwater Management Units

331

c

NPS-FM freshwater values

333

d

Who we heard from

335

e

Local Board breakdowns

339

f

Summary of Feedback Report

349

g

Memo to local boards on 26 May 2022: Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland

379

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monica Xu - Senior Policy Planner, Regional Planning, Plans and Places

Jenny Fuller - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - Manager - Planning, Regional, North, West & Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Lesley Jenkins – Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Community Bike Hubs - Te Poka Pū Paihikara i tēnei Hapori

File No.: CP2022/13841

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views from the Waitematā Local Board on the Community Bike Hubs - Te Poka Pū Paihikara i tēnei Hapori project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community Bike Hubs is a project to accelerate Auckland Transport’s commitment to providing better access to bikes through the establishment of Community Bike Hubs.

3.       The project is funded through Auckland Council’s Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau - The Vibrant Streets (formerly Regional Streets for People) programme.

4.       In the new Community Bike Hub model, Auckland Transport owns the Bike Hubs and takes responsibility for set-up costs while the community runs and operates the Bike Hubs.

5.       This report is seeking views from the local board on:

·    what is the local board’s interest and preferred level of engagement in Community Bike Hubs?

·    does the local board support the Community Bike Hub approach?

·    are there any specific Bike Hub sites in addition to the ones proposed in Attachment A that the local board wants investigated?

·    does the local board have any community groups or individuals in particular they would like Auckland Transport to be engaging as part of this project?

6.       Auckland Transport will review the formal feedback from local boards. Auckland Transport will then evaluate and confirm Community Bike Hub Operators and progress landowner approvals.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide its formal views on the Community Bike Hubs project

b)      provide its preferred level of engagement in the Community Bike Hubs project

c)       provide any additional sites for consideration for Community Bike Hubs

d)      provide any community groups or individuals for Auckland Transport to engage with on Community Bike Hubs.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Community Bike Hubs - Te Poka Pū Paihikara i tēnei Hapori project is developing a new model of Bike Hubs that are owned by Auckland Transport and operated by the community.

8.       The project seeks to promote the successes of community Bike Hubs by funding the establishment and ongoing operation of Bike Hubs while empowering local communities to run and operate the Bike Hub.

9.       Bike Hubs, Bike Kitchens, Bike Spaces and Bike Boxes have been successful community initiatives in Auckland that improve access to bikes by fixing up and redistributing bikes as well as providing events, activations, information and education. These community initiatives are variously supported by Auckland Transport, other Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO), local boards, other agencies and commercial partners and have been shown to be highly successful at the different scales they target.

10.     Bike Hubs were identified as the operating model best suited to growth, with strong organisational accountability, consistent hours, wide offerings and deep roots into the community.

11.     The Community Bike Hubs project has identified the following locations as being a good fit for the new model:

·    Papakura

·    Grey Lynn

·    Pakuranga

·    Manukau

·    Northcote

·    Epsom

·    Onehunga

·    Devonport

12.     The project also will scale up existing bike spaces in Mt Roskill and Waiheke into full Bike Hubs.

13.     Despite their success and their intention to grow, key barriers to growth have been identified for Bike Hubs such as set-up costs and uncertainty of ongoing funding. Auckland Transport’s Sustainable Mobility team has been leading a programme of work to address these barriers and enable growth of the Bike Hub network.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The new Community Bike Hub model is an Auckland Transport-owned, community-run model in which Auckland Transport takes ownership of landowner permissions, consenting, set-up costs and all ongoing site requirements. Auckland Transport then partners with and initially funds community organisations to operate these Bike Hubs, employing locals and developing extensive volunteer networks.

15.     Bike Hubs have historically been housed in two or three shipping containers and this is the model most appropriate to most locations. However, in some locations, CCO or other agency property, such as a town centre storefront or council facility, exists that could be used for a Bike Hub.

16.     Auckland Transport will fully fund these Community Bike Hubs in their first year and will aim in subsequent years to reduce funding to a sustainable level while adding other funding sources such as koha, donated bike sales, other grants or funders and commercial partnerships. Further, Auckland Transport will fully support these Bike Hubs and other existing spaces with dedicated resources, guidance and advice, connections to other Bike Hubs and the wider network, training and upskilling and more.

