I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Albert-Eden Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 27 April 2023

10.00am

Albert Eden Local Board Office
114 Dominion Road
Mt Eden

 

Albert-Eden Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Margi Watson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kendyl Smith

 

Members

José Fowler

 

 

Julia Maskill

 

 

Christina Robertson

 

 

Liv Roe

 

 

Rex Smith

 

 

Jack Tan

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Michael Mendoza – Democracy Advisor

 

20 April 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 021 809 149

Email: Michael.Mendoza@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Migrant Conservation Programme and Connecting People and Parks                                                             5

8.2     Deputation - Citizens Advice Bureau Auckland City-Local Board Update           6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Albert-Eden Thriving Town Centres local economic development and recovery grants 2022/2023                                                               9

12        Albert-Eden Local Board Work Programme Reallocations 2022/2023                                    17

13        Albert-Eden Local Grants and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2022/2023 grant allocations                                                                              23

14        Proposed new community leases to Te Whanau Tupu Ngatahi O Aotearoa- Playcentre Aotearoa at School Road Reserve, Morningside and 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden 41

15        Proposed new community lease to The Umma Trust at Ferndale Park, Mount Albert               53

16        Proposed new community lease to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden                      67

17        Proposed new community lease to Central Bowling Club Incorporated at Kiwitea Reserve, 64A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham                     81

18        Seeking views on the proposed approach for Katoa, Ka Ora -  Speed Management Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland 2024-2027            93

19        Local Board feedback on distribution method of the Local Crime Fund                                  121

20        Addition to the 2022-2025 Albert-Eden Local Board meeting schedule                                  131

21        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                                              135

22        Chairperson's Report                                       145

23        Board Members' Reports                                 147

24        Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records                                                                            149

25        Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                                       167

26        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)          confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 23 March 2023, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Albert-Eden Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Migrant Conservation Programme and Connecting People and Parks

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Kiri Huddleston – Senior Project Manager, Conservation Volunteers New Zealand, to deliver a presentation during the Deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kiri Huddleston – Senior Project Manager, Conservation Volunteers New Zealand, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation updating the local board on the Migrant Conservation Programme and Connecting People and Parks initiative, which is part-funded by the Albert-Eden Local Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank Kiri Huddleston – Senior Project Manager, Conservation Volunteers New Zealand, for her attendance and Deputation presentation regarding the Migrant Conservation Programme and Connecting People and Parks initiative.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Citizens Advice Bureau Auckland City-Local Board Update

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Kate Anderson - General Manager, Citizens Advice Bureau Auckland City Incorporated, to deliver a presentation during the Deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kate Anderson - General Manager, Citizens Advice Bureau Auckland City Incorporated, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation updating the local board of recent service delivery at the Citizens Advice Bureau’s St Luke’s office.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank Kate Anderson - General Manager, Citizens Advice Bureau Auckland City Incorporated, for her attendance and Deputation presentation regarding the organisation’s ‘The Home of Pasifika Golf’ concept plan.

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Albert-Eden Thriving Town Centres local economic development and recovery grants 2022/2023

File No.: CP2023/04484

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the funding allocations for applications received in expressions of interest (EOI) for the Albert-Eden Thriving Town Centres local economic development and recovery grants 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in the EOI for Albert Eden Thriving Town Centres local economic development and recovery grants 2022/2023.

3.       The Albert-Eden Thriving Town Centre local economic development and recovery grants programme supports local business associations (BAs) and business improvement districts (BIDs) with running initiatives that will increase local economic activity in town centres.

4.       There are three BAs (Sandringham Business Association, Greenwoods Village Epsom Business Association, Pt Chevalier Social Enterprise Trust) and four BIDs (Mount Eden Village, The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society), Dominion Road/ Balmoral Chinese Business Association, Uptown) across the Albert-Eden local board area. BIDs are funded through a targeted rate in their area.

5.       The total budget available in this EOI round is $60,000. Eight applications were received and a total of $132,765 requested.

6.       Staff recommend allocating $55,000 across five applications that strongly align with the local board’s priorities and outcomes.

7.       Staff recommend reallocation of the remaining $5,000 EOI grant budget to other projects in the 2022/2023 work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the following applications to receive funding under the Albert-Eden Thriving Town Centres Local Economic Development and Recovery Grants 2022/2023:

 

Applicant 

Funding request for: 

Funding amount recommended

The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society) (BID)

Date Night 2023 

$9,000

Greenwoods Village Epsom Business Association

Village enhancement, social media and hand painted Christmas window motifs

$13,000

Sandringham Business Association

Sandringham Spring Festival 2023

$13,000

Dominion Road Business Association (BID)

Purple Flag- Growing our night-time economy

$10,000

Balmoral Chinese Business Association (BID)

Dominion Road Moon Festival 2023

$10,000

Total:                                                                                                                          $55,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b)      decline the following applications for funding under the Albert-Eden Thriving Town Centres Local Economic Development and Recovery Grants 2022/2023:

Applicant 

Purpose of funding

Staff comments

The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society) (BID)

Morningside LIVE 2023

$0.00

The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society) (BID)

New Zealand Music Month 2023

$0.00

The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society) (BID)

A Nixon Park Christmas 2023

$0.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

c)       note the remaining $5,000 Expressions of Interest (EOI) Albert-Eden Thriving Town Centres Local Economic Development and Recovery Grants 2022/2023 is available to reallocate to other projects in the 2022/2023 work programme.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       In 2022/2023, the local board allocated $120,000 Locally-driven Initiative (LDI) budget to the work programme line 61: Placemaking: Thriving town centre local placemaking. This programme supports Outcome four in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020: A strong local economy with thriving town centres. 

9.       As part of that work programme, $60,000 has been allocated to the Thriving Town Centre local economic development and recovery grants to support local business associations (BAs) and business improvement districts (BIDs) with grants to assist with running initiatives that will increase local economic activities in town centres. BIDs are funded through a targeted rate in their area.

10.     Applications for the Thriving Town Centre local economic development grants 2022/2023 EOI opened on 2 November 2022 and closed on 22 January 2023.

11.     Staff invited all eligible BAs and BIDs in the local board area to apply. Following this, staff offered support to five interested BAs/BIDs to address top concerns and priorities as well as help with their EOI applications. The BAs and BIDs were also invited to present previous grant accountability and discuss their current EOIs at a workshop with the local board on 30 March 2023 and 6 April 2023.

12.     Eight applications were received from two BAs and two BIDs and a total of $132,765 requested.

13.     The applications were presented to the local board at a workshop on 6 April 2023, along with staff recommendations 2022/2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Staff have assessed the applications received against the following criteria:

·        The projects are led and initiated by a local BA or BID.

·        The applicant provided an update on previous projects funded through the 2021/2022 Thriving Town Centres programme.

·        The activities contribute towards a thriving town centre.

·        The projects showcase local collaboration.

·        The initiatives aim to achieve outcomes for the business community in the town centre.

·        The initiatives have a wider community involvement and benefit.

·        If the application in for an event, it increases community connection and belonging.

15.     Table 1 provides a summary of the applications with high alignment, which are recommended for approval totaling $55,000.

Table 1: 2022/2023 applications recommended for funding:

 

Name of Applicant

Purpose of funding

Funding amount requested

Funding amount recommended

Analysis

The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society) (BID)

Date Night

$9,000

$9,000

Events will be held at Trinity Church Hall, New North Road Kingsland. The events offer free babysitting in exchange for caregivers dining in The Fringe District. There will be 8 events planned.

Greenwoods Village Epsom Business Association

Village enhancement, social media and hand painted Christmas window motifs

 

$14,265

$13,000

The local board supported the applicant with a town centre planter project and social media promotion in 2021/2022. This grant will allow maintenance of the planter project which is strategically located in the town centre to encourage visitors to spend time there. A social media contractor will be hired to maintain and promote the "Meet the Locals", "What's Special about Greenwood Village" and "Did You Know" social media pages regularly. Additionally, the grant will be used for hand painted Christmas window motifs which will be displayed around the town centre.

Sandringham Business Association

Sandringham Spring Festival 2023

$10,000

$13,000

Sandringham Spring Festival has been delivered for many years. It is a local signature event, which has been previously supported by this fund. The event provides an opportunity to highlight the businesses in the area and bring the community together.

Dominion Road Business Association (BID)

Purple Flag- Growing our night-time economy

$10,000

$10,000

The Dominion Road Business Association (DRBA) implemented the Purple Flag accreditation in 2020 with previous EOI funding from the local board. This funding will support a coordinator to work with businesses and stakeholders to raise awareness of Purple Flag accreditation.

Balmoral Chinese Business Association (BCBA)

 

Dominion Road Moon Festival 2023

$10,000

$10,000

The funds will be used to support community engagement, performances, and cultural activities for the event. Dominion Road BID and BCBA will work collaboratively to achieve shared goals. Their recent Event Partnership grant application did not go ahead.

 

 

 

$5,000

Unallocated

Total

$53,265

60,000

 

 

 

16.     A total of $60,000 is available in this funding round.

17.     Grants allocated to EOI projects proposed by BA’s and BIDs in previous financial years have typically been around $10,000 per BA/BID. Applicants have therefore mostly developed projects at around this level of funding. BIDs are also funded through a targeted rate in their area.

18.     Staff recommend full funding for projects submitted by The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society) (BID), Dominion Road Business Association and Balmoral Chinese Business Association.

19.     Staff recommend that the Greenwoods Village Business Association EOI projects be funded at $13,000, and that the Sandringham Business Association EOI funding be increased to $13,000. These business associations do not receive any targeted BID rates to supplement project development and delivery and the recommended funding amount corresponds more closely with the delivery cost of the projects submitted.

20.     Table 2 provides a summary of 3 additional projects submitted by The Fringe BID. At the local board workshop on 6 April 2023 the Fringe BID manager identified that the preferred project for consideration in the EOI is the Date Night project, included in Table 1. The additional three projects in table 2 are also of medium or low alignment to local board criteria and are recommended to be declined.

Table 2: Applications not recommended for funding

Applicant 

Purpose of funding

Amount requested

Staff comments

The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society) (BID)

Morningside LIVE 2023

$34,500

Insufficient evidence of specific benefits to the community. R18 ticketed event.

 

The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society) (BID)

New Zealand Music Month 2023

$20,000

Insufficient evidence of specific benefits to the community. R18 ticketed event.

