I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Papakura Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 23 November 2022

4:00pm

Local Board Chambers
35 Coles Crescent,
Papakura

and via Microsoft Teams videoconference

 

Papakura Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Brent Catchpole

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jan Robinson

 

Members

Felicity Auva'a

 

 

Hon. George Hawkins, QSO

 

 

Kelvin Hieatt

 

 

Andrew Webster

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Isobelle Robb

Democracy Advisor

 

17 November 2022

 

Contact Telephone:  027 291 9264

Email: Isobelle.robb@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Mana Incorporated                5

8.2     Deputation - Papakura Town Centre         6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     6

11        Governing Body Member's Update                    9

12        Chairperson's Update                                        11

13        Ōpaheke Sports Park Water and Wastewater Connection                                                          13

14        Ōpaheke Sports Park: User-group Expressions of Interest                                                             21

15        Landowner approval and agreement to lease to Papakura Marae for a Whanau Ora Centre and Emergency Distribution Centre at Te Koiwi Reserve, Papakura                                             49

16        Proposed Papakura to Clevedon Cycleway    59

17        Approval for one new public road name, two new private road names and the extension of an existing road name at 13 Aeronautic Road, Takanini                                                             135

18        Appointments to external organisations       145

19        Local board appointments and delegations for the 2022-2025 electoral term                           153

20        Arrangements for making urgent decisions 161

21        Adoption of a business meeting schedule    165

22        Urgent Decision - Papakura Local Board - Additional Funding for 2022 Santa Parade    169

23        Papakura Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - November 2022                    179

24        Papakura Local Board Workshop Records   185

25        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)          confirm the minutes of its inaugural meeting, held on Wednesday, 26 October 2022 as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Papakura Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.


 

 

8.1       Deputation - Mana Incorporated

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Kelly Peterson-Teariki, from Mana Incorporated, would like to present to the local board regarding their programme starting in Papakura at the end of this month. This programme aims at transforming the paths of young rangatahi involved in crime.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      thank Kelly Peterson-Teariki, from Mana Incorporated, for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Papakura Town Centre

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Tracy Shackleton, Town Centre Manager for the Papakura Business Association, would like to present to the local board on potential solutions for the resolution of a number of issues in Papakura town centre.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      thank Tracy Shackleton, Town Centre Manager for the Papakura Business Association, for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2022/15846

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa and Papakura ward councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues at the Papakura Local Board business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      receive Councillor Angela Dalton and Councillor Daniel Newman’s updates.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Isobelle Robb - Infocouncil Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Chairperson's Update

File No.: CP2022/15847

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Papakura Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on his activities and any issues.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal report from the Papakura Local Board Chairperson.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Isobelle Robb - Infocouncil Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Ōpaheke Sports Park Water and Wastewater Connection

File No.: CP2022/15461

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to add a new project in the future Customer and Community Services work programme 2024 - 2026, utilising the encumbrance release (Bellfield Road SHA) fund and provide an update on the ongoing infrastructure considerations for the proposed Opāheke Sports Park water and wastewater connection.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Papakura Local Board continues to prioritise the development of sports fields to encourage Aucklanders to feel connected and lead active healthy lives.

3.       The development of Opāheke Sports Park has been identified as a key initiative in the Papakura Local Board Plans 2017 and 2020.

4.       On 24 June 2020 the local board commissioned Parks, Sports, and Recreation to proceed with Stage two comprising confirming spatial requirements, the concept design, the estimated cost of construction, and clubroom ownership.

5.       Since the June 2020 decision to progress to stage two, and post community consultation, staff and the local board have been made aware of current park user challenges regarding service requirements for the existing park infrastructure.

6.       Stage two of the investigation identified ongoing core infrastructure-related considerations, particularly in the context of sourcing water and wastewater disposal.

7.       Although the current infrastructure meets existing needs when operating as planned, increased activation leading to greater park usage and further park development is perceived to be constrained.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)       approve the addition of a new project in the future work programme 2023/2024 - 2025/2026 and for inclusion in the 2023/2024 risk-adjusted programme (RAP) to enable the investigation and design for the water and wastewater connection to the public system at Ōpaheke Sports Park to proceed as part of the financial year 2023/2024 risk-adjusted programme (RAP), utilising $50,000 of the encumbrance release (Bellfield Road SHA) fund

b)       receive the update regarding the water and wastewater connection at Opāheke Sports Park

 

Horopaki

Context

Workshop 13 April 2022 – Ōpaheke Sports Park update

8.       On 13 April 2022 Parks, Sport and Recreation, and Community Facilities staff provided an update on the current facility challenges including the effects on park use.

9.         Staff presented the following priorities to maximise the use of the park:

i)    that a connection to the public water supply and wastewater disposal system is installed, to enable further development of fields or facilities that require water and wastewater disposal.

ii)    that some features of the current design guidelines should be retrofitted to existing changing facilities.

iii)   that a formal expression of interest process be conducted to establish potential users of Ōpaheke Sports Park, their expected level of use, how they may be able to contribute to the park’s development, and what outcomes are likely from their use of the park.

iv)   that continued investigation into the viability of a multi-use clubhouse at Ōpaheke Sports Park is deferred until the installation of a more suitable water supply and wastewater disposal system is underway, and until a formal expression of interest process to establish potential users of Ōpaheke Sports Park is completed.

Workshop 21 September 2022

10.     During the workshop, the local board requested that the opportunity to fund the connection to the public water and wastewater system through growth funding is explored.

11.     With growth being concentrated in certain areas and the current priorities targeted at Auckland Housing Programme areas, the $27 million of deferred investment (i.e., growth) and the paucity of investment capacity in the 10-year budget, it has been advised that a further upgrade to Ōpaheke Sports Park would not be prioritised for investment within the constraints of the current funding climate.

12.     Taking into consideration the infrastructure and services constraints (i.e., water and wastewater), associated financial pressures, and the related effects on the availability of the encumbrance fund, the viability of options will need to be reassessed before progressing.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Current water setup and operation for changerooms and fields

Irrigation Water

13.     Irrigation water for the existing sand fields 1 and 2 and cricket block is completely independent of the water supply for the changerooms building.

14.     The water source is an onsite bore, consented and built in 2015/2016. Note that the bore water does not meet the required standard for potable water. This was confirmed through water test results in 2016 and 2022 which were reviewed by the Healthy Waters department.

15.     The untreated bore water is pumped to a 90,000-litre underground storage tank.

16.     Two pumps irrigate fields 1 and 2 and the cricket block according to the programming set up through an irrigation system.

17.     Note on firefighting: 60,000L of the water stored in this tank is required to be available at all times for firefighting in the changerooms building. A special brigade fitting was added to the top of the irrigation tank for easy connection in the event of a fire. This is a condition of consent. The availability of 60,000L of water will be an ongoing requirement for fire compliance until the building is connected to a reticulated mains supply. The firefighting supply will then be obtained from the mains through a new hydrant.

18.     The main significance of the requirement above is that only 30,000L of the tank’s capacity is available for irrigation. This requirement was communicated at the time of handover and the irrigation limit was programmed to retain 60,000L in the tank for firefighting purposes.

19.     It is also significant because the 30,000L of stored water available for irrigation is currently sufficient to supply existing demand. However, the development of irrigation for additional fields cannot be accommodated within the existing capacity. Therefore, the connection to reticulated mains is a prerequisite to further the development of additional fields. The 60,000L held for firefighting capacities will then be freed up for additional irrigation.

20.     Note on bore take consent: the consent is for 100m3/ day up to a maximum of 16,000m3 per year.

Fresh potable water

21.     Fresh potable water is stored on-site in a 30,000L above-ground tank. This tank is a temporary feature that will be redundant after the building is connected to a reticulated water supply.

22.     Fresh potable water is brought to the site by tanker truck in response to an automated alert from the irrigation system to Healthy Waters as the potable tank level drops below a set level.

23.     Fresh potable water is topped up by rainwater harvested from the changeroom’s roof.

24.     Fresh potable water is treated on-site by a filtration/purification unit in the changerooms service area.

25.     Fresh potable water is supplied to all taps, showers, basins, drinking fountains, and toilets.

 

Wastewater

26.     Wastewater is stored on-site in a 25,000L underground holding tank. This tank is a permanent feature of the mains wastewater system, required for holding and flow-balancing before pumping out to the public mains.

27.     Wastewater is emptied by a sucker truck in response to an automated alert to Healthy Waters as the holding tank level rises above a set level.

Existing infrastructure on Ōpaheke Reserve for future connection to reticulated mains

Fresh potable water

28.     A private water main 100mm diameter has been built from the changing rooms to the termination point at the park entrance from Ōpaheke Road.

29.     No further infrastructure is required on Ōpaheke Reserve to switch to a mains connection.

30.     Switch to the mains connection from the tank is by valve already in place at changerooms.

31.     After connection to the mains, the above-ground potable water tank will be redundant and can be removed.

Wastewater

32.     Private 63mm diameter rising wastewater main has been built from changerooms to the termination point at the park entrance from Ōpaheke Road.

33.     Additional infrastructure is required on-site to connect to public mains: two pumps are to be installed in the holding tank connected to the existing private rising main.

34.     After connection to the mains, it is recommended to leave the existing wastewater system in place as a backup means of emptying the tank should pumps or power fail.

Water and wastewater system capacity compared to load of changerooms and future clubrooms

35.     Calculations are based on the winter use of all eight completed sports fields and clubrooms with two toilets as per the concept layout.

36.     The future clubroom water demand is around 5 per cent of the changerooms’ demand, as detailed in Table 5. Note the calculations were undertaken in 2018 prior to the commissioning of concept designs through the Park, Sports, and Recreation Department in 2020.

37.     These calculations should be reviewed once plans for the future development of the clubrooms and sportsfields are established.

38.     Note, the 25m3 underground holding tank provides a storage buffer for the management of waste to the future network, allowing for unexpectedly high peaks of flow.

Table 5: Water demand and supply from Fraser Thomas Ltd Engineering Report and Assessment of Environmental Effects 2018

Item

Low Estimate

High estimate

No. of games per field on the peak day of the week

2

4

Demand

 

 

Annual Water Demand (m³/yr)

Note: Average daily water use peak winter including an allowance for future clubrooms.

1017

2026

Supply

 

 

Roof water harvesting (m³/yr)

354

355

Tanker Top up (m³/yr)

663

1671

 

Public Water and Wastewater Mains

39.     Currently water and wastewater mains have been built by the Bellfield’s development part way along Ōpaheke Road.

40.     Further investigation is needed to establish the suitability of connecting Ōpaheke to either the public mains (i.e., water and wastewater) or Bellfield’s development pump station and the costs associated with each option.

Map

Description automatically generated

Matters for consideration by the Papakura Local Board

41.     There is an opportunity to add a new project into the future work programme 2024 – 2026 as part of the Risk-Adjusted Programme (RAP) to enable the initiation of the investigation and design to commence during the 2023/2024 financial year.

42.     Staff propose the allocation and utilisation of the encumbrance fund to the estimated value of $50,000 to undertake an investigation and design for the water and wastewater connection to the public system, acknowledging that the allocation of the encumbrance fund is at the discretion and prioritisation of the Papakura Local Board.

43.     It should be noted that the use of the encumbrance fund of $50,000 in the financial year 2023/2024, will result in the reduction of the renewal funding of the same value to ensure the Papakura Local Board work programme remains within the approved funding envelope.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

44.     As Customer and Community Services is a significant service provider and property owner, the directorate has a leading role in delivering Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

45.     In providing asset-based services, Customer and Community Services contributes most of the council’s operational greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its facilities and infrastructure.

46.     Property managed by the directorate, in particular coastal assets, will be adversely affected by climate change. The work programme includes actions, consistent with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri to halve the council’s operational GHG emissions by 2030 and to adapt to a changing climate.

47.     Actions include reducing operational GHG emissions through phasing-out gas heating in aquatic centres, improving the efficiency of facilities, investing in renewable energy, and adopting the Sustainable Asset Policy.

48.     At the same time, the directorate will mitigate GHG emissions and improve climate resilience through delivering tree planting programmes across the region. This includes delivering the mayor’s tree planting initiatives, transitioning unproductive farmland on regional parks to permanent native forests, and delivering ecological restoration projects with community groups.

49.     Work is ongoing to build on the above actions and embed climate change considerations into investment decision-making, planning, and corporate policies, including asset management plans and Local Board Plans.

50.     As approved through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, the council’s mandated approach to ‘deliver differently’ is also anticipated to help reduce the council’s carbon footprint by creating a sustainable service network. This may include a shift to digital service models or the consolidation of services into a smaller footprint.

51.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions, and affect Auckland’s resilience to climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     The decision sought for this report has no direct impact on other parts of the council group. A range of stakeholders were engaged to gain insight into Ōpaheke Sports Park, the wider network of fields, and the local and regional sport and active recreation landscape. The information and insight sought from key stakeholders have been used to inform the report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Focus areas of the capital work programme are to respond to the Local Board Plan, and the communities of greatest need and build capacity within the community, including through community-led delivery and partnerships.

54.     Planning of this proposed activity will involve consultation with the community to ensure that their aspirations are understood and responded to.

55.     The proposed activity aligns with the Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

Table 10: 2020 Papakura Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome  

Objective  

Outcome two: A community enriched by its diversity, where people feel

connected and lead active, healthy lives

Progressively upgrade existing parks, sports and

recreation facilities to improve the overall standard and meet the needs of all age groups

 

56.     Staff discussed the infrastructure constraints at a workshop held on 13 April 2022

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

58.     The Auckland Plan focuses on Māori culture and identity is encapsulated in the outcome: Māori Identity and Wellbeing.

