Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN MINUTES

 

 

 

Minutes of a meeting of the Waitematā Local Board held in the Waitematā Local Board Office, Ground Floor, 33 Federal Street, Auckland on Tuesday, 19 September 2023 at 1.00pm.

 

Te Hunga kua Tae mai | present

 

Chairperson

Genevieve Sage

 

Deputy Chairperson

Greg Moyle, (JP, ED)

Via electronic link until 3.47pm, Item 15.

Members

Allan Matson

 

 

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

 

Anahera Rawiri

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

Via electronic link until 3.47pm, item 15.

 

Te Hunga Kāore i Tae Mai | ABSENT

 

Member

Alexandra Bonham

 

 

 

Te Hunga Āpiti kua Tae mai | ALSO PRESENT

 

Councillor

Mike Lee

Until 2.48pm, Item 8.1.

 

Councillor

Julie Fairey

Via electronic link from 2.32pm, Item 12.

 

 

He Hunga atu anō i Tae mai | IN ATTENDANCE

 

Elected Member Relationship Partner

Jennifer Fraser

Via electronic link.

 


Waitematā Local Board

19 September 2023

 

 

 

1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

Chairperson Sage welcomed those present and opened the meeting with a karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/45

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Matson:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          accept the apology from Member A Bonham for absence.

b)         accept the apology from Deputy Chair G Moyle for lateness.

CARRIED

Note: Member A Bonham is absent to attend graduation to recevive her doctorate. Deputy Chair Moyle subsequently entered the meeting at 2.08pm via electronic link.

Resolution number WTM/2023/46

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Matson:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

c)          approve the request for electronic attendance from Deputy Chair Moyle and Member Trotman to accommodate the members at a place that makes their physical presence at the meeting impossible or impracticable.

CARRIED

 

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/47

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Matson:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 15 August 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

CARRIED

Note: Pursuant to Standing Order 1.9.7, Member S Trotman requested that her dissenting vote be recorded.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

There were no leaves of absence.

 

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

The Waitematā Local Board would like to acknowledge the Western Springs Football Club Women’s Team for winning the Kate Sheppard Cup, the National Knockout Competition for Women’s Football Teams.

The Waitematā Local Board would also like to acknowledge and commemorate Suffrage Day 2023. This year we celebrate 130 years of women voting in New Zealand.

The Waitematā Local Board would also like to acknowledge the passing of Clive Cooper-Smith, the Chair of the Ponsonby Community Centre Board.

Note: Pursuant to Standing Order 1.1.1 Precedence of business, moved by Chair G Sage, seconded by Member R Northey, Item 11 – Ward Councillor's Update to be taken before Item 7 – Petitions.

 

11

Ward Councillor's Update

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/48

MOVED by Member A Rawiri, seconded by Member R Northey:  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update from Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

CARRIED

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

There were no petitions.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

8.1

Deputation - Cheryl Adamson - Parnell Business Association

 

Cheryl Adamson and Roger Burton were in attendance to speak to the board about the proposed cycleway in Parnell Town Centre.

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/49

MOVED by Member A Rawiri, seconded by Member A Matson:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          receive the presentation from the Parnell Business Association, noting their objection about the proposed cycleway in Parnell Town Centre and thank Cheryl Adamson and Roger Burton for their attendance.

b)         refer the presentation to Auckland Transport staff for their awareness.

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

 

8.2

Deputation - Sean Selby - Auckland Regional Public Health Service - Te Whatu Ora

 

Sean Selby and Dr Joanna Strom were in attendance to speak to the board about the impact that traffic speeds have on public health.

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/50

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Rawiri:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          receive the presentation from the Auckland Regional Public Health and thank Sean Selby and Dr Joanna Strom for their attendance.

b)         refer the presentation to Auckland Transport staff for their awareness.

CARRIED

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui  | Public Forum

 

9.1

Boopsie Maran

 

Boopsie Maran was in attendance to speak to the board about safer speeds around schools.

