I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 21 February 2023

1.00pm

Waitematā Local Board Office
Ground Floor
33 Federal Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Genevieve Sage

 

Deputy Chairperson

Greg Moyle, (JP, ED)

 

Members

Alexandra Bonham

 

 

Allan Matson

 

 

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

 

Anahera Rawiri

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

 

 

 

16 February 2023

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: katherine.kang@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Western Springs College students - perspectives on health and safety measures on Meola Road.              5

8.2     Deputation - Jennifer Ward - George Courts Building Body Corporate Committee and Auckland Transport.        6

8.3     Deputation - Jo Malcolm                            6

8.4     Deputation - John Constable, Bike Grey Lynn - Ponsonby Park community-led design                                                           7

8.5     Deputation - Aaron Martin - East Skate Club Inc                                                        7

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                8

9.1     Public Forum - Richard Vine                      8

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     8

11        Inner West Cycling and Walking Projects       11

12        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2022/2023                                                             35

13        Draft Contributions Policy 2022, Variation A  43

14        Annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022.                                                                     53

15        Resource management reform: Natural and Built Environment Bill and Spatial Planning Bill                                                                              55

16        Urgent Decision - Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Community Participation) Amendment Bill    77

17        Local board feedback on the draft Future for Local Government report                                   83

18        Auckland Council’s submission on the Inquiry into the 2022 Local Elections                            95

19        Chairperson's report                                        111

20        Board member reports                                     117

21        Waitematā Local Board workshop records   137

22        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                             147

12        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2022/2023

b.      Waitemata Q2 Financial Performance  147


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

Chair G Sage will welcome those present and begin the meeting with a karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 6 December 2022, the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 13 December 2022 and the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 7 February 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.


 

 

8.1       Deputation - Western Springs College students - perspectives on health and safety measures on Meola Road.

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Representatives of Western Springs College will be in attendance to present to the local board on a student perspective on the health and safety measures on Meola road.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Western Springs College representatives for their attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Jennifer Ward - George Courts Building Body Corporate Committee and Auckland Transport.

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Jennifer Ward will be in attendance to present to the board on behalf of the George Courts Building Body Corporate Committee, regarding issues with Auckland Transport.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Jennifer Ward and thank her for her attendance.

 

 


 

 

8.3       Deputation - Jo Malcolm

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Jo Malcolm will be in attendance to present to the board on the Dove Myer Robinson Park flood damage.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Jo Malcolm for her attendance.

 

 

 

8.4       Deputation - John Constable, Bike Grey Lynn

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       John Constable will be in attendance to present to the local board on the Inner West Cycling and Walking Projects on behalf of Bike Grey Lynn. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank John Constable for his attendance.

 

 


 

 

8.5       Deputation - Aaron Martin - East Skate Club Inc

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Aaron Martin will be in attendance to present to the board to advocate potential renewal works for Victoria Park Skate Plaza.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Aaron Martin for his attendance.

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Richard Vine

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.              To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Richard Vine will be in attendance to speak to the board regarding the Leys Institute consultation for its seismic refurbishment.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Richard Vine attendance at the meeting.

 

 


 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Inner West Cycling and Walking Projects

File No.: CP2023/01208

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement from the Waitematā Local Board to proceed with construction of the Point Chevalier to Westmere Improvements and Great North Road Improvements, and pause construction on Waitematā Safer Routes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Improvements to cycling, walking and bus infrastructure along the following routes have been developed under the Urban Cycleway Programme:

· Point Chevalier to Westmere from Great North Road to West End Road via Point Chevalier Road, Meola Rd and Garnet Rd;

· Great North Road between Karangahape Rd and Crummer Road/Grey Lynn Library

· Waitematā Safer Routes including Surrey Crescent-Old Mill Road-Garnet Road (to Meola Rd); and, Richmond Road (from Surrey Crescent to Cox’s Bay Reserve path)

3.       Work on these projects were paused during 2020 following the Covid-19 emergency budget. These projects are now being reviewed in light of Council’s budget pressures and Auckland Transport is seeking feedback from the local board on whether to progress the projects to construction phase.

4.       The projects started in 2016 and public consultation was held in 2017 and 2019. A high level of local support was expressed in the formal consultation exercises, with changes to the project designs to address issues raised. A post-covid check-in was undertaken with the public in 2022.  Over fifty letters of support were received from within the community and wider stakeholders, and five letters of opposition asking for schemes to be paused.

5.       The project team has recently engaged with Grey Lynn Residents Association and Grey Lynn Business Association to see whether some of the parking issues along Great North Road can be resolved within the detail of the scheme.

6.       Local board views will be presented to the Auckland Council Transport and Infrastructure Committee in March 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          endorse the construction of the cycling, walking and bus improvements along Point Chevalier Road, Meola Road and Garnet Rd (between Meola Rd and West End Rd)

b)          endorse the construction of road safety, cycling, walking and bus lane and bus stop improvements along Great North Road (between Crummer Road and Karangahape Road)

c)          endorse the pause in construction of cycle facilities and pedestrian crossing improvements along Richmond Road (between Cox’s Bay Reserve entrance and Surrey Crescent) and Surrey Crescent, Old Mill Road and Garnet Road (south of Meola Rd).

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Transport have developed improvements for people who travel by foot, bike, or bus within the inner-west suburbs of Pt Chevalier, Westmere, and Grey Lynn. Protected cycleways, separated from traffic, are a key feature of each project. The routes expand Auckland’s growing cycleway network, connecting at Point Chevalier with the Northwestern Cycleway and at the city end with Karangahape Road Cycleway and the city centre cycle network.

8.       Three projects were developed in consultation with local residents and businesses:

·    Point Chevalier to Westmere Improvements: Great North Road to West End Road via Point Chevalier Road, Meola Rd and Garnet Road

·    Great North Road Improvements: between Karangahape Rd and Crummer Road/Grey Lynn Library

·    Waitemata Safer Routes: including Surrey Crescent-Old Mill Road-Garnet Road (to Meola Rd); and, Richmond Road (from Surrey Crescent to Cox’s Bay Reserve path)

9.       Work on these projects paused during 2020 following the Covid-19 emergency budget. These projects are now being reviewed in light of Council’s budget pressures.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Auckland Transport has worked with the local communities since 2016 to develop the Point Chevalier to Westmere scheme that provides:

· Continuous cycle tracks along Point Chevalier Road and Meola Road and a spur along Garnet Road as far as West End Road.

· A short section of bus lane along Meola Road to Great North Road to reduce peak time delays.

· Safety improvements and additional pedestrian crossings mid-block and at side streets.

· Additional street trees.

· Storm water separation and undergrounding of power lines.

· Refurbishment and raising of the carriageway of Meola Road.

11.     Central government provided 51% of capital funding for the cycle, bus and pedestrian improvements, with a Council share of around $18m.

12.     The Council is already committed to spend $8.6m on stormwater separation and $9m on refurbishment of Meola Road during 2023. This work will proceed regardless of the cycle scheme.

13.     The scheme was approved previously by the Auckland Transport Board and an overview presented to the Waitematā Local Board.

14.     Auckland Transport has worked with the local community since 2016 to develop the Great North Road scheme that provides:

·    Continuous cycle tracks along Great North Road from Crummer Road to Karangahape Road.

·    Improvements and relocation of some bus stops to improve bus reliability.

·    Safety improvements and additional pedestrian crossings mid-block and at side streets (with consequent loss of some car parking to achieve safe visibility standards for drivers).

·    Additional street trees.

·    Retention of operational space to allow loading for car transporters and other businesses.

15.     51% of capital funding for the cycle, bus and pedestrian improvements is provided by central government, with a Council share of around $15.7m.

16.     The Council is already committed to undertaking stormwater separation work during 2023. This work will proceed regardless of the cycle scheme. A contract has been awarded for the enabling works including the Council Healthy Waters work.

17.     The cycleway construction has been deliberately timed to coincide with other work scheduled for 2023-24 to minimise traffic disruption. The surface renewal and drainage works in Point Chevalier, Meola Road and Great North Road will go ahead even if the cycleways are halted. Delivering the cycleways separately will bring additional construction costs and more disruptions to road users. Money has already been invested in the clearance of trees along Meola Road and ground investigation along Great North Road in anticipation of the projects.

18.     The Great North Road and Point Chevalier to Westmere Improvement projects were discussed with the Waitematā Local Board in workshops held in November 2022 and February 2023 and we recommend construction of these schemes. The funding window for Waka Kotahi funds is time-limited so construction must start in 2023-24.

19.     Auckland Transport has worked with the local community since 2016 to develop Waitemata Safer Routes schemes that provides:

·    Continuous cycle tracks along Richmond Road (to connect with existing cycle lanes), Surrey Crescent, Old Mill Road and Garnet Road to link to Meola Road (to connect with existing cycle lanes).

·    Safety improvements and additional pedestrian crossings mid-block and at side streets.

·    Additional street trees.

20.     100% of capital funding for the cycle and pedestrian improvements is provided by Auckland Council at a current estimated cost of $38m.

21.     The revised scheme was consulted in 2022. The roads affected form local links to schools and shopping areas, but previous opposition in 2017 had caused the schemes to be halted in construction.

22.      The Waitematā Safer Routes scheme was one of three schemes being brought forward for construction in 2022-23 but the intention is to pause this project due to pressure on the programme budget. A summary presentation of the scheme is attached (Waitematā Safer Routes). Auckland Transport request the board to endorse that this project is paused and any safety critical elements of the project will be prioritised through the road safety programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency, Auckland Transport therefore urges Waitematā Local Board to consider prioritisation of projects that help reduce carbon emissions. The proposed projects will encourage walking and cycling reducing carbon emissions, as well as providing additional street trees that can help filter pollutants and reduce surface temperatures.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The schemes are aligned with the Regional Land Transport Plan and will contribute to the Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway. The schemes provide sustainable access to the Council-owned attractions of Meola Reef Reserve, Seddon Fields, Western Springs Park, Motat, Cox’s Reserve and Auckland Zoo.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Waitematā Local Board representatives participated in the Community Liaison Group that was established in 2018 for the Inner West projects.

