I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 27 June 2023

10:00

Council Chamber
Ōrewa Service Centre
50 Centreway Road
Ōrewa

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

Members

Jake Law

Victoria Short

 

Sam Mills

Gregg Walden

 

Alexis Poppelbaum, JP

Leanne Willis

 

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Louise Healy

Democracy Advisor

 

22 June 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 021 419 205

Email: louise.healy@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - YMCA North                                                                                    5

8.2     Deputation - Stillwater Boating Club                                                                 6

8.3     Deputation - Te Herenga Waka o Orewa                                                            6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      7

9.1     Public Forum: Keeping Kauri Kids                                                                    7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              7

11        Proposed new community lease to Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust at 10-12 Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay                                                                                     9

12        Proposed new community ground lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand - Taiaotea Air Scout Group at 702 Beach Road, Taiaotea Reserve, Browns Bay  21

13        Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan review                                                   31

14        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for quarter three 2022/2023                                                                                         41

15        Delegated decision: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Work Programme Reallocations FY2022/2023                                                                                         49

16        Hōtaka Kaupapa - Policy Schedule June 2023                                                         57

17        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records                                                61

18        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of

            Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The chairperson opened the meeting and welcomed those in attendance.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

An apology has been received from Member J Law.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 20 June 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - YMCA North

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Julian Baldey from YMCA North has requested a deputation to discuss a proposed multi-sport community hub at Metro Park, Millwater.


 

2.       A presentation has been provided and is available as Attachment A to the agenda report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Julian Baldey for his presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Presentation - The future of Metro Park......................................................... 69

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Stillwater Boating Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mike Dance from Stillwater Boating Club has requested a deputation to provide an update on the club’s activities and their concerns around parking.

2.       A presentation has been provided and is available as Attachment A to the agenda report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Mike Dance for his presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Presentation - Stillwater Boating Club........................................................... 81

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Te Herenga Waka o Orewa

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Kereama Nathan from Te Herenga Waka o Orewa has requested a deputation to discuss a proposal to expand their facility.

2.       A presentation has been provided and is available as Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Kereama Nathan for his presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Presentation - Te Herenga Waka o Orewa Cultural Centre Development.... 85

 

 

 


 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum: Keeping Kauri Kids

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Jessica McLean has requested public forum time to address the local board regarding Kauri Kids.

2.       A presentation has been provided and is available as Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank / whakamihi Jessica McLean for her presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Presentation - Keeping Kauri Kids................................................................. 95

 

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

Proposed new community lease to Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust at 10-12 Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay

File No.: CP2023/06428

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community ground lease to the Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust (the trust) for the Browns Bay Marine Centre located at 10-12 Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust seeks a new community ground lease to continue occupation and operation from the trust-owned building at Browns Bay Beach Reserve, 10-12 Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay.

3.       The Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust currently hold a ground lease which will reach final expiry on 29 June 2023. The lease will continue to hold over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2022/2023 at their 23 June 2022 local board meeting (resolution HB/2022/80).

5.       The Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust aims to support marine recreation and coastguard activities. Its facilities are also used as a venue for hire to the community. These activities align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 1: a connected community, and Outcome 4: open spaces to enjoy.

6.       The Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. They have all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

7.       The building also serves an essential purpose by providing public toilets for users of the Browns Bay Beach Reserve.

8.       Staff did a site visit in March 2023, and the facilities were found to be well maintained and fit for purpose.

9.       Staff from Park Specialists, Area Operations, Active Recreation, Resilient Land and Coast, and Connected Communities have been consulted with no concerns raised regarding granting a new lease to Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust.

10.     This report recommends that a new community ground lease be granted for a term of 10 years commencing from 30 June 2023 with one 10-year right of renewal.

11.     If the local board decides to grant the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve, under Section 54(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977 a new community ground lease to the Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust for 438 square meters (more or less) located at 10-12 Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay on the land legally described as Part Lot 10 and Part Lot 11 Deposited Plan 10786 (Attachment A to the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – 10 years, commencing 30 June 2023, with one 10-year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (Attachment B to the agenda report).

b)      whakaae / approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note lease charges shall be reviewed by the local board in circumstances where there are changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Horopaki

Context

12.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

13.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2022/2023 at their local board meeting on 23 June 2022 (resolution HB/2022/80).

14.     A new lease to the Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust at 10-12 Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building and lease

15.     The land occupied by the trust is legally described as Part Lot 10 and Part Lot 11 DP 10786, owned by the council in fee simple and classified as a recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

16.     The trust holds a community ground lease for their trust-owned building at Browns Bay Beach Reserve (Attachment A).

17.     The building, called the Browns Bay Marine Centre, consists of a double garage, medium sized hall, a small kitchen, bathrooms, a large meeting room and office space upstairs.

18.     The building is primarily used by the trust to store the coastguard boat, coastguard equipment, and the tractor for launching, while the hall is used for regular coastguard training, and hired out for various community meetings and events.

19.     The building also serves an essential purpose by housing the public toilets for users of the Browns Bay Beach Reserve. The public toilets are maintained separately by council staff.

20.     As a trust-owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee.  These costs are funded by rent from the Browns Bay Boating Club and Coastguard North Shore as well as venue hire fees.

21.     The building is well maintained by the trust. The trust holds funds in reserve and have future maintenance plans for the building.

22.     The trust’s community lease with the council commenced on 30 June 2013 and will reach final expiry on 29 June 2023. The lease to the group will hold over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised with the trust.

The Browns Bay Marine Centre Trust

23.     The trust was incorporated in 1999 by the Browns Bay Boating Club and Coastguard North Shore. It was based on a mutual working relationship between the two groups and with the purpose of looking after the Browns Bay Marine Centre building at the reserve.