 

A document was tabled in support of this item. The copy of the tabled document has been placed on the official minutes and is available on the Auckland Council website as a minutes attachment.

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/51

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Matson:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          thank Boopsie Maran for her presentation on safer speeds around schools and attendance at the meeting.

CARRIED

 

Attachments

a     19 September 2023, Waitemata Local Board: item 9.1 - Public Forum - Boopsie Maran - safer speeds around schools presentation

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

There was no extraordinary business.

 

Note: item 11 – Ward Councillor Update was considered piror to item 7 – Petitions.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 2.24pm

The meeting reconvened at 2.32pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

Waitematā Local Board Annual Report 2022/2023

 

Sugenthy Thomson, Lead Financial Advisor, Glenn Boyd, Local Area Manager, and Nick Palmisano, Local Board Advisor, were in attendance to speak to the item.

 

A document was tabled in support of this item. The copy of the tabled document has been placed on the official minutes and is available on the Auckland Council website as a minutes attachment.

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/52

MOVED by Member A Rawiri, seconded by Member A Matson:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      adopt the tabled draft 2022/2023 Waitematā Local Board Annual Report.

b)      note that any minor proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 28 September 2023.

CARRIED

 

Attachments

a     19 September 2023, Waitematā Local Board: item 12 - Waitematā Local Board Annual Report 2022/2023 - Waitematā Local Board Annual Report 2022/2023

 

 

13

Local board feedback on Māori seats for Auckland Council

 

MOVED by Member R Northey, seconded by Chairperson G Sage:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          note that it is vital to hear and take account of the voices and views of Mana whenua, Mataawaka and the range of all Auckland residents through thorough consultation, to help inform and determine the Auckland Council’s decisions on this matter. Council should only make changes if there is sufficient public support.

b)          support the introduction of Māori seats for the 2025 local elections.

c)          can reasonably presume that the majority of those people who identify as Māori, particularly those whose identification is so strong that they have chosen to enroll on the Māori Roll, deserve and would value the opportunity to elect, and be represented directly through, a Māori Ward, and provide an authentic Māori voice on their Council.

d)          consider that the Local Government Act, the Auckland Council Act and Te Tiriti o Waitangi, mandate for Council the representation of, communication of, and listening and responding to, the views and voice of Māori. Having Māori seats would clearly be an effective way of enhancing our current ways of doing this, including:

i)           the legislative amendment, made at the end of this Parliamentary session, which raised the maximum allowable number of elected Auckland City Councillor from the current number of twenty, makes it wholly practicable and relatively easy simply to add an appropriately determined number of Māori Ward seats to the composition of the Auckland Council.

ii)          some Māori residents of Waitematā and representatives of iwi that have an accepted connection to the Waitematā Board area and asked for our support for the creation of Māori seats on the Auckland Council.

iii)         other legislative changes, enabling those adults of Māori origin to choose the nature of their roll, whether Māori or General, up to three months before a Parliamentary or Council election, will enable the seats to be elected by people who will have chosen they want to identify with the Māori roll for the specific purpose of electing their Councillor, whether or not they make the same choice of roll identification for Parliament.

e)          support the implementation of the Parliamentary model (Māori wards).

i)           as it has operated in Parliament for over 150 years, it appears to us to be preferable for all of the General and Māori seat Councillors to have the same origin and role, namely that of representing, and being elected by, an equivalent total number of people, whether by those on the general roll or those on the Māori roll.

ii)          the Parliamentary system can be adopted without seeking or waiting for further legislative change, which would be required for the Royal Commission system. Such a law change is unlikely to occur in the event of a National / Act Parliamentary majority. These parties’ MPs strongly opposed the Bill for iwi to appoint two representatives to the Canterbury Regional Council and they have said they would oppose any similar appointments to other Councils.