26.     Waitematā Local Board discussed this programme of work at workshops with Auckland Transport in November 2022 and February 2023. 

27.     Collectively the schemes connect local schools and shops in Point Chevalier, Westmere and Grey Lynn and would help to offer safe alternatives to help alleviate pressure on parking and local roads associated with school and workplace travel.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The project consultation included input from local mana whenua representatives through the Central hub hui including choice of native trees for planting.  Both Auckland Transport and Auckland Council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise matawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     Point Chevalier to Westmere: This report requires consideration of investment of $37.3m for the cycling, walking and bus priority measures. 51% of this funding ($19m) is from central government with the remainder (about $18.3m) from Auckland Council’s capital budget.

30.     In addition, $9.7m is allocated to the refurbishment of Meola Road and $8.6m to stormwater and sewage separation work.

31.     Great North Road: This report requires consideration of investment of $28.1m for the cycling, walking, safety and bus priority measures. 51% of up to $24.3m construction funding ($12.4m) is from central government with the remainder (about $15.7m) from Auckland Council’s capital budget.

32.     In addition, $3.3m is allocated to stormwater and sewage separation work in two localities along the route fully funded by Council.

33.     Waitemata Safer Routes: This report requires consideration of investment of around $38m Auckland Council funding for the cycling, walking, and safety measures.

 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The work was programmed to start in late 2022 but was paused for scrutiny by newly elected politicians reviewing public finances. Delaying a decision to build could have a significant impact on delivery timelines and ultimately may put the central government funding at risk.  A record of the sentiment of the Local Board will help reassure Auckland Council and demonstrate adherence to the letter of expectation issued to Auckland Transport by the Mayor.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The Auckland Transport Board will make a recommendation about whether to proceed at a meeting in late February. It is expected that their recommendation will then be examined by the Auckland Council Transport and Infrastructure Committee for a final decision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Inner West Projects

17

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Matthew Rednall (Auckland Transport) Integrated Corridors Programme Director

Authorisers

Adrian Lord – (Auckland Transport) Head of Cycling

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2022/2023

File No.: CP2023/01188

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waitematā Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2022/2023 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·    Victoria Park pavilion roof, changing rooms and toilet renewals: The roof work is now complete. The concept design has been produced and is proceeding onto developed design, with next steps being submission for building consent.

·    Western Springs Development Plan – implementation: Site scoping, investigation and initial consultation is now complete and detailed design is underway.

·    Renewal sports fields and lighting at Seddon Fields: This work is being undertaken to support the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023. Foundation work has been completed with the installing of pits and cables pulled. Poles have been delivered to all sites, with next steps being to lift poles and complete fitting of LED lights.

·    Rockfall protection at Parnell Baths: Investigation has been completed. Some remedial works including cliff face scaling and debris removal were completed in November 2022 due to a slip near the Parnell Baths. 

·    Central Library - renew air handling units: The delivery of new air handling units is part of a multi-year project in-progress and expecting to be completed in 2024/2025. Parks and Community Facilities will continue to liaise with the Central Library on programming of works and during installation to ensure minimum disruption to patrons and library staff.

·    Queen’s Wharf Bike Hub Operations: The bike hub has had 48 days open, 898 visitors and repaired 255 bikes.  The bike hub team are currently working with Eke Panuku to make some improvements to the site ahead of the summer months.

·    WTM: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche One: No agreement was able to be reached. Staff recommend that the budget of $23,000 be investigated for re-allocation to other projects until a solution is finalized.

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred, or merged).

5.       Auckland Council (Council) currently has several bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of half-year financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX on 28 February 2023.

6.       Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

7.        The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2022.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the agenda report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group half-year results for 2022/2023 are released to the New Zealand Exchange (NZX), which are expected to be made public on or about 28 February 2023.

c)       note that the Waitematā Local Board has approximately $14,000 which was revenue collected from film revenue on local parks in 2021/2022, and this can be allocated to local projects during the financial year.

d)      note that staff recommend $23,000 from WTM: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche One be investigated for re-allocation at a future meeting to other projects due to delays in progressing this programme.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Waitematā Local Board has an approved 2022/2023 work programme for the following operating departments:

·    Customer and Community Services

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·    External Partnerships

·    Auckland Emergency Management

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.


 

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Chart, bar chart

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Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

Chart, pie chart

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11.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 


 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Chart, waterfall chart

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Key activity updates

12.     Victoria Park pavilion roof, changing rooms and toilet renewals: The roof work is now complete. The concept design has been produced and is proceeding onto developed design, with next steps being submission for building consent.

13.     Queen’s Wharf Bike Hub Operations: In quarter two, the bike hub has had 48 days open, 898 visitors and repaired 255 bikes. Seventeen bikes were gifted or sold at low cost to the community. The bike hub team are currently working with Eke Panuku to make some improvements to the site ahead of the summer months. The bike hub has been part of several events during ‘Biketober’ including being the starting point for the Kidical Mass Ride on 29 October 2022.

14.     Western Springs Development Plan – implementation: Site scoping, investigation and initial consultation is now complete and detailed design is underway. Stage one renewal physical works for the pathways, furniture, lighting, and signage is scheduled for 2022/2023. The renewal of bridges and other park structures are planned for as stage two delivery across 2022/23 and 2023/24.

15.     Renew sports fields and lighting at Seddon Fields: This work is being undertaken to support the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023. Foundation work has been completed with the installing of pits and cables pulled. Poles have been delivered to all sites, with next steps being to lift poles and complete fitting of LED lights.

16.     Rockfall protection at Parnell Baths: Investigation has been completed. Some remedial works including cliff face scaling and debris removal were completed in November 2022 due to a slip near the Parnell Baths.

17.     Central Library - renew air handling units: The delivery of new air handling units is part of a multi-year project in-progress and expecting to be completed in 2024/2025. Parks and Community Facilities will continue to liaise with the Central Library on programming of works and during installation to ensure minimum disruption to patrons and library staff.

18.     WTM: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche One: This project has been impacted by both COVID-19 delays preventing engagement activity from occurring, and delay in reaching agreement with involved iwi regarding naming principles and process for the local board area. Staff recommend the existing budget of $23,000 be investigated for re-allocation to other projects with decisions to be made at a future meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

20.     Work programmes were approved in June 2022 and delivery is underway. If significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This report informs the Waitematā Local Board of the performance for ending 31 December 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The Waitematā Local Board Local Board Plan 2020 acknowledges and celebrates its commitment to te ao Māori by incorporating and delivering on initiatives which enhance these values and relationships.

24.     As reflected in the Local Board Plan: Outcome 1, the local board aspires that Māori are empowered, and their identity and culture is visible. The local board aims to celebrate and showcase Māori culture and grow respectful and reciprocal partnerships to ensure te ao Māori is embedded in decision making.

25.     The local board is currently investing in projects that seek to deliver on the values of Māori empowerment, cultural enrichment, and partnership. Key activities include:

·    ID 3565: Action Plan to Develop Mana Whenua Relationships: Supplier currently refining project scope and objectives since receiving direction from the local board in November 2022. Project intended to facilitate relationship building opportunities between local board elected members and identified mana whenua representatives at the governance level and to increase Māori input into local board decision-making.

·    ID 3108:  Kia rite Kia mau is an Auckland Emergency Management education programme using a Te Ao Māori lens, that teaches schools and students about the common Auckland hazards and how to be prepared. A contractor has been identified. Engagement, procurement, and contract negotiation are underway. Three schools have been identified and contacted to engage in the programme in the 2023 school year. A secondary school and two primary schools have been approached and are keen to engage. The opportunity to share Te Ao Māori perspective on climate preparedness and resilience for school communities offers a fresh point of connection for all students, particularly Māori and Pacifica.

·    ID 1182: Whakatipu i te reo Māori is a Libraries programme intended to embed te reo Māori in everyday communication. It celebrates and promotes te ao Māori through events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes such as Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Te Wiki o te Reo Māori. Waitematā Libraries have been increasing the te reo Māori content in under 5 programmes such as Wriggle and Rhyme with simple action songs. Children are attracted to repetition, so songs are a great way to embed learning Te Reo. The response from caregivers has been both supportive and positive. Three new staff in the Waitematā team attended an in person mihi whakatau. An increasing number of Waitematā staff are taking up opportunities to learn te reo and learn about te ao Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     This report is provided to enable the Waitematā Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2022/2023 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

27.     The Waitematā Local Board has approximately $14,000 which was revenue collected from film revenue on local parks in 2021/2022, and this can be allocated to local projects during the financial year. Staff will investigate options for allocation and bring this advice to the local board for discussion and to receive further direction.

28.     Waitematā Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) has been impacted by both COVID-19 delays preventing engagement activity from occurring, and delay in reaching agreement with involved iwi regarding naming principles and process for the local board area. Staff recommend the existing budget of $23,000 be investigated for re-allocation to other projects. Staff will investigate options for re-allocation and bring this advice to the local board for discussion and to receive further direction.

Financial Performance

29.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has several bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of half-year financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX on 28 February 2023.