24.     The relationship between these two groups began with the boating club using their tractors to help launch the Coastguard rescue boats for their training and rescue missions.

25.     The facilities used by both groups at Browns Bay were in need of repair and the need for a purpose-built facility was identified at the Browns Bay Beach Reserve. North Shore City Council supported this endeavour, as there was also a need for a new public toilet facility at the site. The combined interest resulted in the Browns Bay Marine Centre being built in 2003 with support from Coastguard North Shore, Browns Bay Boating Club, North Shore City Council and the ASB trust. 

26.     The trust currently has a formal Agreement of Use guiding the use and management of the Browns Bay Marine Centre building.

27.     The objectives of the trust are:

·        to be accessible to the community, support and encourage the use of the land and facility for the designated purpose

·        to create a sense of community good through the use of the facility with it housing the Coastguard North Shore’s sea rescue boat training centre and boat launching facilities

·        the hall space to be available to the community for hire at reasonable rates and to encourage free use by not-for-profit organisations needing a meeting space

·        to manage the facility (now valued at $1.6 million) in good order and repair fit for its purpose as (part) community toilet facility, Coastguard North Shore vessel storage, tractor shed and hall space for event-based use

·        to provide a high level of customer satisfaction to users and members of the public using the facility for activities and events consistent with the community objectives.

28.     The trust supports the local community by providing its facilities as a venue for hire. It is used regularly by groups for first aid training, Bible League, Toastmasters, Coastguard training, day skipper courses, and marine safety education.

29.     Aside from the direct benefits delivered by the trustees’ use of the building around marine recreation and as a base for Coastguard North Shore’s marine search and rescue operations, the shared use of the building helps to build community engagement and community learning for the local community.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

30.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The trust is exercising this right by applying for a new lease. The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

Public notification and engagement

31.     As the trust is contemplated under the adopted Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan 2022, iwi engagement and public notification is not required for granting a new lease to the trust under the Reserves Act 1977.

Assessment of the application

32.     The trust has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver outcomes for the community.

33.     The trust has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

34.     The trust has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

35.     A site visit was completed by staff and the building was found to be well managed and maintained.

36.     The trust has also undertaken improvements including replacing the garage roller doors and repainting the exterior of the building.

37.     The trust provides a valuable service to the local community by supporting marine recreation and marine safety, while making its facility available for hire to help support initiatives and activities within the local community.

38.     The building serves an essential purpose as an operating base for Coastguard North Shore to help cover their large operation in the Hauraki Gulf area for ongoing training, marine search and rescue activities. Council benefits from use of the building as it houses the public toilets.

39.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the trust to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement (Attachment B).

40.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and the community outcomes plan will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.

41.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to the trust for a term of 10 years commencing from 30 June 2023 with one 10-year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

43.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

44.     Staff have received detailed advice from the Resilient Land and Coasts (RLC) team regarding climate impact on this asset as the building is located close to the shoreline and contains the council’s public toilets, resulting in the council having a greater interest in maintaining this asset.

45.     The RLC team have advised no action would be required in the short to medium term to improve resilience against coastal hazards for this building from their assessment of coastal inundation and coastal hazard risk for this area.

46.     It is noted that a Shoreline Adaptation Plan (SAP) is being developed by the Resilient Land and Coasts team to consider the council’s assets in coastal areas and provide guidance for management of those assets in response to climate change.  

47.     Based on RLC’s advice, staff consider it feasible to progress a new lease to the trust based on the recommended terms.

A map of a city

Description automatically generated with low confidence

 

A screenshot of a computer

Description automatically generated with low confidence

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

48.     Staff from Park Specialists, Area Operations, Active Recreation, Resilient Land and Coasts and Connected Communities have been consulted with no concerns raised regarding the proposed new lease to the group.

49.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

50.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote marine recreation, marine safety and community engagement services that will be delivered from the Browns Bay Beach Reserve for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

51.     This report follows a memo presented to the local board on 17 April 2023. The local board indicated its in principle support of the lease proposal.

52.     The delivered activities align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Table A: 2020 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan outcomes and objectives

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 1: A connected community

·        Hibiscus and Bays communities are supported, connected and vibrant.

Outcome 4: Open spaces to enjoy

·        provide a range of play and active recreation opportunities for all ages and abilities in our parks, reserves, and coastal environment.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     Separate iwi engagement was not required as advised under paragraph 31 above in consideration of this lease application.

54.     The lessee has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community (Attachment B). The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through enhancing Māori health and well-being.

55.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

56.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

57.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

58.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

59.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. While there are no financial implications for this new community ground lease to the group at 10-12 Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay, the 2023/2024 annual budget proposes changes to the rent levels within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. As this is only a proposal it will not be operative until adopted.

60.     The group will continue to take responsibility for ongoing maintenance of their building and improvements within their leased area at Browns Bay.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to the trust at 10-12 Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay, the trust’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcomes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

62.     If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the trust to finalise the lease agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Map

17

b

Community Outcomes Plan

19

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chan Park - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

A picture containing text, screenshot, tree, plant

Description automatically generated


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

A close-up of a document

Description automatically generated with low confidence

A close-up of a document

Description automatically generated with low confidence


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

Proposed new community ground lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand - Taiaotea Air Scout Group at 702 Beach Road, Taiaotea Reserve, Browns Bay

File No.: CP2023/07025

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community ground lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand – Taiaotea Air Scout Group for Taiaotea Reserve located at 702 Beach Road, Browns Bay.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Scout Association of New Zealand – Taiaotea Air Scout Group seeks a new community ground lease to continue occupation and operation from their group-owned building at Taiaotea Reserve, 702 Beach Road, Browns Bay.