iii)         it would, in our view, be preferable for the important interests, views and rights of iwi to be pursued through more appropriate channels rather than by making appointments to the Governing Body. These channels include the roles and powers that can be allotted to iwi and hapū through the Natural and Built Environment Act, the Spatial Planning Act, the Local Government Act, Te Tiriti o Waitangi settlements made in Tāmaki Makaurau, and several other laws and regulations.

iv)         the provisions for appointments by iwi to other governing bodies, such as through the water reforms, has proven to be very contentious, and it may well be preferable to gain more general acceptance for Māori seats through having Māori Wards rather than through iwi appointments.

f)           provide the following additional feedback:

i)           agree that the Auckland Council to be elected in 2025 should, in our view, retain the current number of 20 General Ward Councilors as this could justify, on population grounds, the creation of two Māori wards. Two Māori Wards would fall just under the less than ten per cent population ratio normally required but the Local Government Commission Chair told the LGNZ Conference that they would be prepared to relax the less than ten per cent rule. Having two Māori Ward Councillors would ensure that their geographical area and diversity of rohe of iwi in each ward was manageable, would provide mutual cultural and personal support and a potential seconder for any resolutions, to enable them to be discussed. For a Council of Auckland’s population size and diversity this overall number of Ward Councillors is desirable to retain democratic representation and ability to connect with large numbers of people.

ii)          agree that the Auckland Council should seek a legislative amendment to enable Local Boards to have Māori Wards in the circumstances where the local board seeks the creation of such wards and the numbers of people represented by the Māori roll in that Board area would otherwise meet the legislative requirements to justify the creation of a Māori ward or wards. This would enable a democratic right for the people and their elected representatives to determine whether having Māori seats would enhance the interests of their Board area.

iii)         consider that were Māori seats to be created by the Auckland Council, that should not, in itself, make the Independent Māori Statutory Board redundant. The IMSB’s role to advance the interests of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau extends beyond its representation on Council Committees and includes ensuring Auckland Council acts in accordance with statutory provisions relating to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. It has often provided valuable researched information and a voice for Māori, which has informed and enhanced the decisions of the Auckland Council. Whether the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) should be retained, and in what appropriate form and roles, should be decided after a review of the IMSB consulted on and undertaken after decisions are made on the Māori seats issue.

 

The motion was put in parts.

 

a)          note that it is vital to hear and take account of the voices and views of Mana whenua, Mataawaka and the range of all Auckland residents through thorough consultation, to help inform and determine the Auckland Council’s decisions on this matter. Council should only make changes if there is sufficient public support.

 

The motion was put to the vote by a show of hands and was declared carried by 7 votes to 0.

 

b)          support the introduction of Māori seats for the 2025 local elections.

A division was called for, voting on which was as follows:

For

Member R Northey

Member A Rawiri

Against

Member A Matson

Deputy Chairperson G Moyle

Chairperson G Sage

Member S Trotman

Abstained

 

The motion was declared lost by 2 votes to 4.

 

c)          can reasonably presume that the majority of those people who identify as Māori, particularly those whose identification is so strong that they have chosen to enroll on the Māori Roll, deserve and would value the opportunity to elect, and be represented directly through, a Māori Ward, and provide an authentic Māori voice on their Council.

A division was called for, voting on which was as follows:

For

Member R Northey

Member A Rawiri

Chairperson G Sage

Against

Member A Matson

Deputy Chairperson G Moyle

Member S Trotman

Abstained

 

The motion was declared EQUAL.

The chair exercised her casting vote for, so the motion was Carried.