17.     This initiative supports Auckland Council’s strategic goals related to development of alternative modes of transport, especially cycling and its climate change goals.  Most local board plans across the region prioritise responses to climate change, including the promotion of alternatives to travelling by car.

18.     Auckland Transport recommends that local boards support this initiative. Auckland Transport is seeking feedback and more information on:

·    Interest – Does the local board support the Community Bike Hub project?

·    Engagement level - Does the board wish to engage in this project. If so, would it like to:

Collaborate: fund or provide resources and participate as a partner with Auckland Transport (now or in the future)

Consult: engage actively, express its views and work with Auckland Transport

Be Informed: Auckland Transport will keep the local board informed about the project’s progress.

·    Site selection – Are there Bike Hub sites beyond those proposed in Attachment A that the local board thinks would be worth investigating? Community members have helped identify possible locations in each local board area. This report is seeking local boards to provide specific sites they think would be especially appropriate or inappropriate for this project.

·    Community groups – Are there any community groups or individuals in particular the local board recommends Auckland Transport engage as part of this project?

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Auckland’s Climate Action Plan and the council’s priorities.

20.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

21.     The primary climate change benefit of this plan is that Bike Hubs encourage more people to cycle, reducing the number of car journeys and therefore carbon emissions.

22.     The Community Bike Hubs project contributes to Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan as the hubs enable reduced emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     This project is engaging with Community Facilities, Parks Sports and Recreation, Eke Panuku and local boards in order to identify options for possible locations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Workshops were held with local boards throughout August 2022. Informal steering from boards suggests strong support for this project and additional considerations for site selection.

25.     This report is seeking formal feedback from impacted local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

27.     Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

28.     The Community Bike Hubs project has te ao Māori woven throughout. The designs and marketing draw from Māori artists and designs, and the Bike Hub Operating Model explicitly calls out engaging with cultural groups and individuals.

29.     There is opportunity for mana whenua to operate and be involved with these Bike Hubs.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     Auckland Transport is fully funding the Bike Hubs for the first year of operation and looking to slowly step-down Auckland Transport funding to around 40 per cent of operating expenses in the long term. Auckland Transport expects the shortfall to be made up from sale of bikes, koha, other grants or funders and commercial partnerships.

31.     This decision has no financial implications for Waitematā Local Board at this time as Auckland Transport is funding the bike hub for the first year. If the local board wishes to contribute financially in future the implications will be reported then.

32.     Should the local board wish to contribute funding in the future, the project team would welcome a discussion on the matter. The outcome of that discussion would need to be recorded in a decision report, and that report would include detailed information about financial implications. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The proposed decision to proceed with the Community Bike Hub project does not put the Waitematā Local Board at financial or legal risk.  The decision authorises feedback to an Auckland Transport process and that organisation carries the decision-making risk.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Auckland Transport will review the formal feedback from local boards. Auckland Transport will then evaluate and confirm community bike hub operators.

35.     An estimate timeline of actions is provided in Table One below. 

Table One – Estimated Timeline

Date

Action

September 2022

Auckland Transport will continue to work on site development and procurement of the physical assets such as containers, tools and fit-out, etc.

Local boards provide their formal views on potential sites by report.

October 2022

Auckland Transport evaluates and confirms Bike Hub Operators for Stage 1 Bike Hubs. 

There is targeted community engagement and hub operator training in the locations selected for Stage 1 Bike Hubs.

November 2022

Stage 1 Community Bike Hubs open. Stage 1 include Bike Hubs already identified as quick turnaround because of strong existing community support and reduced landowner permissions and consenting requirements.

November - March 2023

There is targeted community engagement and Bike Hub operator training in the locations selected for Stage 2 Community Bike Hub delivery.

April 2023

Stage 2 Community Bike Hubs open. These include Bike Hubs with less active support or with consent or permission required.