3.       The Scout Association of New Zealand – Taiaotea Air Scout Group currently holds a community ground lease which has reached final expiry on 30 January 2023. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The Taiaotea Air Scout Group proposed new community ground lease was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2022/2023 at their 23 June 2022 local board meeting (resolution number HB/2022/80).

5.       The Taiaotea Air Scout Group aims to empower youth through adventurous experiences to lead lives that make a positive difference. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 Outcome 4 - open spaces to enjoy.

6.       The Taiaotea Air Scout Group has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. They have all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance in place.

7.       As this is a group-owned building, they have an automatic right to reapply for a new community ground lease at the end of their occupancy term.

8.       As Taiaotea Air Scout Group is contemplated under the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan, public notification and iwi engagement is not required for granting a new lease.

9.       Staff from Park Specialists, Area Operations and Connected Communities have been consulted with no concerns raised on providing a new community ground lease to Scout Association of New Zealand – Taiaotea Air Scout Group.

10.     Staff completed a site visit during April 2023 and found the facilities have been well maintained by the group.

11.     This report recommends that a new community ground lease be granted to the Scout Association of New Zealand – Taiaotea Air Scout Group for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 July 2023 with one 10-year right of renewal.

12.     If the local board decides to grant the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakaae / grant, under Section 54(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community ground lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand – Taiaotea Air Scout Group for an area comprising 177 square meters (more or less) located at 702 Beach Road, Browns Bay on the land legally described as Lot 82 Deposited Plan 16541 (Attachment A to the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – 10 years, commencing 1 July 2023, with one 10-year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (Attachment B to the agenda report).

b)      whakaae / approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that any lease charges shall be reviewed by the local board in circumstances where there are changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Horopaki

Context

13.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

14.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2022/2023 at their 23 June 2022 local board meeting (resolution number HB/2022/80).

15.     A new community ground lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand – Taiaotea Air Scout Group (the group) at 702 Beach Road, Browns Bay was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community ground lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building and lease

16.     The land occupied by The Scout Association of New Zealand – Taiaotea Air Scout Group is legally described as Lot 82 DP 16541 and contained in record of title NA3C/328, held by Auckland Council. This parcel of land is classified as a recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977 (Attachment A).

17.     The group holds a community ground lease for their group-owned building at Taiaotea Reserve.

18.     The group’s lease agreement commenced on 31 January 2003 and expired on 30 January 2023. The lease is currently holding over on a month-by-month basis on existing terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is granted to the group.

19.     As a group-owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee.  These costs are funded by registration fees, grants, donations and fundraising events.

20.     The group-owned building at Taiaotea Reserve has two floors comprised of:

·        Ground floor: small kitchen, meeting room, toilets and storage for outdoor equipment

·        First floor: large hall for group activities, games and education.

21.     The group have recently upgraded their electrical main switchboard to install new exterior and interior lighting throughout the building. They have also re-carpeted the floors with carpets donated by another organisation. Despite the age of the building (50 years), the building was found to be in a good condition and well maintained by the group.

22.     The building is primarily used by the group to provide outdoor education and youth development programmes and activities for its members.

The Scout Association of New Zealand – Taiaotea Air Scout Group

23.     The Scout Association of New Zealand was established in 1923 and its primary purpose is to empower youth through adventurous experiences to lead lives that make a positive difference. They provide comprehensive outdoor-based programmes, educating boys and girls aged five to 26 with a focus on life skills relating to problem-solving, teamwork, citizenship, and healthy living.

24.     The Taiaotea Air Scout Group is one of 300+ groups within the scout movement, which educates more than 13,000 young people across New Zealand.

25.     The group has been operating for over 81 years from Taiaotea Reserve. Aside from the group’s youth development activities, the group is well connected to the local community and supports local events like the Santa Parade and Summer Spectacular through partnership with the Browns Bay Business Association. The group also undertakes regular beachfront and reserve clean-ups and actively participate in Anzac Day commemorations.

26.     The group are also open to sharing their facilities with the community, and its facilities are hired out to a painting class on an ad-hoc basis.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

27.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The group is exercising this right by applying for a new community ground lease. The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

Public notification and engagement

28.     As the group is contemplated under the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan 2022, public notification and iwi engagement is not required for granting a new lease to the group.

Assessment of the application

29.     The group has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

30.     The group has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

31.     The activities of the group continue to align with the classification of land as a recreation reserve.

32.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained.

33.     The group have also undertaken improvements including replacing the carpets and upgraded their electrical main switchboard.

34.     The group provides a valuable service to the local community by providing opportunities for youth to build life skills, problem solving, teamwork, and citizenship skills.

35.     The group are also open to sharing their facilities to help support initiatives and activities within the local community.

36.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the group to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement and is attached to the report as Attachment B.

37.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and the community outcomes plan will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.

38.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to the group for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 July 2023 with one 10-year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

40.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting the council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

41.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

A picture containing aerial photography, map, tree, urban design

Description automatically generated

A screenshot of a computer

Description automatically generated with low confidence

Group owned building

Picture 1: Aerial of 702 Beach Road, Browns Bay

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     Staff from Park Specialists, Area Operations and Connected Communities have been consulted with no concerns raised regarding the proposed new community ground lease to the group.

43.     The proposed new community ground lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     The proposed community ground lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote youth development that are being delivered from Taiaotea Reserve for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

45.     The report follows a memo presented to the local board on 3 May 2023. The local board indicated its in principle support of the new community lease proposal.

46.     The delivered activities align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective:

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 4: open spaces to enjoy

·    provide a range of play and active recreation opportunities for all ages and abilities in our parks, reserves, and coastal environment.

Table A: 2020 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan outcomes and objectives

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     Iwi engagement was not required as advised under paragraph 28 above in consideration of this lease application.

48.     The lessee has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community as per Attachment B. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community by supporting education and awareness of Māori culture and values, particularly to youth.