 

d)          consider that the Local Government Act, the Auckland Council Act and Te Tiriti o Waitangi, mandate for Council the representation of, communication of, and listening and responding to, the views and voice of Māori. Having Māori seats would clearly be an effective way of enhancing our current ways of doing this, including:

i)           the legislative amendment, made at the end of this Parliamentary session, which raised the maximum allowable number of elected Auckland City Councillor from the current number of twenty, makes it wholly practicable and relatively easy simply to add an appropriately determined number of Māori Ward seats to the composition of the Auckland Council.

ii)          some Māori residents of Waitematā and representatives of iwi that have an accepted connection to the Waitematā Board area and asked for our support for the creation of Māori seats on the Auckland Council.

iii)         other legislative changes, enabling those adults of Māori origin to choose the nature of their roll, whether Māori or General, up to three months before a Parliamentary or Council election, will enable the seats to be elected by people who will have chosen they want to identify with the Māori roll for the specific purpose of electing their Councillor, whether or not they make the same choice of roll identification for Parliament.

A division was called for, voting on which was as follows:

For

Member R Northey

Member A Rawiri

Chairperson G Sage

Against

Member A Matson

Deputy Chairperson G Moyle

Member S Trotman

Abstained

 

The motion was declared EQUAL.

The chair exercised her casting vote for, so the motion was Carried.

 

e)          support the implementation of the Parliamentary model (Māori wards).

i)           as it has operated in Parliament for over 150 years, it appears to us to be preferable for all of the General and Māori seat Councillors to have the same origin and role, namely that of representing, and being elected by, an equivalent total number of p eople, whether by those on the general roll or those on the Māori roll.

ii)          the Parliamentary system can be adopted without seeking or waiting for further legislative change, which would be required for the Royal Commission system. Such a law change is unlikely to occur in the event of a National / Act Parliamentary majority. These parties’ MPs strongly opposed the Bill for iwi to appoint two representatives to the Canterbury Regional Council and they have said they would oppose any similar appointments to other Councils.

iii)         it would, in our view, be preferable for the important interests, views and rights of iwi to be pursued through more appropriate channels rather than by making appointments to the Governing Body. These channels include the roles and powers that can be allotted to iwi and hapū through the Natural and Built Environment Act, the Spatial Planning Act, the Local Government Act, Te Tiriti o Waitangi settlements made in Tāmaki Makaurau, and several other laws and regulations.

iv)         the provisions for appointments by iwi to other governing bodies, such as through the water reforms, has proven to be very contentious, and it may well be preferable to gain more general acceptance for Māori seats through having Māori Wards rather than through iwi appointments.

A division was called for, voting on which was as follows:

For

Member R Northey

Member A Rawiri

Chairperson G Sage

Against

Member A Matson

Deputy Chairperson G Moyle

Member S Trotman

Abstained

 

The motion was declared EQUAL.

The chair exercised their casting vote for, so the motion was Carried.

 

f)           provide the following additional feedback:

i)           agree that the Auckland Council to be elected in 2025 should, in our view, retain the current number of 20 General Ward Councilors as this could justify, on population grounds, the creation of two Māori wards. Two Māori Wards would fall just under the less than ten per cent population ratio normally required but the Local Government Commission Chair told the LGNZ Conference that they would be prepared to relax the less than ten per cent rule. Having two Māori Ward Councillors would ensure that their geographical area and diversity of rohe of iwi in each ward was manageable, would provide mutual cultural and personal support and a potential seconder for any resolutions, to enable them to be discussed. For a Council of Auckland’s population size and diversity this overall number of Ward Councillors is desirable to retain democratic representation and ability to connect with large numbers of people.

A division was called for, voting on which was as follows:

For

Member R Northey

Member A Rawiri

Against

Member A Matson

Deputy Chairperson G Moyle

Chairperson G Sage

Member S Trotman

Abstained

The motion was declared lost by 2 votes to 4.

 

f)           provide the following additional feedback:

ii)          agree that the Auckland Council should seek a legislative amendment to enable Local Boards to have Māori Wards in the circumstances where the local board seeks the creation of such wards and the numbers of people represented by the Māori roll in that Board area would otherwise meet the legislative requirements to justify the creation of a Māori ward or wards. This would enable a democratic right for the people and their elected representatives to determine whether having Māori seats would enhance the interests of their Board area.

