I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 March 2023

5.00pm

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office
Shop 17B
93 Bader Drive
Māngere

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Deputy Chairperson

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Members

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

 

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacqueline Robinson

Democracy Advisor

 

14 March 2023

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: jacqui.robinson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Beautification Trust              5

8.2     Deputation - Māngere East Family Services                                                        6

8.3     Deputation - Mā Te Huruhuru                    6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                7

9.1     Public Forum - Māngere Citizens Advice Bureau                                                          7

9.2     Public Forum - Onehunga-Māngere United Football Club                                   7

9.3     Public Forum - Jin Guo                              7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     8

11        Governing Body member Update                       9

12        Board Members' Report                                     11

13        Chairperson's Report                                         13

14        Adopting the Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park Masterplan                                     15

15        Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets – Auckland Transport                                            23

16        Urgent Decision - Approval for a new private road name at 35-37 Walmsley Road, Māngere                                                                              31

17        An evaluation of the local board TUIA rangatahi mentoring programme                      41

18        Annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022.                                                                     67

19        Local Government New Zealand – membership of Auckland Council                                           71

20        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter two 2022/2023                                                             77

21        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Early Engagement Plan for Local Board Plan 2023. 89

22        Local board resolution responses, feedback and information report                                     115

23        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendars                                                           127

24        Record of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                               133

25        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a) accept the apology from member Togiatolu Walter Togiamua for absence.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 7 December 2022 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday 8 February 2023 as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.


 

8.1       Deputation - Beautification Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Daniel Barthow, CEO, and Dawn Crispe, Community Manager of the Beautification Trust will be in attendance to present the Trust’s work over the financial year 30 June 2021 - 1 July 2022 and to share the impact the Trust has had in South Auckland.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Daniel Barthow, CEO and Dawn Crispe, Community Manager of the Beautification Trust for their attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Beautification Trust Presentation - 15 March 2023 - Deputation................. 141

 

8.2       Deputation - Māngere East Family Services

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Māngere East Family Services will be in attendance to introduce their new team members and give an overview of their work in the Taiao space (waste, stream, pest and ngahere regeneration) over the past 3 years. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Māngere East Family Services for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Mā Te Huruhuru

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Māhera Maihi, founder of Mā Te Huruhuru will be in attendance to present Mā Te Huruhuru’s history, programmes, calls to action and the launch of their youth housing project in Ōtāhuhu on 20 March 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Māhera Maihi, founder of Mā Te Huruhuru for her attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          15 March 2023: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Item 8.3 Deputation -
Mā Te Huruhuru - presentation.................................................................... 157

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Māngere Citizens Advice Bureau

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.        Tiana Muliaga, Manager of the Māngere Citizens Advice Bureau will be in attendance to present to the Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Tiana Muliaga, Manager of the Māngere Citizens Advice Bureau for her attendance and public forum presentation.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Onehunga-Māngere United Football Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.           Anthoy Thrush, Secretary of the Onehunga-Māngere United Football Club will be in attendance to present strategic plans for football and the club to the Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Anthoy Thrush, Secretary of the Onehunga-Māngere United Football Club for his attendance and public forum presentation.

 

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Jin Guo

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.        Jin Guo, resident of Māngere will be in attendance to present on behalf of residents of Kitea Place in relation to the flooding event on 27 January 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Jin Guo for her attendance and public forum presentation.

 

 

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Governing Body member Update

File No.: CP2023/01989

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Board Members' Report

File No.: CP2023/02082

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the board members’ written and verbal reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2023/02083

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the chairperson’s written report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Adopting the Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park Masterplan

File No.: CP2023/01986

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park Masterplan and associated implementation plan (Part 1), dated February 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park Masterplan guides long-term improvements to enhance the parks intrinsic values, meet community need and provide the local board with a framework for future decision making and investment.

3.       The masterplan is being developed in two phases. The Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board approved the draft Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park Masterplan (Part 1) for community engagement in June 2022.

4.       Engagement with the community was undertaken in July and early August 2022. This included seeking input on priorities for the masterplan’s implementation. Overall, the community’s response was supportive of the draft masterplan. 

5.       Based on the results of community feedback, changes to the draft masterplan were proposed. These were workshopped with the park stakeholders (key groups based at the park) in August 2022, resulting in further amendments. Park stakeholders also provided input on implementation priorities.

6.       A summary of feedback and proposed amendments to the draft masterplan were workshopped with the local board in September 2022. The proposed changes were supported.

7.       An implementation plan was subsequently developed based on community, park stakeholder and staff input. A staged approach to the development of the park is recommended. The implementation plan was workshopped with the local board in November 2022 and minor changes were made.

8.       Following adoption of the masterplan and implementation plan, phase 2 of the masterplan process will be initiated. This will focus on exploring the provision of fit-for-purpose, multiuse facilities that support existing services and meet current and future community need, whilst protecting the values of the park. The results will be workshopped with the local board in June 2023. 

9.       The masterplan provides direction for planning, business case development and funding identification to meet community sport and recreation needs in the local area. It will be used to guide the future development of the park and inform the Parks and Community Facilities work programme.

10.     Some works supported by the masterplan have recently been implemented. These include redevelopment of the playground, upgrade of 3 fields including lighting, the provision of new cricket/kilikiti wickets and commemoration of the former homestead.

11.     Funding is currently allocated to upgrade the New Arising Trust clubrooms (FY24), renew the existing toilets and changing facility (FY24/25) and develop a new toilet facility by the playground (FY25/26).

12.     Beyond these projects and renewal of existing assets, there is no specific funding for the masterplan. Part 1 is estimated to cost in the vicinity of $8.3m to deliver.

13.     The proposal is to implement masterplan projects mainly through asset renewals and capital expenditure over a 25-30 year period.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park Masterplan and associated implementation plan (Part 1) dated February 2023 as provided in Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park, located at 161R Robertson Road, is a 21-hectare park purchased by the former Manukau City Council in the early 1970’s.

15.     The park is predominantly a sports park. It also provides for passive recreation activities and is home to a number of community providers – the Māngere Centre Park Sports Association, Papatūānuku Kōkiri Marae, Manukau Live Steamers, Time to Thrive to Stay Alive Trust, New Arising Trust and the Māngere Pukapuka Cricket Club. There are a range of lease arrangements and terms with these groups.

16.     The Whare Koa Māngere Community House is also located at the park which is owned and managed by Auckland Council. The building is a scheduled historic heritage place (Category B) under the Auckland Unitary Plan. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     The purpose of the masterplan is to identify long term improvements to Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park to enhance its intrinsic values, meet community needs and guide future decision making and investment. The plan considers cultural heritage, the natural environment, recreational opportunities, the needs of current and future users, current leaseholders, connections within and external to the park, synergies with nearby parks and safety and security.