30.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g., building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

32.     WTM: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche One: No agreement was able to be reached. Staff recommend that the budget of $23,000 be investigated for re-allocation to other projects until a solution is finalised. There is a risk that if the local board chooses not to re-allocate this funding, financial constraints will mean the budget is not able to be carried forward into 2023/2024 and is lost.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     The Waitematā Local Board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three, 31 March 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitemata Q2 Work Programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Waitemata Q2 Financial Performance - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nick Palmisano - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Draft Contributions Policy 2022, Variation A

File No.: CP2023/00749

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the proposal (draft Contributions Policy 2022, Variation A) to add to the Contributions Policy 2022 projects planned to be delivered beyond 2031 to support growth in Drury.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Development contributions (DCs) are charges that recover from new developments a fair share of the cost of the council’s investment in infrastructure. To date our contributions policy has only recovered a share of cost of our infrastructure investment planned in the next ten years.

3.       The council has agreed to add projects beyond 2031 to the Contributions Policy for the Investment Priority Areas identified in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 in stages starting with Drury. This will ensure early developers pay a fair share of the cost of the cumulative impact of growth on the council’s need to invest in infrastructure.

4.       The Contributions Policy 2022 was adopted in December 2021 and provides for the recovery of $399 million of the investment planned to be delivered in Drury in the period to 2031. The contributions price in Drury under this policy, including regional and sub-regional charges, is $22,564 per household equivalent unit (HUE – a house between 100m2 and 249m2). We are now proposing to vary this policy to add investments we plan to deliver beyond 2031 to support development in Drury.

5.       The original proposal was consulted on in late 2021 as part of the consultation on the region-wide Contributions Policy 2022. At that time, the majority of local boards were in support of the changes proposed in the draft Contributions Policy 2021

6.       The Finance and Performance Committee considered the report on the proposal, which included local board views, at its meeting on 9 December 2021.  The committee agreed to defer a decision on adding investment beyond 2031 to the Drury area to allow for the provision of further information requested by developers and additional time to make submissions once that information was provided. 

7.       The original proposal consulted on was revised accordingly and more information produced. The updated proposal included $2,470 billion of investment in Drury beyond 2031 of which $1.142 billion was to be funded by DCs. This would raise the average DC price in Drury by $60,687 to $83,25.  Public consultation opened on 13 September 2022 for eight weeks, instead of the usual four weeks, and closed on 8 November 2022.

8.       Sixty submissions were received, 33 of which were from those in the development community. The proposal was supported by 35 per cent of all submitters with 50 percent not in support.  A further 15 per cent did not clearly state their views on the proposal.

9.       This report summarises the key points made in submissions and notes officers’ initial analysis of the issues raised.

10.     Local board feedback is sought to inform the Governing Body’s consideration of the adoption of the proposal planned for April 2023. The report to the Governing Body will also be updated reflecting officers' final analysis of the responses to submissions, updates reflecting additional work that has been undertaken since consultation and in particular to incorporate the latest economic forecasts and recent government decisions on their investment in Drury.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve feedback from local boards on the draft Contributions Policy 2022, Variation A.

Horopaki

Context

Development contributions and infrastructure investment

11.     Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community. The Contributions Policy sets out how the council will recover from new development an appropriate and fair share of the cost of infrastructure investment attributable to growth.

Growth and infrastructure investment

12.     Auckland’s population is expected to continue to grow in the next ten years on top of the rapid population growth we have experienced in the last decade, bringing the projected population to 1.8 million early next decade. We are forecasting the construction of 145,800 new dwellings in the next ten years. To support the development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan, we are facing both immediate and longer-term demands for infrastructure in growth areas. If we do not adequately plan for the delivery and funding of this infrastructure, the cumulative effects of this development could lead to an unfair rates burden on future ratepayers or a risk of infrastructure shortfalls for future residents.

Drury

13.     Drury-Opāheke is projected to grow by 22,000 new houses over the next thirty years. The proposal identified that an infrastructure investment of $2,869 billion will be required to support this growth. This investment will include a public and active transport led approach to transport infrastructure, parks and open spaces, and a new community facility that will include a local pool, leisure centre and library.

14.     Investment in Drury will take around 30 years to deliver. The Contributions Policy 2022 only requires developers to contribute to the $399 million of investment we plan to make over the next 10 years. Without DC funding for a share of the $2.470 billion investment planned beyond 2031, there is a risk that those undertaking development will not contribute a fair, equitable, and proportionate portion of the capital expenditure necessary to service long-term growth. This risk could lead to shortfalls in the provision of infrastructure for the future residents of Drury and additional and/or additional demands on the city’s ratepayers.

Consultation 2021 and decisions

15.     In 2021 the council consulted on a proposal to add investments planned to be delivered in Drury beyond 2031 to the 2022 policy and over the next year to the other Investment Priority Areas (IPAs) identified in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031. The IPAs are Inner Northwest, City Rail Link stations and Auckland Housing Programme (AHP) areas (Tāmaki, Mangere, Northcote, Oranga, and Mt Roskill). This would avoid an unfair rates burden on future ratepayers or the risk of infrastructure shortfalls for the future residents of new developments. The majority of local boards supported the original proposal.

a)      The Finance and Performance Committee considered a report on the proposal at its meeting on 9 December 2021 (FIN/2021/119). The committee agreed in principle to add investments beyond 2031 to the Investment Priority Areas but deferred a decision on adding investment beyond 2031 to the Drury area. This was intended to allow the provision of more information to developers and other interested parties and allow more time for them to make further submissions with the benefit of this information.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Updated proposal for consultation in 2022

16.     In response to the council’s direction (resolution FIN/2021/119 b), staff undertook substantial additional work internally, commissioned five external expert reviews of our methodology and key economic issues, and sought expert transport planning and engineering advice on the proposed investments.

17.     The original proposal consulted on was revised by updating our forecasts for the timing and location of growth within Drury and of construction costs, land price inflation, and interest rates.

18.     External reviews were sought on our growth forecasting, cost estimation, and approach to calculating the share of costs to be recovered from developers. Recommendations from these reviews were applied to our calculations of the contributions charges for projects to be delivered beyond 2031 in Drury for inclusion in the proposal consulted on. These changes will also be considered for incorporation into the wider contributions policy as part of our future policy reviews.

19.     Additional analysis of the distribution of the benefits of the proposed transport projects within Drury was also undertaken. The proposal consulted on allocated the transport costs to be recovered from development contributions to four new funding areas within Drury and to the relevant neighbouring areas. Adjustments were also made to neighbouring funding areas to reflect the benefits from community facilities investments, the regional transport funding area for wider transport benefits, and to the regional community facilities funding area for the library accordingly and more information produced.

20.     Following completion of the work above the investments planned for beyond 2031 included in the consultation were:

a)   $1.882 million in transport including arterial roads and key elements of the collector network to provide an integrated public and private transport network and active transport investment connecting Drury to the wider city (in addition to the $243 million council has already committed to invest before 2031)

b)      $403 million for 43 new parks, with a total land requirement of 32.4 hectares (in addition to the $156 million council has already committed to invest before 2031)

c)      $185 million for a single multi-purpose facility including a community facility, leisure centre, library, and local pool.

21.     Stormwater requirements for Drury beyond 2031 will be identified and added to the contributions policy as more information becomes available on the location and form of development.

22.     Of the $2.470 billion of projects, the proposal identified for delivery beyond 2031, $1.142 billion was proposed to be funded by developers through our contributions policy. This additional revenue requirement would raise the contributions price for Drury by an average of an additional $60,687, per household equivalent unit (HUE) to a total of on average $83,251 per HUE. Different charges would apply to different geographical areas based on the benefits accruing to each area.

Consultation

23.     Public consultation opened on 13 September 2022 for eight weeks and closed on 8 November 2022. Additional information provided included 13 documents and two spreadsheets to allow submitters to better understand the proposal. These can be found on the council’s Have Your Say page.

24.     During the consultation period, those from the development industry requested further information and in response the following additional materials were provided:

·        Transport cost estimates for Drury. Further details on individual construction cost elements for transport projects

·        Growth and HUE forecast. Spreadsheet outlining data used to forecast growth

25.     Around 336 stakeholders were directly approached to advise them of the consultation.  A media release was issued, and an article appeared in Our Auckland at the start of the consultation period.  The consultation was also promoted through the council’s Engagement and People’s Panel newsletters.  Forty-four people participated in the Have Your Say events held to support the consultation.

26.     Two online and two face-to-face Have Your Say (HYS) events were held.  Staff also attended a drop-in session in Drury organised by Waka Kotahi, two meetings organised by Drury developers, and a session organised by the Property Council of New Zealand. There were 44 attendees across all events representing 39 organisations. Officers also provided briefings to Waka Kotahi and the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development.

27.     An opportunity for developers to present their submissions directly to the Governing Body at a Have Your Say event was provided on 14 December 2022.  Developers were given a ten-minute slot with five minutes for their presentation followed by 5 minutes for questions from the decision-makers. The mayor and 16 councillors, heard presentations from 14 organisations at the session. 

Feedback and Analysis

28.     Sixty submissions were received. Overall, the proposal was supported by 35 per cent of submitters with 50 percent opposing it. A further 15 per cent did not clearly state their support or otherwise to the proposal. Key themes raised in the submissions are identified below. The submissions received in the consultation are available to elected members on the council’s meeting management system Nexus.

29.     26 individuals and one Māori organisation provided feedback. Of these, 69 per cent were in support of this proposal, 15 per cent did not support the proposal while the views of 15 per cent of submitters were not clearly stated.

30.     Eleven of the individuals who supported the proposal commented that it was fair that developers should pay their fair share towards infrastructure. Those who did not state their support or otherwise thought that the council should support infrastructure development.

31.     33 responses were from those in the development industry. Responses from the industry show that 79 per cent opposed the proposal, six per cent supported it and 15 per cent did not state a clear view. Key themes from the developers’ feedback are outlined below.