49.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

50.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

51.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

52.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning department of the council. While there are no financial implications for this new community ground lease to the group at Taiaotea Reserve, the 2023/2024 annual budget proposes changes to the rent levels within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. As this is only a proposal it will not be operative until adopted.

54.     The group will continue to take responsibility for ongoing maintenance of their building and improvements within their leased area at Taiaotea Reserve.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community ground lease to the group at Taiaotea Reserve, 702 Beach Road, Browns Bay, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     If the local board resolves to grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the group to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Map

27

b

Community Outcomes Plan

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chan Park - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

A picture containing tree, house, screenshot, text

Description automatically generated


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

A close-up of a document

Description automatically generated with low confidence

A close-up of a document

Description automatically generated with low confidence


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan review

File No.: CP2023/07349

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approval to publicly notify the intention to vary the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Varying the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan 2015, including the concept plan that forms part of the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan, is recommended to provide clarity on how the effects of coastal hazards and sea-level rise on the reserve will be managed in the future.

3.       The proposed variation is prompted by the Tonkin and Taylor Mairangi Bay Shoreline Management Options report from 2022 (Attachment B to the agenda report). The Shoreline Management Options report provides updated evidence about coastal hazards impacting the reserve and options to mitigate the effects of climate change.

4.       The Shoreline Management Options report highlights that the existing locations (as seen in Figure 1, below) of the Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club building, the sea wall adjoining the beach, and Montrose Terrace within the reserve, are all under threat from coastal hazards. This is due to their positioning within the coastal erosion susceptibility zone 2070 and exposure to more extreme coastal inundation and sea-level rise impacts. The report therefore recommends the strategic setback of these key features of reserve infrastructure over time.

Old location of Watercare pump stationExisting MBSCL siteSea wallMontrose TerraceApproximate existing MBSLC storage location
New location of Watercare pump station
A screenshot of a computer

Description automatically generated

Figure 1 above – the existing site, with Montrose Terrace (adjacent to the beach) and the Mairangi Bay Surf Club building (to the south) (source: Auckland Council GIS 2022)

5.       The proposed scope of the plan variation is to update the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan in response to findings from the Shoreline Management Options report. The proposed variation will include reviewing the concept plan to move reserve infrastructure away from the erosion susceptibility zone and updating plan policies associated with the concept plan.

6.       Of the options considered (explored further in the table in paragraph 43), limiting the review scope to amending the concept plan and associated policies is recommended because it will enable a comprehensive assessment of reserve infrastructure related to wider coastal impacts.

7.       Although the proposed Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan review is less than a comprehensive review of the full management plan, the Reserves Act 1977 process being followed is that of a comprehensive review due to the significant impact of moving key features in the existing reserve.

8.       The plan variation will involve comprehensive public consultation in two separate and successive phases:

·     engaging the community on parts of the plan proposed for review and why it is required, involving face to face engagement and inviting written suggestions, proposed to start late July or early August 2023

·     seeking feedback on proposed plan amendments, involving inviting written submissions and an opportunity to be heard in support of them, which is proposed for October 2023.

9.       It is estimated that any variations to the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan will be submitted for final local board approval by March 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve public notification of the local board’s intention to vary the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan (Attachment A) and invite written suggestions on the proposed variation.

b)      whakaae / approve the scope of the Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan variation to address the effects of coastal hazards and sea-level rise on the reserve, which would involve updating the concept plan and any relevant polices in the reserve management plan.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan (MBRMP) guides the future management, development, and protection of the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves. The MBRMP was adopted by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in March 2015.

11.     The land within scope of the MBRMP (including the associated coastal walkway) which, is held under the Reserves Act 1977 and classified as either recreation reserve or local purpose (esplanade) reserve.

12.     The concept plan in the MBRMP applies to the main beach reserve in Mairangi Bay, which is a small area within this wider reserve network (a diagram showing the area covered by the concept plan is outlined on page 25 of Attachment A).

13.     The local board has the responsibility for the MBRMP as the administering body under the Reserves Act 1977 for Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves.

14.     Section 41(4) of the Reserves Act 1977 states that “the administering body of any reserve shall keep its management plan under continuous review, so that… the plan is adapted to changing circumstances or in accordance with increased knowledge.” This will apply to the new information about coastal hazards and mitigation options provided in the Shoreline Management Options (T&T) report.

15.     The MBRMP includes policies relating to key pieces of reserve infrastructure such as the Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club (MBSLC) building and associated storage space. The concept plan within the MBRMP includes spatial details around this reserve infrastructure.

16.     There are no operational issues with the majority of the existing MBRMP. It is considered fit for purpose in an operational context, excluding any spatial changes to reserve infrastructure and associated policies.

17.     The MBRMP also includes the upgrade of the existing wastewater pump station which is currently being undertaken by Watercare. This involves relocating the facility within the reserve from 10 Sidmouth Street to a new location at 12 Sidmouth Street.

18.     The existing MBRMP also outlines a plan to shift Montrose Terrace and associated car parking inland (westward) from its current location. This will also be of relevance to spatial reconfiguration in the reserve.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Issues and opportunities

19.     Information is drawn from the T&T report to support the decision to publicly notify an intention to prepare a variation of the MBRMP. Doing so provides the opportunity to address the effects of coastal hazards and sea-level rise on the reserve. All public feedback will be reviewed and considered to inform the draft plan variation.

New information on coastal hazards impacting the beach reserves

20.     The T&T report, released in November 2019 and later updated in December 2022, detailed an updated assessment of coastal hazards and processes, including the likely effects of climate change.

21.     The T&T report proposes the redevelopment of the MBSLC building and associated storage, away from the shoreline. This new information was not considered by the 2015 MBRMP and included concept plan.