March - July 2023

There is targeted community engagement and Bike Hub operator training in the locations selected for Stage 3 Community Bike Hub delivery.

August 2023

Stage 3 Community Bike Hubs open. These include Bike Hubs where a greater level of engagement or site permissions or consents are needed.

July 2024

Project funding ends and Community Bike Hubs are supported through standard Sustainable Mobility funding and other funding sources.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locations and Proposed Sites

393

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Mansfield - Auckland Transport Community Bike Hubs Manager

Authorisers

Caroline Tauevihi – Auckland Transport Head of Community Engagement, Central (Acting)

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Revoke previous local board resolution and grant new community leases at Francis Reserve, 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn.

File No.: CP2022/13802

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To revoke the Waitematā Local Board’s previous resolution and grant new community leases to the following lessees for the various office spaces at Francis Reserve 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn to:

·        Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated

·        Asylum Seekers Support Trust

·        The Inner-City Women's Group Incorporated

·        Nurture People Trust

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 16 August 2022, the Waitematā Local Board considered a business report (Attachment C) and approved community leases to Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated; Asylum Seekers Support Trust; The Inner-City Women's Group Incorporated; Nurture People Trust and Doctors for Sexual Abuse Care Incorporated for the various office spaces at Francis Reserve 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn Resolution WTM/2022/146 (Attachment D).

3.       The Doctors for Sexual Abuse Care Incorporated have now advised that they no longer require a new community lease at 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn (Attachment E- letter) for the following reasons:

·    now have more certain funding streams, and have also changed their working model, with staff based across the country in Christchurch, Nelson and Auckland, and have moved to remote working so they no longer require the space;

·    concern over the associated operational costs of maintaining a physical office space.

4.       The Doctors for Sexual Abuse Care Incorporated have given notice to vacate their current leased office labelled E on the site plan (Attachment A) at the end of September. This results in the availability of this 25m2 office.

5.       Staff undertook an expressions of interest (EOI) process recently for the five vacant office spaces.  Staff do not recommend undertaking another EOI for this newly available space so soon after the completion of the previous EOI. The risk of not undertaking another EOI is minimal given that council has just undertaken an EOI.

6.       During the EOI process, both the Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated and Nurture People Trust applied to be considered for this 25m2 space. Further discussions have been held with both applicants about the availability of the newly available space.

7.       Both groups were assessed through council’s assessment criteria, and both demonstrated their ability to deliver services.  Overall, the Nurture People’s Trust scored a little higher.

8.       This report recommends, pursuant to standing order 1.10.4, that the Waitematā Local Board revoke resolution WTM/2022/146 adopted at its meeting held on 16 August 2022.

9.       Staff recommend granting new community leases to Nurture People Trust for an area comprising approximately 25m2 and Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated for two areas comprising approximately 15m2 each with terms of five (5) years from the 1 November 2022 with one five (5) year right of renewal each to both groups. In addition to granting new community leases to Asylum Seekers and The Inner City Women’s Group Incorporated on the same terms and conditions as the Board resolved on 16 August 2022.

10.     If the local board decides to grant the leases, staff will publicly notify this decision under the Local Government Act 2002. Should there be submissions a hearings process will be set up with the board to resolve these. Upon the completion of these, staff will then work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreements. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      revoke, pursuant to standing order 1.10.4, the Waitematā Local Board resolution WTM/2022/146 adopted at its meeting held on 16 August 2022

b)      grant, a new community lease to the Nurture People Trust for an area comprising approximately 25m2 located at Francis Reserve, 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn on the land legally described as Part Lot 5 DP 13596 (as per Attachment A – Site Plan), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)          term – 5 years, commencing 1 November 2022, with one 5 year right of renewal

ii)         rent – $500.00 plus GST per annum

iii)        operational charge - $625 plus GST per annum.

c)       grant, a new community lease to the Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated for two areas comprising approximately 15m2 each located at Francis Reserve, 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn on the land legally described as Part Lot 5 DP 13596 (as per Attachment A – Site Plan), subject to the following terms and conditions:

iv)        term – 5 years, commencing 1 November 2022, with one 5 year right of renewal

v)         rent – $500.00 plus GST per annum

vi)        operational charge - $750 plus GST per annum for both areas.