A division was called for, voting on which was as follows:

For

Member R Northey

Member A Rawiri

Chairperson G Sage

Against

Member A Matson

Deputy Chairperson G Moyle

Member S Trotman

Abstained

 

The motion was declared EQUAL.

The chair exercised her casting vote for, so the motion was Carried.

 

f)           provide the following additional feedback:

iii)         consider that were Māori seats to be created by the Auckland Council, that should not, in itself, make the Independent Māori Statutory Board redundant. The IMSB’s role to advance the interests of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau extends beyond its representation on Council Committees and includes ensuring Auckland Council acts in accordance with statutory provisions relating to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. It has often provided valuable researched information and a voice for Māori, which has informed and enhanced the decisions of the Auckland Council. Whether the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) should be retained, and in what appropriate form and roles, should be decided after a review of the IMSB consulted on and undertaken after decisions are made on the Māori seats issue.

A division was called for, voting on which was as follows:

For

Member R Northey

Member A Rawiri

Chairperson G Sage

Against

Member A Matson

Deputy Chairperson G Moyle

Member S Trotman

Abstained

 

The motion was declared EQUAL.

The chair exercised her casting vote for, so the motion was Carried.

 

The chairperson put the substantive motion.

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/53

MOVED by Member R Northey, seconded by Chairperson G Sage:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          note that it is vital to hear and take account of the voices and views of mana whenua, mataawaka and the range of all Auckland residents through thorough consultation, to help inform and determine the Auckland Council’s decisions on this matter. Council should only make changes if there is sufficient public support.

b)         can reasonably presume that the majority of those people who identify as Māori, particularly those whose identification is so strong that they have chosen to enroll on the Māori Roll, deserve and would value the opportunity to elect, and be represented directly through, a Māori Ward, and provide an authentic Māori voice on their Council.

c)          consider that the Local Government Act, the Auckland Council Act and Te Tiriti o Waitangi, mandate for Council the representation of, communication of, and listening and responding to, the views and voice of Māori. Having Māori seats would clearly be an effective way of enhancing our current ways of doing this, including:

i)           the legislative amendment, made at the end of this Parliamentary session, which raised the maximum allowable number of elected Auckland City Councillor from the current number of twenty, makes it wholly practicable and relatively easy simply to add an appropriately determined number of Māori Ward seats to the composition of the Auckland Council.

ii)         some Māori residents of Waitematā and representatives of iwi that have an accepted connection to the Waitematā Board area and asked for our support for the creation of Māori seats on the Auckland Council.

iii)        other legislative changes, enabling those adults of Māori origin to choose the nature of their roll, whether Māori or General, up to three months before a Parliamentary or Council election, will enable the seats to be elected by people who will have chosen they want to identify with the Māori roll for the specific purpose of electing their Councillor, whether or not they make the same choice of roll identification for Parliament.

d)         support the implementation of the Parliamentary model (Māori wards).

i)           as it has operated in Parliament for over 150 years, it appears to us to be preferable for all of the General and Māori seat Councillors to have the same origin and role, namely that of representing, and being elected by, an equivalent total number of people, whether by those on the general roll or those on the Māori roll.

ii)         the Parliamentary system can be adopted without seeking or waiting for further legislative change, which would be required for the Royal Commission system. Such a law change is unlikely to occur in the event of a National / Act Parliamentary majority. These parties’ MPs strongly opposed the Bill for iwi to appoint two representatives to the Canterbury Regional Council and they have said they would oppose any similar appointments to other Councils.

iii)        it would, in our view, be preferable for the important interests, views and rights of iwi to be pursued through more appropriate channels rather than by making appointments to the Governing Body. These channels include the roles and powers that can be allotted to iwi and hapū through the Natural and Built Environment Act, the Spatial Planning Act, the Local Government Act, Te Tiriti o Waitangi made in Tāmaki Makaurau, and several other laws and regulations.

iv)        the provisions for appointments by iwi to other governing bodies, such as through the water reforms, has proven to be very contentious, and it may well be preferable to gain more general acceptance for Māori seats through having Māori Wards rather than through iwi appointments.