18.     The masterplan is being developed in two phases. Existing park stakeholders (key user groups based at the park) have aspirations to enlarge their facilities to improve, and in some instances expand, the delivery of their services. It was recognised that extensive work was required to understand park stakeholder and community requirements, network provision and investment opportunities. COVID-19 had already resulted in delays to development of the masterplan, and the local board supported separating the masterplan process into two phases. 

19.     Phase 1 focuses on the ‘green’ space which makes up much of the park - the sports fields, informal recreation and amenity areas and the associated park infrastructure such as parking, playgrounds, toilets and furniture. This phase is the focus of this report.

20.     Phase 2 will explore opportunities to provide multi-use facilities that are fit-for-purpose to support existing and future stakeholders to meet community need, whilst protecting the parks open space values. This will be initiated once phase 1 is adopted by the local board.

21.     The local board approved the draft masterplan (Part 1) for community engagement in June 2022 (resolution number OP/2022/23).

22.     This report presents a summary of the community engagement findings and provides an overview of the final draft masterplan being proposed for adoption.

What we heard from the community

23.     Engagement with the local community, park stakeholders, mana whenua (particularly Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Ahiwaru and Ngaati Whanaunga) was central to the development of the masterplan. Engagement has been undertaken with these groups throughout the design process.

24.     During July and early August 2022 local community feedback was sought on the draft masterplan.

25.     Engagement activities included:

·       AK Have Your Say (online survey)

·       displays at Whare Koa Māngere Community House and Māngere Town Centre Library (hard copies of survey available)

·       social media – via the local board, I am Māngere and park stakeholders

·       two open days – at Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park, outside the Māngere Town Centre Library and at the Māngere Market

·       connecting with local schools and Nga Whare Waatea Marae.

26.     85 survey responses were received (five of these from organisations) and four ideas were submitted. Two email submissions were received, and a number of comments were posted via social media. The park open day was well attended, the library and market open day less so.

27.     Overall the community were supportive of the masterplan.

28.     Key responses:

·        top 5 things people liked about the masterplan – new playground, youth zone, shared walking/cycle pathways, variety of activities, pump track

·        top 5 things that could be improved – safety and security, provision of covered areas and shade, reference to the culture and history of the park, more vegetation, provision of a running track

·        top 5 things for improving safety at the park – better lighting, CCTV, greater security presence/regular safety patrols, fencing the playground, safety measures to stop the dirt bikers

·        of the two options presented to the community for the proposed Youth Zone, option A was the preferred choice with the addition of a netball court, BBQ and hang out space

·        top 5 improvements to the Community Zone – inclusion of a community/youth hub facility, improved security, comfortable seating and shade, an events space, toilets.

29.     A summary of the community’s feedback is provided in the masterplan document in Attachment A.

How staff have responded to community feedback

30.     Key themes raised by the community and the staffs design responses are provided in Attachment A.

31.     The following key changes to the draft masterplan are proposed;

·        incorporate the preferred youth zone option and include a netball court, BBQ and hangout area

·        increase planting provision

·        include a flying fox by the main playground

·        remove the second proposed entrance to the main parking area

·        improve the internal access road

·        improve parking and access to the Manukau Live Steamers area

·        widen the internal pathways where possible (this will be confirmed at detailed design)

·        provide more shade, shelter, water fountains, comfortable seating and bike racks

·        provide an event space in the Community Zone

·        investigate the provision of a link from the proposed shared path along the northern boundary to Calthorp Close.

How the masterplan will be implemented

32.     During the community and park stakeholder engagement, input was sought on development priorities for implementation. The results of this were shared with staff who provided their perspective.

33.     Based on this information an implementation plan has been developed (refer to Attachment A). A staged implementation approach is recommended ensuring a cohesive long-term outcome, as funding becomes available.

Overview of the masterplan proposed for adoption

34.     The following park objectives have been confirmed through the engagement process. They will underpin and guide use and development on the park:

·        A place to connect with others

·        A place to play, be active and participate

·        A place to learn and celebrate our history and cultures

·        A place that provides for changing community needs

·        A place where nature and the environment is enhanced and protected

·        A place that is safe.

35.     The draft masterplan has received a high level of support, and key issues and suggestions have been addressed. On this basis we recommend the final masterplan (Attachment A) is adopted by the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     The masterplan provides for an increase in planting and improved stormwater quality which will improve biodiversity, fauna habitat and help offset carbon emissions.

37.     Implementation will include consideration of aspects such as water sensitive design, use of sustainable and ethical products, use of healthy products, recycling and waste minimisation.

38.     Climate impacts will be further assessed when implementing the masterplan and will be aligned with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     Throughout the masterplan development process various council departments have had input, including Active Communities, Parks and Community Facilities, Connected Communities, Local Board Services and Regional Services and Strategy.

40.     Staff support the changes proposed to the draft masterplan and the implementation plan.

41.     Auckland Transport are designing and delivering the proposed shared pathway along the parks’ northern boundary, linking Robertson Road across the South-Western Motorway to Moyle Park. They are supportive of the design proposal and will work closely with Auckland Council when planning and delivering the shared pathway.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park is a local park under the local board’s governance. 

43.     A key initiative in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan (2020) is to deliver the Māngere Centre Park masterplan to meet increasing sports and recreational needs.

44.     Staff have worked closely with park stakeholders throughout development of the masterplan.

45.     Comments received from the community through engagement on the draft masterplan generally aligned with the elements proposed.

46.     Local board members supported proposed changes to the draft masterplan following community and park stakeholder engagement at a workshop in September 2022. Support was also provided for the implementation plan, subject to some minor changes, at a workshop in November 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     Māori identity and wellbeing is a key outcome in the Auckland Plan 2050.

48.     In the 2018 census, 16.4 percent of people living in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area identified as Māori compared to 11.5 percent in the Auckland region.

49.     The masterplan seeks to increase outcomes for Māori through the park’s objectives and proposals which will create local benefits and opportunities for many communities, including Māori.

50.     Staff presented the draft masterplan at the Mana Whenua Forum in July 2022.

51.     Subsequent hui were held with representatives of Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Ahiwaru and Ngaati Whanaunga.

52.     The following key aspects have been reflected in the proposed plan and will be further considered in phase 2;

·        protection of the open space values to ensure the park can be used by the whole community

·        the importance of future proofing the park and facilities to support the growing and changing needs of the community particularly with the intensification underway by Kāinga Ora in Māngere

·        the importance of flexible, fit-for-purpose facilities

·        the importance of incorporating environmental principles and improving bio-diversity outcomes at the park through water sensitive design and planting

·        understanding and sharing the cultural history of the park

·        the importance of safety and security for the groups based at the park and park users

·        ensuring the park feels welcoming and is well maintained.

53.     Mana whenua have expressed a desire to be involved in phase 2 of the masterplan process and implementation.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     Some works have recently been implemented on the park. These are in alignment with the masterplan. Works include;

·        redevelopment of the playground by the main parking area

·        upgrade of the 3 fields closest to Robertson Road which includes new lighting

·        the provision of two new cricket/kilikiti wickets

·        commemoration of the former homestead.