59.     The provision of services, facilities, and open spaces supports the realisation of the aspirations of Māori, promotes community relationships, and connection to the natural environment, and foster holistic well-being of whānau, hapū and iwi Māori.

60.     Engagement with Māori is critical and, if not already completed, will occur on a programme or project basis, before any work commencing, and be reported back separately to the local board.

61.     Where aspects of the work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on the activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

62.     The local boards recognise the importance of building meaningful relationships with mana whenua, maatawaka and whānau, and understanding Māori aspirations. The outcomes, objectives and key initiatives from the local board plan recognise those areas of common interest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

63.     Changes to the Annual Budget were anticipated but the adopted detail was not yet available at the time that the 2023 – 2025 Customer and Community Services work programme was approved.

64.     The deferral of capital expenditure budgets as a result of the adopted annual budget 2022/2023 was discussed at a local board workshop held on 21 September 2022, notably the deferral of the encumbrance release (Bellfield Road SHA) under the capex deferral criteria as uncommitted funds, as there was no agreed project to be delivered through the encumbrance fund, as detailed in the table below:

 

Budget Source

 

2022/2023

 

2023/2024

 

2024/2025

 

2025/2026

 

2026/2027

Encumbrance release (Bellfield) – budget

(Pre-Deferral)

$0

$0

$1,750,000

$0

$0

Encumbrance release (Bellfield) – budget

(Post-Deferral)

$0

$0

$0

$250,000

$1,500,000

 

65.     There is an opportunity to add a new project into the future work programme 2024 – 2026 as part of the Risk-Adjusted Programme (RAP) to enable the initiation of the investigation and design for the water and wastewater connection to the public system to commence during the 2023/2024 financial year.

66.     Staff propose the allocation and utilisation of the encumbrance fund to the estimated value of $50,000 to undertake an investigation and design for the water and wastewater connection to the public system, acknowledging that the allocation of the encumbrance fund is at the discretion and prioritisation of the Papakura Local Board.

67.     It should be noted that the use of the encumbrance fund of $50,000 in the financial year 2023/2024, will result in the reduction of the renewal funding of the same value to ensure the Papakura Local Board work programme remains within the approved funding envelope.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

68.     There have been some delivery delays and cost escalations in the capital work programme due to the impact of COVID-19. These long-term impacts are anticipated to continue in the 2023 financial year and are being mitigated as far as possible by working closely and proactively with our suppliers and procurement team.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

69.     Subject to the local board’s decision on the proposal outlined in this report, the future work programme 2024 – 2026 will be adapted to reflect the decision in the form of an introduction of a new activity line to undertake the investigation and design of the water and wastewater connection at Ōpaheke Sports Park.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Linda Pillay - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Ōpaheke Sports Park: User-group Expressions of Interest

File No.: CP2022/15434

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present findings of the Expression of Interest process to identify potential user-groups for Ōpaheke Sports Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 25 May 2022 Papakura Local Board resolved to formalise direction for Ōpaheke Sports Park users and next steps for the implementation of the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment [PPK/2022/79].

3.       As part of the 25 May 2022 decision the board approved a scope to deliver an Expression of Interest (EOI) process to ‘identify users of the park and their subsequent commitments, requirements, and vision for Ōpaheke Sports Park’.

4.       Staff delivered an Expression of Interest process which included an online survey, question and answer opportunities and a phone call with each user-group.

5.       Invitations to submit an EOI went to 28 different local, sub-regional and regional community sport providers or facility management groups across a spread of 13 different codes or types of group e.g. facility management organisation.

6.       In total 11 round one EOI submissions were received over the course of the twelve-week period from 14 June 2022 – 6 September 2022.

7.       All existing seasonal user-groups of the park submitted an EOI through a local or regional body, in addition to some groups who have utilised the park on a casual basis and others who have not yet used the park in any capacity.

8.       Groups were made aware of the existing infrastructure and subsequently many indicated that as the park develops over time more commitment could be made to activating the park.

9.       The large cross-over in user-group needs presents opportunities to leverage synergies but can equally strain assets where utilisation is concentrated. Strategic planning will be required to ensure needs of park users are complementary and any form of duplication is avoided.


 

10.     A snapshot of interest, need and compatibility is provided in the table below.

Table 4: Snapshot summary

Most compatible user-groups

Temporary user-groups

Potential future user-groups

Counties Baseball Club

Summer season, diamond code

Franklin United Football Club

Existing user, winter season

Ardmore Marist Rugby & Sports Club

Winter season, low need

Counties Manukau Zone of NZRL

Existing user, year-round user

Pukekohe Pythons Sports Club (League)

Existing user, winter season

Papakura Rugby Football Club

Winter season, overflow

Counties Māori Rugby - Tāmaki Ki Te Tonga

3-month season

 

Papakura Sea Eagles Rugby League & Sports Club

Winter season, overflow

Papakura Rhinos Sports Club (Softball)

Summer season, diamond code

 

 

TTT Runners

Year-round user

 

 

United Cricket Club (Counties Manukau)

Existing user, summer season

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      receive findings of the Expression of Interest process

b)      share a summary of findings and analysis with the 11 user-groups and thank them for their contribution to the process

c)       share findings with council teams as detailed below:

i)       Parks Maintenance team to determine logistics and requirements to cater for user-groups the local board wish to support in activating the park

ii)       Visitor Experience (parks bookings) team ensuring there is a shared understanding of prioritised user-groups and a willingness to accommodate seasonal booking applications

iii)      Franklin Area Operations team for consideration of future planning and investment decisions regarding field and floodlighting provision in Pukekohe


 

Horopaki

Context

Papakura Sports Needs Assessment 2018

11.     Papakura Local Board commissioned the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment in August 2017 which was then adopted on 27 June 2018 [PPK/2018/106]. The needs assessment examines the sports park network identifying issues, opportunities and key projects for sport and recreation provision.

12.     Ōpaheke Sports Park is classified as a ‘Tier 1’ park and highlighted as being ‘central to the network optimisation’ with a series of interconnected user-group permutations proposed to achieve optimal use of the park and the wider local network.

13.     Whilst the needs assessment poses solutions to achieve optimal use of the Papakura sports park network there is a strong reliance on community buy-in and commitment at a time when many groups are struggling with wider social challenges and the lasting effects of COVID-19.

14.     The needs assessment identifies short, medium, and long-term key projects for sports parks. Ōpaheke Sports Park – Future club users, is included as a project and proposes a reconfiguration of user-groups and subsequent park and field allocations.

Future direction of Ōpaheke Sports Park

15.     On 25 May 2022 Papakura Local Board resolved to formalise direction for Ōpaheke Sports Park users and next steps for the implementation of the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment [PPK/2022/79].

16.     As part of the 25 May 2022 decision the board approved a scope to deliver an Expression of Interest (EOI) process to ‘identify users of the park and their subsequent commitments, requirements, and vision for Ōpaheke Sports Park’.

17.     The EOI process is an initial step towards understanding up-to-date community need providing guidance for the local board for future decision-making, advocacy, and investments.

Current state

18.     The playing surfaces consist of two sand-based floodlit fields with an artificial cricket wicket in the middle and a further six soil-based fields containing a grass cricket wicket, and a second artificial cricket wicket.

19.     The playing infrastructure is complimented by a changing room and toilet block containing showering facilities, storage spaces, designated areas for officials, and public access toilets.

20.     Staff and the local board have been made aware of a series of user-group issues regarding service requirements for the existing park infrastructure notably relating to the sourcing of water and wastewater disposal.

21 September 2022 Workshop

21.     Round one EOI findings were workshopped with the local board where a summary of results was presented to provide a high-level picture of community interest to utilise the park.

22.     The findings captured organisation details, current state, and an opportunity to express intended use of the park before dividing into four sections:

a)      participation – including percentage of female and Māori membership and the percentage of membership residing within the Papakura local board and wider south Auckland

b)      infrastructure needs – including core, supporting and additional needs

c)      activation of Ōpaheke Sports Park – how and when groups would activate the park bringing together who (Section A) and what (Section B)

d)      aspirations – open ended opportunity to detail any vision for the park and subsequent commitments to use of the park

23.     Papakura Local Board gave direction for staff to conduct a second round of consultation with the eleven user-groups who expressed interest before reporting findings in the new electoral term.

9 November 2022 Workshop

24.     An analysis of findings from both round one and round two can be found below noting that at the time of writing this report round two findings had not yet been workshopped with the local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

25.     Staff delivered an Expression of Interest process which included an online survey, question and answer opportunities and a phone call with each user-group.

Community groups

26.     Community groups were identified through a mix of current and previous internal council mahi including sports field bookings, investigation and analysis work and plans developed on behalf of council by external consultants.

27.     Staff also engaged CLM Community Sport as the Regional Sports Trust, who were able to contribute to a consolidated inventory of existing and potential future user-groups for Ōpaheke Sports Park.

28.     Invitations to submit an EOI went to 28 different local, sub-regional and regional community sport providers or facility management groups across a spread of 13 different codes or types of group e.g. facility management organisation.

Round one

Process and timings

29.     Invitations to submit an EOI were initially sent via email on 14 June 2022 with a reminder email sent 22 July 2022 before submissions closed 1 August 2022.

30.     Further invitations were sent as and when staff received notification of community interest leading up to the deadline. All submissions received were sent a reply within 48 hours acknowledging their EOI was received.

31.     A post was made on the Papakura Local Board Facebook page on 3 June 2022 outlining the local board decision to proceed with an EOI process and inviting community interest for submissions.

Submissions

32.     In total 11 round one EOI submissions were received over the course of the twelve-week period from 14 June 2022 – 6 September 2022.

33.     Seven different user-groups have activated the park since 2018 with a mix of summer and winter users and seasonal and casual bookings.

34.     All existing seasonal user-groups of the park submitted an EOI through a local or regional body, in addition to some groups who have utilised the park on a casual basis and others who have not yet used the park in any capacity.


 

Table 1: Expression of Interest submissions received

 

Group name (ordered alphabetically)

Code

Bookings history

Local

Ardmore Marist Rugby & Sports Club

Rugby Union

 

Counties Baseball Club

Baseball

 

Papakura Rhinos Sports Club

Softball

Previous bookings

Papakura Rugby Football Club

Rugby Union

 

Papakura Sea Eagles Rugby League & Sports Club

Rugby League

 

United Cricket Club (Counties Manukau)

Cricket

Existing user-group

Franklin

Franklin United Football Club

Football

Existing user-group

Pukekohe Pythons Sports Club

Rugby League

Existing user-group

Sub-regional

Counties Manukau Zone of NZRL

Rugby League

Existing user-group

Counties Māori Rugby - Tāmaki Ki Te Tonga

Rugby Union

 

TTT Runners

Running

 

 

35.     Key findings from the round one submissions are highlighted below with a detailed breakdown of information received in Attachment A.

Table 2: Round one - Key findings

Topic

 

Insights

Spread of codes

Rugby Union x3 Rugby League x3 Football x1      Cricket x1          Running x1   Baseball x1    Softball x1

·     Diverse mix of ways our community would like to activate the park

Membership catchment

Local x6

Franklin x2

Sub-regional x3

·     The majority of interest was local with six groups having ≥70% of membership residing within Papakura local board

·     Interest from neighbouring Franklin groups

·     Scale and quality spaces are hard to find, groups will travel across south Auckland for the right location

Māori outcomes

Local EOI average   = 44% Māori

Local board pop.      = 26.8% Māori (2018 Census)

·     Four of the six local groups have memberships of ≥40% identifying as Māori

·     Across the 11 EOI’s there is an average of 46% of membership identifying as Māori

Infrastructure

Core

Supporting

Additional

·     Significant overlap of need represents opportunities and challenges

·     7 x field-based, 2 x diamond-based, 1 x wickets, 1 x tracks/trails

·     Floodlighting identified by 10 of the 11 (not cricket)

Utilisation

Winter x4       Summer x3     Annual x2          Other x1

·     Overlap of weekday and weekend use irrespective of time of the year

·     Running group an outlier with interest in morning utilisation

Vision

Multi-sport

Potential

Network

·     Nine of the 11 groups acknowledged a vision for shared use

·     Eight groups expressed interest in utilising the park as a ‘home’ ground

·     None of the user-groups are solely utilising this park at this point. Provision across a series of other parks effects needs

 

Round two

36.     At the 21 September 2022 workshop staff presented round one findings and the local board agreed for staff to reengage with prospective user-groups post-local body elections.

37.     As part of round two staff made contact directly with the eleven user-groups who submitted interest through the round one EOI process.

38.     Groups were provided a written summary of conversations with staff and afforded the opportunity to add or amend commentary following consultation with their respective committees or boards.

Round two content

39.     Round one findings provided an up-to-date picture of local sporting interest with the second round presenting the opportunity to better understand the level of interest or commitment to activating the park and analyse the genuine need relative to network provision.

40.     The framework for round two consultation was based on the following areas:

a)   General interest – including specific attraction to Ōpaheke Sports Park

b)   Network provision – ideal scenario (infrastructure and locality) for your user-group

c)   Timing & dependencies – existing commitments at other parks and minimum requirements to activate the Ōpaheke Sports Park

d)   Compatibility – potential efficiencies /duplication, complementary/competing needs

e)   Commitment – intent to develop and/or own any assets, capacity for financial contributions, appetite to lead or partner specific infrastructure elements

41.     Key findings from round two are illustrated below with a detailed breakdown of information received in Attachment B.


 

Table 3: Round two - Key findings

Topic

Insights

General interest

Why Ōpaheke Sports Park?

·     Seven groups identified the of potential quality playing infrastructure as a main interest in the park

·     Location was specifically mentioned as a good fit for three groups and not ideal for two groups

·     Scale of the park was an attraction for four groups

Network provision

Domino effect

·     Existing quality of provision is impacting how often groups activate parks - five groups would prefer investment elsewhere in the network

·     The remaining six groups favoured development of Ōpaheke to be utilised as a home ground

Timing & dependencies

Activate now!