 

The Fringe (Kingsland Business Society) (BID)

A Nixon Park Christmas 2023

$25,000

Low priority application.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21.     Staff recommend reallocation of the remaining $5,000 EOI Albert-Eden Thriving Town Centres local economic development and recovery grant budget to other projects in the 2022/2023 work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     The local board work programme responds to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing information and advice to individuals and groups with projects that support community events to ensure climate change imperatives are considered in their delivery.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Thriving Town Centres programme for Albert-Eden, including the relationships with BIDs and BAs, is managed by Auckland Council’s Connected Communities department with advice from the teams in CCO/External Partnerships and Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The local economic development grants support delivery of the following Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

·        A strong local economy and with thriving town centres.

·        Resilient, connected and empowered communities who value diversity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     The local board work programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori.

26.     One of the projects in the EOI application contributes to Māori aspirations.

27.     The Dominion Road Moon Festival 2022 will include Māori tikanga principles and staff will provide cultural support for the events in the area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The 2022/2023 local board work programme line 61: Placemaking: Thriving town centre local placemaking has an allocated budget of $60,000 for Local Economic Development and recovery grants, as part of the Thriving Town Centres programme.

29.     Staff recommend allocating $55,000 in grant funding to five BIDs and BAs.

30.     Staff recommend reallocation of the remaining $5,000 EOI grant budget to other projects in the 2022/2023 work programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The assessment process has identified a low risk with the associated applications based on the accountability and reporting received from previous projects funded through the 2021/2022 Thriving Town Centres programme.

32.     Recommendations for EOI allocations are based on assessment criteria as outlined in paragraph 13 and reflect the ability of BAs and BIDs to successfully deliver the projects described. Reductions or variation in allocations may compromise the ability for BAs and BIDs project delivery, future development and resilience.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Staff will administer funding agreements for the successful applicants and provide progress reports back to the local board via quarterly reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Daylyn Braganza – Specialist Advisor 

Detlev Jackson – Community Broker

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Work Programme Reallocations 2022/2023

File No.: CP2023/04097

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve reallocation of funding within the Albert-Eden Local Board’s 2022/2023 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Albert-Eden Local Board approved its work programme 2022/2023 on 21 June 2022 (resolutions AE/2022/103, AE/2022/105, AE/2022/106).

3.       As projects progress through the delivery process the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change. As a result, variations are sought to the work programme to ensure the local board’s locally-driven initiatives operational budget is optimised.

4.       After some activities within the work programme have identified underspend for the 2022/2023 financial year, there is $35,093.64 budget available for reallocation.

5.       Auckland Council has signaled that it has a $295million deficit.  All departments, including local boards, are being asked to find savings.

6.       The board has an option to reallocate underspends to projects that can be completed by the end of the 2022/2023 financial year or to offer the underspends up as savings.

7.       It is recommended that the underspend budget from the above initiatives is reallocated to the following projects:

a)   a package to support community Climate Activation in Albert-Eden; or

b)   Community grants (ID 76); or

c)    Accommodation grants (ID82); or

d)   a combination of the above projects, to support both Climate and community outcomes, at the board discretion; or

e)   consider offering the underspend from the following 2022/2023 local board work programme lines totalling $35,093.64 to organisational savings.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the following projects underspend from the 2022/2023 local board work programme:

i.     Carols at Potters Park Christmas event (ID 75) - $5,889.40

ii.    Movies in Parks (ID 78) - $9,895.224

iii.    Thriving town centre local placemaking (ID 61) - $5,000.00

iv.   Event Partnership Fund ( ID 74)- $10,000.00

v.    Local Board film income $4,309.00.

b)        consider approving the reallocation of $35,093.64 towards either:

i.        climate action package; or

ii.       community grants; or

iii.      accommodation grants; or

iv.      a combination of i, ii, and iii; or

v.       returning the funds as operational savings.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Albert-Eden Local Board has an approved 2022/2023 work programme for the following operating divisions:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services (I&ES)

·        Plans and Places.

9.       The local board receives performance updates on the work programme throughout the year; the last report was presented at the February 2023 business meeting.

10.     As projects progress through the delivery process the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change. As a result, variations are sought to the work programme to ensure the local board’s locally-driven initiatives operational budget is optimised.

11.     Underspent operational expenditure can be reallocated across departments, but must remain as operational expenditure (i.e. it cannot not be used as capital expenditure), and should be reallocated on the basis that delivery can be achieved before the end of the financial year. When funding is utilised for a grant, the funding agreement/grant agreement must be signed before the end of the financial year.

12.     Any budget reallocated for a project anticipated to be completed in the current financial year must be spent by 30 June 2023, otherwise it will be treated as savings.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Staff have identified seven activities within the locally-driven initiative (LDI) operational work programme that will deliver an underspend for the 2022/2023 financial year. The total underspend amount to reallocate is $35,093.64.

14.     The following table provides a breakdown of the underspend against each activity.

Table 1: Work programme underspend for reallocation by the local board

ID

Activity Name

Reason for underspend

Underspend

amount

75

Carols at Potters Park Christmas event

Event cancelled due to weather conditions.

$5,889.40

78

Movies in Parks

10 Feb 2023 - event cancelled after flood damage into the park

$6,682.23

78

Movies in Parks

03 March 2023 - event having poor projecting quality, therefore getting a discount from the screening vendor

$3,213.01

61

Thriving town centre local placemaking

Amount not allocated after the Expressions of Interest have been processed. Noting that this number will be final once the board decides on those allocations at the April Business Meeting

$5,000.00

N/A

Local Board film income

Revenue from filming in local parks collected in financial year 2021/2022

$4,309.00

74

Event Partnership Fund

Brazilian day - event cancelled

$5,000.00

74

Event Partnership Fund

Crave day - event cancelled

$5,000.00

Total

$35,093.64

Activities to reallocate budget – options analysis

15.     Staff have identified the following activities, which can be delivered by the end of the 2022/2023 financial year as possible options for reallocation of funding:

·        NEW: package to support community Climate Activation in Albert-Eden

·        ID 76: Community grants

·        ID 82: Accommodation grants

16.     At the point of writing this report, there have been no other new or existing work programme lines identified which can receive and spend additional LDI operating budget before 30 June 2023.

Additional funding towards a package to support community Climate Activation in Albert-Eden

17.     Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan in September 2022 (resolution AE/2022/167).

18.     The projects listed in the table below have been identified by Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff to support the work in the climate activation area.

19.     The projects listed align with the Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes one (Resilient, connected and empowered communities who value diversity) and three (High-quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles). Therefore, have been proposed to be funded with the budget to be reallocated from this current financial year underspend LDI operating budget.

20.     Funding towards climate activation community projects is recommended.

21.     The following table provides a breakdown of the proposed projects with the budget recommended to deliver those activities.

Table 2: package to support community Climate Activation in Albert-Eden:

Project

Funding

eDNA testing kits for local schools

$1,114.47

Capacity building for Perfectly Imperfect (signage, fundraising support, volunteer recruitment, support to source and secure additional location in the board area)

$6,000.00

Additional pop up Tumeke bike fix events (libraries and community events) – 5 events

$2,500.00

 

Additional Cycle Babes events –Tumeke and Pop Ups (5 events)

$2,500.00

 

Additional repair café for Mt Eden Village with Chinese Conservation Education Trust

$2,500.00

Total

$14,614.47

 

Additional funding towards community and accommodation grants

22.     Albert-Eden Local Board has an approved Albert-Eden Community Grants Programme for 2022/2023. Budgets allocated the grants programmes are:

·        $140,500.00 Community grants (ID 76)

·        $155,000.00 Accommodation grants (ID 82).

23.     There are contestable grant rounds still to occur this financial year:

·        one local grant round (April 2023)

·        one multi-board round (April 2023)

·        one quick response round (May 2023)

·        one accommodation support round (May 2023 - this is the only round per financial year).

24.     Historically there has been oversubscription in funds applied for, and there is likely to be capacity to spend some reallocated budgets in these lines before 30 June 2023.

25.     There are current budgets allocated for community and accommodation grants, so outcomes will still be achieved if no additional funding is allocated at this time. Due to the nature of the grants programme, any additional funding is scalable.

26.     Funding towards community (ID 76) and accommodation (ID 82) grants is recommended.

Additional funding as savings

27.     Auckland Council has signaled that it has a $295million deficit.  All departments, including local boards, are being asked to find savings.

28.     It should be noted that at its 23 February 2023 meeting the Governing Body resolved as follows:

29.     Resolution number GB/2023/10

c)  tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the financial situation facing Council in light of the forecast $295 million operational budget shortfall and recent severe weather events and ongoing economic uncertainty

d)  whakaae / agree to encourage the Chief Executive, Local Boards and Council Controlled Organizations to closely scrutinise and manage any spending and, where possible, consider stopping or limiting new discretionary spending

e)  tono / request staff to report back to the next meeting of the Expenditure Control and Procurement Committee on defining the scope of discretionary spend, options for managing or controlling discretionary spend and any implications of stopping or limiting such spend.

30.     The local board can return the underspent to the organisation as savings.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The proposed activities identified in the climate action area can positively impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

32.     At the point of writing this report, staff are not aware whether the community grants proposed in the April 2023 or May 2023 reports may impact positively to minimise the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to local boards. There are no further impacts to be considered with this reallocation of funding.

34.     Relevant departments within Auckland Council have been consulted regarding the reallocations and advice provided as subject matter experts. No objections or concerns have been raised by delivery staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     The reallocation of funding within the local board’s work programme supports strong delivery and optimisation of the local board’s available budget for 2022/2023.

36.     The nature of the reallocation aligns with the local board’s work programme and the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020.

37.     A workshop was held with the local board on 13 April 2023 outlining underspends at that time and early options for reallocation, which included the package to support Climate activation as well as community and accommodation grants.

38.     Finalised advice is contained in this report and reflected in the recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activities of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

40.     At the point of writing this report, staff are not aware whether the community grants proposed in the April 2023 or May 2023 reports have a significant impact on activities of importance to Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Reallocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to take in order to optimise its LDI operating budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

42.     The activities recommended to receive funding align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020.

43.     Should the local board choose not to support the reallocation of the funding from the initiatives identified above, the funding would be offered up as budget savings.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     There is a risk that despite the reallocation, some of the budget remains unspent at the end of the financial year. However, delivery staff from the relevant departments believe it is feasible to deliver the recommended activities within the timeframes required, and the risk of non-delivery is considered to be low, as outlined in the options analysis section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     The funding will be reallocated according to the local board’s resolution, and the relevant department will progress with the delivery of the next steps.