55.     The following projects are currently in the local boards forward work programme;

·        FY24 - $200,000 ABS:Capex (local renewal) to upgrade the New Arising Trust clubrooms

·        FY24/25 - $371,317 ABS:Capex (local renewal) to renew the existing toilet and changing facility

·        FY25/FY26 - $370,000 LDI Capex to construct a new toilet to service the playground.

56.     There is currently no other capital budget allocated to develop Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park. However, the masterplan will provide a basis for the local board to make decisions about future investment in development of the park.

57.     An implementation plan has been developed for phase 1 of the masterplan which recommends staged development of the proposed elements (refer to Attachment A). Estimated costings have been provided. Prices are current as of January 2023. Detailed design and further consultation on various elements (e.g. the Youth Zone) will be required to further refine the project requirements and costings. This will be undertaken on a project by project basis.

58.     The estimated cost for the 3 stages proposed for phase 1 are outlined in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Implementation plan summary

Stage

Timeframe

Projects

Total approximate cost

Short term

1 to 5 years

Signage, internal shared pathways, improved parking, fencing around the #1 field, toilets x2, community nodes x2, internal road and vegetation improvements

$3.3m

Medium term

5 to 10 years

Youth zone, parking, internal road sealing, drainage improvements, cricket nets, planting

$2.7m

Long term

10 years plus

Homestead zone improvements, SH20 shared pathway, flying fox, fitness trail, Māori/nature playspace, artwork, planting

$2.3m

 

59.     Phase 2 will be initiated once the masterplan and implementation plan are adopted. Investment opportunities and options will be considered as part of this work. It is anticipated that costs will be significant as they will include potential facility development and implementation of the Community Zone. The implementation plan will be updated to include the resulting projects. It is anticipated that the projects will be recommended for medium to long term delivery.

Implementation funding

60.     The implementation plan proposes a range of funding options to deliver elements of the masterplan including locally driven initiatives capital funding (LDI Capex), asset renewal budget, growth budget and some can be delivered by others (e.g. Auckland Transport).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     The main risks and mitigations for this stage of the project are outlined in Table 2 below;

Table 2: Risks and mitigations

Risks

Mitigations

Community expectations may be raised that the proposals in the masterplan will be delivered

Any publicity on the adoption of the masterplan will need to clearly communicate that implementation will be staged over the next 25-30 years

Resourcing implementation of the masterplan

We have partnered with council departments throughout the development of the masterplan to ensure they had the opportunity to provide input and to gain buy-in from those who will be responsible for implementation of the masterplan. Effective handover of the masterplan will be crucial for successful implementation

Funding implementation of the masterplan

Implementation of the masterplan will be staged over the next 25-30 years. Delivery of the masterplan will be subject to securing funding from a variety of sources

Phase 2 of the masterplan may involve challenging conversations with park stakeholders

Conduct a series of co-design workshops with park stakeholders to ensure shared outcomes are achieved

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

62.     Following the local board’s adoption of the Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park Masterplan and implementation plan (Part 1), the plans will be handed over to the relevant teams for implementation planning and delivery.

63.     Phase 2 will be initiated. This will involve workshops and conversations with park stakeholders, mana whenua and staff. The results will be workshopped with the local board in June 2023.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere Centre Park Masterplan February 2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sophie Bell - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets – Auckland Transport

File No.: CP2023/02417

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on its successful application to the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme and to seek formal support of the local board project Māngere Ebike Trial - Stage 2.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport’s report on the Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau programme is provided in Attachment A and requests the local board to formally support the project.

3.       The attached report notes that to be part of the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau programme, the local board must meet 10% of the costs of the project. This cost does not impact on current local board budgets as they will be met through staff time commitment. Any future budget requirements will be formally requested from the board through resolution.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the report titled ‘Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets – Auckland Transport” in Attachment A

b)      tautoko / endorse and support the Māngere Ebike Trial - Stage 2 project in the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets – Auckland Transport

25

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Urgent Decision - Approval for a new private road name at 35-37 Walmsley Road, Māngere

File No.: CP2023/02384

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To notify the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of a decision made under the local board’s urgent decision-making process (resolution number MO/2022/172) to approve a new private road name at 35-37 Walmsley Road, Māngere. The relevant documents are provided in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the urgent decision made on 15 February 2023 to approve a new private road name at 35-37 Walmsley Road, Māngere as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision - Approval for a new private road name at 35-37 Walmsley Road, Māngere

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

An evaluation of the local board TUIA rangatahi mentoring programme

File No.: CP2023/02501

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the evaluation of the TUIA (rangatahi mentoring programme) and its recommendations.

2.       To provide an opportunity for the local board TUIA rangatahi mentor, Togiatolu Walter Togiamua to update the board on the programme’s progress.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The local board has supported the TUIA programme since 2017 and has allocated a budget of $3000 for 2022/2023, through its work programme to support the delivery of it.

4.       The TUIA programme seeks to develop the leadership capacity of young Māori in communities throughout New Zealand. The mentoring is on one-to-one basis, with monthly informal and formal meetings, participation in civic events and trainings, with the overall objective of enhancing the TUIA’s leadership skills as a local leader. 

5.       In Auckland, the Franklin, Papakura, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Ōtara-Papatoetoe and Manurewa local boards have committed to TUIA, offering annual rangatahi places on the mentoring programme.

6.       Currently the southern Local Board Services teams are providing administrative support in the management of the programme, with additional assistance from Local Board Communications and Connected Communities departments in promoting the rangatahi mentoring opportunity to iwi, youth, and community groups.

7.       The TUIA programme aligns with Auckland Council’s ‘I Am Auckland’ strategic action plan for children and young people which was adopted in 2013 following significant consultation with the region’s rangatahi (young people). It sets out council’s commitments to children and young people in Tāmaki Makaurau.

8.       In 2021 the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) committee of the Governing Body endorsed a recommendation to carry out a three-year review of I am Auckland to reflect the changing lives of Auckland’s children and young people, including the impact of COVID-19.

9.       In response to the PACE committee resolution, TUIA was one of several council group programmes evaluated. The evaluation report was completed in December 2022 and has been prepared by the Centre for Social Impact. This is provided as Attachment A.