·     There are very few commitments preventing groups from activating the park

·     One group has an occupation license expiring June 2025

·     Two groups are only interested in utilising the park as an overflow ground

Compatibility

Logistics of use

·     Overlap of six groups when accommodating traditional winter season field and lighting requirements including use as overflow

·     Softball and baseball supportive of partnership approach to develop diamond infrastructure

·     TTT Runners highlighted their agile approach, willingness to work with what is offered and minimal impact on other users

Future development

Commitment

·     Seven groups expressed their willingness to seek or support funding for further developments in partnership with council or other user-groups

·     Aside from the United Cricket outdoor nets project no groups indicated an interest in owning playing infrastructure

 

Further considerations

42.     The EOI process helps capture community need at a point in time and crucially, gives an indication of what type of infrastructure is most desired within the community.

43.     Groups were made aware of the existing infrastructure and subsequently many indicated that as the park develops over time more commitment could be made to activating the park.

44.     The large cross-over in user-group needs presents opportunities to leverage synergies but can equally strain assets where utilisation is concentrated. Strategic planning will be required to ensure needs of park users are complementary and any form of duplication is avoided.

Auckland Diamond Sports Facilities Plan 2021

45.     Prince Edward Park is identified as one of only two preferred regional sites for softball in Tāmaki Makaurau.

46.     Prince Edward Park is the only permanent softball facility in the south of the region containing two senior diamonds and six junior diamonds.

47.     Prince Edward Park is also identified as one of five sub-regional dual-code sites with potential to cater for softball and baseball.

48.     Papakura Rhinos and Counties Softball are currently based at Prince Edward Park with the former having submitted an EOI articulating a desire to be based at Ōpaheke Sports Park.

49.     Counties Baseball are currently based at Karaka Sports Park and seeking more fit-for-purpose facilities including access to toilets and changing facilities and quality diamond and outfield surfaces given issues at their current home ground.

50.     Parks and Community Facilities may need to investigate community need prior to planned or potential future investments with consideration for changing service requirements.

Auckland Regional Rugby League Facilities Network Plan 2019

51.     In 2019 a collective of rugby league organisations, including Counties Manukau Rugby League (CMRL), commissioned Visitor Solutions to carry out a facilities network plan to provide recommendations for a ‘Home of Rugby League’.

52.     The plan identified Ōpaheke Sports Park as the preferred location for a ‘Home of Rugby League’ for CMRL. This was presented to Papakura Local Board in 2021 at which time the board informally supported the proposal.

53.     CMRL are often relocated to the back fields over summer, which do not have rugby league markings. Minor operational adjustments such as field markings and additional goal posts may help facilitate activation of the park in the short-term. 

54.     CMRL support the park being multisport and have a good relationship with United Cricket. The ‘Home of Rugby League’ concept remains an aspiration of CMRL, and they wish to further explore how this can be progressed in partnership with willing parties.

Wider Auckland Rugby Facility Plan 2018-2028

55.     The plan shows that due to the large proportion of soil-based sports fields in the Counties Manukau Rugby Union area, there is the greatest shortfall of provision when factoring in field closures.

56.     The plan also highlights a shortage of floodlit provision across Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Manurewa, and Papakura (noting several projects have been completed since the plan was published in 2018).

57.     Counties Māori Rugby do not have a dedicated home ground and have struggled to gain access to fields on an annual basis. The organisation has had to hire fields outside of their south Auckland remit at the expense of their membership. Ōpaheke Sports Park provides an ideal home base being central to their sub-regional geographic catchment.

United Cricket Club (Counties Manukau) Incorporated

58.     On 4 December 2021 council received a Landowner Approval application from United Cricket Club (Counties Manukau) Incorporated for indoor and outdoor cricket nets at Ōpaheke Sports Park.

59.     United Cricket Club have since withdrawn their desire to develop the indoor cricket nets however have confirmed their intent for a three-lane outdoor nets facility. The proposal is due to be presented to the Papakura Local Board in an upcoming business meeting.

Bruce Pulman Park

60.     The Papakura Sports Needs Assessment 2020 identifies Bruce Pulman Park as one of two Premier parks in the network. Papakura Local Board and Auckland Council have invested significantly in increasing floodlit provision for users of the rugby field platforms.

61.     Ardmore Marist Rugby and Sports Club are currently based at Bruce Pulman Park as the primary seasonal user-group utilising the fields and floodlights. The group have experienced challenges in meeting the seasonal user charges, their current occupancy license expires in June 2025.


 

Spring field renovations

62.     The 2022 spring renovation period for council sports fields ran from mid-September to Friday 21 October 2022. Mahi undertaken includes field layout changes and maintenance and traditionally involves blanket regional closures of fields.

63.     Counties Māori Rugby have a three-month season August-October intersecting the annual renovation closure period. Use of the park at this time of the year would trigger a need for adjustments to the timing of renovations and consider the needs of summer code users who would be starting as Counties Māori Rugby finish.

64.     Staff recognise the challenges for various council departments to accommodate sports field use during the shoulder competition period however support an underlying principle to accommodate community requests such as this.

Customer and Community Services work programme – Papakura and Franklin

65.     Investment in like-for-like infrastructure anywhere across the immediate network will have a domino effect on community need. For example, upgrades to playing infrastructure at Prince Edward Park would reduce the need for user-groups based there to utilise Ōpaheke Sports Park.

66.     Pukekohe Pythons Sports Club and Franklin United Football Club are both current users of Ōpaheke Sports Park with a majority of members residing in the Pukekohe area.

67.     Council data shows a large shortfall in weekday floodlit provision for the Franklin region. Franklin Local Board upgraded two sports parks in central Pukekohe during 2021/2022, this increased capacity may cater for user-groups who utilised Ōpaheke Sports Park during the 2022 winter season.

68.     Given the location of Ōpaheke Sports Park bordering the Franklin Local Board area, network effects across Papakura and Franklin should be considered when planning future sports field upgrades.

Clubrooms and storage

69.     Ten of the eleven submissions received either specifically identify storage requirements or make reference to requirements which would logically infer a need for storage. TTT Runners were the only outliers in not stating or implying storage requirements.

70.     Additional to storage, all eleven groups stated a desire for some form of social space including a kitchen, office and/or meeting spaces depending on the group.

71.     Whilst the existing changing room and toilet block allows for future development, if the footprint does not provide sufficient storage and social space additional developments on the park may need to be considered.

72.     Any further permanent infrastructure developments must be strategically assessed to ensure the most proficient use of space that does not hinder growth as the park matures.

Drury-Ōpaheke Future development

73.     Public consultation closed on 8 November 2022 for the Sharing the cost of Drury’s growth – Contributions Policy 2022 variation A, which considered delivering infrastructure to support growth of Drury-Ōpaheke through the 10-year Budget and 30-year Infrastructure Strategy.

74.     Findings from this process may influence investment decisions and timing of future developments.

Community sport sector

75.     Commitments from community groups should not be expected through a broad consultation process and ahead of investment commitments to park developments.

76.     Groups will have different processes and governance requirements to follow in order to make significant decisions such as relocating home grounds. Depending on constitutional requirements and membership size decision-making timelines will vary from group to group.

77.     Membership trends have been less predictable in recent years as individual participants and user-groups manage the lasting effects of COVID-19. Infrastructure developments should be based on evidential need and where possible allow for flexibility of use.

78.     Multisport developments rely on positive relationships between user-groups and any independent entities such as facility management trusts. It is integral to strike the right balance of user-groups where needs will complement rather than conflict.

Conclusion of findings

79.     A snapshot of interest, need and compatibility is provided in the table below.

Table 4: Snapshot summary

Most compatible user-groups

Temporary user-groups

Potential future user-groups

Counties Baseball Club

Summer season, diamond code

Franklin United Football Club

Existing user, winter season

Ardmore Marist Rugby & Sports Club

Winter season, low need

Counties Manukau Zone of NZRL

Existing user, year-round user

Pukekohe Pythons Sports Club (League)

Existing user, winter season

Papakura Rugby Football Club

Winter season, overflow

Counties Māori Rugby - Tāmaki Ki Te Tonga

3-month season

 

Papakura Sea Eagles Rugby League & Sports Club

Winter season, overflow

Papakura Rhinos Sports Club (Softball)

Summer season, diamond code

 

 

TTT Runners

Year-round user

 

 

United Cricket Club (Counties Manukau)

Existing user, summer season

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

80.     There was no climate impact from conducting this investigatory work however future development of the park may be informed by analysis included within this report.

81.     The Parks and Community Facilities department will provide further detail in relation to asset solutions for future development of the park which will include consideration of the environmental impacts.


 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

82.     Consultation was carried out with several council teams as detailed below.

Table 4: Council group consultation

Team

Purpose

Visitor Experience 

Historic bookings for the sports playing platforms and understanding of rationale for declined booking requests.

Land Advisory Services

Landowner Approval requests – updates on United Cricket Club 3-lane outdoor nets proposal.

Parks Maintenance

Understanding of park logistics, challenges and user-group requests.

Parks Planning

Updates on the northern recreational section of Ōpaheke Sports Park.

Consideration of flow and safety around the border of the sports park and recreational areas.

Understanding of nature of paths network and potential for running group use.

Area Operations

-     Papakura

-     Franklin

Work programme projects or intended investments across the sports field network.

Oversight of investments planned for the Pukekohe sub-division of Franklin Local Board.

 

83.     There is no direct impact on the council group by presenting these findings. Insights and data have informed the analysis of findings presented.

84.     Decisions regarding the further development of the park will have different levels of impact across the organisation. As and when decisions are brought to the Papakura Local Board there will be accompanying analysis of specific organisational impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

85.     Round one EOI findings were presented at the 21 September 2022 local board workshop where members supported a second round of consultation to collate further, more detailed information.

86.     Attachment A illustrates the mix of local and sub-regional user-groups who submitted an EOI and includes a percentage of membership from within the local board and/or wider south Auckland area.

87.     Investment across the wider Papakura sports park network, through the work programme or other avenues, will have effects on the subsequent interest for Ōpaheke Sports Park and vice versa.

88.     Given there are two existing user-groups (Pukekohe Pythons and Franklin United Football Club) utilising the park, with memberships predominantly based in Pukekohe, an increase in provision for the neighbouring Pukekohe sub-division may also effect need at Ōpaheke Sports Park.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

89.     Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau – Māori outcomes framework, outlines several mana outcomes which can be considered when planning future park developments to support Māori to thrive through sport.

·    Māori identity and culture – Kia or ate ahurea

·    Effective Māori participation – Kia ora te hononga

90.     The provision of services, facilities, and open spaces supports the realisation of the aspirations of Māori, promotes community relationships, and connection to the natural environment, and foster holistic well-being of whānau, hapū and iwi Māori.

91.     Of the six local user-groups there was an average of 44% of membership identifying as Māori, significantly higher than the 26.8% of the general population within Papakura Local Board.

92.     Across all 11 EOI submissions there was an average of 46% of membership identifying as Māori.

93.     Counties Māori Rugby operate over a three-month season catering to 180 members making up seven representative teams, 100% of which identify as Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

94.     No budget was required to deliver the EOI process, decisions regarding future development of the asset solutions required to activate the park will include an analysis of financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

95.     Risks and mitigations are outlined in the table below.

Table 5. Risks and mitigations of the Expression of Interest process

Risks

Mitigations

Community user-groups who submitted an EOI application may not support the decision-making or rationale for preference of use at the park.

Findings are being presented for local board consideration and do not require decisions regarding long-term use of the park. There are no leases required to formalise use of the changing room and toilet block or the playing surfaces. Groups have been reminded council sports fields are available for seasonal and casual bookings through the online system.

Parks and Community Facilities may not be able to provide the asset solutions required for further development of the park within the existing funding landscape.

Financial staff will work alongside the local board to provide advice regarding advocacy and funding avenues.

Prolonged or staged development of the park may not coincide with community need.

Investments into niche infrastructure should be cross-checked with up-to-date community need prior to future decision-making.

 


 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

96.     Staff will share findings with relevant council teams as detailed below:

·    Parks Maintenance team to determine logistics and requirements to cater for user-groups the local board wish to support in activating the park

·    Visitor Experience (parks bookings) team ensuring there is a shared understanding of prioritised user-groups and a willingness to accommodate seasonal booking applications

·    Franklin Area Operations team for consideration of future planning and investment decisions regarding field and floodlighting provision in Pukekohe

97.     Active Communities staff will continue to assist Parks and Community Facilities to plan and implement work programme items relating to asset solutions to activate the park.

98.     Staff will thank the 11 community user-groups who submitted an EOI application on behalf of the Papakura Local Board.

99.     A summary of findings and analysis will be shared with the 11 user-groups noting that as per regular operations field bookings can be made via the online council system.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

EOI Round 1 findings

35

b

EOI Round 2 findings

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kieran Nevey - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Dave Stewart - Manager Sport & Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 






Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 








Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Landowner approval and agreement to lease to Papakura Marae for a Whanau Ora Centre and Emergency Distribution Centre at Te Koiwi Reserve, Papakura

File No.: CP2022/15554

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek landowner approval from the Papakura Local Board for the landowner application from the Papakura Marae Society Incorporated to construct a Whanau Ora Centre and Emergency Distribution Centre on Te Koiwi Reserve, Papakura.

2.       To seek approval from the Papakura Local Board to grant an agreement to lease and subsequent lease for additional premises to Papakura Marae Society Incorporated for the Papakura Marae’s new development at Te Koiwi Reserve, Papakura.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The applicant, the Papakura Marae Society Incorporated (Papakura Marae), seeks landowner approval and an agreement to lease with a subsequent lease to construct a Whanau Ora Centre and Emergency Distribution Centre on Te Koiwi Reserve, Papakura.