Impact of higher development contributions

Feedback

32.     Developers’ submissions noted the following concerns that higher DCs will:

·        lead to higher house prices as developers seek to recover the increased costs. Developers who had already purchased land commented that they will be particularly disadvantaged as the increased DCs have not been included in the costs of their development

·        lead to Drury being treated unfairly in relation to the rest of the city with much higher DCs

·        discourage the construction of affordable housing as developers seek to recover higher costs with more expensive developments

·        redirect development from Drury to other areas of the city with lower DC prices. Lower DCs are charged in wealthy established central parts of the city where infrastructure is already in place whereas incoming residents to Drury, where affordable housing can be built, are less able to afford higher DCs

·        encourage land banking in Drury until house prices rise further or the policy changes.

Analysis

33.     For developers who have purchased land recently higher DCs will put pressure on their margins.  While staff acknowledge the impact a substantial increase in contributions charges is required if developers are to meet a fair share of cost of the investments required to support Drury’s development. The DCs charged in Drury will be higher than those in other parts of the city but this will reflect the council’s commitment to invest in infrastructure in Drury.

34.     In feedback received from the original consultation, developers expressed concern about the equity of charging them now for investments that wouldn’t be delivered until the next decade. Our independent expert advice confirms the council’s previously presented analysis: that while the physical infrastructure wouldn’t be delivered until later, current landowners still benefit from the commitment to deliver in terms of higher land values. Furthermore, development occurring during the early years of this policy still contributes to the need for planned capital expenditure that will be incurred beyond 10 years’ time.

35.     The independent economic consultants were asked for their views on the equity of our proposal to consider the likely impact of the proposal on house prices, and the viability of development in Drury. The consultants concluded that while the DC price will lower the price developers are willing to pay for land, this reduction is much lower than the increase in land value arising from the planning changes that enable housing development. There may be an indirect effect on the sequence of sites getting taken up for new housing across the city in the short term as development adjusts around a new equilibrium. However, this will be small relative to other market factors. Higher DCs may be an additional cost to development and could be argued to increase the return to holding land undeveloped however, earlier delivery of infrastructure funded by DCs is likely to accelerate development. The full report was included in the supporting documents pack released as part of the consultation process.

Complexity with a 30-year time frame

Feedback

36.     Comments were provided on the accuracy of information on infrastructure requirements planned over a 30-year timeframe, including the assurance that revenue collected today will be used for future investment in infrastructure. Other comments from submitters include:

·        possibility that infrastructure will not be needed resulting in over collection of DCs

·        impact of inflation on delivery of projects over time adds complexity

·        complexities arise around the accuracy of the price of infrastructure over a 30-year timeframe creating uncertainty. For example, when trying to estimate things such as inflation, delivery risks, costs of infrastructure, and future infrastructure demand over a 30-year period

·        doubt that benefits will be received by early developers

·        actions the council will have to take to ensure money collected today will be spent on delivery of the projects over 30-year period

·        it is not clear what happens to the initially unspent portions of development contributions paid, but intended to fund works that are 1, 2 or 3 decades in the future.

Analysis

37.     Forecasting capital expenditure over a 30-year horizon inevitably involves a higher degree of uncertainty than capex over the horizon of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031. However, the Local Government Act 2002 allows for development contributions to be recovered to fund capital expenditure to be incurred beyond the LTP period (10 years). The council may also vary the mix of projects for which development contributions will be used if there is a relevant change of circumstances relating to those projects, and the overall level of contribution does not increase.

38.     Our contributions policy is reviewed every three years to ensure that our planned infrastructure investment continues to meet the need of the developing community and is appropriately costed using the latest available information. This enables us to respond to changing circumstances, while ensuring that our charges remain fair for developers.

Consideration of other sources of funding

Feedback

39.     Several submitters considered the council should have given more consideration to alternative funding mechanisms before deciding to impose DCs. Submitters noted the council:

·        has not demonstrated sufficient consideration of alternative funding methods such as Infrastructure Funding and Financing through the Crown Infrastructure Partners

·        should consider the use of other funding and financing tools – such as targeted rates, congestion charging, Special Purpose Vehicles through the Funding and Financing Act and Specified Development Areas through the Urban Development Act – alongside DCs.

·        should consider using targeted rates to cover the costs of infrastructure that cannot easily be identified with sufficient certainty, subject to these rates being ringfenced for sole use on infrastructure to facilitate growth in the specific area in which the targeted rate applies.

Analysis

40.     The council’s Revenue and Financing Policy notes that at present DCs will be used to fund growth infrastructure. However, the Revenue and Financing Policy also makes provision for the use of other tools such as targeted rates and would also allow the use of levies under the Infrastructure Funding and Finance Act. All these tools have the same effective revenue for the council and cost for developers and landowners (the net present value is the same) but are triggered at different times.

41.     These options remain open to the council and can be used in combination with development contributions. The first step under any of these options is to establish the investments required to support growth in the IPAs and the appropriate share to be recovered from developers or landowners. All tools need to be applied early in the process to ensure early developments pay their share. The potential application of these funding tools will be considered in the advice to council in April.

Accuracy and assumptions used in the model

Feedback

42.     Comments were provided on the accuracy of information on infrastructure requirements planned over a 30-year timeframe, including the assurance that revenue collected today will be used for future investment in infrastructure. Submitters also noted:

·        concern that the costings for the various projects incorporate excessive assumptions in respect of construction cost, contingency funding cost, and general inflation.

·        the recent plan changes which have not been considered

·        the model includes invalid assumptions concerning developer funded mitigation works and DC funded works, likely to lead to double dipping and over-recovery.

43.     Comments on projects were also provided:

·        the new policy encourages the council to design projects that are “gold plated” and have higher initial capital expenditure

·        changes in transport patterns (e.g., mode share, e-bike subscriptions and sharing platforms) will influence future transport requirements.

·        the full list of transportation projects arrived at by Supporting Growth Alliance has never been justified as being required to mitigate the effects of development in Drury East

·        an independent audit of the proposed projects and their intended scale is requested to help ascertain how much of the increased cost relates to local rather than general factors

·        the policy projects listed assumes that the council will purchase land from developers when in practice it is likely to require the land and infrastructure on it to be vested without charge or at a discount rate pursuant to the consent process will not incur these costs.

Analysis

44.     A formal review was undertaken of the methodology the council uses to set DC charges. To do this, three external advisors were contracted to review our methods for growth forecasting, cost estimation, and how we assess the beneficiaries that underpin the DC charge calculations.

45.     The feedback from our earlier consultation, the recommendations of these reviews, and our updated data models have allowed the DC calculation methodology to be refined to better suit the specific circumstances of Drury. The financial models were updated following a review conducted in November 2021. No errors in logic or in the functionality were identified in a review conducted in November 2022.

Updates to proposal

46.     Further analysis of the feedback raised by developers will be presented to the Governing Body for decision making, planned for April 2023 and will include potential changes to the proposed amendment. Officers are in the process of updating the proposal to incorporate further work we have undertaken since consultation concluded to:

·        respond as appropriate to issues raised in submissions including in the key areas noted below

·        refine the projects and project costings in the proposal including

estimates of developer mitigation - roading investments that developers will be required to provide as a condition of consent

property costing

investment decisions by the government

community facilities funding areas

transport funding areas

·    update the forecasts of the following factors to reflect the latest economic conditions and predictions:

growth in the Drury area – reflecting recent plan change decisions

interest rates

construction cost inflation

land price inflation.

Compliance

47.     Some submitters expressed a view that the proposal is not legally compliant and that there may be a case for a judicial review. Staff advice on the Contributions Policy is given in the context of highly prescriptive provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) which cover the content of a contributions policy and the assessment of contributions. These provisions are the only source of the council’s power to require development contributions and must be strictly complied with.

48.     Staff have reviewed the proposal and will consider the matters raised in submissions giving consideration to the legislative requirements in the LGA, including specific content requirements for development contributions policies, and the council’s Revenue and Financing Policy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

49.     Recommendations in this report have a neutral climate impact as they relate to the funding of capital investment rather than decisions on the activities to be undertaken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     The information presented on the projects included in the draft Contributions Policy 2022 Variation A was developed in conjunction with the following council-controlled organisations and council units:

·        Auckland Transport

·        Community Facilities

·        Community and Social Policy

51.     The Chief Economist Unit and Research Investigations and Monitoring Unit worked with us on growth and economic forecasts, the impact of higher development contributions on the pace of development, and on land and house prices.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The Drury funding area in the proposal is within the Franklin and Papakura local board areas. The recommendations in this report support a higher level of infrastructure investment in the Drury area and sets a higher DC price in this area.

53.     Local board feedback is sought to inform the Governing Body’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2022, Variation A in April 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     Development contributions are assessed against the demand that different types of development generate on council infrastructure. Māori developments are assessed under broader development types based on the demand they generate. For example, kaumātua housing is treated the same as retirement villages, and marae are considered under community facilities. As more Māori developments occur, evidence of demand generation can be used to reclassify developments or create new development types.

55.     Eleven iwi authorities (with mana whenua interests) in the Drury area were contacted prior to the start of consultation to seek expressions of interest in discussing and providing feedback on the proposed changes. All iwi authorities were also notified when consultation opened, further advising of how they could have their say. Opportunities to present to the Mana Whenua forum, the Independent Māori Statutory Board and other council forums were explored, however, this topic was not seen as a priority area at the time. One response supporting this proposal was received from mana whenua who considered this was a fairer way to fund the required infrastructure.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.     There are no financial implications from requesting local boards views.

57.     The proposal provides for additional investment by the council beyond 2031 to support growth in Drury of $2.470 billion. The draft Contributions Policy, Variation A provides for $1.142 billion of this investment to be funded by DCs.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     The recommendation requesting local boards views does not present any risk. The risks associated with amending the contributions policy will be set out in the report to the Governing Body planned for April 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.     Feedback from the public consultation will be reported to the Governing Body in February 2023.