10.     A schedule of Auckland Council local boards’ TUIA rangatahi programme mentors and rangatahi for 2023 is Attachment B. TUIA rangatahi have recently been confirmed for this year and it is proposed that the board’s TUIA rangatahi mentor give a brief verbal update on how the 2023 programme is progressing.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the evaluation of the local board TUIA rangatahi mentoring programme (TUIA)

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the evaluation recommendations to consider:

i)   ongoing support for and strengthening of TUIA

ii)   facilitating opportunities for rangatahi and local boards to engage in the larger national conversation about participatory democracy and civics education

iii)  sharing TUIA evaluation learnings and insights with other local boards and other parts of the council group

iv)  further engagement with mana whenua on TUIA to seek insight and learning an increase in operational capacity (identifying a dedicated resource) to support the continuous improvement and upscaling of the TUIA programme,

v)   enhanced professional development for mentors

c)       tuku ki tangata kē / forward this report, attachments and resolutions to the Nga Matarae Heads of Strategic Outcomes and Relationships/Partnerships and request further advice on options to meet the recommendations of the evaluation

d)      whiwhi / receive a verbal update from the board’s TUIA rangatahi mentor on how the 2023 programme is progressing.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local board work programme

11.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board supports the TUIA rangatahi mentoring programme and has done so since 2017. The local board work programme budget is $3000 for 2022/2023, and this is the typical level of annual investment for this programme.

About the local board TUIA rangatahi mentoring programme

12.     TUIA is a programme that has a national and local component. Founded by the Mayors Taskforce for Jobs in 2011, the basis for this initiative is that with the right support and the right opportunities, young leaders can become effective drivers of social and economic change in their respective communities.

13.     The rangatahi is mentored regularly by a local board member, and is supported by the whole local board, involving informal meetings and attending more formal hui. The relationship also provides both partners – rangatahi and the local board – an opportunity to gain insight into intergenerational issues, values and their respective ‘worlds’.

14.     The programme also builds on the network of rangatahi who are contributing to their communities and supporting each other. This is done through the national TUIA wānanga, enabling relationships to be developed across a diverse range of rangatahi throughout the country who recognise, accept and celebrate their whānaungatanga as well as their diversity.

15.     Three pou (pillars) make up the TUIA rangatahi experience; mentoring, community contribution and wānanga.

16.     Rangatahi are invited to attend five wānanga on marae in different parts of the country over the year to build their networks, obtain support, and undertake leadership development opportunities, in an environment that nurtures and celebrates te ao Māori.

17.     National wānanga are coordinated and organised by the TUIA Charitable Trust. From 2011 to 2022 the TUIA programme involved 56 councils, 19 iwi and community-based organisations, and over 350 rangatahi participated.

18.     In Auckland, the Franklin, Papakura, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Ōtara-Papatoetoe and Manurewa local boards have committed to TUIA, offering annual rangatahi places on the mentoring programme.

Evaluation of the TUIA programme

19.     The TUIA programme aligns with Auckland Council’s ‘I Am Auckland’ strategic action plan for children and young people which was adopted in 2013 following significant consultation with the region’s rangatahi (young people). It sets out council’s commitments to children and young people in Tāmaki Makaurau

20.     In 2021 the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee of the Governing Body endorsed a recommendation to carry out a three-year review of the strategy to reflect the changing lives of Auckland’s children and young people, including the impact of COVID-19.

21.     The three-year review included an evaluation of a selected number of existing child and youth programmes delivered by the Auckland Council group. The purpose was to understand what outcomes these programmes achieve and how these align with the goals of I Am Auckland. A key objective was also to provide programme organisers with valuable insights and learnings.

22.     The Centre for Social Impact was commissioned to undertake the evaluations, and six council programmes were selected for evaluation through an expression of interest process:

i)    Local board TUIA rangatahi mentoring programme: Supports rangatahi from the Franklin, Papakura, Māngere-Ōtahuhu, Ōtara-Papatoetoe and Manurewa local boards to contribute to their communities with mentorship from local board members, civics education, community projects, and wānanga with other mentees

ii)   He Pia He Tauira: Provides opportunities for young people from mana whenua iwi to engage with Eke Panuku and express kaitiakitanga and manaakitanga through regenerative placemaking activity

iii)  The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Squad (TOPS): A youth voice initiative that offers leadership development and opportunities for young people in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board area

iv)  West Tech: Increases digital equity by teaching children and young people in West Auckland how to repair laptops and other digital devices

v)   Tula’i: West Auckland based leadership programme for Pasifika youth that includes youth mentoring, inspirational speakers, connection with parents, a camp, and community service

vi)  Girl on Fire: North Shore based programme that encourages young Asian girls to increase physical activity and build leadership skills.

23.     The programmes were chosen after meeting at least two of the following selection criteria:

i)    cover at least two I Am Auckland goals

ii)   deliver to areas of most need i.e. south and west Auckland

iii)  deliver to tamariki and rangatahi Māori

iv)  deliver to Pacific or Asian populations

v)   are youth-led

vi)  target multiple outcome areas e.g. arts and employment

vii) cover other priority child and youth populations e.g. disabled or rainbow young people.

24.     The TUIA programme evaluation report prepared by the Centre for Social Impact is dated December 2022 and is included as Attachment A.

25.     A schedule of Auckland Council local boards TUIA rangatahi programme mentors and rangatahi for 2023 is included as Attachment B.

Benefits of the TUIA programme

26.     The TUIA programme evaluation (Attachment A) and anecdotal evidence highlights the value and success of the programme. It indicates that the mentor/mentee model at local board level is impactful.

27.     This programme aligns with many local board objectives and I Am Auckland goals.

28.     In the south Auckland context, TUIA is proving to be a platform for enhancing local board member community networks and iwi relationships, building rangatahi capability/experiences and developing local community succession-planning.

Recommendations from the evaluation

29.     There are a number of recommendations from the evaluation for the local board’s consideration as detailed below.

Strengthening the future TUIA

30.     The evaluation identifies a number of benefits of the programme and recommends ongoing advocacy for and promotion of TUIA. The evaluation also notes alignment of this local board programme with some of the recommendations in the Future for Local Government review. For example, the Future for Local Government review discusses the need to increase community understanding about the role of local government, and therefore encourage greater civics education and participation, as well as ensuring te ao Māori values and mechanisms for partnership and engagement are reflected at all levels of council systems. In its own way, the TUIA programme is delivering to these outcome areas in local governance of Tāmaki Makaurau.

Looking at TUIA as part of a larger conversation on participatory democracy and civics education

31.     The evaluation recommends that south Auckland local boards are facilitated to connect with the TUIA national body, as an opportunity for rangatahi and local boards to engage with the larger national conversation about participatory democracy and civics education.

Building ongoing evaluation into TUIA

32.     The sharing of evaluation data and insights with key stakeholders is recommended as part of the evaluation, and that this be integrated into the future programme design. Council staff and mentors involved in TUIA could connect with the national TUIA body to collaborate on evaluation approaches, and to share learnings and insights from local boards, mentors and rangatahi with other governance entities in Auckland and other regions.

TUIA and engagement with mana whenua iwi

33.     The evaluation recommends active engagement with mana whenua on TUIA. There is currently strong engagement with some of the south Auckland local boards and iwi mana whenua, which has been further enhanced by the TUIA connection.

