I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday 26 September 2023

10:00am

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board office
2 Glen Road
Browns Bay

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

Members

Jake Law

Victoria Short

 

Sam Mills

Gregg Walden

 

Alexis Poppelbaum, JP

Leanne Willis

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

 

Louise Healy

Democracy Advisor

 

21 September 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 021 419 205

Email: louise.healy@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Manly Bowling Club                                                                       5

8.2     Deputation - Rodney District Sports                                                                  6

8.3     Deputation - Heatstroke: climate change killer                                                6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      7

9.1     Public Forum - The Esplanade footpath extension                                          7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              7

11        Approval for renaming a section of a public road at 17 Small Road, Silverdale   9

12        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Work Programme Reallocation - September 2023                                                                                                                                       17

13        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report 2022/2023                                    29

14        Chairperson's report (Covering report)                                                                    47

15        Local board feedback on Emergency Management Bill                                         49

16        Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park – Fisheries New Zealand discussion paper                                                                 59

17        Local board feedback into the council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee                                67

18        Funding Auckland's Storm Recovery and Resilence                                              75

19        Biodiversity Credit System – central government discussion document            83

20        Hōtaka Kaupapa - Policy Schedule August 2023                                                     89

21        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records                                                93

22        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of

            Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday 12 September 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Manly Bowling Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Andy Dorrance from Manly Bowling Club has requested a deputation to update the local board on the club’s future plans. 

2.       A presentation has been provided and is available as Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Andy Dorrance for his presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Presentation - Proposed Manly Sports Centre............................................ 101

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Rodney District Sports

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Colin Roberts and Dave Adams from Rodney District Sports have requested a deputation to update the local board on the club’s future plans. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Colin Roberts and Dave Adams for their presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Heatstroke: climate change killer

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Dr Mairi Jay has requested a deputation to address the local board on climate change and the danger of heatstroke.

2.       A presentation and supporting information have been provided and are available as Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Dr Mairi Jay for her presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Presentation - Heatstroke: climate change killer......................................... 123

b          The path from Heat Stress to Heat Stroke................................................... 137

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - The Esplanade footpath extension

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Greer Wilcox has requested public forum time to address the local board regarding the extension of the footpath at The Esplanade, Campbells Bay.

2.       Supporting material has been provided and is available as Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Greer Wilcox for his attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Supporting information................................................................................. 139

 

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Approval for renaming a section of a public road at 17 Small Road, Silverdale

File No.: CP2023/13067

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to rename a section of the public road, Hydrangea Crescent, at the development at 17 Small Road, Silverdale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The applicant/developer, Botanic Partnership Limited, seeks to rename a section of Hydrangea Crescent as approved by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on 16 September 2021 (Resolution HB/2021/115) to become an extension of Pukanui Place.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been generally met. Mana whenua has not been consulted because no new road name is proposed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the renaming of part of the existing public road Hydrangea Crescent, to ‘Pukanui Place’, thereby extending the name of the existing private road, Pukanui Place through to Small Street, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Resource consent (Auckland Council reference SUB60360541) was granted in September 2020 for the subdivision of the site and creation of a public road. Resource consent reference LUC60371766 was issued in June 2021 for a retirement village and private roads.

6.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved six private road names and one public road name for the development in September 2021 (resolution HB/2021/115) which included ‘Hydrangea Crescent’ for the public road and ‘Pukanui Place’ for a private road.

7.       Botanic Partnership Limited has advised that, now that a number of residents have moved in, the layout of Hydrangea Crescent has cause confusion for the residents and therefore Botanic Partnership Limited requests to rename a section of Hydrangea Crescent to ‘Pukanui Place’ so that Pukanui Place would extend to Small Road in the north.

8.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

9.       As per Auckland Council records, the development at 17 Small Road is still currently held under one record of title. Botanic Partnership Limited has advised that they are the owner of the site which contains the retirement complex. No landowners (other than Botanic Partnership Limited) will be affected by the renaming of the road.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.     Assessment: All the name options have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the addressing standards in respect of road naming. While the predominance of the technical standards are considered to have been met, due to the change to the road layout, ‘Hydrangea Crescent’ is no longer a crescent-shaped road and therefore does not comply with the guidelines. Detailed assessment is provided in Paragraphs 13 and 14 below. It is for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

12.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the renaming of the road as proposed is acceptable. This includes the fact that Pukanui Place is a private road whereas the portion of road to be renamed (previously Hydrangea Crescent) is public. Furthermore, council’s property addressing team have confirmed that any changes to property addresses as a result of the renaming can also be accommodated.

13.     Road Type: ‘Place’ is an acceptable road type for the extension of Pukanui Place. As per the guidelines, the road type ‘Crescent’ is generally suitable for an open-ended crescent shaped road. In this case, ‘Hydrangea Crescent’ will no longer be a crescent shaped road and therefore ‘Crescent’ is no longer a suitable road type for this road.

14.     Botanic Partnership Limited was advised to change the road type but has decided not to make any change for the following reasons:

·        retaining the existing road type would limit disruption to the development; and

·        the road type ‘Crescent’ is an acceptable road type as per LINZ guidelines for addressing in retirement villages where ‘Crescent’ has been listed as a suitable road type for an open-ended road.