60.     Staff will provide advice, options and responses to the issues raised in the feedback to the Governing Body to assist in their decision making. 

61.     A decision-making report to the Governing Body is planned for April 2023 and will include potential changes to the draft policy and local board feedback.

62.     All local board feedback is due on 3 March 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022.

File No.: CP2023/00751

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report for 2021-2022 shows how the council group is contributing to the 10 mana outcomes of Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework, and the LTP 10-year budget priorities.

3.       The council group published its first Māori Outcomes Report in 2019. This fourth edition flows on from earlier reports and provides information on performance, including how the council group has been supporting a Māori response and recovery from COVID-19. Each report aims to provide a comprehensive picture of annual progress to decision makers across the council group, Māori partners, elected members, leaders in governance, and whānau Māori.

4.       Highlights for the 2021-2022 year include:

·        Elevation of the council’s most senior Māori leadership role, Director Ngā Mātārae and Māori Outcomes, to the Executive Leadership team.

·        Manaaki Fund 2021 contributed to Māori partners’ Covid-19 initiatives, which supported whanau wellbeing during Auckland’s longest Covid-19 lockdown. A total of $297,570.00 was granted.

·        Continued success of Toi Tū Toi Ora through a year long programme of work in support of the previous year’s hugely successful Toi Tū Toi Ora exhibition.

·        Marae Infrastructure Programme continues to progress major infrastructure upgrades for six marae, and another nine marae formally engaged at various stages.

·        Amotai continues to support Māori businesses into procurement opportunities. In financial year 22, funding from the Māori Outcomes Fund enabled Amotai to work across 126 procurement opportunities worth a total of $150 million.

5.       Delivery challenges faced by some of our partners led to underspend of the Māori Outcomes Fund, with $14.3 million of its $18.7 million budget spent.

6.       Separate to the annual Māori outcomes report are 6-monthly measures reports for Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework. The inaugural measures report for the July 2021 – Dec 2021 period was presented to the Parks, Arts Community and Events committee at the September 2022 meeting.

7.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022 will be publicly published with copies distributed to key partners including mana whenua iwi and mataawaka entities.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021/2022 - Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report 2021-2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ashley Walker - Principal Advisor - Maori Outcomes

Authorisers

Lou-Ann Ballantyne - Head of Māori Strategic Outcomes

Herewini Te Koha - Director Māori Outcomes

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Resource management reform: Natural and Built Environment Bill and Spatial Planning Bill

File No.: CP2023/00999

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform local board members of the Government’s proposals to reform the resource management system and invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Natural and Built Environment Bill (NBE Bill) and Spatial Planning Bill (SP Bill) were introduced to Parliament on 15 November 2022 and have been referred to the Environment Select Committee. Submissions on both bills close on 5 February 2023. However, Auckland Council has been granted a short extension to 10 February 2023.

3.       The Government is undertaking a comprehensive reform of the resource management system. It will repeal the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) and replace it with:

·        the Natural and Built Environment Bill (NBE Bill)

·        the Spatial Planning Bill (SP Bill)

·        Climate Adaptation Bill (CA Bill).

4.       The NBE Bill will replace the RMA. The SP Bill replaces current requirements for a spatial plan for Auckland and will work in tandem with the NBE Bill. The scale of reform is substantial and will have significant impacts on Auckland Council.

5.       This submission will build on Council’s previous submissions to the Resource Management Review Panel’s Issues and Options paper, the NBE Bill Exposure Draft and the Ministry for the Environment’s Discussion paper. Local boards provided input to these submissions.

6.       The deadline for local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission was 23 January 2023, whilst the deadline for feedback to be appended to the council’s final submission was 3 February 2023.As this deadline was before the next ordinary business meeting the Waitematā Local Board provided feedback to council’s submission through an urgent decision (resolution number WTM/2022/200).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision to approve the Waitematā Local Board feedback (Attachments C and D to the Agenda Report) on the Government’s proposals to reform the resource management system.

Horopaki

Context

Resource management system reform

7.       Central Government is reforming the resource management system.

8.       Cabinet largely modelled the reform on the Resource Management Review Panel’s recommendations. The objectives for reform adopted by Cabinet are shown in Appendix B.

9.       In February 2021, Cabinet agreed to repeal and replace the RMA with the Natural and Built Environment Bill (NBE Bill), the Spatial Planning Bill (SP Bill), and the Climate Adaptation Bill (CA Bill).

10.     An exposure draft of the NBE Bill was released in June 2021. While the council submitted on this exposure draft, there are many matters in the NBE Bill that were not included, and council has an opportunity to submit on these now.

11.     These matters include the process to developing the National Planning Framework (NPF), consenting, compliance and enforcement, urban tree cover, subdivision, designations, and the functions and roles of Ministers and agencies, regional councils and territorial authorities, in the system.

12.     An overview of the proposed system can be found here: Our future resource management system: Overview | Ministry for the Environment

13.     The Planning, Environment and Parks Committee delegated approval of council’s formal submission to the Chair, Deputy Chair and an Independent Māori Statutory Board member on 8 December 2022.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

SP Bill and NBE Bill to work in tandem

14.     The SP Bill and NBE Bill will work in tandem. The NBE Bill will require the development of a national planning framework (NPF) and an NBE plan. The SP Bill will require the development of regional spatial strategies (RSS). The RSS must be consistent with the NPF and both the NBE plan and RSS must give effect to it where directed. In addition, the NBE plan must be consistent with the RSS (Figure 1). In essence, the reformed system will create one NBE plan and one RSS for each region.

Diagram

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Figure 1: Key components of the new resource management system

15.     The national planning framework (NPF) will provide direction on the integrated management of the environment for matters of national significance or where consistency nationally or across parts of New Zealand would be desirable. It will consolidate all existing national direction instruments under the RMA, such as National Policy Statements, and include some new functions.

16.     Both the NBE and SP Bills require those exercising powers and functions to give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi. This is stronger than the current RMA equivalent, which requires the principles to be ‘taken into account’.

17.     The RSS and NBE plans will be prepared and notified by regional planning committees (RPC). The RPC will be made up of local government representatives and Māori (and will include a central government representative for matters relating to the RSS). The RPC may establish sub-committees to focus on particular matters or for a sub-region. The RPC will be supported by a secretariat.

18.     The council strongly opposed the RPC mechanism in previous submissions on the basis that the separation of plan-making from other decision-making, such as long-term plans or infrastructure strategies, will lose integration between planning, funding and financing.

19.     Local boards had concerns regarding the potential for local voice to be weakened in the new system. They highlighted the importance of a strong voice for local communities and local boards in the development of strategies and plans to ensure consideration and recognition of local issues in shaping our unique places.

20.     Overall, this new system increases costs to central government and Auckland Council while system users benefit from large cost savings. The largest cost increase falls on local government (Auckland Council).

Spatial Planning Bill

21.     The SP Bill provides for Regional Spatial Strategies (RSS).

22.     RSS are intended to coordinate and integrate the performance of functions across different legislation associated with the management of the natural and built environment, including the NBE Bill, the Land Transport Management Act 2003 and the Local Government Act 2002 (Figure 2).

23.     RSS assist in achieving the purpose of the NBE Bill, including recognising and upholding te Oranga o te Taiao, and the system outcomes outlined in the NBE Bill.

Figure 2: Regional spatial strategy integration across different legislation

24.     The RPC will identify big issues and opportunities facing the region (including infrastructure, and infrastructure investment and funding) and develop an RSS and implementation plans to respond to them.

25.     The RSS will set out a vision and objectives for a region’s development and change over a 30-year plus timeframe. It is reviewed every nine years. Implementation plans set out priority actions that delivery partners will take to implement the RSS and must be reviewed every three years.

26.     Auckland Council is required to implement and administer the RSS while having a limited role in its preparation. When an RSS comes into effect (made operative), it will replace the Auckland Plan 2050.

27.     The funding and financing of infrastructure to implement the RSS is an area of concern. The council previously submitted that all partners in the RSS deliver investment within local government funding constraints. It is therefore imperative that the cumulative effects of growth, and how to apportion the cost of meeting this growth, are addressed through implementation plans. A range of funding and financing mechanisms is required to support implementation. This is not currently addressed in the Bill.

28.     For more detailed information on the SP Bill, see Appendix B.

Natural and Built Environment Bill

29.     The NBE Bill provides an integrated framework for regulating both environmental management and land use planning. It enables the use and development of the environment within environmental limits and requires positive outcomes to be achieved and adverse effects to be managed.

30.     The purpose of the bill is to:

(a)  enable the use, development and protection of the environment in a way that:

·    supports the well-being of present generations without compromising the well-being of future generations

·    promotes outcomes for the benefit of the environment

·    complies with environmental limits and their associated targets

·    manages adverse effects

(b)  recognise and uphold te Oranga o te Taiao.[1]

31.     The NBE Bill will require the Auckland region to have a Natural and Built Environment plan (NBE plan) to provide for the integrated management of the natural and built environment.  When an NBE plan comes into effect (made operative), it will replace the Auckland Unitary Plan.

32.     The NBE plan will be prepared and developed by the RPC - Auckland Council is required to participate and collaborate in the process. The RPC will be funded by Auckland Council.

33.     In the new system, Auckland Council will continue to be the consenting authority.

34.     For more detailed information on the NBE Bill, see Appendix B.

Feedback timetable

35.     The table below sets out the key timeframes for local board input on the Bills:

Milestone

Date

Bills released

15 November 2022

Briefing for local boards

2 December 2022

Deadline for incorporated feedback

23 January 2023

Deadline for appended feedback

3 February 2023

Submission deadline

10 February 2023

Further material

36.     The council submitted on key components of both bills in March 2022 in its response to the Ministry for the Environment’s Our Future Resource Management System Discussion Document. This can be found here: Kotahi - Our future RM System - Materials for discussion.pdf - All Documents (sharepoint.com)

37.     The council also submitted on the direction of the Climate Adaptation Bill in mid-2022, alongside consultation on the National Adaptation Plan under the Climate Change Response Act 2002. This can be found here: Kotahi - National Adaptation Plan.pdf - All Documents (sharepoint.com)

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     For central government, a key objective for the new resource management programme is to better prepare for adapting to climate change and risks from natural hazards, as well as to better mitigate emissions.