46.     If funding grants to external groups are resolved by the local board, funding agreements will be prepared, outlining the purpose of the funding and accountability requirements.

47.     The Albert-Eden Local Board 2022/2023 work programme will be updated to reflect the board’s formal decisions and any variations will be reflected from the quarter three performance report onwards.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Canela Ferrara - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Grants and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2022/2023 grant allocations

File No.: CP2023/03503

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Albert-Eden Local Grants Round One and the Multiboard Round Two 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2022/2023 on 17 May April 2022 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

3.       This report presents applications received for the for Albert-Eden Local Grants Round Two 2022/2023 (Attachment B) and the Multiboard Grants Round Two 2022/2023 (Attachment C).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2022/2023 financial year. A total of $85,268.60 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $55,231.40 to be allocated to one quick response and one local grants round.

5.       Twenty-five applications were received for Local Grants Round Two 2022/2023, requesting a total of $156,156.99 and twenty-six applications were received for Multiboard Grants Round Two 2022/2023 requesting a total of $121,229.50.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)       agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Albert-Eden Local Grants Round Two 2022/2023 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2301-236

Island Base Trust

Arts and culture

Towards studio hire, wages, venue hire, catering, and photography at Base FM, Kingsland for a Music Youth Mentoring Programme from 1 May 2023 to 22 December 2023.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-255

Shager Ethiopian Entertainment NZ (SEENZ) Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards weekly workshop hiring for dance practices, decorations, venue hire, and instructor costs, for the Ethio-Kiwi Kids programme from 1 May 2023 to 31 December 2023 held at the Wesley Primary and Wesley Intermediate School.

$4,200.00

Eligible

LG2301-257

The Massive Company Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, Manaakitanga, and marketing costs for rehearsals for Massive Company’s return season of Half of the Sky in September 2023.

$3,004.00

Eligible

LG2301-288

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the facilitator fees, travel, administration, equipment, and resources to deliver 20 spoken word poetry workshops at schools in the Albert-Eden local board area.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-291

Eden Arts: Maungawhau Mount Eden Community Arts Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and musicians’ fees for the “Mt Eden Chamber Music Festival” to be held between 22 to 24 September 2023.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-294

Naad Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, sound, musicians' fees, videography, and photography for the "East meets West" musical event at Mt Albert War Memorial Hall from 5 to 23 June 2023.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-202

The Upside Downs Education Trust

Community

Towards the speech-language therapy fees for seven children with Down Syndrome in the local board area.

$5,658.00

Eligible

LG2301-205

Communities Against Alcohol Harm Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of appointing a lawyer for conducting community workshops, supporting local groups, communities, and individuals to identify premises whose primary activity is gambling, and objecting to the renewal of alcohol licenses.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-242

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards rates costs for the Asthma Centre at 581 Mt Eden Rd, Mt Eden.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-252

Learning At The Point Community Kindergarten Incorporated

Community

Towards all costs including entertainment including food, music, hiring of Ferris wheel, popcorn, and candy floss machines, face painting, bean bags, marquee, lights, heaters, social media marketing, and cleaning to host a series of events throughout the year.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-254

Mobility Assistance Dogs Trust

Community

Towards the Client Placement Coordinator's salary.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-274

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards the venue hire, and the facilitators' costs to deliver the “Road Safety” programme for 65 youths from the Mt Albert Grammar School.

$3,500.00

Eligible

LG2301-275

Gribblehirst Community Hub Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of a projector, screen, security ceiling mount, freezer, and the build cost of a Pataka Kai.

$3,638.99

Eligible

LG2301-276

Auckland Sexual Abuse Help Foundation Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the operational costs of the "Dear Em" programme.

$8,000.00

Ineligible

LG2301-278

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of training and supervision of the youth worker team and counsellors from May to December 2023.

$6,000.00

Ineligible

LG2301-281

Rest Assured Respite Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the setup and delivery cost of the monthly education sessions, including the cost of venue hires, sandwich board, flyers, posters, banners, speakers' fees, advertising, and coordinator's wages from May 2023 to April 2024 for people living with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Fibromyalgia (FM) in the Albert-Eden local board area.

$6,194.10

Eligible

LG2301-285

Mt Eden Community Patrol Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of a community patrol car.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-287

Bhartiya Samaj Charitable Trust

Community

Towards counsellor's fee.

$10,000.00

Ineligible

LG2301-289

Access Community Radio Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of a 3-year firewall subscription, internet wireless equipment (WiFi), and a five-year subscription fee for the "Auckland Settlement Hub" at 875 New North Road, Mt Albert.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-204

The Auckland Table Tennis Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of two table tennis tables, coaching cost and wages for the development coach.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-220

Pt Chevalier Croquet Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a year's lawn fertilisers for the maintenance of the three croquet playing greens at the Point Chevalier Croquet Club

$4,836.90

Eligible

LG2301-226

Tri Star Gymnastics Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of gymnastic equipment.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-230

Mt Albert Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the junior coaching costs from October 2023 to April 2024.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-280

The Salvation Army New Zealand

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of gym equipment.

$4,940.00

Eligible

LG2301-297

Pt Chevaliar Tennis & Squash Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a defibrillator.

$3,185.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$156,156.99

 

 

b)       agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Multiboard Round Two 2022/2023, listed in Table Two below:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2223-207

David Riley

Arts and culture

Towards Eight bilingual Pacific superhero children's books and audiobooks from June 2023 to October 2023

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-252

The Operating Theatre Trust trading as Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards ticket purchase and bus costs from 24 June 2023 to 15 November 2023

$5,064.50

Eligible

MB2223-255

Fiji Girmit Foundation

Arts and culture

Towards funding for 14th May event to be held in Auckland Region

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-261

Kahui Tu Kaha - Operating Account

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, catering costs, gardening materials, Pasifika craft and activity resources, gym and Hikoi resources, Maori crafts and activity resources, production and printing costs, and guest speakers

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-262

Showquest Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and related costs, and theatre production costs for hosting youth theatre performances

$4,500.00

Eligible

MB2223-266

Recreate NZ

Arts and culture

Towards youth programme costs, facilitation, and volunteer costs for the delivery of 40 youth events from 1 May 2023 to 30 April 2024

$4,000.00

Ineligible

MB2223-201

Fix Up Look Sharp

Community

Towards leasing costs of the 2 spaces in Onehunga and Avondale from June 2023 until June 2024.

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-205

Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club Incorporated

Community

Towards building further three trails to complete the Mareatai Mountain bike park, The 2023 Final Touch’s Project

$1,500.00

Ineligible

MB2223-224

Bellyful New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards contribution to overall costs for meal production and service delivery from 1 June 2023 to 31 December 2024

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-226

OutLine New Zealand Incorporated Donation Account

Community

Towards volunteer training and support, advertising costs, clinical supervision, insurance, office expenses, and operational IT costs

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-227

Young Workers Resource Centre

Community

Towards education coordinator wages and teaching resources costs from June 2023 till May 2024.

$1,250.00

Ineligible

MB2223-228

The Reading Revolution

Community

Towards wages of the manager for the shared reading programme at local libraries and retirement villages and community hubs

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-233

Supporting Families In Mental Illness NZ(SFNZ) Limited

Community

Towards the northern region manager's salary

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-236

Pet Refuge New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards administration costs for the Pet Refuge from 5 June 2023 to 31 March 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-239

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards costs of providing dedicated Asian services including salaries, venue and equipment hire, volunteer expenses, overheads, meeting, catering, and event costs

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-247

Deaf Action New Zealand Inc

Community

Towards NZ Sign Language Club venue hire, administration and Coordination, material and travel cost around Auckland from 3 June 2023 to 2 June 2024

$5,650.00

Eligible

MB2223-257

Garden to Table Trust

Community

Towards salaries, mileage and home office cost to deliver Garden to Table Food Education Programme at 44 schools from 1 June 2023 to 31 May 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-265

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards costs of the development, production and distribution of the brochures and cards; and the video-conferencing equipment and installation

$2,265.00

Ineligible

MB2223-271

PHAB Association Inc Contracts Operations Account

Community

Towards the costs of delivering youth events, including facilitators, catering, wages, project and event facilitation, and admin surcharge

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-231

Body Positive Incorporated

Community

Towards advertising costs including posters, street posters, magazine ads, and digital and social media advertising

$6,600.00

Eligible

MB2223-259

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards costs of delivering the Raise Up programme including events, activities, workshops, community outreach, and core volunteer expenses

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-202

New Zealand Eid Day Trust

Events

Towards the cost of Venue, Security, Cleaning, Furniture / Fixtures, Audio and visual, Games and entertainment, Electrical requirements, Volunteers training and food for the 2023 NZ Eid day

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-274

Interacting

Events

Towards radio comms, face painters, bins, project manager, film tutor, jewelry making tutor, and mold making tutor at the Interact Festival from 30 October 2023 to 10 November 2023

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-218

NZ Wushu Academy Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards expenses for Kung-Fu Wushu Experience Programme, including Coach fees, Administration fee and Mileage.

$4,400.00

Eligible

MB2223-221

Auckland Softball Association Inc.

Sport and recreation

Towards ongoing operating expenses for facilitating softball leagues and tournaments in the Auckland Region from June 2023 to December 2023.

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-264

Icon Trampoline Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards security door and security lights purchase at 137 Buckland Rd from 1 June 2023 to 31 August 2023

$4,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$121,299.50

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2022/2023 on 17 May 2022 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

11.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2022/2023 financial year. A total of $85,268.60 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $55,231.40 to be allocated to one local grants round, one quick response round, and one multiboard grants round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Albert-Eden Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Albert-Eden Local Grants Round Two 2022/2023 (Attachment B) and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2022/2023 (Attachment C) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Fifteen applicants applying to Albert-Eden Local Grants Round Two and fourteen applicants applying to Multiboard Grants Round Two indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2022/2023 financial year. A total of $85,268.60 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $55,231.40 to be allocated to one quick response and one local grants round.

23.     Twenty-five applications were received for Local Grants Round Two 2022/2023, requesting a total of $156,156.99 and twenty-six applications were received for Multiboard Round Two 2021/2022 requesting a total of $121,229.50.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Albert-Eden Local Board allocating funding for round two of the local and multiboard grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023

31

b

Albert-Eden Local Grants Round Two 2022/2023 Grant Applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Albert-Eden Multiboard Grants Round Two 2022/2023 Grant Applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Vincent Marshall - Grants Advisor

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Proposed new community leases to Te Whanau Tupu Ngatahi O Aotearoa- Playcentre Aotearoa at School Road Reserve, Morningside and 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden

File No.: CP2023/04268

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Te Whanau Tupu Ngatahi O Aotearoa - Playcentre Aotearoa at School Road Reserve, Morningside.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Te Whanau Tupu Ngatahi O Aotearoa - Playcentre Aotearoa (the group) seeks a new community lease to continue occupation and operation from the group-owned building at School Road Reserve, Morningside.