22.     The T&T report recommends removing the existing seawall between the reserve lawn and the beach, as shown in Figure 1, in the longer term. Removal of this hard protection structure would naturalise the transition between the land and sea enabling the creation of a more resilient natural beach system.[1] The permanence of the sea wall will be considered under this plan variation because the sea wall is in the coastal hazards zone. The seawall is an asset owned and maintained by Auckland Council.

23.     Naturalising the coastal edge will also increase the public’s recreational options for use of the beach through the full tidal cycle. Currently there is marginal area of beach available for recreation at high tide, with the sea abutting the sea wall.

24.     The T&T report includes other coastal management options to provide a more sustainable, longer-term shoreline management response. However, the recommended option will most easily enable the reserve to be resilient to the impacts of coastal hazards and sea-level rise and will be considered as part of the plan variation.

25.     The plan variation will also be informed by relevant national and regional policy and guidance, including:

·        the Auckland Unitary Plan

·        Ministry for the Environment climate change guidance

·        the New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement 2010, specifying that the effects of climate change should be considered over at least a 100-year timespan

·        the “managed retreat” approach outlined in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. Moving structures away from the coastline will allow for greater flexibility and adaptation in addressing climate change impacts.

Future location of Mairangi Bay Surf Club

26.     The existing MBRMP contemplates a larger lease area for the MBSLC building in its current location. This new building may allow for the proposed re-development of:

·        the clubrooms

·        boat storage space

·        a refreshment kiosk

·        public toilets

·        changing facilities.

27.     The MBRMP does not however provide details on a different location of the new MBSLC building beyond the existing building footprint.

28.     The current building is within the erosion susceptibility area 2070 (see Figure 2 for imagery of the existing surf club building during a storm) and relies on the council’s existing seawall. Over time, regardless of the current seawall, the site will also be exposed to coastal inundation and sea-level rise.

29.     Therefore, the proposed scope of the MBRMP variation includes consideration of a new MBSLC building location setback from the erosion susceptibility area. This requires changes to the concept plan included in the MBRMP.

A screenshot of a computer

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Figure 2 above – the surf club during a 2016 storm event (source: Matthew McNeil, Senior Coastal Specialist, Auckland Council)

30.     The MBSLC building’s lease came to an end on 31 May 2023, meaning that now is an opportune time to consider the location of the future building. The lease is on a month-by-month basis until terminated, or a new lease is granted.

Mairangi Bay Surf Club storage requirements

31.     The existing MBRMP envisioned a MBSLC storage structure which will be shifted to the roadside of Sidmouth Street. This places it on reserve land vacated by the Watercare pump station (as illustrated in Figure 3).

32.     The MBSLC is, in the interim, currently storing equipment in shipping containers positioned in the south-eastern corner of the reserve. The MBSLC has an existing Landowner Approval agreement with council.

33.     A permanent storage location will be canvassed with the community as part of the management plan review process.

Montrose Terrace and associated parking relocation

34.     The T&T report indicated that Montrose Terrace, and the associated car parking, will need to be relocated from its existing location adjacent to the beach, to a location proposed further inland within the reserve. The T&T report confirmed that the road’s location is also within the erosion susceptibility area 2070. See Figure 3 below.

35.     This proposed realignment of the road better connects the reserve to the beach and provides an extended beachfront reserve. Shifting the road inland also increases the coastal buffer in response to sea-level rise, and provides improved pedestrian beach access.

36.     Montrose Terrace is a formed legal road, controlled and managed by Auckland Transport.  Auckland Transport are required to close Montrose Terrace before it can be shifted inland.

37.     Council staff are currently working with Watercare and Auckland Transport on shifting Montrose Terrace and will keep the local board updated on these discussions. This initiative is part of the existing MBRMP.

A screenshot of a computer

Description automatically generated

Figure 3 above – extract from the Tonkin and Taylor Shoreline Management Options Report 2022, showing the concept plan from the existing Reserve Management Plan, with erosion susceptibility layers for the next 50 and 100 years overlain.

38.     Since the MBRMP was approved in 2015, there has been a change in approach by council regarding car park provision on reserve land. It is now considered less appropriate, when weighed against the increased competing demands for public open space.

39.     The T&T report also predicts the reserve being reduced in size due to coastal inundation in the future. It is considered that the car park provision under the concept plan could therefore be reduced to maximise public recreation space. This will be an element of the upcoming consultation process.

Plan variation options

40.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board was presented with four options on how the management plan could be varied at a workshop on 21 February 2023 (see paragraph 44 below for further details).

41.     Of the four available options, Option 2 is recommended. Amendment of the concept plan and associated policies is recommended through the variation process as the most effective way to confirm the local board’s shoreline adaptation approach for this reserve. Reviewing and varying the MBRMP is also considered to provide more certainty for the MBSLC, as per the table below.

Proposed scope of the variation

Pros

Cons

Option 1 - Full review of whole MBRMP – not recommended

More thorough than reviewing parts of plan.

 

Inefficient and unnecessary when partial review of relevant policies and concept plan would suffice. Also, there are no operational issues with the majority of the plan, therefore, a review should concentrate on specific areas.

Option 2 - Vary policies relating to coastal processes and spatial aspects of concept plan (triggered by coastal processes) - recommended

Clearly outlining the local board’s shoreline adaptation approach in the management plan. MBSLC also requests security of confirming new locations for their building and storage. This process is to be led by public engagement.

None apparent.

Option 3 - Vary policies relating to coastal processes and remove concept plan from MBRMP – not recommended

Simple to do.

Delays decisions on location of key reserve features, such as MBSLC building, which is included on the existing concept plan.

Including the concept plan (discussed under Option 2) would be more comprehensive and provide clearer direction for the community.