4.       The proposed Whanau Ora Centre will be a 1200m² building that will be comprised of health and social services, offices and conference facilities. The Emergency Distribution Centre will be an 800m² one-level building with a mezzanine floor.

5.       Relocation of the Marae vehicle entrance from Hunua Road to Parker Street is also proposed, leading to a car park of 200 spaces between the two proposed buildings.

6.       Construction of the development is anticipated to be for a period of approximately 18 months. 

7.       Papakura Marae have an existing community ground lease for part of the land at Te Koiwi Park. The current lease is for a 33-year term and expires on 28 February 2044. Rather than grant a new lease, the recommendation is to grant a lease for the additional premises which allows the term to run concurrently with the current and operative lease.

8.       The proposed new additional community lease area to the Papakura Marae for land at Te Koiwi Park, Papakura was publicly notified. The notification appeared in the Papakura Courier in August 2022 with a submission deadline for 16 September 2022. No submissions or objections were received.

9.       Staff engaged with all iwi identified as having an interest in the land for the proposed new additional community lease area to the Papakura Marae for land at Te Koiwi Park, Papakura. No issues were raised. The Marae also provided letters of support from Nga Tai Ki Tamaki, Ngati Te Ata and Ngati Tamaoho.

10.     A condition of the landowner approval will require the applicant to obtain the required regulatory consents for the proposed development where further detailed design information will be provided.

11.     Staff recommend that the Papakura Local Board support the landowner application, agreement to lease and subsequent lease of additional premises. The proposal supports and enhances Papakura Marae‘s ability to provide valuable services to the local community, whilst maintaining access to and use of Te Koiwi Park.

12.     If the Board supports the recommendation, staff will formalise an agreement to lease with the associated landowner approval conditions, thereby providing the applicant with approval to proceed with the development. 

13.     If the Board does not support the recommendation, the applicant will be advised of the decision.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)   grant landowner approval to the Papakura Marae Society Incorporated to construct a Whanau Ora Centre and Emergency Distribution Centre, with associated car parking, on Te Koiwi Park, Papakura.

b)   grant under the Local Government Act 2002 an agreement to lease to the Papakura Marae Society Incorporated for 11,575 square meters (more or less) of additional land at Te Koiwi Park, Papakura described as Part Allotment 61 Suburban Section 1 parish of Opaheke, (outlined in Red and marked B on Attachment A), on the following terms:

i)          that funding be secured for the complete development on or before 1 December 2024 and prior to any works commencing

ii)         the development works to commence within one (1) year from the date of satisfaction of condition i. above

c)   grant, under the Local Government Act 2002, a deed of additional premises to Papakura Marae at Te Koiwi Park comprised of approximately 11,575 square metres, shown (outlined in red and marked B on Attachment A) on the land described as Part Allotment 61 Suburban Section 1 parish of Opaheke subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)          commencement date- the day following the date all conditions of the agreement to lease have been satisfied

ii)         term – the period from the Commencement date and the expiry date of 28 February 2044.

iii)        rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iv)        note all other terms and conditions to accord with the original lease dated 13 October 2010

d)   note that public notification and iwi engagement for Auckland Council’s intention to grant a lease of additional premises to the Papakura Marae at Te Koiwi Park, Papakura has been undertaken.

e)   note that no objections to the notified proposal of the new community lease area to the Papakura Marae at Te Koiwi Park were received.

 

Horopaki

Context

Papakura Marae history/background

14.     Te Koiwi Park is held by Auckland Council in fee simple under the Local Government Act 2002 for recreational purposes.

15.     The Papakura Marae Society Incorporated (Papakura Marae) was established in 1979 as an incorporated society with charitable status, with the purpose of providing cultural, health and social services for the people of Papakura and the surrounding area. It is estimated that the Marae currently serves over 5000 people through its health and social services programs. As well as providing the traditional role of a marae through its provision of health and social services to the families and whanau of Papakura, it is also an important community facility, being utilised by many community groups and schools. It is estimated that there are approximately 35,000 people that visit the marae annually, with the Marae being used seven days a week.

16.     Papakura Marae has held a lease with the Papakura District Council since the 1980’s. A new 33-year lease was formalised with Papakura District Council on 13 October 2010.

Previous land-owner approval

17.     In 2019 and 2020 Papakura Marae was granted landowner approval by the Papakura Local Board for the construction of nine kaumatua housing units within its existing leased area. These units have been constructed.

Current proposal

Whanau Ora Centre

18.     Papakura Marae is requesting landowner approval to construct a 1200m² integrated Whanau Ora Centre building that will be comprised of three levels, each with a 400m² floor area.

19.     Health services will be on the ground floor, social services on the first floor and staff offices and conference facilities on the upper floor.

20.     The applicant has stated that the Whanau Ora Centre will allow them to be more responsive to the needs of the community and cover health, employment, justice and social service needs which is not able to be catered for within the current facilities.

Emergency Distribution Centre

21.     Papakura Marae has also requested landowner approval to construct an Emergency Distribution Centre which it is proposed to serve as a multi-purpose community hub centered on food distribution, community connections (for example teaching people how to grow their own food) and civil defense emergency response.

22.     The Marae have advised that the current operating space at the Marae is limited, and the new distribution centre will provide the Marae with a sustainable means to meet demand as well as future proof a space for growing demand.

Marae Car-parking Entrance and Carpark

23.     The proposal involves the relocation of the existing Marae vehicle entrance from Hunua Road to Parker Street leading into a new car park of 200 spaces between the two new proposed buildings. The proposed entrance is to provide a safer access point into the site and the car parking is to cater for increased use associated with the site.

24.     Auckland Transport are supportive of the proposal in principle and will undertake a more detailed assessment at the regulatory stages.

Timeframe

25.     The construction of the development is anticipated to be staged over an 18-month period once the applicant has obtained funding and all the necessary regulatory requirements.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Specialist input

26.     The following council specialists have reviewed and support the proposal:

·       parks and places specialist

·       community lease advisor

·       marae advisor

·       head of resilience

27.     The area of Te Koiwi Park where development is proposed is indicated in Attachment A. Further design detail will need to be submitted by the applicant through the regulatory stages. Further detail includes architectural design drawings of the proposed development, infrastructure servicing plans, landscaping plans and an arboriculture assessment.

28.     The options for the local board is to approve or decline the landowner application and lease for additional premises.

29.     If the local board approve the application, Papakura Marae will be able to undertake the proposed development subject to the specified conditions for landowner approval and agreement to lease.

30.     If the local board decline the application, the Marae will not be able to undertake the proposed development.

31.     It is recommended that the local board support landowner approval being granted for the proposal for the following reasons:

·   council’s parks and places specialist, community lease advisor, marae advisor and head of resilience have been consulted and support the proposal

·   the proposal will not adversely affect long-term public access to, or use of, Te Koiwi Park

·   the proposal will allow the Marae to continue to provide valuable services to the community and enhance the services currently provided

·   any adverse effects of the proposal can be mitigated by conditions placed on any landowner approval issued

·   the proposed development will help to strengthen the sustainability of the Marae and the contribution and level of support it provides in the surrounding community

·   the proposal supports key areas of the Auckland Plan as they relate to council’s commitment to Māori; and,

·   the proposal aligns with the Papakura local Board Plan by assisting people to lead active, healthy and connected lives.

32.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements.

33.     The Papakura Marae continues to demonstrate its ability to deliver the facility and offer invaluable services to the wider community. 

34.     The development requires large amounts of funding from external parties. As part of any funding agreements the funders will likely undertake due diligence on the Marae’s financial state and operational model moving forward.

35.     Staff have determined that the Papakura Marae meets the additional leased land requirements under the terms of the original lease as evidenced below:

i)   it is a registered charitable trust

ii)  it has complied with the terms of the operative lease

iii) it has a history of delivering quality services to the local community

iv) the Papakura Marae is managed appropriately as evidenced by its longevity and programmes offered.

v)  The Papakura Marae holds all necessary insurance, including public liability cover.

36.     The agreement to lease documentation will confirm tenure while allowing the Marae time to secure funding before it commences any physical works.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lessee:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

·        include any other outcomes that will improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts.

38.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

39.     The majority of Te Koiwi Park, including the area for the proposed development lies within a flood plain. The applicant will be required to provide the necessary engineering reports/assessment as part of regulatory processes which will address any impacts of the proposed development on the flood plain.

40.     Vegetation including several large trees will need to be removed as part of the proposed development. The applicant will be required to submit an arborist report and replacement planting plan to council for approval to mitigate the loss of these trees.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     The application and its effects have been assessed by a number of technical experts on behalf of both the applicant and the council. These areas of expertise include arboriculture, parks strategy, community leasing and emergency management.

42.     No other council groups are affected by the proposal beyond those consulted with.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     The proposal aligns with the Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 outcome ‘A community enriched by its diversity, where people feel connected and lead active, healthy lives’, by allowing the Marae to continue to provide its existing and future services to the Papakura community.

44.     The proposal aligns with the Auckland Plan 2050 by promoting Māori success, innovation and enterprise through supporting the Marae to become self-sustaining and prosperous.

45.     The Marae is well supported by the community and serves over 5000 people through its health and social services programs and provides space utilised by several community groups and schools.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are outlined in council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

47.     The proposed development will have a positive impact on Māori by further helping to strengthen the sustainability of the Marae and the contribution and level of support it provides in the surrounding community. This helps to demonstrate council’s commitment to Māori by strengthening the contribution of Māori within Auckland and helping to advance Māori social, cultural, economic and environmental wellbeing.

48.     An email was sent to all iwi identified as having an interest in the area containing detailed information on the land, the lessee, and the lease proposal.

49.     An invitation to iwi representatives was extended to hui and/or for a kaitiaki site visit to comment and provide feedback on any spiritual, cultural, or environmental impact with respect to the proposal.

50.     No objections or requests for hui or kaitiaki site visit were received from the iwi and mana whenua groups who responded.

51.     The Papakura Marae have also provided letters of support from Nga Tai Ki Tamaki, Ngati Te Ata and Ngati Tamaoho.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     The construction and ongoing maintenance costs of the proposed development will be borne by the Marae. There will be no financial cost to the local board for the proposal and associated infrastructure. The Marae’s ongoing viability, finances and governance is strong and any resourcing from council is likely to be operational and of a nature that provides general amenity to all park users. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     There are no significant risks to council associated with the proposal and the proposal strategically meets council’s direction.

54.     There is a low risk of Papakura Marae being unable to secure the funding required for the development. Papakura Marae is an established entity with a strong track record. In addition, the agreement to lease will include a condition to secure all the required funding for the development prior to any works commencing.

55.     If the status quo was to be maintained (i.e. the Board declines the proposal), there is a potential risk that council’s existing relationship with the Papakura Marae may be negatively affected as council may be seen to not be furthering its obligations to Māori as contained within the Papakura Local Board Plan and draft Auckland Plan 2018. Furthermore, if the local board resolve to not grant landowner approval or a lease for additional premises, this will undermine the Marae’s efforts to secure funding and negatively impact on its ability to provide valuable health, social and civil defense emergency response services to the local and wider community.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     If the local board resolves to the grant landowner approval and a lease of additional premises, staff will work with the applicant to formalise the agreement in accordance with the local board decision. In addition, the landowner approval will be issued to the society with associated conditions which will include, but not be limited to, further detailed design and landscaping plans and an arborist report being provided.

57.     If the local board declines the application, the applicant will not be able to proceed with the proposed development.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Papakura Marae development plan

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Darren Cunningham - Senior Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Proposed Papakura to Clevedon Cycleway

File No.: CP2022/15688

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive and consider recommendations on a proposed Papakura to Clevedon Cycleway.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Papakura Local Board resolved to change the scope of work for the Papakura to Clevedon Cycleway on 21 September 2021 to progress concept designs and visualisations.

3.       Arup Limited was commissioned by Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (TAU) on behalf of the Papakura Local Board to develop a concept design.and visualisations on the identified feasible routes from the 2021 Papakura to Clevedon Cycleway Feasiblity Study.

4.       Arup Limited completed the Papakura to Clevedon Cycleway Recommendations Report (the report) in September 2022.

5.       The report provides an overview of the work completed to date. It outlines the key findings of the 2021 feasibility study and the cycleways status in terms of alignment with the current Auckland Transport plans and funding availability.

6.       The Papakura Local Board is asked to receive the report and consider the key recommendations of the report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board: 

 

a)      receive the Papakura to Clevedon Cycleway Recommendations report (Attachment A). 

b)      accept the key recommendations of the report including:

i)       continue to advocate to Auckland Transport for prioritising cycle investment in Papakura

ii)       continue to work with Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi to develop a strategy for implementing short-term solutions which improve connectivity between the train station and Papakura town centre

iii)      continue to work with Auckland Transport, advocating for the findings from the feasibility study 2021 to be adopted and incorporated into Future Connect programme.

iv)      continue to identify and explore additional funding streams.


 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Hūnua Traverse is a proposed 45km walking and cycling recreational route through the Hūnua Ranges Regional Park linking Clevedon to Kaiaua on the Firth of Thames that is being developed in conjunction with the Franklin Local Board.

8.       The Papakura Local Board is interested in exploring options that will connect the Hūnua Traverse to the Papakura town centre. The purpose of the project is to enhance the economic viability of the Papakura town centre through increased visits by cyclists using the trail and other users of the trail.

9.       Arup Limited was commissioned by Tātaki Auckland Unlimited on behalf of the Papakura Local Board in early 2021 to investigate the feasibility of developing a cycleway connecting Papakura train station and the start of the Hūnua Traverse in Clevedon.