Dedicated TUIA resource

34.     The evaluation recommends an increase in operational capacity (identifying a dedicated resource) to support the continuous improvement and upscaling of the TUIA programme.

35.     Currently support is primarily provided by southern Local Board Services teams (administration and some coordination), with specific assistance from Local Board Communications and Connected Communities (promoting the rangatahi mentoring opportunity to iwi, youth and community groups). There is considerable reliance on each elected member mentor to lead much of the activity for the local TUIA programme.

Professional development for mentors

36.     The evaluation recommends that a thorough training programme is provided to local board members who are mentoring rangatahi. It is important the mentor/mentee relationship is one of trust, and that both parties are working in safe environments. Professional development of mentors would help ensure an ongoing positive youth development experience, and that the mentors are well-equipped and supported to be effective in this responsible role.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     There are no specific climate impacts as a result of the evaluation as future actions are yet to be determined. The TUIA programme involves some climate impact as rangatahi are required to travel to wananga in different parts of the country as part of the programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     This report provides information on the evaluation of the TUIA programme to participating local boards. Boards are invited to provide any feedback or take further action to implement the recommendations of the evaluation as necessary.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The TUIA programme is focused on rangatahi development, strengthening relationships with iwi mana whenua and better outcomes for Māori communities in the participating southern local board areas. Staff believe the TUIA programme has positive impact on Māori communities in local areas.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     There are no specific financial implications arising from this report as it provides information to the local board on an evaluation of a programme. Funding for the TUIA programme for 2022-2023 has already been approved and any future funding will need to be approved through normal council budget processes.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

TUIA Programme Evaluation report

47

b

Southern local boards TUIA rangatahi programme 2023 – mentors and rangatahi

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shoma Prasad - Local Board Engagement Adviso

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022.

File No.: CP2023/02233

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report for 2021-2022 shows how the council group is contributing to the 10 mana outcomes of Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework, and the LTP 10-year budget priorities.

3.       The council group published its first Māori Outcomes Report in 2019. This fourth edition flows on from earlier reports and provides information on performance, including how the council group has been supporting a Māori response and recovery from COVID-19. Each report aims to provide a comprehensive picture of annual progress to decision makers across the council group, Māori partners, elected members, leaders in governance, and whānau Māori.

4.       Highlights for the 2021-2022 year include:

·        elevation of the council’s most senior Māori leadership role, Director Ngā Mātārae and Māori Outcomes, to the Executive Leadership team

·        Manaaki Fund 2021 contributed to Māori partners’ Covid-19 initiatives, which supported whanau wellbeing during Auckland’s longest Covid-19 lockdown. A total of $297,570.00 was granted

·        continued success of Toi Tū Toi Ora through a year long programme of work in support of the previous year’s hugely successful Toi Tū Toi Ora exhibition

·        Marae Infrastructure Programme continues to progress major infrastructure upgrades for six marae, and another nine marae formally engaged at various stages

·        Amotai continues to support Māori businesses into procurement opportunities. In financial year 2022, funding from the Māori Outcomes Fund enabled Amotai to work across 126 procurement opportunities worth a total of $150 million.

5.       Delivery challenges faced by some of our partners led to underspend of the Māori Outcomes Fund, with $14.3 million of its $18.7 million budget spent.

6.       Separate to the annual Māori outcomes report are 6-monthly measures reports for Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework. The inaugural measures report for the July 2021 – Dec 2021 period was presented to the Parks, Arts Community and Events committee at the September 2022 meeting.

7.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022 will be publicly published with copies distributed to key partners including mana whenua iwi and mataawaka entities.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021-2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2021/2022 - Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report 2021-2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ashley Walker - Principal Advisor - Maori Outcomes

Authorisers

Lou-Ann Ballantyne - Head of Māori Strategic Outcomes

Herewini Te Koha - Director Māori Outcomes

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Local Government New Zealand – membership of Auckland Council

File No.: CP2023/02214

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide local boards with information that enables them to provide feedback to the Governing Body when it considers Auckland Council’s ongoing membership of Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Mayor of Auckland leads the development of the annual plan. The mayor is promoting reduction of expenditure and in this context has asked for consideration of the council’s ongoing membership of LGNZ. This will be considered by the Governing Body at its meeting on 23 March 2023.

3.       The council currently pays a subscription of approximately $400,000. In addition, there are costs associated with attending the annual conference and other activities. That expenditure could be applied to other council services.

4.       Although Auckland Council is large enough to continue without using the resources and services provided by LGNZ, key questions are: should New Zealand have an association of local government? And, if so, should Auckland Council support this even though it might not need to use any of the resources or services provided by LGNZ?

5.       This report provides information that will assist local boards to provide feedback to the Governing Body.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      kohuki / consider its feedback for the Governing Body’s consideration of Auckland Council’s ongoing membership of Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ).

Horopaki

Context

6.       LGNZ is constituted as an incorporated society (New Zealand Local Government Association Inc). The members of the society are individual councils.

7.       The objectives of LGNZ, under the constitution, are summarised as:

·        promote the national interests of local government

·        advocate on matters affecting the national interests of local government

·        dialogue with government, parliamentarians and government agencies

·        provide information to members

·        research matters on behalf of member authorities

·        provide advice and training opportunities

·        hold conferences.

8.       The components of LGNZ are:

·        National Council, which is the governing body of LGNZ

·        National Council Committees, to guide best practice

·        Zones, which are geographical groups of councils and Auckland Council

·        Sector Groups, which are groups of councils based on local government sectors (metropolitan, provincial, regional, rural).

9.       The president and vice-president are elected at an annual general meeting (AGM) by ballot of member councils.

10.     The National Council comprises the president and 17 members who are generally appointed by zones and sectors. Provision has been made in the LGNZ constitution for three members of Auckland Council on the National Council, one of which is reserved for a representative of Auckland Council’s 21 local boards. The National Council employs the chief executive.

11.     Zones and sectors generally:

·        make appointments to the National Council

·        provide advice to the National Council

·        disseminate information to members

·        assist the National Council with dealing with issues

·        receive updates from LGNZ on issues facing local government.

12.     Auckland Council is not a member of a geographical zone of councils. It is its own Zone, recognising the 21 local boards in the Auckland Council model. The Auckland Council Zone meets four times per year and is attended by representatives of the 21 local boards and the Governing Body. The LGNZ President and Chief Executive, or their nominees, report to the Zone on the key issues facing the local government sector and being addressed by the National Council.

13.     Auckland Council gets a number of benefits from its interactions with LGNZ. These benefits include keeping abreast of national issues affecting local government, influencing local government issues on the national agenda, providing sector leadership, and elected representatives being able to connect and network with their peers from across the country.

14.     Auckland Council’s annual subscription for 2022/2023 is $350,352.26 excluding GST and covers an April to March financial year. 