3.       The group currently holds a ground lease at School Road Reserve, Morningside which reached final expiry on 31 October 2018. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The progression of the new lease to Playcentre Morningside was identified and approved by the Albert-Eden Local Board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 on 15 June 2021 resolution AE/2021/81.

5.       The group aims are to provide the community with a hub for families where parents as first educators are welcomed and supported. It also assists and fosters innovation and research in the fields of early childhood education, adult education, and young children. These activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board plan 2020 outcome one - Resilient, connected, and empowered communities who value diversity.

6.       The group has provided all the required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. The group has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and where required building insurance, in place.

7.       School Road Reserve, Morningside is a group-owned building, the group therefore have an automatic right to re-apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term.

8.       Council has completed a community outcomes plan with the group, which will be appended to the leases. (Attachment B).

9.       No concerns were raised from iwi engagement on the proposed new leases.

10.     Staff engaged with the Parks and Places Specialist, Area Manager and Strategic Broker on the proposed new leases, no concerns were raised.

11.     This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to the group for a term of three years commencing from 1 May 2023 with one three year right of renewal for the site at School Reserve in line with the Albert-Eden Leasing policy 2017 AE/2017/52.

12.     If the Albert-Eden Local Board decides to grant the leases, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      grant, under Section 61(a) Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease to Te Whanau Tupu Ngatahi O Aotearoa - Playcentre Aotearoa for 630 square meters (more or less) located at School Reserve, 1a Western Springs Road, Morningside on the land legally described as Part Allotment 44 Sec 5 Suburbs of Auckland that is held under the Reserves Act 1977 as classified Local Purpose Reserve (Playcentre) vested in council in trust by the Crown (as per Attachment A – Site Plan- Morningside Playcentre), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)       term – three years, commencing 1 May 2023, with one three year right of renewal.

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus Goods and Services Tax (GST) per annum if demanded.

iii)      Include an additional obligation in the lease agreement that the lease holder takes actions to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions related to their operations to reduce climate impact and include this in the Community Outcomes Plan.

iv)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B – Community Outcomes Plan).

b)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

c)       noting that lease charges shall be reviewed by the local board in circumstances where there are changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

d)      note that iwi engagement for Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Whanau Tupu Ngatahi O Aotearoa - Playcentre Aotearoa located at School Road Reserve, Morningside and 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden has been undertaken.

e)      note that no objections to the notified proposal of the new community lease to the Whanau Tupu Ngatahi O Aotearoa - Playcentre Aotearoa located at School Road Reserve, Morningside and 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden were received.

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

14.     The Albert-Eden Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021/2022 on 15 June 2021 local board resolution AE/2021/81.

15.     The progression of this lease to the group at School Road Reserve, Morningside was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community leases as approved on the work programme.

Land, building/s and lease

16.     The group hold a community lease for the group owned building on council administered land situated at School Reserve, 1a Western Springs Road, Morningside.

17.     The land is legally described as Part Allot 44 Sec 5 Suburbs of Auckland and is held under the Reserves Act 1977 as classified Local Purpose Reserve (Playcentre) vested in council in trust by the Crown.

18.     The proposed lease area is approximately 630m2 (Attachment A).  The activities undertaken from the premises are in accordance with the land classification.

19.     For a group owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee.  These costs are funded from membership fees and fundraising.

20.     The building is primarily used by the group to provide the community with a hub for families where parents as first educators are welcomed and supported.

21.     These programmes provide practical help, inform and support, and where necessary, link families to more specialised help within the community.

Whanau Tupu Ngatahi O Aotearoa - Playcentre Aotearoa

22.     The group was established in 1941 and its primary purpose is to provide families the chance to play, grow and learn together, as well as forge meaningful friendships with other families in the community.

23.     The group caters to over 60 children. Each year there are different children as the older one’s graduate to school and younger ones join. Each child also has an adult accompanying them. 

24.     The group holds sessions each morning and some afternoons and allow the facility to be hired out to members at other times. As these buildings are bespoke early childhood centres they are not suitable for public hireage.

25.     The group has been operating from this site for over 50 years. The group own and maintain the building and all other improvements at School Reserve, Morningside.

26.     The group current community lease at School Reserve with council expired on the 31 October 2018. The lease to the group is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

27.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to re-apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. Playcentre Morningside is exercising this right by applying for a new lease.

28.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

29.     On 24 May 2017 the Albert-Eden Local Board resolved, under Resolution number AE/2017/52, on a community occupancy policy that outlines the standard terms for community leases and licence to occupy council sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area for community owned buildings with a three-year standard term with a single three year right of renewal, giving a six-year term.

Public notification and engagement

30.     No public notification is required for land held under the Reserves Act 1977 when classified as local purpose reserve. 

31.     Under Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 staff engaged with iwi on the proposed lease. This process is detailed in points 52-58.

Assessment of the application

32.     The group has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver the community with a hub for families where parents as first educators are welcomed and supported.

33.     The group has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

34.     The group has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and where necessary building insurance, in place.

35.     A site visit was undertaken by staff, and it was found that the facility is well managed and maintained.

36.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been completed to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreements and is attached to the report as Attachment B.

37.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and the community outcomes plan will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.

38.     Under Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, the recommended lease term for a tenant-owned building is ten years with one ten-year right of renewal providing a total of 20 years. And for a council-owned building is five years with one five-year right of renewal providing a total term of ten years.

39.     On 24 May 2017 Albert-Eden Local Board resolved, under Resolution number AE/2017/52, on a community occupancy policy that outlines the standard terms for community leases and licence to occupy council sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area for council owned and tenant-owned buildings with a three-year standard term with a single three year right of renewal, giving a six-year term.

40.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to the group, for a term of three years commencing from 1 May 2023 as per recommendations with one three year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     It is anticipated that continued activation of the building will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission.

42.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

43.     Any asset improvements and maintenance undertaken by the council will strive for maximum re-use and recycling of existing material. This will be in alignment with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle) to ensure minimum impact on greenhouse gas emission.

44.     Council also advocates any asset improvements and maintenance undertaken by the group to strive for maximum re-use and recycling of existing material.

45.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

46.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the leases, as no part of the leased areas are in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed lease as it will provide positive outcomes for the community.

48.     The proposed new lease have no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote a hub for families where parents and care givers as first educators are welcomed and supported for benefit of the Albert-Eden Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

50.     The assessment of the application was workshopped with the Albert-Eden Local Board on 23 February 2023. The local board indicated in principle support of the lease proposal.

51.     The delivered activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective:

Table One: 2020 Albert-Eden Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 5: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs

Our community services and buildings provide diverse and inclusive spaces that meet the changing needs of our community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant a new community lease for School Road Reserve, Morningside, was undertaken in March 2023 with the 13 iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Albert- Eden Local Board area. The engagement involved:

·        an email to all iwi identified as having an interest in the area containing detailed information on the land, the lessee, the lease proposal as per Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

·        an invitation to iwi representatives was extended in March 2023 to a hui and or for a kaitiaki site visit to comment and provide feedback on any spiritual, cultural, or environmental impact with respect to the proposal.

53.     No objections or requests for a hui or kaitiaki site visit was received from the iwi and mana whenua groups who responded.

54.     The group has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community as per Attachment B of this report. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through specify benefits to Māori through pre-school education which includes respecting and nurturing their values, culture, and traditions.

55.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

56.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

57.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

58.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests, and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

59.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. While there are no financial implications for this new community ground lease to the group at School Road Reserve, Morningside, the 2023/2024 annual budget proposes changes to the rent levels within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. As this is only a proposal it will not be operative until adopted.

60.     Ongoing maintenance of the group owned asset at School Reserve will be covered by the lessee.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community leases to the group at School Road Reserve, Morningside this could impact on the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities and they will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome five.

62.     The new lease afford the group security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of their facility and to run their programmes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     If the local board resolves to grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the Whanau Tupu Ngatahi O Aotearoa - Playcentre Aotearoa to finalise the lease agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site plan Playcentre Aotearoa Morningside

45

b

Attachment B - Community Outcomes Plan - Playcentre Aotearoa Morningside

47

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Heaven - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Table

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Table

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Proposed new community lease to The Umma Trust at Ferndale Park, Mount Albert

File No.: CP2023/04273

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to The Umma Trust for part of Ferndale House, Ferndale Park, Mount Albert.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Umma Trust (the trust) seeks a new community lease to continue occupation and operation from the council-owned building at Ferndale Park, 830 New North Road, Mount Albert.

3.       The trust currently holds the lease for one of the office spaces in the building which has reached final expiry on 30 September 2022. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the Albert-Eden Local Board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2022/2023 at their 21 June 2022 local board meeting (Resolution number AE/2022/103).

5.       The trust aims to provides support to women and children from a refugee background. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 outcome one - Resilient, connected, and empowered communities who value diversity.

6.       The trust has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. The trust has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability in place.

7.       As this is a council-owned building, a review of alternatives for the use of the premises should be carried out as good practice. For this, an expression of interest process can be undertaken to gauge interest and best use. The space within the building currently leased by Umma Trust is only 16 square meters.

8.       However, if the incumbent group is needed in the area and the group is performing well, the local board has the discretion to grant a new lease to the group without undergoing an expression of interest process.

9.       In the current case the incumbent group is needed in the area, is performing well and satisfies the requirements under the Auckland Council Community Guidelines 2012. Additionally, the premises is suitable for its purposes.

10.     The proposed new community lease to the trust for the office space of the building at Ferndale Park, does not require publicly notification as the land is held as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

11.     Iwi engagement has been undertaken in the month of April 2023 and no concerns were raised.

12.     A site visit was undertaken by the staff on 17 November 2022 and the facility appears to be in good condition, is well utilised and maintained. Recent improvements have taken place at Ferndale House as part of the Parks and Community Facilities renewal programme.

13.     A community outcomes plan has been agreed upon with the trust.

14.     Staff engaged with internal stakeholders on the proposed new lease. No objections were received.

15.     The site does not lie in a flood prone area nor is it susceptible to coastal inundation.

16.     This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to the trust for a term of three years commencing from 1 May 2023 with one three year right of renewal, with final expiry on 30 April 2029 in the line with the Albert-Eden Leasing Policy 2017.