d)         grant, new community leases to Asylum Seekers Support Trust and The Inner City Women’s Group Incorporated for their respective areas comprising approximately 15m2 located at Francis Reserve, 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn on the land legally described as Part Lot 5 DP 13596 (as per Attachment A – Site Plan), subject to the following terms and conditions:

vii)       term – five (5) years, commencing date 15 August 2022, with one five (5) year right of renewal

viii)       rent – $500.00 plus GST per annum per group

ix)        operational charge - $375 plus GST per annum for approximately 15m2 for Asylum Seekers Support Trust

x)         operational charge - $375 plus GST per annum for approximately 15m2 for Inner City Women’s Group Incorporated

e)   note that Community Outcomes Plans be prepared; approved by the Waitemata Local Board and appended to the lease as a schedule of the community lease agreements.

f)    note that the community leases are approved in accordance with all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and Local Government Act 2002.

g)   note that approval of the new community leases at Francis Reserve, 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn is subject to public notification under the Local Government Act 2002.

h)   appoint a hearings panel to consider any objections received through the public notification process in relation to granting the community leases at Francis Reserve, 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport, and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

12.     The Waitematā Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their local board meeting on 15 June 2021 (resolution WTM/2021/128).

13.     The progression of community leases for the office spaces at Francis Reserve, 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn were part of the approved work programme.

Land, buildings, and lease

 

14.     The land is located at Francis Reserve, 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn (refer to Attachment A Site Plan). The land is legally described as Part Lot 5 DP 13596 and held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002).

15.     A subsidised operational cost for council owned buildings is charged to the lessee.

16.     Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated, Asylum Seekers Support Trust, Doctors for Sexual Abuse Care Incorporated and The Inner City Women’s Group Incorporated currently holding over on expired community leases for the council owned land and rooms within the building situated at Francis Reserve 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn. All groups’ current leases expired on 31 July 2021 and are holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

17.     There are a total of five office spaces across two buildings. The rooms range in sizes from approximately 15 and one 25m2

18.     The buildings are primarily used by these groups to provide education, mentoring and programmes to the community and agencies in the field on sexual assault/abuse; support for asylum seekers; family violence and parenting. These activities align with the local board plan outcomes.

19.     All groups reapplied for their tenancy through the EOI process.

20.     The Doctors for Sexual Abuse Care Incorporated have now given notice to vacate their current leased office labelled E on the site plan (Attachment A) at the end of September. This results in the availability of this 25m2 space.

21.    

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.     When a council owned community lease space becomes available, a review of alternatives for the use of the premises should be carried out as good practice. For this, an EOI process can be undertaken to gauge interest and best use.

23.     This report recommends against undertaking another EOI for this newly available space because Council had undertaken an EOI recently.

24.     The risk of not undertaking another EOI is minimal given that Council has just undertaken an EOI. All groups that applied in the recent EOI were granted rooms; and an EOI is a lengthy process.

Public notification

25.     Prior to any lease being granted, the proposed community leases are required to be publicly notified under Section 138 of the Local Government Act 2002. Should there be submissions a hearings process will be set up with the board to resolve these. 

26.     The cost of the public notification will be met by the Parks and Community Facilities department of the council.   

Assessment of the applications

27.     Both Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated and Nurture People Trust submitted a comprehensive application for the new lease of the 25m2 as part of their submission to the original EOI, demonstrating their ability to deliver services. This report therefore focuses on the assessment of Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated and Nurture People Trust for consideration of office labelled E on the site plan (Attachment A)- the 25m2 space. Further discussions have also been held with both applicants about the availability of the newly available space.

Applicants

Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated (existing tenant)

28.     The group was established in 1975 and its objective is to provide services on family violence matters whilst working with a variety of government agencies in this field.

29.     The group has 190 members of different age groups, nine staff and six volunteers. The group’s opening days/hours are morning to evening Monday to Friday including evening meetings. The group’s advocate/referral agencies use the space in the weekend.