Composition of the National Council

15.     The National Council comprises:

·        the President

·        the chair of Te Maruata

·        one member elected by each of zones 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

·        three members elected by the Metropolitan Sector Group (except Auckland Council)

·        two members elected by the Regional Sector Group

·        one member appointed by each of the provincial and rural groups

·        the Mayor of Auckland

·        one elected member appointed by the Auckland Council governing body

·        one elected member appointed by the Auckland Council local boards.

 

16.     Committees of the National Council include:

·        Te Maruata

·        the Young Elected Members’ committee

·        the Community Board Executive Committee (an advisory committee)

·        other committees set up by the National Council from time to time.

17.     Although the members of LGNZ are the councils, the LGNZ constitution provides for one position on the National Council to be appointed by Auckland Council local boards.

18.     A decision about the ongoing membership of LGNZ is made on behalf of Auckland Council as a whole and is made by the Governing Body.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The Mayor of Auckland has a statutory role of leading the development of, among other things, the annual plan. Local boards will be aware that the mayor is proposing an annual plan that seeks to reduce council expenditure.

20.     In this context the mayor has asked that the ongoing membership of LGNZ is considered. The subscription together with related costs such as conference attendance is over $400K. That amount could be used for other council purposes.

21.     Before the formation of Auckland Council, the eight legacy councils each paid their subscriptions to LGNZ. The subscription paid by Auckland Council is not the sum of those subscriptions, but a lower amount.  As the subscription has already been discounted (by about $200K), seeking a further significant reduction is not considered to be an option.

22.     LGNZ’s latest annual report (for 2021/22) shows that its gross surplus (revenue less direct costs) was just over $2 million and its net surplus before tax (after deducting operating expenses) was $341,007.

23.     There are 78 councils in New Zealand with populations ranging in size from 600 (Chatham Islands) to 1.7 million (Auckland). The average population size per council is approximately 85,000 (about the size of an Auckland Council ward). After Auckland Council the next largest council in terms of population is Canterbury Regional Council with a population of 655,100.  The largest city is Christchurch with a population of 389,130. Auckland Council is considerably larger than any other council in New Zealand.

24.     LGNZ comprises and represents all councils in New Zealand. It is the body that central Government Ministers consult when seeking a view from the local government sector.

25.     LGNZ provides resources such as policy advice, elected member development and conferences that are available to the whole sector. 

26.     Auckland Council, on the other hand, is large enough to provide policy advice and elected member development without calling on LGNZ services; although in the past there has been a collaboration between LGNZ and Auckland Council at a staff level and on National Council and its committees at elected member level.

27.     LGNZ’s latest annual report notes that LGNZ has coordinated a sector response to major reforms, including the RMA reforms and Three Waters. LGNZ has also organised webinars about issues raised by the Future for Local Government Review.

28.     In the future, there is the possibility of major local government reforms arising from the report of the Future for Local Government Review Panel. If this happens, it could be beneficial for Auckland Council to be a part of a sector approach to those reforms, in which case a future council might choose to rejoin LGNZ if the current council resigns its membership.

29.     Issues around climate change will likely become more important in the future and it may be important to co-ordinate a sector approach to these.

30.     Key questions are: should New Zealand have an association of local government? And, if so, should Auckland Council support this even though it might not need to use the resources or services provided by LGNZ?

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     As a consequence of the pandemic, LGNZ has held some meetings online but not all. If Auckland Council resigned its membership of LGNZ there would be less air travel between Auckland and Wellington by those attending meetings.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     There are no impacts on the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     LGNZ exists primarily for elected members (as compared to Taituarā which exists for local government managers). Under the constitution, councils are the members of LGNZ. The constitution recognises local boards by providing a position on the National Council to be elected by Auckland Council’s 21 local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The LGNZ National Council has a committee known as Te Maruata. It promotes the participation of Māori in local government and provides a network for Māori elected members.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     The current expenditure on LGNZ activities, approximately $400,000, could be used on other Auckland Council activities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     There is a risk, if Auckland Council is not a member of LGNZ, of Auckland Council not being able to influence the position of the sector on various policy matters. This risk is considered to be low as Auckland Council is large enough to be seen by central government as an important local government participant to be communicated with separately to the sector as a whole.

37.     There is a risk to LGNZ that if Auckland Council resigns its membership that this will adversely impact LGNZ’s financial position.

38.     Being part of LGNZ has the benefit that the council can socialise Auckland issues with the elected representatives of other councils. There is a risk that Auckland Council could lose the understanding and support of other councils if it withdraws from LGNZ. Loss of support by other councils could affect Auckland Council’s relationship with central government.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Local board feedback is due on 15 March 2023 and will be collated and reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Oliver Roberts - Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter two 2022/2023

File No.: CP2023/02336

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2022/2023 work programme.  

3.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed), grey (cancelled, deferred or merged) or red (activities that have significant issues). 

4.       One hundred and thirty-four of the 139 work programme items are on track; four items have some risk to delivery; and there is one item with significant issues, ID# 3, Pukaki Crater access easement. 

5.       Key activity updates from this period include: 

·        Local civic events Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, ID#255: There is an anticipated underspend as there have been fewer openings and blessings than expected this financial year and a reallocation of $4,000 is recommended

·        Moana-Nui-a-Kiwi pool and leisure centre: Operations, ID# 32: Membership has grown by more than 10 per cent in the last 12 months

·        Community grants Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, ID# 263: $42,532.00 spent towards Local Grants round one and Multiboard Grants round one

·        Māngere Centre Park - upgrade sports fields and lighting, ID# 30180: Lighting installation is now complete on Field 1 as per FIFA specifications  

·        Paneke / Radonich Park service assessment, ID# 641: A draft assessment, which provides medium term (1-5 years), and long term (5-10 years) park outcomes has been produced

·        MO: Ecological and environmental volunteers programme FY23, ID# 640: 100 volunteer hours were recorded this quarter 

·        Bike Hub Māngere, ID# 632: The Māngere Bike Hub was open for 43 days, had 930 visitors, fixed 189 bikes and was supported by 77 volunteer hours

·        Māngere Centre Park - renew and upgrade park assets, ID# 20554: Construction on playground fencing has started. 

6.       The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2022 

b)      whakaae / approve the reallocation of $4,000 from Local civic events Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, ID #255 for local board Annual Budget 2023/2024 engagement.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has an approved 2022/2023 work programme for the following operating departments: 

· Customer and Community Services 

· Infrastructure and Environmental Services 

· Plans and Places 

· Tātaki Auckland Unlimited. 

 

8.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph. 

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot 

9.       The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red), and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey). 

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status 

 

  

10.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes.   

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department 

 

Key activity updates 

 

11.     Local civic events Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, ID# 255: It is expected that there will be an underspend as there are fewer anticipated openings in quarter 3 and 4. A reallocation of $4,000 to support Mana Whenua and Local Stakeholder engagement events for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Budget 2023/2024 is recommended. The current Annual Budget engagement amount is $1,000. The increased budget would allow for meaningful and targeted local engagement with mana whenua, stakeholders, and community groups and organisations.