10.     A feasibility study (Attachment A, section A.1) and strategy investigation was completed in July 2021. The study identified potential routes, examined the opportunities and constraints of the potential routes, and provided recommendations on necessary steps to realise the preferred route.

11.     The potential route options considered in the study include rural routes 1 to 4 and urban routes A to E (refer to the picture below).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·    Route 1 is from the intersection of Clevedon Road / Cosgrave Road and travels north along Cosgrave Road and Mill Road, east along Airfield Road, Clevedon Takanini Road, and finishes on Papakura-Clevedon Road to Clevedon town centre. The estimated cost for construction of Route 1 is between $1million and $10 million.

·    Route 2 is from the intersection of Clevedon Road / Cosgrave Road and travel east along Clevedon Road and Papakura to Clevedon Road before turning north on Mullins Road and east on Clevedon to Takanini Road before rejoinning Papakura to Clevedon Road to Clevedon town centre. The estimated cost for construction of Route 2 is between $1million and $10 million.

·    Route 3 is from the intersection of Clevedon Road / Cosgrave Road and travels east along Clevedon Road and Papakura to Clevedon town centre. The estimated cost for construction of Route 3 is between $1 million and $10 million.

·    Route 4 is from Papakura train station along Marne Road, Settlement Road and Dominion Road to Hunua Road. It travels along Jones Road and Garvie Road to John HiIl Road, Sky High Road, and Monument Road to Clevedon town centre. The estimated cost for construction of Route 4 is likely to be more than $10 million.

·    Route A weaves through residential streets to the north of the station, including Prictor St, Ingram St, Old Wairoa Road, and Fernaig Street to connect to Cosgrave Road. The estimated cost for construction of Route A can be up to $1 million.

·    Route B travels along Clevedon Road before turning north at the intersection of Clevedon Road and Cosgrave Road onto Cosgrave Road to connect with Route 1. The estimated cost for construction of Route B is between $1 million and $10 million.

·    Route C is from Papakura train station along Clevedon Road and continues onto Papakura to Clevedon Road to the intersection with Cosgrave Road to connect with Routes 2 and 3. The estimated cost for construction of Route C is between $1 million and $10 million.

·    Route D travels eastward from the Papakura train station on Willis Road and Sheehan Avenue before turning north on Dominion Road to the intersection of Papakura to Clevedon where it connects to Routes 2 and 3. The estimated cost for construction of Route D can be up to $1 million.

·    Route E travels southward from the station along Marne Road then eastward along Settlment Road and south along Dominion Road to the intersection with Hunua Road to connect with Route 4. The estimated cost for construction of Route E can be up to $1 million.

12.     Papakura Local Board endorsed the findings and recommendations of the feasibility study on 25 August 2021. At this meeting the local board resolved:

Resolution number PPK/2021/149

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      endorse the Papakura to Clevedon Bike Trail Feasibility Study (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      request that staff develop project scopes for the following recommended priority projects for local board consideration:

i)        assessment of Papakura train station user experience

ii)       further work on urban routes A to D and rural routes 1 to 3, including ground investigations and structural analysis of bridges and culverts along the routes

iii)      wider stakeholder and public engagement on a short list of options to ensure the wider community understands the purpose and objectives for the proposed investment.

c)      note that rural route 4 and urban route E are not recommended to be taken forward for further investigation as it is not considered to be reasonably practical

d)      request Auckland Transport add the Papakura to Clevedon Bike Trail project as a future project in the Regional Land Transport Programme.

e)      delegate authority to the Papakura Local Board Chairperson to approve any minor edits or amendments to the Papakura to Clevedon Bike Trail Feasibility Study that may be necessary.


 

13.     Papakura Local Board resolved to change the scope of work for the Papakura to Clevedon Cycle Trail on 21 September 2021: to  

Resolution number PPK/2021/1

·    progressing some concept designs and visualisations which can be used to help communicate the vision for the project to key stakeholders.

·    developing targeted information to support and assist the local board in preparing and lodging applications for short term (tactical urbanism) improvements.

·    this option includes applications to Auckland Council’s Streets for People fund and Waka Kotahi’s Innovating Streets for People fund.

14.     Arup Limited was commissioned to carry out further work to create concept designs and investigate local improvements in the Papakura town centre to improve the urban amenity and provide accessibility for local residents in October 2021.

15.     Auckland Transport released the Cycling and Micro-mobility Programme Business Case in April 2022, which outlines a programme of infrastructure improvements, non-infrastructure initiatives, policy and advocacy opportunities to realise 750,000 daily cycling trips in Auckland.

16.     The Cycling and Micro-mobility Programme Business Case did not propose any cycleways in Papakura as part of the recommended programme to be funded for the first ten years.

17.     With limited funding available to the Papakura Local Board, the concept designs and visualisations were developed to help promote the project and support funding applications through alternative funding streams.

18.     A concept study has been prepared considering short-term improvements to be made on connectivity between the train station and town centre. The study also built on the work that was completed as part of the feasibility study while also taking into account the 2018 Papakura Metropolitan Centre Framework for Action.

·    Option 1: Wood Street – Great South Road: Integrate Central Park to create a green avenue that connects through Great South Road with separated cycle facilities and an improved pedestrian environment.

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·    Option 2: Railway Street West – Broadway:  the best opportunity to create a distinct rail precinct. Connecting through Broadway to the town square with improved pedestrian facilities, wayfinding and separated cycle facilities.

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·    Option 3: Railway Street – Averill Street- Great South Road: This route offers the most direct connection to the town centre and Averill Street could support dedicated safe cycle facilities.

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19.     Part of the commissioned work also requested Arup to support and prepare applications to Auckland Council’s Streets for People and Waka Kotahi’s Innovating Streets programmes.

20.     In both cases, applications were not lodged by Arup on behalf of the Papakura Local Board. This is because Auckland Transport was going to make a single application on behalf of the Auckland Council family to the Waka Kotahi programme.

21.     A wayfinding strategy was recommended in the feasibility study 2021 to improve cyclists’ ability to easily and confidently find their way between Papakura train station, and Clevedon/the Hūnua Traverse.  However, any changes to signage would require the approval of the local road controlling authority - Auckland Transport.

22.     Given the safety concerns including high traffic volume, high speed, and narrow bridges associated with Papakura to Clevedon Road, Arup advised that it is considered unlikely that Auckland Transport would accept any changes to wayfinding that might make the route more attractive to cyclists without complementary investment in infrastructure upgrades to address the safety concerns.

23.     While the current approach being progressed by Auckland Transport does not appear to support the benefits of investing in cycleways in Papakura, there are other potential avenues that the Papakura Local Board could pursue to progress this project.

24.     A series of recommendations are proposed for the Papakura Local Board’s consideration:

·    Continue to advocate to Auckland Transport for prioritising cycle investment in Papakura

·    Continue to work with Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi to develop a strategy for implementing short-term solutions which improve connectivity between the train station and Papakura Town Centre

·    Continue to work with Auckland Transport, advocating for the findings from the feasibility study 2021 to be adopted and incorporated into Future Connect programme

·    Continue to identify and explore additional funding streams.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Auckland Transport has been approached for feedback on the feasible routes. Auckland Transport indicated further investigation and design work is needed to confirm cycle connections within the Papakura town centre with relevant funding secured.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The draft report was workshopped with the Papakura Local Board on 9 November 2022.

27.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes specifically:

·             A vibrant and prosperous local economy

·             A well-planned metropolitan centre for Papakura

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     All relevant mana whenua iwi were invited to participate in the hui at an early stage in the feasibility study process.  Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, and Te Ākitai Waiohua provided feedback on the feasibility study highlighting the strategic value of the project such as potential environmental benefits.

29.     There has been no engagement with mana whenua on the concept study.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The estimated cost for the combined feasible urban and rural routes identified is likely to be $20 million.  A further business case process is required to determine the preferred route and required budget allocation.

31.     With limited funding available to the Papakura Local Board, access to external funding streams will be required to realise the construction of the preferred route.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Delivery of a full cycle connection between Papakura and Clevedon is likely to be subject to funding constraints due to limited funding available to the Papakura Local Board.

33.     The Cycling and Micro-mobility Programme Business Case did not propose any cycleways in Papakura as part of the recommended programme to be funded for the first ten years.

34.     Papakura Local Board could further advocate to Auckland Transport for prioritising cycle investment in Papakura.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Once the Papakura Local Board receives the report, the Papakura Local Board could further advocate to Auckland Transport for prioritising cycle investment in Papakura as per report recommendations.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Papakura to Clevedon Cycleway Recommendations Report

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Luo Lei – Local Economic Development Advisor

Authorisers

John Norman – Head of Economic Places

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Approval for one new public road name, two new private road names and the extension of an existing road name at 13 Aeronautic Road, Takanini   

File No.: CP2022/15311

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Papakura Local Board to name one new public road and two new private roads, being commonly-owned access lots (COALs), created by way of a subdivision development at 13 Aeronautic Road, Takanini.

2.       To seek approval from the Papakura Local Board to extend an existing road name to a new road, created by way of a subdivision development at 13 Aeronautic Road, Takanini.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the Local Board’s approval.

4.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Aeronautic Developments LP, agent Kate Guy of McConnell Property has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the Local Board.

5.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

6.       The proposed names for the new private roads at 13 Aeronautic Road are:

COAL 1 in Pink

·    Long Spear Lane (Applicant Preferred)

·    Peraro Lane (Alternative 1)

·    Maurea Lane (Alternative 2)

COAL 2 in Pink

·    Pupahi Court (Applicant Preferred)

·    Purimu Court (Alternative 1)

·    Pukauri Court (Alternative 2)

7.       The proposed names for the new public road at 13 Aeronautic Road are:

Road to vest (Road 1 in Purple)

·    Karikari Crescent (Applicant Preferred)

·    Kuwha Street (Alternative 1)

·    Takarepo Street (Alternative 2)

8.       The existing road name to be extended to the new road (Road 2 in Purple) at 13 Aeronautic Road is:

·    Kapia Drive

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)         approves the names Long Spear Lane (COAL 1) and Pupahi Court (COAL 2) for the new private roads created by way of subdivision at 13 Aeronautic Road, Takanini, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90103130, resource consent references BUN60377791 and SUB60377793).

b)         approves the name Karikari Crescent (Road 1) for the new public road created by way of subdivision at 13 Aeronautic Road, Takanini, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90103130, resource consent references BUN60377791 and SUB60377793).

c)         approves the extension of the existing road name Kapia Drive for the new road (Road 2) created by way of subdivision at 13 Aeronautic Road, Takanini, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90103130, resource consent references BUN60377791 and SUB60377793).

Horopaki

Context

9.       Resource consent reference BUN60377791 (subdivision reference number SUB60377793) was issued in April 2020 for the construction of 18 new residential freehold units and two commonly-owned access lots (COAL).

10.     Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A and B.

11.     In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

12.     Therefore, in this development, only two of the new COALs and the public road to vest require a road name because they serve more than five lots. The other COALs do not need to be named as they serve less than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the COALs that require a name are labelled.

13.     The new dwellings served by the other three COALs that do not require a road name will have street numbers allocated off the newly named public road to vest (Road 1).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

15.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

16.     Theme: The proposed names all reflect a historical and/or landscape/environmental link to the local area.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

COAL 1

Long Spear Lane

(Applicant Preferred)

(Meaning) In wet places a long spear with a handle was used to locate kauri gum. Link to the local area. History of site – Papakura kauri gum fields.

Peraro Lane

(Alternative 1)

(Meaning) Māori word meaning scimitar shell - a long bivalve mollusc with thin, fragile shells with the hinge one-fifth of the way along the longest side. White with a thin, dark brown coating. Link to the local area. History of waterways connected to the site – gathering shellfish.

Maurea Lane

(Alternative 2)

(Meaning) Māori word meaning tiger shell – a univalve mollusc of the rocky shore found from low tide level to depths of over 100m under rock ledges. Mottled reddish-brown shell is tall and very pointed. Link to the local area. History of waterways connected to the site – gathering shellfish.

COAL 2

Pupahi Court

(Applicant Preferred)

(Meaning) to make camp, pitch camp. Link to the local area. History of site – Papakura Kauri gum fields.

Purimu Court

(Alternative 1)

(Meaning) Māori word meaning purple cockle, - a fan-shaped, bivalve mollusc that lives in muddy sand from low tide to about 180m. It has a ribbed shell, white to pinkish outside, and whiteish with a patch of purple on the inside. Link to the local area. History of waterways connected to site – gathering shellfish.

Pukauri Court

(Alternative 2)

(Meaning) Māori word meaning frilled venus shell, - a bivalve mollusc that lives in sand near low tide. It has a heavy shell with frills on the outside. Link to local area. History of waterways connected to site – gathering shellfish.

ROAD 1

Karikari Crescent

(Applicant Preferred)

(Meaning) To dig. Link to the local area. History of site – Papakura kauri gum fields.

Kuwha Street

(Alternative 1)

(Meaning) Māori word meaning elegant venus shell - a bivalve mollusc that burrows into soft mudstone or sandstone near low tide. It has a long angular shell with sharp ridges, grey to pale brown. Link to local area. History of waterways connected to site – gathering shellfish.

Takarepo Street

(Alternative 2)

(Meaning) Māori word meaning pink sunset shell, - a triangular-shaped bivalve mollusc commonly deeply buried in sand near low tide. Narrow shell, pinkish outside with bands of reddish-purple and is reddish-purple on the inside. Link to the local area. History of waterways connected to site – gathering shellfish.

 

17.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

18.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

19.     Road Type: ‘Court’ and ‘Lane’ are an acceptable road type for the new private roads, suiting the form and layout of the COALs. ‘Crescent’ and ‘Street’ are acceptable road types for the new public road, suiting the form and layout of the road.