e)          provide the following additional feedback:

i)           agree that the Auckland Council should seek a legislative amendment to enable Local Boards to have Māori Wards in the circumstances where the local board seeks the creation of such wards and the numbers of people represented by the Māori roll in that Board area would otherwise meet the legislative requirements to justify the creation of a Māori ward or wards. This would enable a democratic right for the people and their elected representatives to determine whether having Māori seats would enhance the interests of their Board area.

ii)         consider that were Māori seats to be created by the Auckland Council, that should not, in itself, make the Independent Māori Statutory Board redundant. The IMSB’s role to advance the interests of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau extends beyond its representation on Council Committees and includes ensuring Auckland Council acts in accordance with statutory provisions relating to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. It has often provided valuable researched information and a voice for Māori, which has informed and enhanced the decisions of the Auckland Council. Whether the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) should be retained, and in what appropriate form and roles, should be decided after a review of the IMSB consulted on and undertaken after decisions are made on the Māori seats issue.

CARRIED

 

 

14

Funding Auckland's Storm Recovery and Resilience

 

Glenn Boyd, Local Area Manager, was in attendance to speak to the item.

 

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member R Northey:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          note that input is being sought from local boards at the same time as public consultation due to the very tight timelines involved and the need to provide certainty for impacted Aucklanders

b)          support the proposal outlined, incorporating repairs to the roading network, the Making Space for Water Strategy and the buyout of Category Three homes, acknowledging that somewhat more than half of the funding will come from Central Government and that this funding will allow Auckland to proceed with much needed work as soon as possible.

c)          support all elements of the proposal, but particularly the Making Space for Water strategy, which will make Aucklanders safer and the city more resilient while also improving biodiversity and wellbeing through the creation of blue-green corridors.

d)          note that, while it is important to help fund people to move out of dangerous properties, there are a number of issues to consider in establishing a robust, equitable methodology that spreads the risk and responsibility across all players involved in the property sector including banks and insurance companies. It is also necessary to encourage prudence and avoid creating moral hazards. The Waitematā Local Board recommends:

i)           that category 3 properties are bought out where building again on the land is imprudent because the risk of living there is intolerably high. Having been bought out it is essential that these sites are rezoned as park land, public open space or reserve.

ii)          consider that only primary homes are covered for Council buy out. This should also include apartments that might be counted as commercial by insurers because they are run by a body corporate.

iii)         consider that the government’s buy out price be based on a percentage of land value (not improvements), for example 80% of land value.

iv)         consider that insurance companies pay out owners at the amount of rebuilding costs, to the level agreed in policies, which the owner can use to build or buy elsewhere.

v)          consider that the Governing Body advocate to Central Government to demand the banks to write off a large proportion of outstanding mortgage debt, for example 80 or 90% (after buy out and insurance income for category 3 residential properties and any other residences, primary or secondary, where the risk for occupation is intolerably high.

vi)         consider that banks should still be encouraged to make loans to category 2 homes to make them more resilient. Homeowners, insurers, banks and councils need to work together in this regard.

vii)       note that, in addition to (iv), where owner occupiers of category 3 homes are left with nothing, a fixed sum is offered (around the sum of a deposit for a median house price), or the equity they had in their home (whichever is the lower). This should apply where the home is insured or where the owners have evidence that they had insurance within the last two years and evidence that over this time insurance companies have refused to reinsure a building. This would apply to some multi-unit developments that are categorized as commercial because they have a body corporate.

viii)      note that the balance of any shortfall is borne by property owners.

e)          provide the following additional feedback:

i)           note that it is necessary to encourage good decision making going forward to reduce risk.

ii)          note that information about risk to property is prominent in sales information and LIMs and includes information about, and links to, the Auckland Council hazard map.

iii)         note that Council valuations (CVs) and their methodology are reviewed to ensure they reflect natural hazards in the land value, particularly around category 2 properties and areas.