Option 4 - Extend lease of MBSLC building through a notified process under the Reserves Act 1977, without varying the MBRMP – not recommended

The surf club could apply for a new lease and raise different options for a new lease footprint at their convenience.

Confirming a new lease footprint in this way risks inconsistencies with the existing concept plan, which limits the building to a different footprint. Therefore, higher risk of lease not being granted.

 

42.     The other variation options (1, 3 and 4) are not considered appropriate because the majority of the MBRMP is fit for purpose. They would either delay decisions about the location of reserve infrastructure, or would result in leases being inconsistent with the existing MBRMP.

43.     The status quo option, of not varying the MBRMP, is not considered appropriate because it would fail to address the future location of the MBSLC building, or the local board’s approach to shoreline adaption in this reserve.

Reserves Act 1977 process to follow for plan variation

44.     Section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977 requires a two-stage public notification process for preparation and comprehensive review of a reserve management plan. The Reserves Act 1977 also provides greater flexibility for a less than comprehensive review. The first stage is to notify an intention to review/prepare a management plan and seek written suggestions, and the second is to notify the draft plan and invite suggestions or objections, also providing the opportunity to be heard.

45.     Given the potential significant implications for the MBRMP concept plan of removing or relocating key reserve infrastructure, staff recommend that the comprehensive review process is undertaken. High levels of public interest are anticipated, involving many and various stakeholders.

46.     The proposed comprehensive review steps for the MBRMP variation are:

·        notify intention to vary the MBRMP and invite written submissions (this report)

·        face to face engagement with interested parties

·        engagement with mana whenua throughout process

·        preparation of draft variation to the management plan (and included concept plan)

·        notify final draft MBRMP for feedback and invite written submissions

·        hearings process and deliberations

·        approval of final variation to MBRMP by the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

47.     This review is necessitated by the release of the 2022 T&T report that includes recent coastal hazards and climate change information which highlights the threats posed to existing reserve infrastructure and identifies mitigation options.

48.     The MBRMP concept plan and policies are proposed to be updated to reflect the need to relocate key reserve infrastructure to provide longer-term sustainable solutions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

49.     The proposed review of the MBRMP has been discussed widely with and is supported by council units and council-controlled organisations, including Parks and Community Facilities, Resilient Land and Coasts, Legal Services, Watercare and Auckland Transport.   

50.     Realigning the shoreline was recommended by the T&T report as a solution to the coastal issues faced in the reserve and is supported by council staff from Parks and Community Facilities and Resilient Land and Coasts in the Infrastructure and Environmental Services unit.

51.     Staff will continue to work closely with council teams in reviewing the plan, to ensure that it is aligned with council’s other plans regarding parks where possible.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local board views

52.     A memo was provided to the local board in February 2023, seeking feedback on the MBRMP review, engagement approach and notification of the intention to prepare a plan. At a workshop on 21 February 2023, the local board expressed their in principle support to progress the MBRMP review. 

Local impacts

53.     The proposal to consult the public twice on the review, will help ensure that the community views and park issues are fully considered to inform the plan variation.

54.     Mairangi Bay Surf Lifesaving Club members are eager to have the security of a new building footprint. They may wish to present building footprint options further inland during the submission process.

55.     Council will seek the views of neighbours, mana whenua, park users and the wider community during the two rounds of consultation proposed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     The Reserves Act 1977 is one of the acts in the First Schedule to the Conservation Act 1987. Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 contains an obligation to give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi (te Tiriti/the Treaty).

57.     As such, in performing functions and duties under the Reserves Act 1977, such as reviewing a reserve management plan, the local board must give effect to the principles of te Tiriti/the Treaty.

58.     The principles of te Tiriti/the Treaty that are likely most relevant in making decisions on the MBRMP are:

·        partnership – mutual good faith and reasonableness

·        informed decision making – being well-informed of the mana whenua interests and views. Consultation is a means to achieve informed decision-making

·        active protection – this involves the active protection of Māori interests retained under te Tiriti/the Treaty. It includes the promise to protect rangatiratanga and taonga.

59.     The Local Government Act 2002 also contains obligations to Māori, including to facilitate Māori participation in council decision-making processes (sections 4; 14(1)(d); 81(1)(a)).

60.     Ongoing involvement of all interested mana whenua in the review of the MBRMP will be encouraged to:

·        enable te ao Māori to be incorporated into the management of the Mairangi Bay Reserves local parks network; and

·        provide an opportunity for mana whenua to express their kaitiaki role.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

61.     There will be an operational cost to revising the MBRMP, and initial estimates suggest approximately $30,000 to $40,000 will be required to facilitate this process.

62.     The local board allocated $30,000 in 2022/2023 to cover costs associated with the project. This cost will include covering public notification, mana whenua and community engagement, specialist technical advice and hearings.

63.     Costs associated with this project will be met through a mixture of local board budget from 2022/2023 carried forward and surplus funded from available regional budget in 2023/2024. Carry forwards and budgets are being confirmed as part of work programme development for 2023/2024.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     Staff undertook a risk assessment as part of the preparation for the plan variation. The following table outlines the most significant risks and mitigation steps.

IF <event>

THEN <impact>

Possible mitigations

If the community are having to engage with council over multiple topics at the same time

Then the community may not provide feedback on how they would like the park managed in the future. This means that the plan variation may not accurately reflect community aspirations

·    align with other engagement activity where possible to make it easy for the community to participate

·    use multiple engagement channels to reach the community, including those people who do not normally take up the opportunity to engage

·    review results of engagement activities that have been undertaken recently, to see if feedback has been given that is relevant for the development of the plan.