30.     The group has been providing administrative services from the building since at least 2006. The group’s current community lease with the council expired on 31 July 2021. The lease to the group is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

Nurture People Trust (new Tenant)

31.     The group was established in 2018 and its objective is to provide supportive and educational parenting classes for families from all socio-economic levels. The group has temporarily used a community lease premises in the past but if successful will be a first-time lessee of a Council community lease premise.

32.     The group serves 300+ families and facilitate parenting classes, nature playgroups and one to one connection face to face or online. Their parent classes are divided into three separate classes - Infants, Infants on the Move and Toddler. Nurture People also works with Early Learning Centre Trusts and teachers who struggle to afford professional support and mentoring.

33.     One of the founders is also now a birth trauma support practitioner with Healing Birth and is able to offer this service with other community groups and/or support local community by making its facility available for hire.

34.     The group had been operating from a private space in Te Atatu which is now no longer available. A lease at Warnock Street would provide their families opportunities to link with the hub of other supportive services for women in the complex.

35.     Both Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated and Nurture People Trust were assessed against a set of criteria.

36.     Both have scored equally in terms of having full open membership; whether the premises meeting the organisations’ needs; requiring a few modifications and alignment with Waitemata Local Board Plan outcomes.

37.     The Women’s Refuge scored a little higher in terms of not looking to apply for financial funding from the Council and extent of usage.

38.     The Nurture People’s Trust scored higher for group sustainability which was defined as no affiliation with a regional or national body; willingness to share; and number of references.

39.     Overall, the Nurture People’s Trust scored higher.

40.     The areas proposed to be leased to Asylum Seekers Support Trust; and The Inner City Women’s Group Incorporated remain unchanged from the original report (Attachment C) and resolution (Attachment D). Proposed changes to the areas recommended to Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated and the Nurture People’s Trust are outlined in Attachment A – Site Plan.

41.     The groups will be required to have in place all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance.  

42.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and internally the building appears well managed.

43.     The groups provide valuable services to the local community and nation-wide.

44.     Staff recommends the below charges for each group:

·    rent of $500 plus GST

·    operating expenses of $625 plus GST per annum for the approximately 25m2 room 

·    operating expenses of $375 plus GST per annum for the approximately 15m2 room

45.     The operating costs contribute to Council’s maintenance of the buildings, insurance, and utilities.

46.     A Community Outcomes Plan will be negotiated with each group to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreements. 

47.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.  

48.     Staff recommends that a new community lease be granted to the Nurture People Trust for an area comprising approximately 25m2 for a term of 5 years commencing 1 November 2022 with one 5 year right of renewal years right of renewal. The term is recommended given the board resolved to grant a community lease of 5 years with one 5 year right of renewal years year right of renewal in the original resolution.

49.     Staff also recommend that new community leases be granted to the Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated for two areas comprising approximately 15m2 each for a term of 5 years commencing 1 November 2022 with one 5 year right of renewal years right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     It is anticipated that activation of the building will result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission for example when workers and clients use various motorised vehicles to attend the classes at the space.

51.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates, via each lessee’s Community Outcomes Plans, that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

52.     Asset improvements and maintenance undertaken by the council will strive for maximum re-use and recycling of existing material. This will be in alignment with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle) to ensure minimum impact on greenhouse gas emission. Asset improvements undertaken by the tenants should adhere to these same principles as proposed asset improvements will be reviewed by Council officers prior to approval to go ahead.

53.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

54.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

55.    

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

56.     Leasing staff had consulted with Parks and Community Facilities operational management and maintenance; and Connected Communities in the original report (Attachment C). Changes proposed in this report should not affect the subject of their original review. Parks and Community Facilities operational management and maintenance; and connected communities were supportive of and/or did not raise concerns, that have not otherwise been catered for, with the proposed lease.