20.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

25.     On 5 October 2022 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Tamaterā (Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Ngāti Whanaunga (Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated)

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

26.     The following responses were received:

Date

Iwi

Comments

5 October 2022

Waikato – Tainui

Waikato Tainui supports the use of the Māori names and defers to local mana whenua for the

last say.”

6 October 2022

Te Ākitai Waiohua

Te Aakitai Waiohua does not oppose the suggested and alternative names put forward.”

6 October 2022

Te Ahiwaru

On behalf of Te Ahiwaru, we acknowledge and appreciate the theme for namings proposed.

We are encouraged particularly by the enthusiastic inclusion of Te Reo Māori.

A slight suggestion would be that these names, dialect and spelling are cross checked exclusively with Te Akitai Waiohua, as specific Takaanini (Tuupuna) descendants.”

 

27.     As identified above, Te Ahiwaru have expressed their support of the proposed names showing their appreciation of the theme and use of Te Reo Māori. Te Ākitai Waiohua have also indicated through their response that the group has no issues with the proposed names.

28.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

30.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database.  LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

141

b

Attachment B - Location Map

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amy Cao - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Diagram

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Appointments to external organisations

File No.: CP2022/15509

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint elected members to external organisations and agree the process for appointing the single local board representative to the Local Government New Zealand National Council.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have a statutory responsibility to communicate with community organisations and special interest groups within their local board area. These organisations range from business associations, statutory organisations, trusts, to entities for which the council has the right to appoint directors (known as council organisations (COs)). Elected members are often invited to participate in these external organisations in various capacities.

3.       This report provides detail about these various categories of appointments to external organisations to inform appointments by the local board.

4.       Attachment A to this report provides details of the external organisations that have existing arrangements with the local board or for which a relationship is prescribed in policy, such as business associations running Business Improvement District (BID) programmes. Local boards are being asked to make appointments to these organisations at this time and to consider any further appointments as part of their local board engagement plan and strategy for the term.

5.       Local boards are also collectively required to appoint a single representative (to represent all 21 local boards) to the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) National Council, to fill one of three seats provided for Auckland Council. This report recommends a process for making a joint appointment.

6.       Staff recommend that local boards consider appointing a lead and an alternate for various organisations for the 2022-2025 triennium. The function of alternate representative is to act as a backup to and to perform the appointee duties, including attendance at meetings, in the appointee’s absence.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint a representative and alternate to each of the external organisations listed in Appendix A for the 2022-2025 triennium.

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson to work with other local board chairpersons to form a selection panel to appoint a local board representative to the LGNZ National Council as soon as possible.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Participation in community organisations is an established part of an elected member's role and having a relationship with community organisations and interest groups is an important part of the local board role.

8.       Several external organisations provide for the formal participation of representatives of the Auckland Council in their affairs. These can include arrangements via:

·        a trust deed that provides for a council representative on an organisation’s board, committee, or other function

·        provisions in law, policy or resource consent that require council representative arrangements. For example, a regulation providing for a community liaison committee or a resource consent requiring the formation of a committee with elected member representation

·        other partnerships or associations entered into by the council which provide for elected member representation.

9.       These arrangements often include other duties depending on the organisation, the nature of that organisation’s work and/or the relationship with the council.

Council organisations (COs) and other formal arrangements

10.     Council organisations (COs) are companies or entities in which Council has the right to appoint 1 or more of the trustees, directors, or managers (however described) of the company or entity, but Council has less than 50% control. An ‘entity’ includes any partnership, trust, arrangement for the sharing of profits, union of interest, co-operation, joint venture, or other similar arrangement; but does not include a committee or joint committee of a local authority. 

11.     There are various other entities that have been set up for a specific purpose some of which are formal documents such as a resource consent. These includes consultative groups such as the Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group, community forums, community impact forums (Department of Corrections) and others.

12.     External organisations relevant to the local board are listed in Appendix A.

Representatives to business associations with Business Improvement District (BID) programmes

13.     Business associations are independent organisations that are governed by their own constitutions but often work closely with the council because of the roles they play and interest in local business communities (town and commercial centres).

14.     Some business associations participate in Auckland Council’s BID programme – which sets a framework to provide BID-operating business associations (BIDs) with BID targeted rate funding, so those business associations can act for the benefit of the specified business area.  Business associations that operate a BID programme are also required to work with Auckland Council to ensure there is accountability for the BID targeted rates collected by the council.

15.     Auckland Council’s BID Policy 2022 sets the framework for governance, accountability, and management of the BID programmes. The BID Policy outlines the role of the local boards and the local board representative in relation to BIDs. It recognises that within Auckland Council, local boards are the primary relationship lead with BIDs.

16.     Local boards have allocated decision-making responsibilities relating to BID programmes, including, but not limited to:

·        advising on BID programme strategic direction (with the business association) and providing feedback to the business association regarding its annual BID programme presentation to the local board

·        approving establishment of new BID programme and boundary area within the parameters set by the Auckland Council BID policy

·        approval of any changes or amendments to an existing BID programme boundary area

·        recommending to the Governing Body BID programme targeted rate grant amounts and proposed changes to a BID targeted rate mechanism.

17.     To manage the relationship with BIDs and ensure adequate information sharing between local boards and these entities, the BID Policy provide that local boards will appoint a local board to represent the local board and liaise (with the BID) on their behalf.

18.     The local board representative role supports the governance-to-governance relationship between the two organisations and is not operationally focused.  Only the local board representative, or the alternate representative if the appointed representative is not available, may represent the local board at BID executive committee and General Meetings, but this does not prohibit BIDs from engaging with other local board members. Depending on the relationship, between the parties, the involvement of local board representatives on business associations may go further to include:

·        an invitation that the local board representative be appointed to the business association executive committee with speaking rights

·        bestowal of voting rights by the business association on the local board’s representative.  The bestowal of voting rights is not recommended.  This is to avoid any conflicts of interests (real or perceived), or disputes between the local board and the BID.  However, provided the BID and the local board representative are comfortable that risks can be managed, the BID Policy does not prevent this.

Other business associations not running BID programmes

19.     Often other business associations who are not running BID programmes find that having a dedicated liaison is helpful. This is especially useful if the business association intends to join the BID programme in the future. In that regard, local boards are encouraged to appoint a liaison representative, and an alternate if desired, for all business associations in its area.

20.     The list of business associations relevant to this local board is included in Attachment A.

Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) National Council

21.     The LGNZ Rules were amended in 2019 to remove Auckland Council from Zone 1 and to provide for Auckland’s representation at the National Council. Given its sheer size and shared governance structure, Auckland will now operate as its own LGNZ ‘zone’ and of its three seats on the LGNZ National Council, one is earmarked for a representative that is appointed by the 21 local boards. The other seats are filled by the Mayor of Auckland (or his alternate) and a representative to be appointed by the Governing Body.

22.     The LGNZ rules require appointments to the National Council to be made within eight weeks of the triennial local government elections.

23.     In 2019, local boards agreed to delegate authority to the local board chairpersons and the 21 chairpersons formed a selection panel to appoint a single representative of the local boards to the LGNZ National Council. This process enabled a representative to be appointed within the necessary time and was an efficient and appropriate process for making shared decisions.

24.     Staff are recommending a similar process for this term, whereby local boards delegate to chairpersons the power to form a selection panel and for the selection panel to collectively to make the LGNZ National Council representative selection at their meeting in early December 2022.

Appointments for the purpose of managing relationships and communications

25.     The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 specifically provides that a local board must communicate with community organisations and special interest groups within its local board area (section 13(2)(c)). In the past few terms, some local boards appointed dedicated leads to manage these relationships and ensure good communication lines with specific organisations and interest groups. These members act as a liaison between the local board and these organisations or groups.

26.     While appointing representatives is one way to maintain good relationships and open communication, it is important that this is not done in isolation from the work of the local board during the term. In that regard, staff consider that a conversation about the local boards engagement plan for the term can best inform decisions on appointments that are made purely for the purpose of engagement and communications. This would ensure there is strategic value in these appointments and that there is a clear distinction from other appointments being recommended in this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

27.     The appointments outlined in this report are not all similar and the responsibilities and duties of an elected member will vary depending on the type of appointment and organisation. Key considerations for appointment decisions should include:

Ensuring appointees have the capacity and skills to undertake the responsibilities

28.     This report attempts to outline the differences between the various appointments so that potential nominees can assess if they are the right fit. Some of the roles require members to represent the interests of the Council or perform governance functions. Others may require a lot of time commitment for meetings.

29.     A great deal of appointments require attendance of members at either monthly or quarterly meetings of these external organisations.

30.     Elected members are encouraged to consider taking on responsibilities only if they can commit to the time and effort that is required.

31.     Any other additional considerations will be included in the list in Appendix A.

Managing conflicts of interests

32.     The primary role of elected members appointed to external organisations is representing the council. However, depending on their activities, these arrangements may impact their decision-making role within the council.

33.     Conflicts of interest can sometimes arise in relation to such appointments, for example where the appointment involves a legal duty to act in the organisation’s best interest (e.g. as a director or trustee). A conflict may also arise where the appointed representatives become heavily involved and very invested in the affairs and decisions relating to that external organisation. In these situations, a conflict could arise when the local board is making certain types of decision in relation to the other organisation.

34.     In order to reduce the risk of conflicts, elected members should not take part in the management of these organisations.  Unless there is a specific arrangement otherwise, the role as an appointee should be confined to attending meetings, voting at annual or general meetings and acting as a conduit of information.

35.     From 20 November 2022 new amendments to the Local Government Act 2002 come into force and require elected members to make a pecuniary interest return within 120 days of coming into office and before the last day of February in subsequent years, which includes declaring all appointments that a member has by virtue of being an elected member. Having an interest does not necessarily mean there is a conflict, but it is important to be mindful of any perceptions of conflict if elected members are actively involved with community groups, even in their official capacity.

Accountability

36.     Appointed representatives are strongly encouraged to make regular reports to the local board on their activities and as appropriate, progress made by that organisation on key issues that is relevant to the local board and council.

Official capacity

37.     Elected representatives are delegated representation roles in their capacity as elected local board members. Should they cease to become an elected member, their appointment would be automatically repealed. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     This decision is procedural in nature and is not expected to result in any increase to greenhouse gas emissions nor will it be adversely impacted by the predicted effects of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     Auckland Council staff support local boards in programmes and partnerships involving business associations and other external organisations that may be covered in this report.

40.     Staff in the Governance Division provide support to members who are involved with the LGNZ National Council.

41.     Other than that, these appointment decisions facilitate positive relationships with key partners and are not expected to have any significant adverse impact on the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     Local boards are generally committed to nurturing and maintaining relationships with key stakeholders. This report and recommendations align with what local boards want.

43.     There may be an interest in making more appointments or arrangements of this nature for the purpose of managing relationships and ensuring key community groups have dedicated liaisons that make their engagement with the local board easier. Staff are supportive of this approach, however, in order to ensure these arrangements are meaningful and useful, the local board is strongly encouraged to consider making any additional appointments in the context of a discussion about its engagement strategy for the term.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     This is a procedural decision that is not considered to have specific implications for Māori. Where relevant, any specific arrangements for Māori co-governance and co-management entities will be addressed in a dedicated report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     The decision to appoint elected members to outside organisations is procedural in nature so does not have any financial implications.

46.     Where financial decisions relating to these external organisations are taken, the implications of those decisions and these appointments, where appropriate and relevant, will be assessed accordingly.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     There are some reputational risks that may arise if elected members appointed to external organisations do not meet the expectations for their role. These include attendance at meetings and making themselves available or accessible to the groups to which they are appointed. To manage these risks, elected members are encouraged to carefully consider these roles and requirements and only take these commitments on if they can honour them.

48.     To mitigate the risk of actual and perceived conflicts when can undermine decisions of the council, elected members are required to include the appointments made in this report in their annual declarations.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     Once appointed, staff will prepare correspondence from the chairperson to these external organisations introducing the new local board and informing them of the appointed representatives for their organisation.

50.     Following the delegation of authority to the chairperson, provided all local boards agree to this recommendation, staff will bring the matter of the LGNZ National Council appointment to the next meeting of local board chairpersons for a decision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Papakura Local Board 2022 External Organisations Appointments List

151

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lee Manaia - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Local board appointments and delegations for the 2022-2025 electoral term

File No.: CP2022/15515

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make internal appointments and delegations to manage the workload and enable the discharge of duties and responsibilities in a timely manner.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards are responsible for a wide range of council decisions. As per their legislative role, most of these decisions relate to non-regulatory responsibilities of the council allocated to local boards.

3.       In the first term of Auckland Council, all 21 local boards (and the Governing Body) made a general delegation to the Chief Executive of all their responsibilities, duties and powers subject to the exclusions, restrictions and clarifications set out in the Chief Executive’s Delegations Register. The exercise of responsibilities, duties and powers delegated from local boards is subject to the Local Board Delegation Protocols (Protocols). The Protocols require a range of decisions to be reported to the local board and require that certain decisions made by staff be subject to consultation with the local board, through a nominated local board member (or portfolio holder).

4.       Local boards have also been delegated some decisions relating to regulatory processes from the Governing Body. These include giving input into the resource consent process and making objections to liquor licence applications. Some of these decisions are subject to statutory timeframes so having individual members take the lead on such matters ensures the local board can participate effectively in these processes.