12.     Moana-Nui-a-Kiwi pool and leisure centre: Operations, ID# 32: Membership has grown by more than 10 per cent in the last 12 months and group fitness class attendance is steadily increasing. 

13.     Tātou Belonging - we bring communities together Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, ID# 1166: Māngere East Library received a refurbishment with new tables, chairs, wheels for the shelving and a new back deck. Old furniture and pavers were donated to Ōtāhuhu Youth Club and the Tongan Youth Trust based in Māngere. 

14.     Youth: Capacity building and participation Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, ID# 245: The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Interfaith Youth Collective (MOIYC) supported and co-hosted the Māngere Christmas Fun Day on December 3 at the Māngere Town Centre. 

15.     Community grants Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, ID# 263: $42,532.00 spent towards Local Grants round one and Multiboard Grants round one. 

16.     Māngere Centre Park - upgrade sports fields and lighting, ID# 30180: Lighting installation is now complete on Field 1 as per FIFA specifications. 

17.     Paneke / Radonich Park service assessment, ID# 641: A draft assessment that provides medium term (1-5 years) and long term (5-10 years) park outcomes has been produced. Additional content that addresses conditions of use by the 'kumara growers' will be provided by the closed landfill team in quarter three. The draft assessment will then be presented to the board at a workshop in April 2023. 

18.     MO: Ecological and environmental volunteers programme FY23, ID# 640: 100 volunteer hours were recorded this quarter. Planning for the 2023 planting season is underway with quotes obtained for plants and site preparation. A residents group completed a clean-up at Te Ararata stream. 

19.     Schools Waste Minimisation programme (Māngere-Ōtāhuhu), ID# 628: Engagement with 17 schools has been ongoing. Secondary waste audits have been carried out, which have shown a reduction in landfill waste and indicated that the schools' food scrap composting systems are up and running. There is still capacity to engage another preschool.  

20.     Bike Hub Māngere, ID# 632: During this period the Māngere Bike Hub was open for 43 days. The bike hub had 930 visitors, fixed 189 bikes and was supported by 77 volunteer hours. Events held during this quarter include the Māngere ebike trial community launch event, Biketober Labour Wheels Day community ride and Halloween ebike community ride and a Power Up Māngere event to celebrate international ‘car-free’ day with a community bike pitstop and ride. 

21.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu - install CCTV cameras, ID#18735: The report has been approved by Council's security team for the closed-circuit televisions (CCTV) to be upgraded in Māngere and Ōtāhuhu. However, there is not sufficient budget to complete the project and additional budget is being requested. 

22.     Māngere Centre Park - renew and upgrade park assets, ID# 20554: Construction on playground fencing has started. This is being undertaken to prevent unauthorised motorbikes and bikes in the park. 

 

Activities with significant issues 

23.     Pukaki Crater access easement, ID# 3: The Co-Management Committee has requested an ‘indicative cost’ for the design and construction of a bund upgrade at Pukaki Crater. To provide an ‘indicative funding envelope’ for the design and construction of the bund upgrade a pre-feasibility study costing $37,000 is required. The board is to decide if it wishes to fund this feasibility study in 2023-2024 as an initiative. A workshop will be held in April 2023 to discuss this item.

 

Activities on hold 

24.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold: 

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Aquatic (Toia-Ōtāhuhu Pool Leisure Centre and Moana-Nui-A-Kiwa) - renew pool plant, ID# 31759.

·        Māngere Bridge Library - comprehensive renewal, ID# 20552. 

·        Pukaki Crater access easement, ID# 3. 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.  

26.     Work programmes were approved in June 2022 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This report informs the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of the performance for ending 31 December 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The local board has a number of initiatives that promote Māori outcomes as detailed below.  

30.     Māori Responsiveness Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, ID# 253: Engage with mana whenua, mataawaka and local board members to identify appropriate projects that respond to Māori aspirations in a practical and effective way, engage and build relationships with local marae, engage with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify projects that respond to local Māori aspirations. 

31.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Pop-Up Activations, ID# 262: Fund the delivery of a series of pop-up events that are free to attend and celebrates Māori and Pasifika culture and activate the courtyard at Māngere Arts Centre - Ngā Tohu o Uenuku.  

32.     Pest Free Ihumātao, ID# 661: To continue to empower iwi to implement restoration activities to protect the key taonga such as Ōruarangi Awa, Ōtuataua Stonefields and Ihumātao Papakāinga. This will include Makaurau Marae undertaking regenerative restoration, native plant services, biosecurity control and monitoring, biodiversity surveys, community engagement and waste minimisation practices. 

33.     Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places), ID# 2831: Māori naming (and associated story telling) of parks and places in partnership with mana whenua to value and promote Auckland’s Māori identity and use of te reo Māori, the outcome being a dual Māori/English name or a sole Māori name. 

34.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is also part of Ara Kōtui, a joint mana whenua and southern local boards initiative that explores and supports opportunities that enable mana whenua involvement in local board decision-making. Currently up to 12 mana whenua are involved in this initiative.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     This report is provided to enable the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2022/2023 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions. 

37.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three, 31 March 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Work programme update quarter two (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quarterly Operating Performance quarter two report

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Abbot - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Early Engagement Plan for Local Board Plan 2023.

File No.: CP2023/02546

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform and seek feedback from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on the early engagement process in developing the Local Board Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board plans are strategic three-year plans developed in consultation with the community. They set out the direction for the local area reflecting community aspirations and priorities.

3.       Local board plans are inclusive of, and connected to, regional strategies and plans, including the Auckland Plan (the 30-year vision for Auckland), the council’s 10-year Budget (Long-term Plan) and annual budgets.

4.       Workshops were held in November and December 2022, and January and February 2023 to review the delivery of the current Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan and receive analysis and advice from various departments on budget challenges, reprioritisation of work programmes to increase focus on climate action, Māori responsiveness and delivering on core council services such as our pools, open spaces and facilities.  

5.       Initial ideas and initiatives from board members have formed the content of the Early Engagement summary document provided as Attachment A. Focus areas and initiatives include our community, places, people, economy and environment. This document will form the basis of early engagement and to formulate engagement questions but will not be presented as a draft local board plan document as that is yet to be developed.  

6.       There will be three phases of engagement for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2023 as outlined in Attachment B. Phase one will focus on creating awareness about the local board plan and gather initial feedback (early engagement). Phase two will be a special consultative procedure (SCP) where the community is invited to give formal feedback on the draft plan. Phase three will include formal adoption of the plan and closing the loop with local communities.

7.       The purpose of undertaking early engagement is to work with key community stakeholders on developing the draft Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan for later public consultation. Early engagement also tests engagement processes, shares what the board has achieved through the current local board plan and seeks initial views from stakeholders, partners, mana whenua iwi and community leaders to help the board in drafting a Local Board Plan 2023. It is also provides an opportunity for the community to reflect on their initial challenges and aspirations for the local area.