57.     Additionally, the proposed new leases should have no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

58.     The proposed leases will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote the aforementioned services and programmes for the Waitematā Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

59.     The assessment of the applications were workshopped with the Waitematā Local Board on 8 March 2022. The local board indicated its in principle support of the lease proposals. The Waitematā Local Board were comfortable to consider granting new leases to Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated and the Asylum Seekers Support Trust for their existing office spaces, whilst undertaking EOI for the other three office spaces.

60.     On 16 August 2022 the Waitemata Local Board resolved to grant new community leases to Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated; Asylum Seekers Support Trust; The Inner-City Women's Group Incorporated; Nurture People Trust and Doctors for Sexual Abuse Care Incorporated for the various office spaces at Francis Reserve 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn Resolution WTM/2022/146 (Attachment D).

61.     At the 6 September 2022 Waitemata Local Board workshop, the board raised a few questions for leasing staff to investigate.

62.     One of the questions was whether Nurture People’s Trust’s services will undermine the services currently provided by the Grey Lynn community centre children programmes.  Leasing staff is working with Council’s Place and Partner specialist, who holds the relationship with the Grey Lynn community centre, on any potential competition between the two organisations and will connect the two organisations with each other for them to complement and support each other’s services. Nurture People Trust runs 9-week parenting sessions focusing on the mental well-being of the mother in order to transform the bond parents have with their children. Their services are topic focused sessions dealing with emotions, conflict and much more compared to tradition playgroups.

63.     The other question the board raised was on qualifications of the applicants. Linkedin New Zealand shows that Tineke Sutton(Co-director of Nurture People Trust) holds qualifications obtained in New Zealand including Diploma in Teaching – Secondary; Primary Retraining Project; Post Graduate Diploma in Early Childhood. The other cofounder was also found on Linkedin New Zealand.

64.     The delivered services and programmes align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

“Outcome 2: Connected communities that are inclusive, accessible, and equitable.”

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

65.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant new community leases for rooms within Council-owned building at the aforementioned site was undertaken with the iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Waitematā Local Board area. The engagement involved:

·     a presentation at the Central South Mana Whenua Forum held at 29 September 2021 held online via Microsoft Teams.

·     an email to all iwi identified as having an interest in the area as captured in Attachment B, containing detailed information on the land, the lessee, the lease proposal as per Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

66.     No objections or requests for hui or kaitiaki site visit were received from iwi and mana whenua groups to date.

67.     No further iwi engagement were untaken and no further objections or requests were received.

68.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.  

69.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

70.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests, and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

71.     There are no changes proposed to the financial implications assessed in the original report. The financial implications assessed in the original report were:

·         rents are kept at the same level as they were set by legacy Auckland City Council.

·        all costs relating to the advertisement of the council’s intention to publicly notify the granting of the proposed lease will be borne by the Community Facilities Department of Auckland Council.

·        ongoing operational costs of the asset will be covered by the council which is accounted for in current and future budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     Should the local board resolve not to grant proposed community leases to Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated, Asylum Seekers Support Trust, The Inner City Women’s Group Incorporated and Nurture Peoples Trust at 4 Warnock Street, Grey Lynn the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     If the local board resolves to the grant of the proposed new community leases, staff will publicly notify this decision under the Local Government Act 2002. Upon the completion of public notification, which is open for a month, should there be submissions a hearings process will be set up with the board to resolve these. Then staff will work with the Auckland Women’s Refuge Incorporated, Asylum Seekers Support Trust, The Inner City Women’s Group Incorporated and Nurture People Trust to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

403

b

Email to Mana Whenua and Iwi

405

c

Waitemata Local Board 16 August 2022 business report

409

d

Waitemata Local Board Resolution WTM/2022/146

417

e

Letter

419

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tsz Ning Chung - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Urgent decision to approve Waitematā Local Board feedback to be included in Auckland Council's feedback on the Reshaping Streets regulatory package

File No.: CP2022/13847

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the local board feedback made under Urgent Decision on Auckland Council’s feedback on the Reshaping Streets regulatory package.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council was preparing for a submission on the Reshaping Streets regulatory package which was released by the Ministry of Transport on 9 August 2022 for public consultation. The deadline for submissions is 19 September 2022.