39.     The importance of climate change is recognised in the NBE Bill at the system outcome level (Part 1 of the Bill). This outcome states “in relation to climate change and natural hazards, achieve the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, removal of greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and reduction of risks arising from – and better resilience of the environment to – natural hazards and effects of climate change”.

40.     Under the SP Bill, the RSS must identify areas that are vulnerable to significant risks from natural hazards and areas impacted by climate change. It must also identify measures for reducing those risks, addressing effects and increasing resilience.

41.     Under Part 2 of the NBE Bill (Duties and restrictions), NBE plans can make rules that will affect existing rights and land use consents when there are risks associated with natural hazards and climate change.

42.     The resource management reform programme also includes the Climate Adaptation Bill.  This will be released in 2023 and will address issues associated with managed retreat.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     The proposals will have significant impacts across the Auckland Council group.

44.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

45.     The Water Services Entity Act 2022, under the Three Waters Reform programme, establishes the Northern Water Services Entity for the Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland and Northland regions. It is important that council’s submission addresses the role of this new entity as a significant delivery partner in the legislation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     Local board views are being sought on the draft submission and will be incorporated into the council’s final submission as appropriate.

47.     Staff presented at the local board members’ briefing on 2 December 2022.

48.     No specific role for local boards is identified in the NBE or SP Bills. The NBE Bill contains proposals for Statements of Community Outcomes (SCOs). These are voluntary instruments to provide local authorities with a mechanism to directly input local voice into RSS and NBE plans. SCOs will be prepared by territorial authorities and will express the views of a district or local communities.

49.     It is critical that there is a strong voice for local communities and local boards, and consideration of local issues, in the development of strategies and plans. The council previously submitted that community input leads to better plans through the sharing of local knowledge, and identification of local priorities. The council also supported an approach where appropriate engagement outcomes are prescribed in legislation to ensure that this reflects local boards’ statutory functions. This is not currently addressed in the Bills.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     A key Government objective for the new resource management system is to “give effect to the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and provide greater recognition of te ao Māori, including mātauranga Māori”. This has been provided for throughout the NBE and SP Bills starting with the purpose statement, which includes recognising and upholding te Oranga o te Taiao.

51.     There are a number of positive outcomes or impacts for Māori that include:

·        a new requirement to ‘give effect to’ the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi

·        three system outcomes that cover 1) the relationship of iwi and hapū (and their kawa, tikanga, and mātauranga) in relation to their ancestral lands, water, sites, wāhi tapu, wāhi tūpuna and other taonga, 2) protection of protected customary rights and recognition of statutory acknowledgement, and 3) the conservation of cultural heritage

·        mana whenua representation on RPCs (a minimum of two persons)

·        iwi and hapū can provide te Oranga o te Taiao statements to RPCs

·        establishment of an independent National Māori Entity to provide independent monitoring of decisions and

·        Mana Whakahono ā Rohe and engagement agreements.

52.     The Supplementary Analysis Report also states central government will provide a funding contribution to local government to support areas such as iwi / hapū management plans, negotiation of Mana Whakahono ā Rohe agreements, Māori governance, and technical capability and capacity building.

53.     Local government will fund Māori participation in the performance of local government functions and duties and powers under the NBE bill (e.g. consenting, compliance and monitoring etc).

54.     A communication on the NBE and SP Bills has been sent to all iwi entities and their feedback sought. IMSB secretariat staff will work with the council’s technical team throughout the development of the submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     The submission will be developed within existing resources.

56.     The SAR report states that the costs of the new resource management system will increase for councils. These costs will be driven by the transition and establishment costs, development of new plans, strategies and instruments, and enhanced compliance and enforcement duties.

57.     The estimated increase in total costs spread across all regional, territorial and unitary councils is $43 million per year. The estimated increased costs are not calculated on a per council basis. 

58.     The intent of the new system is for most costs to fall on central and local government which, in turn, delivers decreased costs for system users.

59.     There is a lack of detail on central government funding to support local government with the transition and implementation of the new system.

60.     Auckland Council will be required to fund the RPC and the associated secretariat. The council currently performs similar functions at a governance and operational level. However, the RPC will be made up of local government and mana whenua representatives.

61.     The NBE Bill states that, in the case of a region with a unitary authority, that authority must determine the amount of funding to be provided to the RPC. The RPC must prepare and make publicly available a statement of intent each financial year that reflects the budget agreed for the RPC. If any disputes arise, the RPC or local authority may apply to the Minister for the Environment to resolve the dispute. Decisions are binding on the local authorities. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

62.     Financial and legal expertise will be sought in the development of the submission to identify possible financial, legal and reputational risks to the council associated with the new resource management system.

63.     Risks identified to date include:

·    the separation of the planning function from funding and financing decisions (such as the long-term plan process)

·    insufficient coordination and alignment with the Three Waters Reform (the removal of water infrastructure from council control impacts planning and funding decisions)

·    lack of detail on central government funding to support local government with the transition and implementation of the new system

·    lack of opportunities or clear avenues for local democratic input in the system.

64.     The new system has a long transition period of 10 years for the establishment, transformation, and consolidation phases. In that time, the NPF will be developed through a Board of Inquiry process to enable the development of the RSS and NBE Plan. 

65.     The NPF will be rolled out in stages after the Bills are enacted. The first version will integrate existing national direction to inform RSS development and future iterations will inform NBE plan development.

66.     The details of the NPF are vitally important for the new system and remain unknown currently.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     As this submission deadline falls outside the normal local board business meeting schedule, some local board feedback was provided using an urgent decision or through delegated feedback.

68.     Key questions to help local boards structure their input is provided in Appendix A.

69.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, prepared a first draft of the council’s submission. This will be circulated to local board members on 25 January 2023.

70.     Below are the key dates for input into the submission:

·        23 January 2023: final date for local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission

·        25 January 2023: draft submissions shared with local board members.

·        2 February 2023: the final submission will be reported to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee and circulated to elected members

·        3 February 2023: final date for any formal local board feedback to be appended to the council’s submission

·        10 February 2023: final submission will be lodged.

71.     Once the select committee report is released on 22 May 2023, staff will provide local boards with a memo summarising the select committee conclusions.

72.     Auckland Council will have an opportunity to submit on the Climate Adaptation Bill when it is introduced to Parliament in mid-2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Questions to help guide local board submissions (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Detailed Analysis and Advice on the new Resource Management System - local boards (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Waitematā Local Board - Resource Management Reform - Feedback

65

d

Waitematā Local Board - Resource Management Reform - Urgent Decision

75

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Karryn Kirk - Principal Strategic Adviser Auckland Plan Implementation

Amber Dunn - Principal Strategic Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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21 February 2023

 

 

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21 February 2023

 

 

Urgent Decision - Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Community Participation) Amendment Bill

File No.: CP2023/00747

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waitematā Local Board use of an urgent decision to provide feedback on Auckland Council’s submission to the Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Community Participation) Amendment Bill, currently before the Justice Select Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Community Participation) Amendment Bill was introduced to parliament in December 2022 and is currently before the Justice Select Committee. This Bill provides an opportunity to amend the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012, in order to strengthen local councils and communities’ ability to have a real and fair say in the regulation of and accessibility to alcohol in their own communities. The proposed reforms would:

·        remove the appeals process for local alcohol policies,

·        remove cross-examinations from licensing hearings, and

·        remove the limits around who can object to an alcohol licence.

3.       Auckland Council will be making a submission to the Justice Select Committee on this Bill. A draft submission has already been circulated to local board members for feedback by the Community and Social Policy Unit.

4.       The deadline for local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission was 1 February 2023. As this deadline was before the next ordinary business meeting, the Waitematā Local Board provided feedback to council’s submission through an urgent decision (resolution number WTM/2022/200).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision to approve the Waitematā Local Board feedback (Attachment A and B to the Agenda Report) on Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Community Participation) Amendment Bill.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Sale and Supply of Alcohol - Feedback

79

b

Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Community Participation) Amendment Bill - Urgent Decision

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on the draft Future for Local Government report

File No.: CP2023/00345

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the Draft Report released by the Future for Local Government Review Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Future for Local Government Review Panel released its Draft Report (the Report) for consultation on 28 October 2022.

3.       Auckland Council is preparing a submission in response to the Report. Submissions close on 28 February 2023.

4.       The Report makes 29 recommendations on a wide range of areas including: revitalising citizen-led democracy, achieving Tiriti-based partnership between Māori and local government, the approach to allocating roles and functions across different players, achieving genuine partnership between central and local government, more equitable funding, designing a local government system to enable the change we need, and putting in place effective system stewardship.

5.       Auckland Council has previously reached positions on some of the Report’s recommendations through programmes of work or engagement with central government. These positions will be the starting point for preparing the submission but there will be an opportunity for this council to reconsider those positions.

6.       The deadline for local board feedback to be incorporated into council’s submission was 2 February 2023. As this deadline was before the next ordinary business meeting the Waitematā Local Board provided feedback to council’s submission through as urgent decision (resolution number WTM/2022/200).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)   note the urgent decision to approve the Waitematā Local Board feedback (Attachments A and B to the Agenda Report) on the draft Future for Local Government Report. 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Minister for Local Government established the Future for Local Government Review (the Review) in April 2021 and established a Review Panel (the Panel). The purpose of the Review is to identify how our local democracy and governance system needs to evolve over the next 30 years, to improve the wellbeing of communities and the environment and to actively embody the Treaty partnership.