5.       To enable effective and efficient decision-making, it is appropriate that individual members undertake the following duties and responsibilities:

a)   Provision of local board views and feedback during staff consultation on general landowner approvals

b)   Provision of local board views and feedback during staff consultation on activities that are subject to regulatory approval e.g film applications and events

c)   Provision of formal feedback on resource consent-related matters, specifically input into resource consent notification decisions and provision of local board views, if any, on publicly notified resource consents; includes providing views, if required, on any council decisions relating to the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020

d)   Preparation of and submission of objections, if any, to liquor licence applications and authority to speak at relevant hearings, if required

e)   Representation at meetings of joint committees, working groups and other bodies which the local board is a party of or invited to.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint a nominated contact, and an alternate, for staff consultations over landowner approval applications (excluding applications for filming and events)

b)      kopou / appoint a nominated contact, and an alternate, for staff consultation on applications for filming, events and other activities on local parks and local facilities that also require regulatory approval;

c)       kopou / appoint a lead, and an alternate, for liquor licence matters and delegate authority to that member, including any alternate, to prepare and provide objections, if any, and speak to any local board views at any hearings on applications for liquor licences

d)      kopou / appoint a lead, and an alternate, on resource consent matters and delegate authority to that member, including any alternate, to:

i)          provide the local board views, if any, on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

ii)         prepare and provide local board’s views, if any, on notified resource consents and speak to those views at any hearings if required

iii)        provide the local board’s views on matters relating to or generated by the COVID-19 (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020 while this legislation remains in force

e)      kopou / appoint a representative, and an alternate, to meetings of the LGNZ Auckland Zone and to take the lead on matters relating to this forum

f)       tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson to work with other local board chairpersons to select shared representatives to council working groups, working parties and other internal bodies, where there is a limited number of local board representatives to be selected from amongst all 21 or clusters of local boards

g)      kopou / appoint a representative, and an alternate, to the Manukau Harbour Forum joint committee

h)      kohuki / consider any other appointments and delegations that may be appropriate, to manage the workload and responsibilities of the local board.

Horopaki

Context

6.       To enable the effective and efficient conduct of a local board’s business, the Local Government Act 2002 (the Act) provides that a local board may delegate to a committee, subcommittee, or member of the local board, or to an officer of council, any of its responsibilities, duties, or powers, except for the exceptions listed in clause 36D, schedule 7 of the Act. The responsibilities that cannot be delegated include the duty to identify and communicate the interests and preferences of the people in the local board area in relation to the content of the strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.

7.       It is standard practice for local boards to delegate responsibilities for specific tasks and duties to individual members, to enable those tasks and duties to be discharged in a timely manner.

8.       Local boards have also made general delegations to the Chief Executive which enable staff to make a range of other decisions on behalf of the local board. Some decisions delegated to the Chief Executive are conditional on consultation with the local board, so this report includes appointments of representatives with whom staff can consult and seek local board views from.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       Local boards have been allocated decision-making responsibility for various non-regulatory activities including the use of and activities within local parks and local community and recreation facilities.  Considering and determining requests by the public and other third parties for the use of these parks and facilities is therefore within the allocated responsibilities of Local Boards. Auckland Council refers to these decisions as “landowner consents” or “landowner approvals”.

10.     Through the general delegation to the Chief Executive, all local boards have delegated landowner approval decisions to staff subject to consultation with the local board. This enables this customer-facing process to be administered efficiently.

11.     The Protocols provide that the nominated local board member can request staff (who are undertaking the consultation) to refer the landowner approval applications to a local board business meeting for a decision. This approach is typically exercised sparingly and in relation to controversial issues of particular interest to the Local Board or local community. Referring the matter to the local board for decision adds a considerable amount of time and resource to the process as it requires staff to follow the reporting timeframes for business meetings and slows down council’s response to the customer.

12.     Separately Auckland Council takes regulatory decisions in relation to applications made under its Bylaws and the Resource Management Act 1991. Regulatory decisions sit with the Governing Body and are often delegated to staff or to independent commissioners. Before taking decisions, the Governing Body must consider the views and preferences expressed by a local board where the decisions affect the local board area.

13.     This report recommends the appointment of local board members to take the lead on providing these approvals and views.

General landowner approvals

14.     The role of the local board’s nominated lead for general landowner approvals is to be the point of consultation for staff. The lead’s responsibility is to:

·    receive information about the proposed activity which requires landowner approval

·    provide views, if any, about the impact of the proposal on the local park and the local community

·    maintain a focus on governance matters noting that staff who maintain the park and undertake operational duties will be identifying the relevant operational issues

·    ensure that reasons are given to support the views based on relevant and not irrelevant considerations

·    consult other members of the local board, if appropriate, and collate their feedback, if any, to give to staff

·    provide views, if any, in a timely manner (staff recommend nominated leads strive to provide feedback within 5 days, if possible) and,

·    provide regular updates to the local board on landowner approval applications received as appropriate.

15.     The exercise of council’s general powers to make landowner decisions is not unconstrained. Whether taken by staff or at the full local board level, decision-makers must ensure decisions are made in accordance with statutory and common and public law principles.

Filming

16.     Screen Auckland (part of Tātaki Auckland Unlimited) is the agency in charge of permitting applications for filming in the Auckland region. They also facilitate the request for landowner approvals relating to film applications.

17.     Due to recent growth in screen industry activity, Screen Auckland is now processing approximately 1000 permit applications per year. This number is predicted to continue to increase as the film industry recovers from COVID-19 restrictions.

18.     Screen Auckland’s service level commitment is to process film applications within three to five working days. These timeframes reflect the nature of this industry and is line with the ‘film-friendly’ direction in the Auckland Film Protocols but it adds pressure to internal consultation processes.

19.     The recommended timeframe, for consulting with local boards on filming applications, is two working days. These tight timeframes also mean that referring the matter to the full local board will most likely result in cancellation of the application as applicants will likely just opt for a different location. In this regard, to meet council’s service level commitments, the local boards are being encouraged not to refer film applications to the full local board for consideration.

20.     The role of the local board’s film lead is to be the point of consultation for staff processing applications for film permits on local parks. The lead’s responsibility is to:

·    receive information about filming applications on local parks

·    provide views, if any, on how the activity may impact the local park and local communities

·    maintain a focus on governance matters noting that operational staff will be identifying any operational issues

·    ensure reasons are given to support the views and that these are based on relevant and not irrelevant considerations

·    respond within two working days (staff will assume the local board does not have any feedback to give if there is no response received within this timeframe) and,

·    provide updates to the local board on their nominated lead activities as appropriate.

Events

21.     The Protocols require that a nominated local board lead is consulted, on behalf of the local board, on event applications that meet certain triggers. These triggers are:

·    applications to hold events on council-owned land in the local board area that require regulatory approval and involve one or more of the following matters:

o complete or substantial closure of the public open space

o more than 500 people

o road closure

o liquor

o ticketed event.

22.     The role of the local board’s events lead is to be the point of consultation for staff processing event permits on local parks. The lead’s responsibility is to:

·    receive information about event application on a local park, when the above triggers are met

·    provide views, if any, on how the event activity may impact the local park and local communities

·    maintain a focus on governance matters noting that staff who maintain the park and undertake operational duties will be identifying any operational issues e.g. need for traffic management etc

·    ensure reasons are given to support the views and that these are based on relevant and not irrelevant considerations

·    respond in a timely manner (staff recommend nominated leads strive to provide feedback within 5 days, if possible)

·    provide updates to the local board on their nominated lead activities as appropriate.

23.     Staff are also required under the Protocols to notify the nominated local board member of areas relating to the event that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk and decisions to approve events on council owned land in the local board area. The nominated lead will be the primary point of contact for these communications.

Liquor licence matters

24.     The District Licensing Committees consider and grant or renew applications for liquor licences and manager’s certificates. When a business applies for a new liquor licence (on-licence, off-licence, club licence, or special licence) or a renewal, these applications are publicly notified.

25.     The Governing Body has delegated to local boards the power to object to liquor licensing applications under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (GB/2014/103).

26.     Local boards have 15 working days from the date of a public notice of liquor licence applications (new or renewals) to provide an objection on the matter. The District Licensing Committee is required to convene a public hearing whenever an objection has been filed unless the application is withdrawn, the objector does not require a public hearing or it believes that the objection is vexatious and based on grounds outside the scope of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.

27.     As per the practice in previous terms, this report recommends delegating responsibility to an individual local board member to monitor public notices and lodge objections, if required, on time.

28.     The nominated member’s authority extends to representing the local board at any public hearing that considers the local board’s objection. Where the nominated member is not available to attend a public hearing to speak to the local board’s objection, the alternate member or chairperson or other member agreed by the local board can represent the local board.

Input to resource consent matters

29.     Decisions to grant resource consents are regulatory decisions of the council that sit with the Governing Body and are delegated to staff.

30.     Governing Body has resolved that Local boards will be given the opportunity, within the statutory timeframes, to provide feedback, if any, on whether resource consent applications should be publicly notified (GB/2011/156). 

31.     Local Boards can also provide views on resource consent applications once they have been notified (and may speak to these views at hearings). 

32.     Resource consent processes are subject to statutory timeframes. To ensure the local board can participate effectively in this process, it is recommended that the local board appoint and authorise an individual member to take the lead in developing and providing feedback when applications are received.

33.     Local boards, in previous terms, have identified a list of issues that automatically trigger their feedback on resource consent matters. When these issues or ‘triggers’ present themselves in a resource consent application, staff will email the nominated lead copies of applications for feedback. Local board leads are encouraged to provide comments on the matter within 3 working days.

34.     Considerations by the lead, on behalf of the local board, should include how or if the proposed activity may adversely affect people in the local board area.

35.     If the local board desires, the nominated lead for resource consent matters can also be the member in charge of assisting the local board in developing its feedback on other planning matters such as plan changes and notices of requirement. These matters cannot be delegated so feedback, if any, must be decided on by the full board.

Auckland Zone/LGNZ

36.     Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) is an incorporated society (New Zealand Local Government Association Inc) which represents the national interests of councils around New Zealand and leads best practice in the local government sector.

37.     The objectives of LGNZ include promoting and advocating matters affecting the national interests of local government. LGNZ holds regular dialogue with government, parliamentarians and government agencies and provides thought leadership and research on matters of interest to local authorities.

38.     LGNZ members are organized in geographically based zones and sectors generally. In 2019, LGNZ Rules were amended to remove Auckland from Zone 1 with an expectation that Auckland Council, with its 21 local boards, will operate as its own zone group (Auckland Zone).

39.     In the previous term, Auckland Zone held quarterly meetings with the LGNZ President and Chief Executive. These meetings were co-chaired by the councillor and local board member who are appointed to the Local Government New Zealand National Council. Each local board appointed a representative to attend meetings of the Auckland Zone and take the lead on all matters relating thereto.

Delegation to chairperson – selection of shared representatives

40.     From time to time during the term, local boards may be invited to appoint a limited number of representatives to working parties, advisory groups, and other groupings that the Governing Body may set up. The selection of a small number of people to represent many local boards requires local boards to work together.

41.     In the previous term, chairpersons were critical to reaching these joint decisions. Chairpersons can work as a selection committee (utilising their monthly Chairs’ Forum) to discuss and agree jointly on shared representatives for all local boards as and when required. In the previous term, this was also a process authorised by local boards for the selection of the single local board representative to the Local Government New Zealand National Council and a representative to the Establishment Unit Board for the light rail project.

42.     As representatives of their local boards, chairpersons can also work together in clusters to select representatives from different parts of the region, where this is required.

Appointment to joint committees and other internal groups

Manukau Harbour Forum

43.     The Manukau Harbour Forum is a joint committee established by the nine local boards surrounding the Manukau Harbour. The joint committee structure of this forum enables these local boards to engage in collective and collaborative action to achieve improvements in water quality and the natural biodiversity of the Manukau Harbour and agreed joint actions that help improve the amenity value of the harbour.

44.     As appointing bodies of the Manukau Harbour Forum, the nine local boards and the forum itself work collaboratively with mana whenua, the government, non-government organisations, businesses and communities that live on the harbour and its contributing waterways and estuaries.

45.     Each local board appoints a member who represents the local board at meetings of the forum and takes the lead on all matters relating to the forum. Appointing an alternate can ensure the local board will be able to have a representative at meetings of the Manukau Harbour Forum should the appointed member not be available.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     This report recommends the appointment of nominated local board members to ensure that council can undertake its operational and statutory duties in a timely manner, while receiving local board input and decision-making in matters that are of local importance.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     This report seeks to appoint nominated local board members to perform specific functions.

48.     Any local board member who is appointed as a nominated board member should ensure that they represent the wider local board views and preferences on each matter before them.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have a positive or negative impact for Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have financial implications on Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     If local boards choose not to appoint a nominated board member for landowner approvals, film applications and events, staff will need to seek feedback from the chairperson. This could potentially lead to a busy workload for the local board chairperson, in addition to their existing duties.

52.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide views on notified applications, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to submission closing dates and miss the opportunity to have their feedback presented and heard at a hearing.

53.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide their views on liquor licences, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to closings dates for submissions not coinciding with political meetings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Nominated local board members providing feedback will engage with staff acting in accordance with the Local Board Delegation Protocols.

55.     Training for local board members will be offered on the Resource Management Act 1991 and the preparation of effective feedback for applications notified as part of a Resource Management Act 1991 process.

56.     Nominated local board members (and alternates) who are delegated the responsibility of preparing and providing objections and speaking to the local board’s objection at District Licensing Committee Hearings should sign-up to receive alcohol notices. This will ensure that they hear about new applications as soon as they are open for comment.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lee Manaia - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Arrangements for making urgent decisions

File No.: CP2022/15862

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse a decision-making arrangement for use by the local board when urgent decisions are required but it is not practicable to convene a meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards hold decision-making meetings as regularly as they consider appropriate to discharge their responsibilities. A monthly (ordinary) meeting schedule helps staff schedule reports and decisions during the term and ensures elected members' attendance. When a need for an urgent decision arises outside of this schedule, the law allows for extraordinary or emergency meetings.