3.       The Ministry of Transport is proposing a package of technical rule changes, known as Reshaping Streets, which are intended to make it easier for local authorities to make street changes that support public transport, active travel, and placemaking.

4.       These regulatory changes will make it easier for Auckland Council to implement existing strategies, however there is no legal requirement for local authorities to make street changes or lessen the level of consultation undertaken.

5.       Auckland Council staff, alongside Auckland Transport and Eke Panuku, are preparing a joint technical submission on the basis that the proposals are well aligned with key council positions/strategies such as the Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway, the Auckland Plan, Vision Zero, and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.

6.       Local boards wishing to provide feedback must be provided by 7 September 2022, which will be appended to the final submission.

7.       Further information on the Reshaping Streets consultation can be found at https://www.nzta.govt.nz/about-us/consultations/reshaping-streets-consultation/.

8.       The deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission was 7 September 2022. The next local board meeting was not scheduled until 20 September 2022. Accordingly, the urgent decision process was utilised.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision to approve local board feedback on Auckland Council’s feedback on the Reshaping Streets regulatory package.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision - Feedback on the Reshaping Streets regulatory package

423

b

Waitematā Local Board Feedback on the Reshaping Streets regulatory package

427

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gabriel Ford - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations

File No.: CP2022/12763

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide for appropriate arrangements for decision-making between the final local board meeting of the current electoral term and the inaugural meeting of the new local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The last meeting of the Waitematā Local Board in this current term is on the 20 September 2022. Between that meeting and the first meeting of the local board in the new term, decisions may be needed from the local board. As for each of the previous terms, temporary arrangements for making these decisions need to be confirmed.

3.       The term of office of the current local board members ends the day following the official declaration of election results. Following the declaration, which is expected to be Friday 14 October 2022, the term of office for members elected to the local board will commence.

4.       For the period from the commencement of their term of office until their inaugural meeting where members are sworn in (interregnum), decisions may be made by the Auckland Council Chief Executive under existing delegations.

5.       The existing local boards delegation to the Chief Executive requires, amongst other things, that staff consult with the allocated local board portfolio holder/lead on certain decisions. As a temporary measure, this report seeks to allow staff to make decisions without complying with the requirement for consultation during the interregnum. 

6.       Staff also seek confirmation of arrangements for making decisions at the local board level in the period between the final local board meeting and the official end of term. The urgent decision delegations and process that is already in place adequately caters for this scenario.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      confirm that the local board’s existing urgent decisions delegations process will be utilised where decisions are required from the local board between the final local board business meeting (20 September 2022) and the end of term (15 October 2022).

b)      note that from the commencement of the term of office of new members until the inaugural meeting of the incoming local board (interregnum), all decision-making will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under current delegations.

c)       note that the Chief Executive will not be required to comply with consultation requirements in the local boards’ delegation protocols when making decisions during the interregnum.

d)      request that the Chief Executive exercise restraint when making decisions during the interregnum and to consider referring significant decisions to the first meeting of the incoming local board.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Current elected members remain in office until the new members’ term of office commences, which is the day after the declaration of election results (Sections 115 and 116, Local Electoral Act 2001). The declaration will be publicly notified on 14 October 2022, with the term of office of current members ending and the term of office of new members commencing on 15 October 2022.

8.       The new members cannot act as members of the local board until they have made their statutory declaration at the inaugural local board meeting (Clause 14, Schedule 7, Local Government Act 2002).

9.       Following the last local board meeting of the current electoral term, decisions may be needed on urgent matters or routine business as usual that cannot wait until the incoming local board’s first business meeting in the new electoral term.

10.     As with each of the previous electoral terms, temporary arrangements need to be made and/or confirmed for:

·    making urgent decisions before the end of term

·    making decisions that require consultation with local board/local board members during the interregnum.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urgent decisions – arrangement for remainder of the term

11.     Between the last business meeting and the declaration of results expected around 14 October 2022, current local board members are still in office and can use their existing urgent decisions delegations to make decisions that are required from the local board during this time.