If the plan variation process raises community expectations about funding availability, especially for the new surf club building

The community may potentially have unrealistic expectations regarding the council possibly funding a new surf club building

·    to manage community expectations, consultation material can explain, that securing funding for facility development is not within scope of the proposed plan variation process. Once the plan variation is adopted, this would trigger implementation planning, including investigation of funding streams as required by the MBSLC.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     Next steps to vary the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan include:

·        publicly notifying the intention to vary the management plan for at least one month, starting in July/August 2023

·        initiating engagement and partnership with mana whenua

·        commencing targeted engagement with key stakeholders. 

 

66.     To support the public notice, key messaging around the plan variation will need to be drafted, explaining to the community why the management plan review is being proposed, and which sections of the plan are likely to be reviewed.

67.     Suggestions from the first round of consultation will be given full consideration in preparing the plan variation.

68.     It is estimated that the draft Mairangi Bay Reserves Management Plan variation will be available for public consultation around October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan (2015) (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Mairangi Bay Shoreline Management Options report (2022) (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Extent of reserve map (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tommo Cuthbert-Ashmore - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services & Strategy

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for quarter three 2022/2023

File No.: CP2023/08237

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the local board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2022/2023 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this period include (but are not limited to):

i)        ID 692: Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration: the contractors continue to engage with a number of community organisations across the area. Their focus has been in Campbells Bay Rothesay Bay, Taiotea Creek, Ara Weiti, Okura Bush, Stanmore Bay, Nukumea Stream, Otanerua Stream and Silverdale Tributary (Ōrewa Estuary). Part of their work has included supporting restoration organisations to do storm damage checks after the 2023 storms, and to help restoration groups to adapt their restoration plans in response to the damage. Additionally, they have run fish identification sessions, water quality testing sessions, saline wedge surveys. They have also worked with Stanmore Bay school, Whangaparāoa School and are planning to work with Nukumea School and Silverdale Primary. In addition, they ran a workshop at the Okura Forest Festival.

ii)       ID 507: Te Ao Māori and community led conservation: continuing engagement with Ngāti Manuhiri to organise and deliver further cultural inductions with local community members, which will be delivered before the end of this financial year. Conversations continue to be very positive, with high engagement, maintaining a very strong relationship. These inductions will build on the sessions last year, continuing to improve group community understanding of te ao Māori. The funding agreement has now been written. Good discussions continue with Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara in establishing content to deliver cultural inductions. Internal change processes continue within this iwi, which has slowed conversations.

iii)      ID 32099: Aicken Reserve - install walkway lighting: detailed design has been received and the local board were provided with an update in the February 2023 monthly local board report. Vector has been engaged to install a new single-phase pit to supply power to the new lights.

iv)      ID 175: Apply the Empowered Communities Approach – connecting communities Hibiscus and Bays: this work has been refocused on Community Resilience planning for Hibiscus and Bays to ensure that resilience networks (four in total) can begin to formulate emergency response plan - two in each subdivision.

 

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activity is reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        ID 694: HB: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two: Interpretive text has not yet been received from iwi.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has an approved 2022/2023 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        External Partnerships: Business Associations.

7.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet local board plan 2020 outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

A picture containing text, screenshot, display, font

Description automatically generated

Storm events

8.       On Auckland anniversary weekend, an unprecedented storm event caused flash floods and other impacts on lives, homes, possessions and businesses. This led to the declaration of a local State of Emergency on 27 January 2023.  On 12 - 14 February 2023, another major storm event, Cyclone Gabrielle, followed. A National state of emergency was invoked as thousands of people were displaced, with widespread damages across large parts of the North Island.

9.       A National State of Emergency was declared on 14 February 2023, with the region transitioning to recovery mode from Friday 3 March 2023.

10.     Some local community facilities were affected by the flooding including Ōrewa library, Ōrewa Community Centre, East Coast Bays Community Centre and Mairangi Arts Centre, and one local community facility, Stanmore Bay Leisure Centre, was used as Civil Defence Centre (CDC).

11.     Impacts to individual activities are reported in the work programme update (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

A picture containing text, screenshot, font, diagram

Description automatically generated

13.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

          A picture containing text, screenshot, display, number

Description automatically generated

Key activity updates from quarter three

14.     Key updates in the delivery of the local board work programmes for quarter three include:

i)        ID 180: Develop a resilient youth ecosystem across the Hibiscus and Bays area: the focus for this year has been supporting the Social Lab and Youth-Led initiatives. In this quarter we have the development of the Hoops and Life event which has been moved to next financial year due to storms but planning and local connections are underway now. We are also supporting the development of a network for youth providers in the Hibiscus Coast to provide the same support and connection offered through Bays in Action in East Coast Bays

ii)       ID 24353: Hibiscus and Bays – Ngahere Urban Forest Strategy – Implement Planting Plan: planting plans are being updated for Everard Reserve and Whenua-roa – D’Oyly Reserve and trees ordered

iii)      ID 724: Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure: the Mountains to Sea Trust have started delivery of the programme in four schools/early childhood education centres (Puawai Montessori, Rangitoto Kindergarten, Sherwood Primary, Stanmore Bay Kindergarten). There is still one space available, the contractor is in discussion with two early childhood education centres. Dates for three celebration events have been booked

iv)      ID 26010: 86 Harvest Ave, Orewa - develop new neighbourhood park: Mana whenua engagement is ongoing for collaboration during design phases. Preparation of concept design for second round of community consultation is underway

v)      ID 16475: (OLI) Kohu Street to Marine View, Orewa Beach - renew northern seawall: Topographical surveying of the site is complete. Analysis of the geotechnical and survey data has commenced.

Activities with significant issues

15.     There is one work programme line that has a red status: ID 694: HB: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two: Interpretive text has not yet been received from iwi. Work is progressing for this project and the local board were notified of the delay in a workshop on 14 March 2023 where staff also discussed tranche 2 sites for naming.