17.     If the local board decides to grant the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      grant, under Section 61 (2B) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease to The Umma Trust for 16 square meters (more or less) located at 830 New North Road, Mount Albert on the land legally described as Part Deposited Plan 2174 and Part Lot 3-4 Deposited Plan 29193 (as per Attachment A – site map), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)       term – three years, commencing 1 May 2023, with one three year right of renewal with final expiry 30 April 2029.

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus Goods and Services Tax (GST) per annum if demanded.

iii)      operational charge - $400.00 plus GST per annum.

iv)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B – Community Outcomes Plan).

v)      include an additional obligation in the lease agreement that the lease holder takes actions to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions related to their operations to reduce climate impact.

b)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

c)       noting lease charges shall be reviewed by the local board in circumstances where there are changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

d)      note that iwi engagement for Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to The Umma Trust located at Ferndale Park, has been undertaken.

 

Horopaki

Context

18.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

19.     The Albert-Eden Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2022/2023 at their local board meeting on 21 June 2022 (Resolution number AE/2022/103).

20.     The progression of this lease to the trust at Ferndale Park, 830 New North Road, Mount Albert was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building/s and lease

21.     Ferndale Park is located at 830 New North Road, Mount Albert. (Refer to Attachment A Site Plan) The land is legally described as Part Deposited Plan 2174 and Part Lot 3-4 Deposit plan 29193 held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified local purpose reserve (community buildings) and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     The trust holds a community lease for an office space in the council owned Ferndale House situated at Ferndale Park.

23.     The area proposed to be leased is 16sqm square meters (more or less) as outlined in Attachment A – site map.

24.     An annual subsidised operational cost for a council owned building is charged to the tenant.

25.     The council has undertaken improvements to Ferndale House including refurbishment of the office, new lightening, new flooring, and re-painting, this was carried out from October 2022 until March 2023 as part of Parks and Community Facilities renewal programme.

26.     The office room in the building is primarily used by the group to manage and coordinate the outreach programmes that they run in the local community.

27.     These programmes provide settlement services to refugee women and children in the community.

The Umma Trust

28.     The trust was established in 2003 with the aim to provide social and community services for refugee and migrant communities with a specific focus on the wellbeing on women, children and families who are socially and economically disadvantaged.

29.     The trust takes a strength-based approach to supporting families and works in a holistic manner. The group supports women and children from a refugee background living in the Albert-Eden area to settle into New Zealand successfully. The families come either as part of the government refugee quota or family reunification.

30.     The trust is also an accredited social services agency employing five women social workers from refugee background communities, who speak eight plus languages and work with high needs families.

31.     The trust also provides a diversity of health, education, budgeting and recreation programmes for women, children and youth that aim to ensure that families can lead productive, quality lives and be actively involved in New Zealand society.

32.     The trust has had 5800 individuals who participated in their community programmes in 2022. The trust has two full time paid staff and nine part time paid staff. The trust also has 30 part time volunteers who provide 100 volunteers hours per week.

33.     The trust share and collaborate within the interconnected office spaces at Ferndale House with two other tenants, the Mt Albert Historic Society and the Nepalese Association.

34.     The trust has been operating from Ferndale House, Ferndale Park since October 2007. The building has gone through recent renewal work.

35.     The trust’s current community lease with the council commenced on 1 October 2007 and expired on the 30 September 2022. The lease to the group is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

36.     At the expiry of a lease for a council owned building, a review of alternatives for the use of the premises should be carried out as good practice. For this, an expression of interest process can be undertaken to gauge interest and best use. The space available within the building is only 16 square meters.

37.     However, if the incumbent group is needed in the area and the group is performing well, the local board has the discretion to grant a new lease to the group without undergoing an expression of interest process.

38.     In the current case the incumbent group is needed in the area, is performing well and satisfies the requirements under the Auckland Council Community Guidelines 2012. Additionally, the premises is suitable for its purposes.

39.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

40.     On 24 May 2017 the Albert-Eden Local Board resolved, under Resolution number AE/2017/52, on a community occupancy policy that outlines the standard terms for community leases and licence to occupy council sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area for community owned buildings with a three-year standard term with a single three year right of renewal, giving a six-year term.

Public notification and engagement

41.     The proposed new community lease to the trust for the office space at Ferndale House on Ferndale Park does not require publicly notification as the land is held as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

42.     Iwi consultation is required in terms of Section 4 of the Conservation Act and has been undertaken in the month of April 2023.

Assessment of the application

43.     The trust has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver community services to women and families which provides a sense of belonging within the community.

44.     The trust has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

45.     The trust has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability in place.

46.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained.

47.     The council has undertaken improvements to Ferndale House including refurbishment of the offices, new lightening, new flooring, and re-painting.

48.     The trust provides a valuable service to the local community by supporting women and children from a refugee background.  The group runs various programmes which help refugees settle into New Zealand such as learners license programmes, English classes, and soccer coaching.

49.     The trust also provides a diversity of health, education, budgeting and recreation programmes for women, children and youth that aim to ensure that families can lead productive, quality lives and be actively involved in New Zealand society.

50.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the trust to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement and is attached to the report as Attachment B.

51.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and the community outcomes plan will be included as part of the lease agreement.

52.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to the trust for a term of three years commencing from 1 May 2023 with one three year right of renewal with final expiry 30 April 2029.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

53.     It is anticipated that continued activation of the building will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission. A shared workspace will however decrease overall energy use, as users will not consume energy at individual workspaces. The shared space will provide opportunity and enable people to enjoy positive healthy lifestyles and will increase capability and connections within the local community.

54.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·     use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·     use eco labelled products and services

·     seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

55.     Asset improvements and maintenance undertaken by the council will strive for maximum re-use and recycling of existing material. This will be in alignment with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle) to ensure minimum impact on greenhouse gas emission.

56.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

57.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.


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Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

58.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed lease as it will include positive outcomes to the community.

59.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

60.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote and support women and children from a refugee background for the Albert-Eden Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

61.     The assessment of the application was workshopped with the Albert-Eden Local Board on 23 February 2023. The local board indicated in principle support of the lease proposal.

62.     The delivered activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective:

Table one: 2020 Albert-Eden Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome

Objective

Outcome one: Resilient, connected, and empowered communities who value diversity

People are included, interconnected, and celebrate our diversity

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant a new community lease for the office space at Ferndale House on Ferndale Park, 830 New North Road, Mount Albert was undertaken in April with the thirteen iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Albert-Eden Local Board area. The engagement involved:

·        an email to all iwi identified as having an interest in the area, containing detailed information on the land, the lessee, the lease proposal as per Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

·        an invitation to iwi representatives was extended in April 2023 to hui or for a kaitiaki site visit to comment and provide feedback on any spiritual, cultural, or environmental impact with respect to the proposal.

64.     No objections or requests for hui or kaitiaki site visit received from the iwi and mana whenua groups who responded.

65.     An email was received from Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki in support of the proposed lease.

66.     The lessee has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community as per Attachment B of this report. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through specific benefits to Māori through education, culture and traditions.

67.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

68.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

69.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

70.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

71.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. While there are no financial implications for this new community lease to the group at Ferndale House, the 2023/2024 annual budget proposes changes to the rent levels within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. As this is only a proposal it will not be operative until adopted.

72.     Ongoing maintenance of the asset will be covered by the council which is accounted for in current and future budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

73.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to The Umma Trust at Ferndale Park, 830 New North Road, Mount Albert, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome one.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

74.     If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with The Umma Trust to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan - Ferndale Park, 830 New North Road, Mount Albert

57

b

Community Outcomes Plan - The Umma Trust

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Heaven - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Table

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Proposed new community lease to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden

File No.: CP2023/04276

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated for Nicholson Park, located at 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated (the club) seeks a new community lease to continue occupation and operation from the council owned building and courts at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden.

3.       The club currently hold the lease on the building and grounds which has reached final expiry on 9 July 2021. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021/2022 at their 15 June 2021 local board meeting (Resolution number AE/2021/81).

5.       The club aims to provide facilities to enable the community to participate in the recreational sport of tennis. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 outcome five - Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs.

6.       The club has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. The club has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.

7.       The clubs continue to invest in the facility and will be replacing obsolete and dangerous floodlights and fencing. As part of the lease application the group have requested the installation of an on-line booking system.

8.       As this is a council-owned building, a review of alternatives for the use of the premises should be carried out as good practice. For this, an expression of interest process can be undertaken to gauge interest and best use. However, if the incumbent group is needed in the area and the group is performing well, the local board has the discretion to grant a new lease to the group without undergoing an expression of interest process.

9.       In the current case the incumbent group is performing well and satisfies the requirements under the Auckland Council Community Guidelines 2012. 

10.     Public notification and formal iwi consultation is not required as the 1993 Nicholson Park Management Plan recognises the sport of tennis as being one of the foundation sports played on the park.

11.     A site visit was undertaken on 24 June 2021 and established that the premises are being well managed and maintained. 

12.     A community outcomes plan has been agreed upon with the group.

13.     Staff engaged with internal stakeholders on the proposed new lease. No objections were received.

14.     The site does not lie in a flood prone area nor is it susceptible to coastal inundation.

15.     This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated for a term of two years commencing from date as per their recommendation to trial the book-a-court system, with one four year right of renewal.

16.     If the local board decides to grant the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      grant, under Section 54 (1) b of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated for a 3861 square meters (more or less) located at 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden on the land legally described as Lot 49 Section 6 Suburbs of Auckland (as per Attachment A – Site Plan), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)       term – two (2) years, commencing 1 May 2023, with one four year right of renewal.

ii)       online book-a-court system, a two-year trial.

iii)      rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded.

iv)      maintenance fee - $500.00 plus GST per annum.

v)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B – Community Outcomes Plan).

b)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

c)       noting lease charges shall be reviewed by the local board in circumstances where there are changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

17.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community. Albert-Eden Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021/2022 at their local board meeting on 15 June 2021 (Resolution number AE/2021/81).

18.     The progression of a new lease to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden, was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building/s and lease

19.     Nicholson Park is located at 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden (refer to Attachment A Site Plan – Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden). The land is legally described as Part Allotment 49 Section 6 Suburbs of Auckland. The land is held by the Crown and vested in council in trust and as a classified recreation reserve. 