3.       Extraordinary meetings require the chief executive to provide each local board member with three working days’ notice (or if the meeting is called by resolution, within a lesser period of notice as specified in the resolution, being not less than 24 hours). Emergency meetings require the person calling the meeting (or a person acting on their behalf) to provide 24 hours of notice to local board members and the chief executive.  Extraordinary or emergency meetings are often not practicable to organise, and the short notice period may result in failure to achieve a quorum. In these circumstances, an arrangement for decision-making without a meeting is necessary to enable the local board to deal efficiently with urgent matters.

4.       In the last few terms, all 21 local boards adopted an urgent decision-making arrangement which consisted of a conditional delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board when it cannot meet to make them. The exercise of this delegation has previously been subject to authorisation, to confirm that the decision requested is urgent and that it is not practicable to call an extraordinary or emergency meeting.

5.       Staff recommend that this process is adopted in the current term for use as and when required.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board, if the local board is unable to meet

b)      confirm that the Local Area Manager, chairperson, and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the use of the local board’s urgent decision mechanism by approving the request for an urgent decision in writing

c)       note that all urgent decisions made, including written advice which supported these decisions, will be included on the agenda of the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) provides that a local authority must hold the meetings it needs for the good government of its area.

7.       The LGA also provides that local boards may delegate to committees, other subordinate decision-making bodies, staff, or members of the local board any of its responsibilities and powers for the purposes of efficiency and effectiveness in the conduct of local board business.

8.       The LGA clarifies that some local board decisions are not able to be delegated, including the duty to identify and communicate the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the content of the strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council (clause 36D, schedule 7 LGA). 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urgent Decisions delegation

9.       The recommended arrangement is one that local boards have had in place over the past few terms. This arrangement has generally worked well to enable responsiveness to situations requiring decisions that arise over the Christmas/New Year holiday period, emergency decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic, and other unforeseen circumstances. This mechanism has enabled timely submissions to central government consultations, something that is usually subject to very constrained timeframes.

10.     The urgent decision-making arrangements involve a delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson (subject to the authorisation process set out below), to make urgent decisions required before the next meeting if it is not practicable to hold an extraordinary or emergency meeting.

Authorisation

11.     The delegation to make urgent decisions is subject to authorisation. The authorisers will approve the use of the urgent decision mechanism if they are satisfied that:

a)      the decision is required urgently, i.e., before the next planned meeting of the local board, and

b)      it is not practicable in the circumstances to call an extraordinary or emergency meeting of the local board.

12.     The authorisers will include the chairperson, deputy chairperson and the Local Area Manager (or their nominee). Their considerations should include the significance of the decision, including whether this is likely to be controversial or not, and the ability to meet statutory and logistical requirements for an extraordinary or emergency meeting in the particular circumstances.

Request for urgent decision

13.     Requests for an urgent decision should outline:

a)      the decisions or resolutions sought

b)      the nature of the issue

c)      the reason for urgency.

Decision-making requirements

14.     Elected members exercising the urgent decision delegation must make their decision in accordance with the decision-making principles and requirements in the LGA and Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and they must determine the best way to fulfil the requirements laid out in that legislation. These requirements include:

·        identifying and assessing all reasonably practicable options for achieving the decision’s purpose and assessing those options in terms of their advantages and disadvantages (s 77 LGA)

·        if it is a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, considering the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with ancestral lands, water, sites, waahi tapu, valued flora and fauna, and other taonga (s 77(1)(c) LGA)

·        considering the views and preferences of people likely to be affected by, or have an interest in, the decision (s 78 LGA).

15.     Elected members require quality advice to inform good decisions. Where the request for an urgent decision has come from staff, staff should provide their advice in the Auckland Council report format. It may not always be possible for staff to produce comprehensive reports within constrained timeframes, so in such circumstances they should endeavour to provide sufficient information in an appropriate format, such as a memorandum.

Public accountability

16.     Urgent decisions made under delegated authority should be published on the agenda of the next ordinary meeting of the local board. The information to be published must include the urgent decision and all relevant information provided to the decision-makers, provided it is not confidential.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     This decision is procedural in nature and is not affected by climate impacts nor will it result in any changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

18.     The urgent decision mechanism enables urgent decisions to be made in a timely manner and this makes it a useful tool for responding to any climate change-related emergency.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The urgent decision-making mechanism proposed in this report enables the council group to respond to situations requiring urgent decisions in a timely manner when it is not practical to call the full local board together.

20.     These decisions include, for example, local board input to council submissions that are provided whenever there is a central government consultation. The timeframes for these submissions can be very constrained and it is crucial that local board input is provided sooner rather than later, so that it can be considered by the Governing Body (or its committees) who adopt the submission on behalf of Auckland Council.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This report outlines the local board urgent decision-making arrangement that can be used when it is not practical to call the full local board together.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     This report concerns a procedural matter and is not considered to have any specific implications for Māori.

23.     When making urgent decisions under the delegation, decision makers will need to consider the impact of each decision on Māori, their land and other taonga, as appropriate.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There are no financial implications arising from the procedural decision sought through this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The authorisation step provides an opportunity to assess and confirm the urgency and to decide if it is practicable to have an extraordinary or emergency meeting. This step is intended to help ensure the delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson is used in appropriate circumstances.

26.     The chairperson and deputy chairperson are strongly encouraged to seek views from other local board members when making urgent decisions to ensure the urgent decision reflects those views to the extent possible.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     If the local board adopts the urgent decision-making mechanism proposed in this report, this will provide a process that will be used as and when required.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Isobelle Robb - Infocouncil Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Adoption of a business meeting schedule

File No.: CP2022/15519

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Papakura Local Board meeting schedule for the period November 2022 to September 2025.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules. In particular, clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings. Sections 46, 46A and 47 in Part 7 of LGOIMA require that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting, and that local board meetings are open to the public.

3.       Adopting a meeting schedule helps with meeting these requirements. It also allows for a planned approach to workloads and ensures that local board members have clarity about their commitments.

4.       A draft meeting schedule for the period November 2022 to September 2025 has been developed and is included below for adoption by the local board.

5.       Frequency: One business meeting per month (excluding January) is sufficient for formal business to be considered. There are some instances for which the local board may need to have additional meetings for important decisions such as local board plans, local board agreements or to provide input into regional strategies, policies and plans. Local board meeting schedules will be updated with any additional meetings once those details are confirmed. Outside of its scheduled meetings, local boards can call extraordinary and/or emergency meetings as and when required.

6.       Timing: The standard practice in previous terms is to hold the monthly ordinary meeting in the final half of the month (weeks three or four) which enables local boards to prepare for any workshop items for these meetings in the first half of the month.

7.       Other matters: Commencing the business meeting during business hours will enable meetings to be productive, maximise access to staff and ensures best use of resources. Having the meetings in a set location ensures consistency and ability to use technology that is built into council facilities as required. This can include the use of screens, speakers and Wi-Fi connections that enable remote attendance.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      adopt the meeting schedule outlined below for the period November 2022 to September 2025

DATE

TIME

VENUE

Business Meeting

 

Wednesday 22 November 2023

Wednesday 07 December 2023

Wednesday 15 February 2023

Wednesday 22 February 2023

Wednesday 22 March 2023

Wednesday 26 April 2023

Wednesday 24 May 2023

Wednesday 28 June 2023

Wednesday 26 July 2023

Wednesday 23 August 2023

Wednesday 27 September 2023

Wednesday 25 October 2023

Wednesday 22 November 2023

Wednesday 13 December 2023

Wednesday 28 February 2024

Wednesday 27 March 2024

Wednesday 24 April 2024

Wednesday 22 May 2024

Wednesday 26 June 2024

Wednesday 24 July 2024

Wednesday 28 August 2024

Wednesday 25 September 2024

Wednesday 23 October 2024

Wednesday 27 November 2024

Wednesday 11 December 2024

Wednesday 26 February 2025

Wednesday 26 March 2025

Wednesday 23 April 2025

Wednesday 28 May 2025

Wednesday 25 June 2025

Wednesday 23 July 2025

Wednesday 27 August 2025

Wednesday 24 September 2025

4.00pm

Papakura Local Board Chambers, 35 Coles Crescent, Papakura

 

 

b)      note the dates and times for business meetings to make decisions on local board plans and local board agreements are yet to be scheduled.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Isobelle Robb - Infocouncil Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Urgent Decision - Papakura Local Board - Additional Funding for 2022 Santa Parade

File No.: CP2022/15729

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the urgent decision dated 4 October 2022 of the Papakura Local Board to approve an additional grant of $5,200 to the Papakura Rotary Club to ensure the delivery of the 2022 Santa Parade.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 22 June 2022 the Papakura Local Board approved the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme.

 

3.       Work programme line #363 – Event partnership fund Papakura, allocated zero dollars to the 2022/2023 financial year for the Papakura Rotary Club to deliver the Papakura Santa Parade as the event was unable to be delivered in the previous financial year due to Covid-19 restrictions.  The funds were carried forward.

 

4.       The Papakura Rotary Club has advised that the traffic management costs have significantly increased.  Previously the cost of the Traffic Management has been around $4,000.

 

5.       The quote for this year’s parade has come in at $420.00 + GST for the Traffic Management Plan and $7,744 + GST for Traffic Management on the day, totalling $8,164+ GST.

 

6.       The Papakura Rotary Club have been allocated $17,500.00 (funds carried forward from the previous financial year) to deliver the Santa Parade.

 

7.       Papakura Rotary Club has advised if they are able to contain all other costs to the same as previous years, then this year’s budget will be $22,700 which leaves a shortfall of $5,200.

 

8.       The last Papakura Local Board business meeting was held on 28 September 2022.  The next Papakura Local Board business meeting will likely be scheduled in late November 2022.  The additional grant will allow the Papakura Rotary Club to deliver the Papakura Santa Parade within budget.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision dated 4 October 2022 of the Papakura Local Board to approve an additional grant of $5,200 to the Papakura Rotary Club to ensure the delivery of the 2022 Santa Parade as follows:

That the Papakura Local Board:

 

a)         approve an additional grant of up to $5,200 to the Papakura Rotary Club to enable the delivery of the 2022 Santa Parade from the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme line #363, noting the additional allocation will be reallocated from the $25,000 underspend with the New Zealand Rugby League (NZRL) secondary schools competition funds (work programme line #363) not being uplifted due to the event being held in Rotorua.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision - Papakura Local Board - Additional Grant to Deliver 2022 Santa Parade

171

b

Urgent Decision - Papakura Local Board - 2022 Santa Parade - Attachment A - Traffic Management Quote

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Isobelle Robb - Infocouncil Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Papakura Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - November 2022

File No.: CP2022/15290

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Papakura Local Board the three months Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governance Forward Work Calendar is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next three months. The Governance Forward Work Calendar for the Papakura Local Board is included in Attachment A of this report.

3.       The calendar aims to support the local board’s governance role by:

i)    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)   clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)  clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month, be included on the agenda for business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar for November and December 2022.

 

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The council’s Quality Advice Programme aims to improve the focus, analysis, presentation and timeliness of staff advice to elected representatives. An initiative under this is to develop forward work calendars for Governing Body committees and local boards. These provide elected members with better visibility of the types of governance tasks they are being asked to undertake and when they are scheduled.

6.       There are no new projects in the Governance Forward Work Calendar. The calendar brings together in one schedule reporting on all of the board’s projects and activities that have been previously approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes Governing Body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response.

7.       This initiative is intended to support the board’s governance role. It will also help staff to support local boards, as an additional tool to manage workloads and track activities across council departments, and it will allow greater transparency for the public.

8.       The calendar is arranged in three columns, “Topic”, “Purpose” and “Governance Role”:

i)    Topic describes the items and may indicate how they fit in with broader processes such as the annual plan.

ii)   Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates

iii)  Governance role is a higher-level categorisation of the work local boards do. Examples of the seven governance categories are tabled below:

 

Governance role

Examples

Setting direction / priorities / budget

Capex projects, work programmes, annual plan

Local initiatives / specific decisions

Grants, road names, alcohol bans

Input into regional decision-making

Comments on regional bylaws, policies, plans

Oversight and monitoring

Local board agreement, quarterly performance reports, review projects

Accountability to the public

Annual report

Engagement

Community hui, submissions processes

Keeping informed

Briefings, local board forums

 

9.       Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar. The calendar will be updated and reported back every month to business meetings. Updates will also be distributed to relevant council staff.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     This report is an information report providing the governance forward work programme for the next three months.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The council is required to provide Governance Forward Work Calendar to the Papakura Local Board for their consideration.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

12.     All local boards are being presented with a Governance Forward Work Calendar for their consideration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

13.     The projects and processes referred to in the Governance Forward Work Calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

14.     There are no financial implications relating to this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

15.     This report is a point in time of the Governance Forward Work Calendar. It is a living document and updated month to month. It minimises the risk of the board being unaware of planned topics for their consideration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

16.     Staff will review the calendar each month in consultation with board members and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Papakura Local Board November Governance Forward Work Programme 2022

183

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Isobelle Robb - Infocouncil Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Table

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

Papakura Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2022/15289

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Papakura Local Board record for the workshops held on 14, 21 and 28 September, and on 2 and 9 November 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      note the Papakura Local Board workshop records from:

i)       14 September 2022

ii)       21 September 2022

iii)      28 September 2022

iv)      2 November 2022

v)      9 November 2022

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

14 September 2022 Papakura Local Board Workshop Record

187

b

21 September 2022 Papakura Local Board workshop record

189

c

28 September 2022 Papakura Local Board Workshop Record

191

d

2 November 2022 Papakura Local Board Workshop Record

193

e

9 November 2022 Papakura Local Board workshop record

195

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Isobelle Robb - Infocouncil Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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Papakura Local Board

23 November 2022

 

 

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