8.       The contents of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan will be developed by the board with its local communities between June and August.

9.       The Local Board Plan will be formally adopted by the board in October 2023.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the draft early engagement summary document in Attachment A and the Engagement Plan in Attachment B for early engagement with local communities on the Local Board Plan 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Local Government Act (Auckland Council) 2009, s20, requires each local board to adopt a local board plan by 31 October in the year immediately after the year of each triennial general election.

11.     Local board plans are strategic three-year plans developed in consultation with the community.

12.     The Early Engagement Summary document in Attachment A takes into account members’ views, advice and analysis on financial challenges faced by council and is reflective of the achievements of the current plan. The draft document comprises of aspirational outcomes, and some of the key initiatives on local activities, projects, and facilities.

13.     Informal early engagement will take place from April to May 2023. It provides a key opportunity for mana whenua iwi, mataawaka, community partners and stakeholders to influence the content of the plans by putting forward ideas, initiatives and priorities or projects. Public engagement at this stage allows for a ‘community conversation’ that can shape the setting of priorities to formulate the draft plan.

14.     There will be three phases of engagement for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2023:

·    Phase One, which is treated as early engagement, will take place from April to May 2023 and will focus on gathering initial feedback from mana whenua, mataawaka, partners and community stakeholders to inform the development of the draft local board plan

·    Phase Two will be a Special Consultative Procedure, which is a statutory consultation requirement under the Local Government Act. There will be a formal public notification and feedback process from July-August 2023

·    Phase Three will be post adoption of the local board plan in October 2023 and will involve sharing the plan with local communities and closing the loop with those who gave feedback.

15.     For early engagement, the focus will be on targeted stakeholder consultation which includes; community partners, community grant recipients, local board venue and facility hirers and users, mana whenua iwi, Māori communities and local youth partners.

16.     Engagement with mana whenua will be through rangatira ki te rangatira across local iwi and hapū partners, which includes: Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ahiwaru, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngai Tai Ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Tamaoho, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngāti Paoa, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Tamaterā, Te Patukirikiri and Ngāti Tamaoho. The board will also work in partnership with marae in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area.

17.     A draft Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan, supported by an Engagement and Project Delivery Plan will be tabled at the board’s business meeting in June for the board to adopt, before going out for formal engagement with the local community.

18.     The board will formally adopt its Local Board Plan 2023 in October 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     In 2019, Auckland Council voted unanimously to declare a Climate Emergency, and the following year the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan was adopted. The Annual Budget 2022/2023 gives effect to those actions by guaranteeing ring-fenced funding to cut emissions, including a half-billion-dollar boost to deliver new and more frequent bus services across the region. Although the targeted rate is ring-fenced to deliver the actions in the Annual Budget 2022/2023, local boards can also address climate change in their local board plans.

20.     Local Board Plans will seek to set out the board’s priorities and initiatives in addressing climate impact and seek the views of the community in meeting that challenge. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Initial local strategic context, including ideas and initiatives from board members have formed the content of the Early Engagement summary document in Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     Auckland Council has committed to a treaty-based partnership with Māori. The local board will engage with mana whenua at rangatira ki te rangatira level across local iwi and hapū partners.

23.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, a Māori outcomes performance measurement framework, has been developed with mana whenua entities and Māori communities to reflect te ao Māori, be informed by mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) and be Māori centric. It provides practical guidance for staff to deliver on Māori outcomes, by identifying focus areas where the council group can best influence and direct resources, and by providing measures to ensure consistent delivery.

24.     The Kia Ora Tāmaki Mākaurau framework forms the foundation for the Māori outcomes in local board plans alongside improved engagement with Māori communities and mana whenua. It is intended that specialists from Ngā Mātārae will be involved in the development of local board plans as well as Māori outcomes specialists in other departments of council.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     There are no specific financial implications arising from this report as it provides information to the local board on the delivery of early engagement for local board plan 2023. Funding of $6,500 for engagement initiatives has already been approved and any future funding will need to be approved through normal council budget processes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Staff will commence early engagement in April 2023 and report the findings to the board for incorporation into its draft Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Early Engagement Summary - Local Board Plan 2023 Draft

93

b

Engagement Plan – Local Board Plan 2023

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shoma Prasad – Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Local board resolution responses, feedback and information report

File No.: CP2023/01988

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

Information reports for the local board

2.       The board provided feedback on the Resource management reform: Natural and Built Environment Bill and Spatial Planning Bill for incorporating in council’s submission, under delegation to the Chair. The feedback is provided as Attachment A.

3.       The board provided feedback on the government’s Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Community Participation) Amendment Bill, 2023 to be attached to council’s submission, under delegation to the Chair.  The feedback is provided as Attachment B.

4.       Staff recommended granting landowner approval for the installation of stormwater assets within the Favona Road Esplanade Reserve, Favona. The board was consulted on the proposal and staff will issue a landowner approval using their delegated decision-making powers. The supporting information is provided as Attachment C.

5.       The board provided feedback to Auckland Council’s submission on He mata whāriki, he matawhānui, the Draft Report of the Future for Local Government Review, under delegation to the Chair. The supporting information and Auckland Council’s submission is provided as Attachment E.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the feedback on the Resource management reform: Natural and Built Environment Bill and Spatial Planning Bill for incorporating in council’s submission provided as Attachment A

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the feedback on the Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Community Participation) Amendment Bill, 2023 for attachment to council’s submission provided as Attachment B.

c)      whakaae / accept the Land Owner Approval information for the installation of stormwater assets at Favona Road Esplanade Reserve, 2R Favona Road, Favona issued through delegated decision as provided in Attachment C.

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the feedback to Auckland Council’s submission on He mata whāriki, he matawhānui, the Draft Report of the Future for Local Government Review, issued through delegated decision and provided in Attachment D.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resource Management reform: Natural & Built Environment Bill and Spatial Planning Bill - feedback

117

b

Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Community Participation) Amendment Bill 2023 - feedback

121

c

2R Favona Road, Favona - Land Owner Approval information

123

d

Draft Future for Local Government report - Local board feedback and Auckland Council's submission (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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15 March 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendars

File No.: CP2023/02395

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa for February 2023 and March 2023 for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board are in Attachment A and Attachment B. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Hōtaka Kaupapa.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - February 2023

129

b

Governance Forward Work Calendar - March 2023

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

Record of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2023/02272

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 8 February and 22 February 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 8 February and 22 February 2023.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Notes 8 February 2023

135

b

Workshop Notes 22 February 2023

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

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15 March 2023

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a Beautification Trust Presentation - 15 March 2023 - Deputation    Page 141

Item 8.3      Attachment a    15 March 2023: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Item 8.3 Deputation -
Mā Te Huruhuru - presentation  Page 157


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 

















Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 March 2023

 

 



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