20.     The approved 1993 Nicholson Park Management Plan recognises tennis being played on the park.

21.     Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated holds a community lease for the council owned land and building situated at Nicholson Park.

22.     The area proposed to be leased is 3,861 square meters (more or less) as outlined in Attachment A – Site Plan.

23.     An annual subsidised maintenance fee for a council owned building is charged to the tenant.

24.     The building and courts are primarily used by the club to provide for the community to participate in the recreational sport of tennis.

Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated

25.     Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated was established in 1922 and its primary purpose is “To Make Tennis A Part of Every Aucklanders’ Life”. The key objective of Tennis Auckland, enshrined in their constitution, is to develop opportunities, programmes, and facilities to enable, encourage and enhance participation in tennis.

26.     The club seeks to achieve this vision and objective by providing a range of facilities at the ASB Tennis Arena in Parnell, Scarbro Tennis Centre in Glen Innes, Manukau Tennis Centre in Manukau, and Nicholson Park in Mt Eden. All these facilities are fully accessible to the public.

27.     The courts are open for public use seven days a week; apart from interclub bookings on Saturdays during summer; and the occasional private booking.

28.     The club have been stewards of the Nicholson Park tennis venue for over 20 years. In September 2018 the club with financial help from council, resurfaced all six courts with a new all-weather surface and refurbished the council owned clubhouse.

29.     The club continue to invest into the facilities and will be replacing obsolete and dangerous floodlights, fencing and as part of the lease application the group have requested the installation of an on-line booking system.

30.     An on-line booking system allows fair and controlled access to courts. The system allows equitable access, ensuring those who can afford to contribute to the upkeep of the courts do so, whilst those who cannot afford to pay can access free court time, provided within the schedule.

31.     Floodlighting, integrated with on-line booking, will be provided, allowing 6,000 additional court hours per year for those wishing to play outside daylight hours. 35 percent more playing time at times outside normal working hours.

32.     A booking schedule has been devised. This gives a total of 630 available court hours per week. There will be daily time-slots available on two courts free of charge. At present there are 32 hours envisaged weekly.

33.     Revenue from the court booking system will be invested back into the property and a sinking fund will be established.

34.     Council staff from leasing, Active Recreation have assessed the request for the online system and support the installation on a trial basis for the first two years.

35.     The club’s current community lease with the council commenced on 10 July 2006 and expired on the 9 July 2021. The lease to the group is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

36.     The club are currently unable to capture casual players who do not book and just turn up to play. The casual usage is extensive, but they currently do not have any data.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

37.     At the expiry of a lease for a council owned building, a review of alternatives for the use of the premises should be carried out as good practice. For this, an expression of interest process can be undertaken to gauge interest and best use. However, if the incumbent group is needed in the area and the group is performing well, the local board has the discretion to grant a new lease to the group without undergoing an expression of interest process.

38.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

39.     On 24 May 2017, the Albert-Eden Local Board resolved, under Resolution number AE/2017/52, on a community occupancy policy that outlines the standard terms for community leases and licence to occupy council sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area for community owned buildings with a three-year standard term with a single three year right of renewal, giving a six-year term.

40.     This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated for a term of two years commencing from date as per their recommendation to trial the book-a-court system, with one four year right of renewal.

Public notification and engagement

41.     The current adopted Nicholson Park reserve management plan contemplates the group and activity therefore no public notification or iwi engagement is required.

Assessment of the application

42.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver tennis services.

43.     The club has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

44.     The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability in place.

45.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained.

46.     The club provides a valuable service to the local community by providing these facilities and in addition the club puts a major focus on giving children an opportunity to experience tennis and has delivered the Hot Shots tennis programme to over 40,000 school children in the last five years. They provide an extensive support programme to the network of over 50 clubs (with 8,500 members) in the community, as well as providing coaching opportunities for all ages and abilities.

47.     The club also runs school programmes, junior coaching, local tournaments, inter-club competitions and club development workshops.

48.     Aotearoa Māori Tennis Association is affiliated to and has a Memorandum of Understanding with Tennis New Zealand and has a close association with the club.

49.     The neighboring Mt Eden Tennis Club support and collaborates with the club.

50.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement and is attached to the report as Attachment B.

51.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and the community outcomes plan will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.

52.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated for a term of two years commencing from date as per their recommendations, to trial the book-a-court system, with one four year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

53.     It is anticipated that activation of the building and park will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission.

54.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

55.     Asset improvements and maintenance undertaken by the council will strive for maximum re-use and recycling of existing material. This will be in alignment with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle) to ensure minimum impact on greenhouse gas emission.

56.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

57.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.


Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

58.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed lease as it will include positive outcomes for the community.

59.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

60.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote the participate in the recreational sport of tennis for the Albert-Eden Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

61.     The assessment of the application was workshopped with the Albert-Eden Local Board on 23 February 2023. The local board indicated its in principle support of the lease proposal.

62.     The delivered activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 outcome five and objective:

Table One: 2020 Albert-Eden Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome

Objective

Outcome Five: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs.

Our people can live healthy active lifestyles

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.     No Iwi engagement is required as the management plan for the reserve recognises the activities of the club.

64.     The lessee has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community as per Attachment B of this report. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through health and well-being.

65.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

66.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

67.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

68.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests, and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

69.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. No concerns were raised regarding the financial implications for the new lease to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated for the building and courts at Nicholson Park.

70.     While there are no financial implications for this new community lease to the club at Nicholson Park, the 2023/2024 annual budget proposes changes to the rent levels within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. As this is only a proposal it will not be operative until adopted.

71.     Ongoing maintenance of the asset will be covered by both the club and council which is accounted for in current and future budgets. A maintenance fee is charged to the lessee.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome.

73.     The new lease affords the groups security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility. Should the building remain unoccupied, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and possible improvements. Council will be liable for the assets regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals. The renewal of the building will also not appear in the annual work programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

74.     If the Albert-Eden Local Board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan - Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden

71

b

Community Outcomes Plan - Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated

73

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Heaven - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Proposed new community lease to Central Bowling Club Incorporated at Kiwitea Reserve, 64A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham

File No.: CP2023/04465

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To classify Allotment 249 Parish of Titirangi as a recreation reserve under section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

2.       To grant a new community ground lease to Central Bowling Club Incorporated for reserve land located at Kiwitea Reserve, 64A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Central Bowling Club Incorporated (club) seeks a new community lease to continue occupation and operation from the group-owned building at, Kiwitea Reserve, 64A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham.

4.       The club currently holds the lease on the ground which has reached final expiry on 31 October 2021. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

5.       The new lease was identified and approved by the Albert-Eden Local Board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2022/2023 at the 21 June 2022 Albert-Eden Local Board meeting (Resolution number AE/2022/103).

6.       During the new lease assessment, it was discovered the land parcel on which the club sits is currently held as an unclassified recreation reserve. Prior to granting the new lease, land classification is required in terms of the Reserves Act 1977.

7.       The club aims to encourage the participation in the game of bowls which provides health, and recreational benefits and a sense of belonging within the community. These activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board plan 2020 Outcome Five – parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs.

8.       The club has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. The club has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

9.       As this is a group-owned building, they have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term.

10.     Staff visited the site on16 February 2022 and the facilities appear to be well utilised and maintained.

11.     A community outcomes plan has been agreed and will be appended to the lease.

12.     Iwi engagement ran between 3 March 2023 and 7 April 2023. No concerns were raised.

13.     Staff engaged with internal stakeholders on the proposed new lease. No objections were received.

14.     The site does not lie in a flood prone area nor is it susceptible to coastal inundation.

15.     This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to the club for a term of three years commencing from 1 May 2023 with one three year right of renewal.

16.     If the Albert-Eden Local Board decides to grant the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the classification of the land legally described as Allotment 249 Parish of Titirangi, held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in Auckland Council in trust from unclassified recreation reserve to a classified recreation reserve under section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

b)      grant, under Section 54 (1) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease to Central Bowling Club Incorporated for 3,913 square meters (more or less) located at Kiwitea Reserve, 64a Kiwitea Street, Sandringham on the land legally described as Allotment 249 Parish of Titirangi held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in Auckland Council in trust (as per Attachment A –Site Plan Central Bowling Club), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)       term – three years, commencing 1 May 2023, with one three year right of renewal.

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded.

iii)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B – Community Outcomes Plan).

iv)      include an additional obligation in the lease agreement that the lease holder takes actions to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions related to their operations to reduce climate impact.

c)       approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

d)      noting lease charges shall be reviewed by the local board in circumstances where there are changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012

e)      note that public notification and iwi engagement for Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Central Bowling Club Incorporated located at Kiwitea Reserve, 64a Kiwitea Street, Sandringham has been undertaken from the 8 March to 14 April 2023.

f)       note that no objections to the notified proposal of the new community lease to the Central Bowling Club Incorporated at Kiwitea Reserve, 64a Kiwitea Street, Sandringham were received.

 

Horopaki

Context

17.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

18.     The Albert- Eden Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2022/2023 at their local board meeting on 21 June 2022 (Resolution number AE/2022/103).

19.     The renewal of this lease to the club at Kiwitea Reserve, 64A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building/s and lease

20.     Kiwitea Reserve, 64a Kiwitea Street, Sandringham refer to (Attachment A Site Plan – Central Bowling Club), is on land that is legally described as Allotment 249 Parish of Titirangi. It is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as an unclassified recreation reserve, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in Auckland Council in trust.

21.     Prior to granting the new lease, land classification is required in terms of the Reserves Act 1977. This is recommended to be done under section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     The club holds a community ground lease for the council administered land and group owned building situated at Kiwitea Reserve, 64a Kiwitea Street, Sandringham.

23.     The area proposed to be leased is 3,913 square meters (more or less) as outlined in Attachment A – Site Plan Central Bowling Club.

24.     For a group owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee.  These costs are funded from membership fees, fundraising and private hire.

25.     The building is primarily used by the group to provide a facility to encourage the participation in the game of bowls. The facility is also used for pool, table tennis, darts and is available for hire to members of the public.

26.     The facility is well maintained and well utilised and operates seven days a week.

27.     These programmes provide health, and recreational benefits and a sense of belonging within the community.

Central Bowling Club Incorporated

28.     The club was established in 1953 and its primary purpose objective is to provide a facility to encourage the participation in the game of bowls.

29.     The club has 120 members representing a wide variety of ethnicities but generally from an older age group. The facility is open each day from midday for the members to play bowls and enjoy physical activity and socialise.