iv)         recommend that planning tools, policy, advocacy to central government and incentives are leveraged systematically to avoid building occurring in areas of risk.

v)          recommend that natural hazards continue to be a qualifying matter for intensification in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

 

MOVED by Member A Matson, seconded by Member S Trotman, an amendment to the original motion:

d)          note that, while it is important to help fund people to move out of dangerous properties, there are a number of issues to consider in establishing a robust, equitable methodology that spreads the risk and responsibility across all players involved in the property sector including banks and insurance companies. It is also necessary to encourage prudence and avoid creating moral hazards. The Waitematā Local Board recommends:

v)          consider that the Governing Body advocate to Central Government to encourage the banks to write off a large proportion of outstanding mortgage debt, after buy out and insurance income for category 3 residential properties and any other residences, primary or secondary, where the risk for occupation is intolerably high.

A division was called for, voting on which was as follows:

For

Member A Matson

Deputy Chairperson G Moyle

Member A Rawiri

Chairperson G Sage

Member S Trotman

Against

Member R Northey

Abstained

 

The motion was declared carried by 5 votes to 1.

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/54

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member R Northey:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          note that input is being sought from local boards at the same time as public consultation due to the very tight timelines involved and the need to provide certainty for impacted Aucklanders.

b)         support the proposal outlined, incorporating repairs to the roading network, the Making Space for Water Strategy and the buyout of Category Three homes, acknowledging that somewhat more than half of the funding will come from Central Government and that this funding will allow Auckland to proceed with much needed work as soon as possible.

c)          support all elements of the proposal, but particularly the Making Space for Water strategy, which will make Aucklanders safer and the city more resilient while also improving biodiversity and wellbeing through the creation of blue-green corridors.

d)         note that, while it is important to help fund people to move out of dangerous properties, there are a number of issues to consider in establishing a robust, equitable methodology that spreads the risk and responsibility across all players involved in the property sector including banks and insurance companies. It is also necessary to encourage prudence and avoid creating moral hazards. The Waitematā Local Board recommends:

i)           that category 3 properties are bought out where building again on the land is imprudent because the risk of living there is intolerably high. Having been bought out it is essential that these sites are rezoned as park land, public open space or reserve.

ii)         consider that only primary homes are covered for Council buy out. This should also include apartments that might be counted as commercial by insurers because they are run by a body corporate.

iii)        consider that the government’s buy out price be based on a percentage of land value (not improvements), for example 80% of land value.

iv)        consider that insurance companies pay out owners at the amount of rebuilding costs, to the level agreed in policies, which the owner can use to build or buy elsewhere.

v)         consider that the Governing Body advocate to Central Government to encourage the banks to write off a large proportion of outstanding mortgage debt, after buy out and insurance income for category 3 residential properties and any other residences, primary or secondary, where the risk for occupation is intolerably high.

vi)        consider that banks should still be encouraged to make loans to category 2 homes to make them more resilient. Homeowners, insurers, banks and councils need to work together in this regard.

vii)      note that, in addition to (iv), where owner occupiers of category 3 homes are left with nothing, a fixed sum is offered (around the sum of a deposit for a median house price), or the equity they had in their home (whichever is the lower). This should apply where the home is insured or where the owners have evidence that they had insurance within the last two years and evidence that over this time insurance companies have refused to reinsure a building. This would apply to some multi-unit developments that are categorized as commercial because they have a body corporate.

viii)     note that the balance of any shortfall is borne by property owners.

e)          provide the following additional feedback:

i)           note that it is necessary to encourage good decision making going forward to reduce risk.

ii)         note that information about risk to property is prominent in sales information and LIMs and includes information about, and links to, the Auckland Council hazard map.

iii)        note that Council valuations (CVs) and their methodology are reviewed to ensure they reflect natural hazards in the land value, particularly around category 2 properties and areas.

iv)        recommend that planning tools, policy, advocacy to central government and incentives are leveraged systematically to avoid building occurring in areas of risk.

v)         recommend that natural hazards continue to be a qualifying matter for intensification in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

CARRIED

 

Deputy Chairperson G Moyle left the meeting at 3.47pm.