8.       The Panel released its Interim Report in October 2021. The case for change described a local government under pressure without all the levers needed to deliver on community wellbeing. The sector therefore needs to work collaboratively with others including central government, iwi/Māori organisations, the business sector and community groups. It noted that trust had broken down and that there is a need for greater understanding between central government and local government.

9.       The Panel released its Draft Report He mata whāriki, he matawhānui on 28 October 2022. The Report can be found at: https://www.futureforlocalgovernment.govt.nz/reports/

10.     The Report makes 29 recommendations and asks a range of questions intended to inform the Final Report to the Minister.

11.     The Panel states that we are in a period of change (climate change, pandemics, biodiversity loss, social and economic inequity). This is causing many of our communities to lose trust in democratic institutions and to disengage. Government reform is creating further uncertainty for the role of local government in communities.

12.     The challenges facing Aotearoa New Zealand are too big for central government to address alone. Local government has a fundamental role to play in responding to these complex issues and improving the wellbeing of communities. This will require renewal and change (shifts) to many aspects of the local government system.

13.     The Panel previously indicated five shifts are needed to make this change: strengthened local democracy, authentic relationships with hapū/iwi and Māori, a focus on wellbeing, genuine partnership between central and local government, and more equitable funding. Two additional shifts – system design and stewardship – will also need to be considered.

14.     The Report sets out recommendations and asks questions in relation to: revitalising citizen-led democracy, Tiriti-based partnership between ori and local government, allocating roles and functions, local government as champion and activator of wellbeing, replenishing and building on representative democracy, and equitable funding and finance.

15.     Following the release of the Report, the Review Panel undertook a further round of engagement with the local government sector across New Zealand. This included three in-person sessions with local board members in Auckland on 5 and 6 December 2022.

16.     The Governing Body has approved the preparation of an Auckland Council submission in response to the Report. Submissions are due by 28 February 2023.

17.     The Panel’s Final Report is due with the Minister by June 2023. Any response to the Panel’s final recommendations will be a decision for the next government.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The purpose of the Review is highly relevant to local government and Auckland Council.

19.     Some recommendations in the Report are of a functional order (e.g. allocation of roles), some more foundational (e.g. Te Tiriti based partnerships) and some about the ‘system’ we work within. The Report does not necessarily set out all the relationships/interdependencies between the components.

20.     It is proposed that the council’s submission draws these connections where possible to ensure there is a clear understanding of how all elements of the future system will work together and potential impacts and risks. Council should also seek further clarity on the future funding framework for local government and the pathway to build the required capability and capacity to carry out its future role.

21.     The council has formed positions in previous terms on a number of recommendations contained in the Report. These will be the starting point for preparing the submission but there will be an opportunity for this council to reconsider those positions through the drafting process.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     The Report acknowledges that councils have a significant role in mitigating and adapting to climate impacts in their areas. It also notes that the future climate challenge for local government is likely to be greater than the challenge it has faced over the past 30 years to address the infrastructure deficit.

23.     Current funding streams to manage the impacts of climate events are already being challenged, placing many communities at risk and requiring a long-term approach to addressing these issues. The sums involved to mitigate and respond to climate effects are likely to be significant.

24.     Accordingly, the Report recommends (recommendation 23) that central government develops an intergenerational fund for climate change, with the application of the fund requiring appropriate regional and local decision-making input.

25.     In its submission on the Draft National Adaptation Plan earlier this year, Auckland Council argued that central government funding is crucial and must have a long-term focus.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     CCO chairs and chief executives have been provided with a summary and high-level analysis of the Report.

27.     CCO staff are included in the experts across the council group who will develop the council’s submission for approval.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The Report proposes that putting wellbeing at the core of council’s purpose and its roles and functions will unlock greater wellbeing outcomes for communities. Councils have an opportunity to strengthen and expand their role in three key ways: as anchor institutions, place-makers, and systems networkers and convenors.

29.     The Report also proposes a framework to guide the allocation of roles and functions between different actors: central government, local government, hapū/iwi and community. The framework starts with a local-first approach (the subsidiarity principle) and is guided by te ao Māori values.

30.     The Panel has engaged with local board members over the course of the Review in July 2021, March 2022 and most recently on 5 and 6 December 2022 through three separate in-person sessions held across Auckland.

31.     Local board views on the Report are sought and will be incorporated into the council’s submission as appropriate. Formal local board feedback will be appended to council’s submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     A finding of the Review is that the system needs to ensure a more meaningful expression of rangatiratanga and a more culturally specific exercise of kāwanatanga by councils, with te ao Māori values reflected at all levels of the system.

33.     In response, the Report proposes fundamental changes to Te Tiriti o Waitangi provisions of the Local Government Act 2002, a strategic role for Māori in identifying and addressing priority outcomes that will lift community wellbeing, as well as strengthened specific mechanisms for partnership and engagement (including the incorporation of tikanga Māori).

34.     It also proposes improvements to Māori representation at the council table, and a concerted investment in the capability and capacity of both local government and Māori to build and maintain a Tiriti-based partnership in local governance.

35.     Staff have engaged with iwi on the system shifts proposed by the Panel at earlier stages in the Review process. Now that the Report has been released, iwi have been asked for their views to be considered for inclusion in council’s submission.

36.     There has been ongoing engagement with IMSB staff on the Review and they will have an opportunity to review the council’s submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     The submission will be developed within existing resources.

38.     The recommendations of the Review Panel are multi-faceted and there is insufficient information to anticipate or quantify financial implications for the council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     No risks have been identified in relation to preparation of council’s submission.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Staff are drafting a submission for the Governing Body’s approval at its meeting on 23 February 2023.

41.     There will be a briefing on the Draft Report for local board members on 23 January 2023.

42.     Local board views to be considered for incorporation into council’s submission must be received by 2 February 2023.

43.     Formal feedback to be appended to council submissions must be received by 23 February 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitemata Local Board - Future for Local Government Review - Feedback

87

b

Waitemata Local Board - Future for Local Government Review - Urgent Decision

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise O’Shaughnessy - Manager Strategic Advice

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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21 February 2023

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Auckland Council’s submission on the Inquiry into the 2022 Local Elections

File No.: CP2023/00750

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the Justice Committee’s Inquiry into the 2022 local elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parliament’s Justice Committee is conducting an inquiry into the 2022 local elections and is calling for submissions, which close on 14 February 2023. It is usual practice for the Justice Committee to conduct an inquiry following a parliamentary or local election in case there are issues that require a legislative response. For this inquiry, the committee will examine the law and administrative procedures for the conduct of the 2022 local elections, with particular reference to:

a)      low voter turnout

b)      the provision of election services by private organisations, with particular reference to:

·        special voting

·        provision of ballot papers

·        complaint processes

·        accountability for local elections

·        postal voting (including security of ballots and whether postal voting is an effective method of receiving votes)

c)      the age of eligible voters (with reference to lowering the age of eligible voters to 16 years).

3.       The changes to legislation requested in the draft submission are:

(i)      to allow overseas voters the ability to obtain and return a vote electronically as they do for parliamentary elections

(ii)     to accept votes date-stamped by the postal provider on the day of elections (or earlier)

(iii)     to increase the nomination deposit fee for mayoral candidates to reduce the risk of having to re-run an election if any candidate is found, prior to election day, to not be qualified to stand for election.

4.       Staff will report a fuller evaluation of the 2022 Auckland elections to the Governing Body meeting on 23 March 2023. Due to the Justice Committee’s early submission deadline it was not possible to complete this within the timeframe.

5.       The draft submission is attached as Attachment A and focusses on the issues the Justice Committee has identified. The body of this report provides an overview of the points made in the submission.

6.       The draft submission does not take a position on the question of lowering the voting age but makes comments that are relevant to Auckland Council’s context. The local board might consider whether to resolve a position on voting age.

7.       Due to the constrained timeframe most local boards have not been able to meet to provide feedback but have used their urgent decision-making processes. Feedback that is received prior to the Governing Body committee meeting will be circulated. As is practice, all local board comments will be appended to the Auckland Council submission.

8.       The deadline for local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission was 7 February 2023. As this deadline was before the next ordinary business meeting, the Waitematā Local Board provided feedback to council’s submission through an urgent decision (resolution number WTM/2022/200).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision to approve the Waitematā Local Board feedback (Attachments B and C to the Agenda Report) on the Government’s proposals to reform the resource management system.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Parliament’s Justice Committee is conducting an inquiry into the 2022 local elections and is calling for submissions, which close on 14 February 2023. For this inquiry, the Justice Committee will examine the law and administrative procedures for the conduct of the 2022 local elections, with particular reference to:

a)      low voter turnout

b)      the provision of election services by private organisations, with particular reference to:

·    special voting

·    provision of ballot papers

·    complaint processes

·    accountability for local elections

·    postal voting (including security of ballots and whether postal voting is an effective method of receiving votes)

c)      the age of eligible voters (with reference to lowering the age of eligible voters to 16 years).

10.     The draft submission focusses on these issues and raises some additional matters for legislative change.

11.     The Minister of Justice has separately established an Independent Electoral Review to review electoral law.  In September 2022 the review panel released its consultation document and submissions closed in November 2022. The panel will publish a draft report in May 2023 for public comment on the panel’s recommendations and will provide its final recommendations to Government in November 2023[2]. This review deals with Parliamentary electoral law but is of relevance to local government in that matters such as the electoral term and voting age are within its scope.