30.     Members have also represented both Auckland and New Zealand at bowls.

31.     The club also offers it facilities to other sport clubs to play indoor bowls, pool, table tennis and darts.

32.     The facility is also available to rent to members of the public. The club has stricter rules around behaviour for hireage and as such the club has not come to the attention of council for many years.

33.     The group has been operating from 64a Kiwitea Street for over 40 years. The group continually spend funds on the upkeep of both the building and grounds.

34.     The club’s current community lease with the council commenced on 1 November 2011 and has reached final expiry on the 31 October 2021. The lease to the group is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

35.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The club is exercising this right by applying for a new lease.

36.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

37.     On 24 May 2017 Albert-Eden Local Board resolved, under Resolution number AE/2017/52, on a community occupancy policy that outlines the standard terms for community leases and licence to occupy council sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area for community owned buildings with a three-year standard term with a single three year right of renewal, giving a six-year term.

Public notification and engagement

38.     As there is no adopted reserve management plan, public notification is required under the Reserves Act 1977 prior to any lease being granted.  Iwi engagement is also required under the terms of section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 prior to any lease being granted.

39.     The proposed new community lease to the Central Bowling Club Incorporated for the land at Kiwitea Reserve, 64a Kiwitea Street, Sandringham was publicly notified. The notification appeared in the Central Leader on 16 March 2023 and the Auckland Council website’s Have Your Say webpage with a submission deadline of 14 April 2023.

40.     The cost of the public notification was met by the Parks and Community Facilities department of the council.

41.     No submissions or objections to the notified proposal were received.

Assessment of the application

42.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver a facility that encourages the participation in the game of bowls which provides health, and recreational benefits and a sense of belonging within the community.

43.     The club has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

44.     The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

45.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained.

46.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been completed for the club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement and is attached to the report as Attachment B.

47.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and the community outcomes plan will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.

48.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to the club for a term of three years commencing from 1 May 2023 with one three year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

49.     It is anticipated that continued activation of the building will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission. The group share their space which will however decrease overall energy use, as users will not consume energy at individual community spaces. The shared space will provide opportunity and enable people to enjoy positive healthy lifestyles and will increase capability and connections within local community.

50.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

51.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

52.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

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Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed lease as it will include positive outcomes in the local community.

54.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

55.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote physical and social activities that will be delivered from Kiwitea Reserve, 64a Kiwitea Street Sandringham for the Albert-Eden Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

56.     The assessment of the application was workshopped with the Albert-Eden Local Board on 23 February 2023. The local board indicated its in principle support of the lease proposal.

57.     The delivered activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective:

Table one: 2020 Albert-Eden Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 5: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs

Our people can live healthy active lifestyles.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

58.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant a new community lease for the club at Kiwitea Reserve, 64A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham was undertaken with the thirteen iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Albert-Eden Local Board area. The engagement involved:

·     an email to all iwi identified as having an interest in the area as captured in Attachment A, containing detailed information on the land, the lessee, the lease proposal as per Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

·     an invitation to iwi representatives was extended to a hui and or for a kaitiaki site visit to comment and provide feedback on any spiritual, cultural, or environmental impact with respect to the proposal.

59.     No objections or requests for a hui or kaitiaki site visit received was from the iwi and mana whenua groups who responded.

60.     The lessee has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community as per Attachment B of this report. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through health and wellbeing benefits to Māori.

61.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

62.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

63.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

64.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

65.     All costs relating to the advertisement of the council’s intention to grant the proposed lease will be borne by the Parks and Community Facilities department of Auckland Council.

66.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. While there are no financial implications for this new community ground lease to the group at Kiwitea Reserve, the 2023/2024 annual budget proposes changes to the rent levels within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. As this is only a proposal it will not be operative until adopted”

67.     Ongoing maintenance of the asset will be covered by the lessee.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

68.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to the club at Kiwitea Reserve, 64a Kiwitea Street Sandringham the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcomes.

69.     The new lease affords the groups security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility. Should the building become unoccupied, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and possible improvements.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

70.     If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the club to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan Central Bowling Club

85

b

Attachment B - Community Outcomes Plan - Central Bowling Club

87

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Heaven - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Graphical user interface, application

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Seeking views on the proposed approach for Katoa, Ka Ora -  Speed Management Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/04070

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views on the approach for developing Katoa Ka Ora, Auckland’s Speed Management Plan 2024-2027.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (AT) have adopted the Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognize the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. AT is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       Katoa, Ka Ora is a speed management plan for the Auckland region. It is a plan to set safe and appropriate speed limits in order to reduce road deaths and serious injuries.

5.       AT workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with local boards in February and March 2023. This report seeks formal views on the five development approaches for the speed management plan.

6.       Local boards provided formal views in May 2022 on speed limit changes. If local board views have changed, AT will make any amendments needed before a proposal is mapped.  We expect Katoa, Ka Ora to be publicly consulted in mid-2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      provide views on the proposed approaches for development of Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland per the form in Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       AT is Auckland’s road controlling authority. Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at levels that are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and their use. 

Alignment with Central Government Policy

8.       Waka-Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency adopted a ‘Vision Zero’ approach to road safety in 2019 when it launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy that aims to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads to zero by 2050.

9.       The Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits.

10.     The Rule requires road controlling authorities to use reasonable efforts to have at least 40 per cent of speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by 30 June 2024. The remainder must be completed by 31 December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

11.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications. The majority of Auckland schools are classified as Category One, which require speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) in the area outside of the school.

Alignment with Auckland Council Policy

12.     Auckland Council’s Planning Committee requested AT to accelerate the road safety and speed management programmes and work with partners to make Auckland a Vision Zero region in 2018.

13.     Since receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and from the AT Board, AT has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland and reduced speeds on many roads.

14.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes (Phase 3), the focus has been on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae. Local boards received localised reports on public feedback in early May 2022 and provided feedback at their May business meeting. This feedback was used in preparing final recommendations that went to the AT Board.

15.     Speed limit changes approved by the AT Board have been implemented during December 2022- March 2023.

Auckland Transport’s role

16.     AT manages more than 7,300 kilometres of roads for Auckland Council. 

17.     This role includes setting speed limits and since ‘Vision Zero’ was adopted, AT has been progressively reviewing and amending speed limits to align with the strategy. Changes have been made only after engaging with both the community and their representative local board.

18.     Road deaths have reduced 30 per cent where speed limits have changed in the 24 months following the June 2020 Auckland speed limit reductions. In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a 9 per cent increase in road deaths.

19.     The Safe Speeds Programme focuses on speed limit review. Physical speed management measures like speed tables or raised crossings require careful consideration and planning because of costs and funding constraints. Following speed limit changes, roads are monitored and evaluated to help prioritise engineering investment decisions.

20.     30km/h is the internationally accepted speed to greatly reduce the chances of people walking or cycling from being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle.

21.     Speed limit changes made in the first three phases of the Safe Speeds Programme (between June 2020 and March 2023) were completed under the AT Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 and the Speed Limits Amendment Bylaw 2022.

22.     The Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 is the current legislation, and it requires all road controlling authorities to have a speed management plan. The AT plan is Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland, with development of the plan currently in a discussion phase with local boards.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     Following AT’s Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan presentation on 16 February 2023, AT is seeking formal views from the local board on proposed mapping approaches for speed management.

24.     The presentation slide pack is included with this report as Attachment B.

25.     The proposed approaches will be used along with the eight working principles when public consultation takes place on Katoa, Ka Ora, Speed Management Plan for Auckland, later in 2023.

26.     The draft working principles are provided in Table One below.

Table One – Draft working principles

Draft working principles used to guide the development of

Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan 

1.   Tiakitanga. The top priority of speed management is to keep people safe and alive on Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland’s roads.​ 

2.   Easy to understand. Speed limits are a critical part of an integrated safe road system; we will ensure they are easy to understand for all.​ 

3.   Safe children. Safe speeds around schools will ensure the safety of children (and all ages and people).​ 

4.   Safe speed limits. Speed limits align with government guidance . We consider complex factors ranging from the function of our roads and streets* to how many people travel outside of vehicles.​ 

5.   Safe infrastructure. Investment in engineering and safety improvements will be prioritised on roads that have high safety needs and provide active mode benefits.​ 

6.   Partnership. We work with our Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi and other partners in governance, design, delivery, education, communication, enforcement and monitoring. ​ 

7.   Healthy communities. Safe speeds support more walking and cycling; this improves health and is better for the environment.​ 

8.   Measure results. We constantly monitor the roads to evaluate any changes required to make our roads and streets safe. ​ 

*AT’s Future Connect and Roads and Streets Framework tools to be used.​ 

Proposed mapping approaches

27.     There are two groups of proposed approaches.

·    Consistent Approach (Approaches One and Two) – these require consistency across all local boards to have a regional approach for Aucklanders.

·    Tailored Approach (Approaches Three, Four and Five) – these approaches allow for a tailored approach for each local board. 

28.     The proposed approaches are detailed more in Table Two below.

Table Two: Proposed Approaches for developing Katoa, Ka Ora, Speed Management Plan

Consistent approaches

Approach One

An easy-to-understand approach

Includes:

·    treating blocks of roads/ local road areas to ensure consistent speed limits across the same types of roads e.g., similar urban residential roads don’t have limits of 30, 40 and 50 km/h in adjacent streets

·    matching the speed limit to the use and design of the road, i.e. slower speeds for areas that have higher amounts of people walking and cycling such as residential roads, near schools and/or town centres, and for roads that are designed for lower speeds

·    filling in ‘gaps’ so there are not small pockets of untreated roads which is inconsistent for drivers

·    treating roads that could be rat runs, e.g., drivers take short cuts through local residential streets or traffic is pushed from one road to another.

Approach Two

A high benefit cost ratio approach, proposing methods that provide higher return on investment.

Includes:

·    permanent changes for local roads

·    variable changes at school gates for arterial roads (high movement roads) and high-speed rural roads

·    changes for high-risk roads, or town centres on high-risk roads where support has been identified from previous engagement

·    complementing planned infrastructure or developments, e.g. new housing areas.

Tailored approaches

Approach Three

An approach that is responsive to requests from partners and communities for specific speed limit reductions. These include requests from mana whenua, local boards, schools and community groups.

Approach Four

An approach that covers a high percentage of roads in the local board area for this phase of the programme.

Approach Five

An approach that implements approved changes early in the local board area for this phase of the programme.

29.     Auckland Transport is seeking local board views on each approach to understand benefit to the community, prioritisation of community requests, preferred percentage of cover and timing of implementation.