12.     The urgent decisions process includes a delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson that enables them to make decisions on behalf of the local board where it is not practical to call the full board together.

13.     All requests for an urgent decision will need to be supported by adequate staff advice and information and clear recommendations.

Decision-making during the interregnum

14.     All local boards have made a general delegation to the Chief Executive. During the interregnum, any decisions that will be required from the local board, and which cannot wait until a local board meeting, will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under his existing delegations.

15.     The delegation to the Chief Executive is subject to a requirement to comply with the delegation protocols, which require consulting with the local board on some decisions that are made by staff under delegated authority. Consultation is often done through a local board lead (referred to as a portfolio holder in the delegation protocols). The most common area requiring consultation is landowner consents relating to local parks. Parks staff receive a large number of landowner consent requests each month that relate to local parks across Auckland.

16.     During the current term, while the elected members remain in office, staff will continue to consult with leads/portfolio holders as required by the delegation protocols (or chairperson where there is no portfolio holder). However, during the interregnum, staff will be unable to comply with this requirement due to the absence of appointed portfolio holders/lead/chairpersons to consult with.

17.     As a temporary measure, it is recommended that staff continue to process business as usual decisions that cannot wait until the local board’s first business meeting without consultation. Following the election of chairpersons at the inaugural meetings, staff will consult with the chairperson when and if required and can resume consultation with appointed representatives once new arrangements for leads/portfolio holders are in place.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     This report relates to procedural matters and has no quantifiable climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The arrangements proposed in this report enable the council to proceed with necessary business during the election period. During the interregnum, staff will exercise restraint and ensure that any significant decisions are deferred to the incoming local board.

20.     These arrangements apply only to local boards. The reduced political decision-making will be communicated to the wider council group.

21.     The governing body has made its own arrangements to cover the election period, including delegating the power to make urgent decisions between the last governing body meeting of the term and the day the current term ends, to any two of the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and a chairperson of a committee of the whole. From the commencement of the term of office of the new local board members until the governing body’s inaugural meeting, the Chief Executive will carry out decision-making under his current delegations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This is a report to all local boards that proposes arrangements to enable the council to process routine local matters during the election period. This will enable the council to meet timeframes and provide good customer service.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report and decision being sought relates to a procedural matter and does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a risk that unforeseen decisions will arise during this period, such as a decision that is politically significant or a decision that exceeds the Chief Executive’s financial delegations.

26.     This risk has been mitigated by scheduling meetings as late as possible in the current term and communicating to reporting staff that significant decisions should not be made during October 2022.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The decision of the local board will be communicated to senior staff so that they are aware of the arrangements for the month of October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2022/13851

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for the local board chair to provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board Chair to update the local board on activities he has been involved in since the last regular meeting.

3.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chair may, by way of report, bring any matter to the attention of a meeting of the local board or its committees that is within their role or function to consider.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Chair’s report for September 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair Northey Board Report September 2022

453

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gabriel Ford - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Board member reports

File No.: CP2022/13886

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board’s elected members to update the Waitematā Local Board on matters they have been involved in following the previous month’s meeting and other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Waitematā Local Board to provide a written or verbal update on their activities for the month or any other matter they wish to raise with the board.

3.       This is an information item, and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report from Deputy Chair Bonham and Member Gunthorp for September 2022

b)      receive verbal reports from Member Fryer, Member Leoni and Member Sage for September 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputy Chair Bonham Report September 2022

471

b

Member Gunthorp Report September 2022

483

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gabriel Ford - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Waitematā Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2022/13852

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous local board business meeting. Attached are copies of the proceeding records taken from the workshops held on:

•     23 August 2022

•     6 September 2022

•     13 September 2022

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance to Standing Order 12.1.4, a record of the proceedings of every Waitematā Local Board workshop held over the past month, including the names of the members attending and the general nature of the matters discussed during the workshop, shall be circulated to the members of the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Waitematā Local Board workshop records for the workshops held 23 August, 6 September, and 13 September 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Records August-September 2022

487

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gabriel Ford - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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