12.     The key steps in a local election by postal vote comprise:

·    the Electoral Commission updates the Parliamentary electoral roll

·    the council’s Electoral Officer updates the ratepayer roll

·    the council’s Electoral Officer calls for and receives nominations for candidates

·    the council’s Electoral Officer arranges for voting documents to be posted to those on the residential and ratepayer rolls

·    voters have about three weeks to post their ballots

·    the ballots are counted, and the council’s Electoral Officer declares the results.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Low voter turnout

13.     The submission compares turnout in Auckland with turnout in other New Zealand metropolitan councils and with some councils overseas.

14.     The level of turnout in Auckland is in-line with these, though higher turnout is experienced in countries with compulsory voting and in a few standouts such as Denmark.

15.     The submission conveys the results of the council’s most recent post-election survey where respondents were asked why they did not vote. The top reasons were:

·     I don’t know anything about the candidates

·     I forgot to vote

·     I am not interested in politics or politicians.

16.     Some common suggestions to improve turnout include online voting (which Auckland Council has supported in the past). This is on hold while the Government Communications Security Bureau has concerns about cyber-security. In Canada over 150 municipalities conduct online voting, but a researcher there advised turnout increased by only about 3 per cent.

17.     The draft submission also comments on the possibility of providing booth voting as well as postal voting. For the 2022 elections there was a noticeable increase in those who wished to vote on election day itself. Booth voting on election day, in addition to postal voting in the weeks prior, would reduce barriers for some. Electors of councils in the United Kingdom have the option of both, but turnout is same as for Auckland Council, if not lower.

18.     The submission also considers the argument for introducing political parties into local elections but, again, this is the case with councils in the United Kingdom, which have low turnouts.

19.     Compulsory voting would be a major change and should be left to the Independent Electoral Review panel.

20.     The draft submission notes there are no obvious easy solutions to increasing turnout (other than compulsory voting) however it notes options for reducing barriers and improving voter experience.

Provision of election services by private organisations

21.     The draft submission notes that it is impossible for staff to run elections as well as undertaking their normal duties.  The routine election services need to be contracted out for the sake of efficiency and effectiveness.

22.     For the 2022 elections, Auckland Council utilised 25 staff (mostly on a part-time basis) from across the main organisation to undertake those activities that it had a responsibility for.  Collaboration between this virtual team and Elections Services was important and worked well.

Special voting

23.     The identification of special voting centres and their staffing is a collaborative undertaking between the Electoral Officer, Election Services and the council.  Council facilities are used and council staff take part and are trained by the Electoral Officer to undertake the associated duties.

24.     There have been issues experienced with running out of special voting papers due to electors attending special voting centres outside of their area.  An option being investigated for 2025 is to provide the ability to print special voting documents at special voting centres if hard copies run out.

Provision of ballot papers

25.     The draft submission notes the various reasons an elector might not receive a ballot paper, a frequent one being that electors forget to update their details on the electoral roll with the result their ballot paper is sent to their former address.

Complaint processes

26.     The submission notes that there are three agencies involved in complaints about local elections, those being:

·        the Electoral Commission in terms of matters relating to the electoral roll

·        the Electoral Officer, who is responsible for the conduct of the election

·        the council, which is responsible for regulations relating to election signs and for promoting the elections.

27.     This can be confusing for electors who sometimes contact the wrong agency when making a query or wanting to make a complaint. Auckland Council has learnt that there needs to be excellent communication between the agencies to ensure that queries and complaints are dealt with appropriately.

28.     Council advisory staff dealt with:

·    32 complaints / queries relating to election signs

·    54 complaints / queries relating to election protocols for staff and incumbent members

·    63 complaints / queries not categorised.

29.     Council bylaw enforcement staff conducted 154 visits of election signs as a result of complaints.

30.     The Electoral Officer referred three complaints of alleged offences to the Police.

Accountability for local elections

31.     The submission notes that the council has previously expressed support in principle for the administration of local elections to be the responsibility of the Electoral Commission.  Until that happens the council believes the current arrangements, with their respective accountabilities, work well.

Postal voting

32.     The submission notes that postal services are now in decline and that Auckland Council provided vote boxes for voters to deposit their ballots at:

·    Countdown supermarkets

·    train stations

·    libraries and other council facilities.

33.     There were 136 vote boxes with 127,000 votes deposited into them (31 per cent of all votes). 

34.     The submission notes that postal voting does not serve overseas voters well.  Staff are aware of one voter in Australia whose voting pack was posted on 16 September and who received it on 15 October, in the week following election day.  This was subsequently found to be a problem with an overload in the local mail centre.

35.     For Parliamentary elections, overseas voters may download their voting paper, fill it in and upload it back.  This happens over the internet and regardless of GCSB concerns about online voting, staff believe this is a risk worth taking and the same option should be available for overseas voters in local elections. A recommendation is made for legislative change to allow this.

Age of eligible voters

36.     The draft submission does not commit the council to a position on this topic but makes comments about some matters that are relevant to local elections and to the council:

(i)         Local elections use the parliamentary electoral roll which is established under the Electoral Act 1993. Age eligibility is not set separately under the Local Electoral Act 2001, and this should continue to be the case

(ii)        Local elections include electing licensing trust members. Young people cannot purchase alcohol until they are 18 years of age. This is due to greater vulnerability of younger people to alcohol harm. Vulnerability to alcohol is a separate issue to the competency to vote and should not disenfranchise a young person. Older people who are vulnerable to alcohol are not disenfranchised. 

(iii)       The council’s Youth Advisory Panel has a minimum age of 14 though the youngest to date has been 15 years old. Experience is that younger people contribute with well-considered opinions.

Candidate deposit to stand for mayor

37.     If a candidate for mayor is found, between the close of nominations and election day, to be unqualified to stand for election the election for mayor is declared void and has to be held again. The cost of doing this is covered by insurance but it would be extremely inconvenient to electors and increase the risk of reputational damage. The election of a new mayor would not be finalised until the following year.

38.     There are no other positions where this is required.

39.     For the 2022 Auckland Council elections, there were 23 candidates for mayor. The higher the number of candidates, the greater the risk of an unqualified mayoral candidate, and invalidated election. If the threshold for standing for mayor was raised, it would reduce candidates to those who were serious about standing and the risk of having to hold the elections again would be reduced. The submission proposes raising the deposit for mayoral candidates from $200 to $500. A balance needs to be struck between mitigating this risk, and not limiting candidacy for mayor to those who are wealthy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

40.     Most of the issues discussed in the submission do not impact the climate except that it is likely online voting would reduce emissions if it meant that voting documents and booklets for over 1 million electors no longer needed to be printed and posted. This reduction would be ongoing.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     There are no impacts on the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     Local board views are being sought on the draft submission and will be incorporated into the council’s final submission as appropriate. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     The impact of elections on representation of Māori on Auckland Council is an important matter and is being considered separately to this submission through an internal review of the Council’s election processes to be conducted in March.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     There are financial implications associated with matters discussed in the submission, but these have not yet been quantified. For example, if the council introduces booth voting in additional to postal voting, then there will be an additional cost to running the election.

45.     On the other hand, if the return of ballot papers is not through New Zealand Post but by voters depositing their ballots in council vote boxes, there could be a small reduction in cost due to the freepost reply not needing to be paid.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     The risks associated with a mayoral candidate being unqualified to stand election with the result the election has to be run again is raised in the council’s submission. This is a significant risk for Auckland Council. Mitigation to this risk is described in paragraphs 43-45.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     The Planning, Environment and Parks Committee will consider the submission on Thursday 2 February 2023.

48.     Local board resolutions will be included in the Auckland Council submission on this matter.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Submission to the Justice Committee Inquiry into the 2022 Local Elections. (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Inquiry into the 2022 local elections - Feedback

103

c

Inquiry into the 2022 local elections - Urgent decision

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2023/00968

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for the local board chair to provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board Chair to update the local board on activities he has been involved in since the last regular meeting.

3.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chair may, by way of report, bring any matter to the attention of a meeting of the local board or its committees that is within their role or function to consider.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)  receive the Chairperson’s report for November 2022 to 10 February 2023

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair Sage Board Report November 2022 to 10 February 2023

113

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Board member reports

File No.: CP2023/00985

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board’s elected members to update the Waitematā Local Board on matters they have been involved in following the previous month’s meeting and other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Waitematā Local Board to provide a written or verbal update on their activities for the month or any other matter they wish to raise with the board.

3.       This is an information item, and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report from Member A Bonham and Member R Northey for December and January 2023.

b)      receive a verbal report from Deputy Chair Moyle, Member S Trotman, Member A Matson and Member A Rawiri for December and January 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member Alex Bonham Report December 2022 and January 2023

119

b

Member Richard Northey Report December 2022 and January 2023

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

Waitematā Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2023/01228

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous local board business meeting. Attached are copies of the proceeding records taken from the workshops held on:

•     13 December 2022

•     31 January 2023

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance to Standing Order 12.1.4, a record of the proceedings of every Waitematā Local Board workshop held over the past month, including the names of the members attending and the general nature of the matters discussed during the workshop, shall be circulated to the members of the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Waitematā Local Board workshop records for the workshops held 13 December and 31 January 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Records 13 December 2022

139

b

Workshop Records 31 January 2023

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

21 February 2023

 

 

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21 February 2023

 

 

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21 February 2023

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Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Waitematā Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

12        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2022/2023 - Attachment b - Waitemata Q2 Financial Performance

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

Act: s48(1)(a)
Code: s7(2)(j)
Reason: In particular, the report contains detailed financial information related to the financial results of the Auckland Council group that requires release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Te Oranga o te Taiao means: the health of the natural environment, and the essential relationship between the health of the natural environment and its capacity to sustain life, and the interconnectedness of all parts of the environment, and the intrinsic relationship between iwi and hapū and te taiao

[2] https://electoralreview.govt.nz/have-your-say/