Member S Trotman left the meeting at 3.47pm.

 

15

Local board feedback on Emergency Management Bill

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/55

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member R Northey:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          delegate to Member A Bonham to provide the local board input to the development of Auckland Council’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill by 29 September 2023.

CARRIED

 

 

 

16

Local board feedback into the council submission to Fisheries New Zealand on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/56

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Rawiri:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          delegate to Member A Bonham to provide the local board feedback on proposed bottom fishing restrictions in the Hauraki Gulf by 29 September 2023.

CARRIED

 

 

17

Local board feedback into the council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/57

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Rawiri:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          delegate to Member A Bonham to provide the local board feedback on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to be incorporated into the Auckland Council’s submission to the Environment Select Committee by 29 September 2023.

CARRIED

 

 

18

Submissions and feedback on the draft Waitematā Local Board Plan 2023

 

Nick Palmisano – Local Board Advisor – was in attendance to speak to the item.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/58

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Matson:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          receive submissions and feedback on the draft Waitematā Local Board Plan 2023.

b)         thank the constituents and organisations, including businesses, BIDs and all those who submitted feedback for the draft Waitematā Local Board Plan 2023.

c)          note that the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2023 Summary of Feedback document (Attachment A) will be available on the Auckland Council Have Your Say page.

d)          note the key themes identified in the public feedback including:

(i)             support for positive climate action and environmental restoration programmes.

(ii)            recognition that the plan had accurately captured the appropriate needs and concerns of the community.

(iii)          support for the recognition of the importance of heritage, character and unique features of the local board area.

(iv)          support for the increased focus on people, including disabled people, community connection, and opportunities to engage, attend events, and participate in well maintained parks and open spaces.

(v)            for parks and open spaces, submitters supported the focus on biodiversity, protection of mature trees, and building natural hazard resilience to climate change events.

(vi)          greater support for arts and creative sector programmes to improve community outcomes.

(vii)         retention and protection of existing assets such as Freemans Bay Community Hall, Grey Lynn library and Leys institute.

(viii)       support for the delivery of the Ponsonby Park project at 254 Ponsonby Road.

(ix)          encourage kaitiaki and volunteers to be more active and involved in the community and deliver for themselves.

CARRIED

 

 

19

Feedback under delegation - Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/59

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member R Northey:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the local board feedback in Attachment B to the agenda report provided through approved urgent decision delegation on the proposed direction of the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024.

CARRIED

 

 

20

Feedback under delegation - Draft Future Development Strategy

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/60

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Matson:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the local board feedback in Attachment A to the agenda report provided under delegation on the draft Future Development Strategy.

CARRIED

 

 

21

Chairperson's Report

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/61

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Rawiri:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Waitematā Local Board Chairperson’s Report for September 2023.

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

Board Members' Reports

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/62

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Rawiri:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          receive the written reports from Member A Bonham and Member R Northey for September 2023.

b)         receive the verbal reports from Member A Matson and Member A Rawiri.

CARRIED

 

 

23

Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/63

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Rawiri:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Waitematā Local Board workshop records for the workshops held on 8 August, 22 August, 29 August, 5 September and 12 September 2023.

CARRIED

 

 

24

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

Resolution number WTM/2023/64

MOVED by Chairperson G Sage, seconded by Member A Rawiri:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the September 2023 governance forward work calendar as attached to the agenda report.

CARRIED


25        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

There was no consideration of extraordinary items.

 

 

 

 

4.20 pm                                              The chairperson thanked members for their attendance and attention to business and declared the meeting closed.

 

CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD AT A MEETING OF THE Waitematā Local Board HELD ON

 

 

 

DATE:.........................................................................

 

 

 

CHAIRPERSON:.......................................................