30.     Attachment A contains a form for local boards to provide their views on the proposed approaches.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

32.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create more pleasant urban environments, revitalise local centres and make it safer for children to travel independently.

33.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     The Safe Speeds Programme has been endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning Committee. We have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     AT workshopped with all local boards during February/March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes kanohi ki te kanohi (face-to-face).

36.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February/March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

37.     Auckland Transport is seeking formal views from local boards through this report. The presentation slide pack from the workshops is included as Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

39.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. Detailed engagement about speed around rural marae has recently been completed as part of Phase Three and is currently being implemented. 

40.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

41.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at the recent workshops in February/March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications. 

43.     Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. A comprehensive communication and marketing plan is being developed to share with Aucklanders that ‘safe speeds save lives’.

45.     Possible funding constraints may require the scale of the plan or delivery to be slowed or delayed until future phases of the Safe Speeds Programme.  Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

46.     Public views expressed during consultation may differ to the views expressed by the local board in their resolution. As AT have done in previous consultations we will come back to the local board and provide interim reports, before a further resolution is sought.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback provided by local boards and will use this along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our obligations as a road controlling authority to help develop Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan for Auckland.

48.     A report will be provided to local boards to show how feedback has been used to help shape the final plan that goes out for public consultation.

49.     Public consultation is planned for mid-2023, but dates are subject to change. Dates will be confirmed after the Regional Transport Committee approval of the draft plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Form for the local board to provide views on proposed Approaches One - Five

95

b

16 February 2023 workshop material on Katoa, Ka Ora for Albert-Eden Local Board

97

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marlene Kotze - Auckland Transport Programme Director

Authorisers

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 



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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Local Board feedback on distribution method of the Local Crime Fund

File No.: CP2023/04416

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the preferred option for distribution of the Local Crime Fund. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Crime Fund is a one-off, $2 million central government allocation to Auckland Council for community safety / crime prevention initiatives.

3.       Staff have developed a series of options for distribution of the funding, with input from key community safety stakeholders.

4.       Feedback is being sought from all local boards on the preferred option for distribution of the funding by 28 April 2023.

5.       The feedback will inform a report to the Regulatory and Safety Committee to approve a decision, scheduled to be presented on 30 May 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback, if any, on the preferred option for distribution of the Local Crime Fund.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       On 28 November 2022, the Prime Minister announced a multi-million dollar funding package to address retail crime and reoffending throughout New Zealand.

7.       Of that, $2 million was granted to Auckland Council to support crime prevention and youth engagement approaches or intervention programmes, referred to by council as the ‘Local Crime Fund’.

8.       The Local Crime Fund was set up to assist with crime prevention with a focus on youth interventions and Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) measures such as patrols, street lighting, CCTV cameras, and planters, as well as community development. The CPTED guidelines have been provided in Attachment A (https://www.cpted.net/Primer-in-CPTED).

9.       The Regulatory and Safety Committee, by its delegations, have the necessary authority to approve the distribution method of the funding on behalf of the Governing Body. A report outlining the options will be presented on 30 May 2023 for the committee to consider.

10.     Local board views on the preferred option are being sought by 28 April 2023 to be included in the report to the Regulatory and Safety Committee.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The funding will activate new or strengthen existing community-led partnerships that focus on youth crime prevention and town centre / retail crime prevention through a CPTED lens. It is a one-off fund that cannot be used to fund business-as-usual council operations.

12.     Staff have engaged community safety stakeholders formally and informally during the development of options to distribute the Local Crime Fund. This includes, but is not limited to, NZ Police, community patrols, Māori wardens, Business Associations, outreach services, Auckland Transport, Regulatory and Compliance and Youth Empowerment teams.

13.     Feedback from partners was key to ensuring there was alignment with existing initiatives and availability of partners to deliver on programme options.

14.     Staff have identified four potential options for distribution and spending of this fund for the consideration of the committee.

Option

Mechanism

Benefits

1.   Local board allocation – spend on local safety and youth initiatives

Funding would be included in the 2023-2024 local board work programme as a project line and earmarked for safety programmes, youth activation and town centre / retail safety CPTED outcomes.

 

Formula for funding allocation to be agreed.

·    Existing structure in place for distribution

·    Enables local responses and solutions to localised crime and youth offending issues.

·    Flexibility in how the investment can be distributed across the CPTED / youth prevention areas.

·    Opportunity to engage residents and businesses in community-led initiatives.

2.   Regional Grants programme

Distribution will be via regional grants where town centre / retailers would be invited to apply for funding for CPTED initiatives.

 

Regional or sub-regional youth organisations would be invited to apply for funding for intervention programmes.

·    Existing structures in place for distribution.

·    A contestable process may encourage innovative programmes and experienced youth organisations to apply.

·    Increases impact at subregional and regional level.

·    Higher level of investment for individual programmes may lead to greater impact and scalability.

·    Disbenefits include local and smaller groups missing out on funding and potential uneven distribution across region

3.   Combination option

Part funding would be included in the 2023-2024 local board work programme as safety lines with youth activation and town centre / retail safety CPTED outcomes.

Regional or sub-regional youth organisations would be invited to apply for funding for intervention programmes.

·    Existing structures in place for distribution.

·    Provides both a local and regional response.

·    Provides clearer differentiation between the two themes and processes.

·    Feedback from community stakeholders has identified this as the preferred option.

4.   Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) / Business Associations

Funding would be directly administered to BIDs and non-BID business associations for CPTED interventions and targeted youth initiatives.

 

Formula for funding distribution to be agreed.

·    Existing contracts and relationships with BIDs and Business Associations are in place to support development of distribution.

·    Low administration and grants management would be required for administration and distribution of funds.

·    Accountability would be monitored via local board/BID and business meeting reporting processes.

 

15.     For options one and three that recommend distributing funding through the local board work programme, relevant data is being reviewed to develop options on how funding could be distributed across all 21 local boards equitably.

16.     Staff intend to present a formula for distribution to the committee that is based on the locally driven initiatives funding (LDI) formula and considers relevant crime statistics, such as retail and youth crime, in order to ensure there is an equitable allocation to areas with greater need.

17.     Options to inform a decision on the formula for distribution via local boards are being worked on and will be presented alongside the relevant options in the report to the Regulatory and Safety Committee.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The decision at hand is an administrative matter and will not impact on greenhouse gas emissions. Concrete projects that will be funded in the future from this fund will be assessed individually for their impact on climate change when they are identified and approved.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The impacts of this decision on the council group will be minimal. The options identified are designed to utilise existing mechanisms for efficiency purposes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The feedback from local boards will inform a decision by the Governing Body through its Regulatory and Safety Committee on the administration of funding given to the council to address retail crime and reoffending in local communities. Local boards are being invited through this report to share their views and preferences on the options available to the committee.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The impact of the distribution of the Local Crime Fund on Māori has not been assessed. The overall purpose of the fund is to address crime and is therefore expected to have a positive impact on all communities including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no adverse financial implications of the decision being sought.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the feedback decision being sought from local boards. Local board feedback will be shared with the committee for consideration in the making of their final decisions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Feedback from local boards, if any, will be collated and included in the report to the Regulatory and Safety Committee under the local impacts and local board views section.

25.     The decision of the Regulatory and Safety Committee will be available in the published minutes of the 30 May 2023 meeting.

26.     The programme will be delivered during 2023/2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) guidance

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michal Dziwulski – Regional Community Safety Advisor

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson – General Manager Connected Communities

Carol Hayward – Acting Manager Planning and Operations

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Addition to the 2022-2025 Albert-Eden Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2023/04069

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for two additional meeting dates to be added to the 2022-2025 Albert-Eden Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the Annual Budget 2023/2024 and Local Board Plan 2023 timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on 23 November 2022.  Resolution number AE/2022/202.

3.       At that time the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the Annual Budget 2023/2024 and Local Board Plan 2023 were unknown. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve two additional meeting dates as new additions to the 2022-2025 Albert-Eden Local Board meeting schedule, so that the modified Annual Budget 2023/2024 and Local Board Plan 2023 timeframes can be met.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the addition of two additional meeting dates to the 2022-2025 Albert-Eden Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the Annual Budget 2023/2024 and Local Board Plan 2023 timeframes as follows:

i)       Thursday, 11 May 2023 at 3.00pm

ii)       Thursday, 14 September 2023 at 3.00pm.

b)      whakaae / agree that the additional meetings will be held at the Albert-Eden Local Board office, 114 Dominion Road, Mt Eden, Auckland.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·    clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·    sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule at its 23 November 2022 business meeting.  Resolution number AE/2022/202.

8.       The timeframes for local board decision-making in relation to the local board agreement which is part of the Annual Budget 2023/2024 and Local Board Plan 2023 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

9.       The board is being asked to make decisions in early-May, mid-June, early September and late October/early November 2023 to feed into the Annual Budget 2023/2024 and Local Board Plan 2023 processes. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The local board has two choices:

i)        Add the meetings as additions to the meeting schedule.

or

ii)       Add the meetings as extraordinary meetings.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the Annual Budget 2023/2024 timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic Annual Budget 2023/2024 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the Annual Budget 2023/2024 process could be considered at this meeting.

13.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report. Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the Budget, the local board agreement not being adopted in time for inclusion in the Annual Budget and delays in adoption of the Local Board Plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2023/04073

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillor Julie Fairey’s report for the period March 2023 (Attachment A).

b)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillor Christine Fletcher’s verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor Fairey report for period March 2023

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2023/04075

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for the local board chairperson to provide a written and/or verbal update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chairperson will update board members by way of a report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Chairperson M Watson’s verbal/tabled update for April 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2023/04076

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for local board members to provide a written update on projects and events attended since the previous month’s local board meeting and to discuss other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an information item and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

3.       Local board members are recommended to use a Notice of Motion, rather than a Board Member Report, should a member wish to propose a recommendation or request action to be undertaken by staff.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the tabled/verbal Board Member Reports for April 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2023/04077

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous month’s local board business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its workshops held since the previous month’s local board business meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records for the workshops held on 16 and 30 March 2023 and 6 and 13 April 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 16 March 2023

145

b

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 30 March 2023

149

c

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 6 April 2023

153

d

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 13 April 2023

157

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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27 April 2023

 

 

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27 April 2023

 

 

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27 April 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

File No.: CP2023/04078

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Albert-Eden Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Albert-Eden Local Board is appended to the report as Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly and reported to the local board’s business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward work programme calendar for April 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar - April 2023

163

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

27 April 2023

 

 

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