Activities on hold

16.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        ID 18071: Hibiscus and Bays - deliver Centre Plan improvements. This project is on hold until future years.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

17.     These activities are deferred from the current work programme into future years:

·        ID 3237: Mairangi Bay Beach Reserve: Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club (community lease): this item has been deferred until new coastal management plan has been completed and resolved through Service and Asset Planning team.

Cancelled activities

18.     These activities are cancelled:

·        ID 3481: Hibiscus Coast indoor recreation facility options analysis: this activity has been cancelled and budget offered as savings. Metro Park East has previously been identified as the preferred location for any additional indoor recreation provision to replace the old Silverdale Bowling Club. Direction was given by the local board at the 21 March workshop to stop this work programme item and reallocate the $25,000 funding

·        ID 186: Local civic events Hibiscus and Bays: no activity occurred as no civic events were scheduled in quarter three. Funds from this line were re-allocated at a local board business meeting on 28 February to lines 172: operational grant top up to Centrestage Theatre and 182: operational grant top up to Estuary Arts Centre (resolution number HB/2023/12).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

20.     Work programmes were approved in June 2022 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

21.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        ID 480: Restore Hibiscus and Bays Coordinator

·        ID 64: Pest Free Hibiscus Coast

·        ID 721: Zero Waste Early Childhood Education Programme

·        ID 572: Eco-Neighbourhoods Hibiscus and Bays

·        ID 65: Pest plans on private land Okura

·        ID 724: Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure

·        ID 1113: Taonga tuku iho - Legacy - we preserve our past, ensure our future (environment) Hibiscus and Bays.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     This report informs the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 provides a commitment framework through the development of initiatives that respond to Māori aspirations. The following activities have a Māori outcome focus:

·        ID 507: Te Ao Māori and community led conservation

·        ID 174: Māori responsiveness Hibiscus and Bays

·        ID 694: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche two

·        ID 1105: Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori - Hibiscus and Bays

·        ID 175: Apply the Empowered Communities Approach – connecting communities Hibiscus and Bays.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     This report is provided to enable the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2022/2023 work programme. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

26.     At 31 March 2023, Locally Driven Initiatives operational projects were $305,000 below budget, and are mostly on track for delivery by year end. All other operating expenditure totaled $696,000 below budget. Operating revenue exceeded budget by $532,000, driven by higher than anticipated patronage numbers at the Stanmore Bay pool and leisure Centre.

27.     Capital spend of $5 million was above the total year to date budget of $3.7 million. Most of this was investment in the renewal of local community assets, which totaled $4.1 million capital spend to date. Delivery progress on individual projects can be found in the work programme update (Attachment A).

28.     The complete Hibiscus and Bays Local Board financial performance report for the 9 months ended 31 March 2023 can be found in Attachment B to the agenda report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

30.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

31.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board: 1 January - 31 March 2023 Work Programme update (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board: Quarter Three Operating Performance Financial Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Saskia Coley – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

Delegated decision: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Work Programme Reallocations FY2022/2023

File No.: CP2023/08084

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To acknowledge that a decision was made under delegated authority by Gary Brown, chairperson, and Julia Parfitt, deputy chairperson, on the 22 May 2023 for the final reallocations of budget underspends confirmed in the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Work Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 22 May 2023 the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board was provided a memo (Attachment A to the agenda report), which provided information for the proposed reallocation of underspends within the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Work Programme

3.       The memo noted staff identified underspends of $35,000 from three activities within the current operational work programme and recommended a reallocation of the underspends to two community partners operational top up lines, including Estuary Arts Centre and Centrestage Theatre, to address the risk of future budget constraints limiting budget allocations to these groups and impacting on their capacity to sufficiently cater to local board community needs in FY2023/2024.

4.       This was approved by the chairperson and deputy chairperson using delegated authority resolved on at the 28 February 2023 local board business meeting (HB/2023/12) and included as Attachment B to the agenda report.

5.       This report is to formally record the decision made under delegation for the reallocations of underspend in the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Work Programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the decision made under delegated authority by Gary Brown, chairperson and Julia Parfitt, deputy chairperson, on the 22 May 2023 for the final reallocations of budget underspends confirmed in the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Work Programme to operational grants for community organisations, including Estuary Arts Centre and Centrestage Theatre.

 


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Work Programme reallocations 2022/2023 memo

51

b

Delegated decision - May 2023

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Saskia Coley – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

A picture containing text, screenshot, font, document

Description automatically generated

A picture containing text, screenshot, font, parallel

Description automatically generated

A screenshot of a document

Description automatically generated with low confidence


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

A picture containing text, letter, screenshot, font

Description automatically generated


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa - Policy Schedule June 2023

File No.: CP2023/06872

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for June 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule, a schedule of items that will come before the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at business meetings over the coming months.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is included as attachment A to the agenda report.

4.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

5.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed, and the schedule is subject to change.  Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for June 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa - Policy Schedule for June 2023

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

A close-up of a document

Description automatically generated with low confidence


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2023/06875

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for June 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the workshop records for June 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for June 2023

63

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

A picture containing text, screenshot, font, document

Description automatically generated

A picture containing text, screenshot, font, number

Description automatically generated

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Presentation - The future of Metro Park          Page 69

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Presentation - Stillwater Boating Club            Page 81

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Presentation - Te Herenga Waka o Orewa Cultural Centre Development                                        Page 85

Item 9.1      Attachment a    Presentation - Keeping Kauri Kids                  Page 95



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 












A screenshot of a phone

Description automatically generated with medium confidence


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 





Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

27 June 2023

 

 





[1] This naturalisation process involves reducing maintenance of the existing seawall over time and removing it entirely as it reaches the end of its asset life. The strategy, accompanied by planting of the coastal interface, would naturalise the transition between land and sea.