15.     Consultation: Mana whenua has not been consulted because no new road name is proposed. No consultation with any other property owners was necessary. However, it should be noted that the renaming of the road was initiated from concerns raised by residents of the retirement village.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to. In this instance, no new road name is proposed, therefore no consultation was necessary. 

20.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

22.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Location Map

13

b

Site Plan

15

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Qiuan Wang – Senior Planning Consultant, Align

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Matthew Kerr – Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Work Programme Reallocation - September 2023

File No.: CP2023/12549

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the reallocation of funding within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s 2023/2024 Work Programme to support the operational costs of Kauri Kids Early Learning Childcare Centres in the Hibiscus and Bays area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has withdrawn from the direct provision of Early Childhood Education services as part of the 2023/2024 Annual Budget. The decision to continue or discontinue these services locally was delegated to local boards by the Governing Body.

3.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved to continue funding operational costs from their Locally Driven Initiative Budget for Early Childcare Education services in Browns Bay and Stanmore Bay until 22 December 2023 (resolution HB/2023/94).

4.       A breakdown of the operational budget costs for funding these services has been provided to the local board by way of memo from the General Manager Active Communities on 11 August 2023 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

5.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved its Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024 in July 2023 (resolution HB/2023/100). Within this resolution the following amendment was noted: ii) work programme ID 177: Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays, note the budget figure will be adjusted in response to the confidential decision made at the 25 July 2023 business meeting.

6.       Council staff recommend the local board reallocate funding of $25,623 from work programme ID 177: Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays to a new line titled: Operational Costs: Kauri Kids Early Childcare Education services, to cover the operational cost for both Stanmore Bay ($13,722) and Browns Bay centres ($11,901) until 22 December 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the reallocation of $25,623 from work programme ID 177: Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays to a new line titled: Operational Costs: Kauri Kids Early Childcare Education services, to cover the operational cost for both Stanmore Bay ($13,722) and Browns Bay centres ($11,901) until the 22 December 2023.

Horopaki

Context

7.       As part of development of the 2023/2024 Annual Budget, Auckland Council proposed the withdrawal of the direct provision of Early Childcare Education (ECE) services. This proposal was based on:

·        the small market share held by council, in comparison to the significant market provision across Auckland

·        council’s reasons for market entry no longer existing

·        council’s limited and declining user base, with approximately 300 children enrolled across 10 centres

·        significant ratepayer subsidy per child within six local board areas.

8.       At the Governing Body meeting on 8 June 2023, a resolution (GB/2023/100) was passed to withdraw from the direct provision of ECE as a regional service and enabled local boards to determine whether to continue the service locally.

9.       Council staff met with the six affected local boards including Hibiscus and Bays to understand their service preferences and provide further detail to support decision-making.

10.     At their business meeting on 25 July 2023, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved (resolution HB/2023/94) to:

          g)      whakaae / approve the continuation of the early childhood education services for the remainder of the calendar year (until 22 December 2023) using Locally Driven Initiative opex funding; and allocate the required additional Local Driven Initiative funds in the 2023/2024 financial year work programme, based on a pro-rata calculation and other local board decisions on early childhood education services, to be confirmed by staff

11.     Further work was undertaken by council staff to understand costs to individually impacted local boards and a breakdown of the operational costs for funding two ECE service centres, including Stanmore Bay and Browns Bay until 22 December 2023. This was provided to the local board by way of memo from the General Manager Active Communities (Attachment A to the agenda report).

12.     This memo detailed the decisions of the six local boards who operate ECE services in their area i.e. to withdraw from direct provision of services, to continue the direct provision of ECE services in their board area via a third-party provider with current service funded until 30 June 2024, and in Hibiscus and Bays Local Boards’ case to withdraw from direct provision of service from 22 December 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) costs per centre for each local board

13.     Based on the decisions of the six local boards, ‘table 2’ within the memo (Attachment A) lists how much each local board will need to budget for in the 2023/2024 financial year. The LDI costs cover operations and indirect costs, which include ICT, fleet, marketing, service oversight and compliance.


 

Table 1: Copy of table 2 in the 11 August 2023 Kauri Kids early childhood centres update memo to local boards

Table 2: 2023/2024 LDI requirements

 

Reallocation recommendation

14.     At the Hibiscus and Bays Business Meeting on 25 July 2023, the local board approved its Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024 (resolution HB/2023/100).

15.     Within this resolution the following amendment was noted: ii) work programme ID 177: Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays, note the budget figure will be adjusted in response to the confidential decision made at the 25 July 2023 business meeting (referring to resolution g) in Confidential item 2: Confidential information to support local board decision making on the local provision of ECE of the official minutes).

16.     Council staff recommend the reallocation of $25,623 to be made from work programme ID 177: Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays to a new line titled: Operational Costs: Kauri Kids Early Childcare Education services.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The proposed work programme reallocation does not impact on the increase of greenhouse gas emissions.

18.     Contestable grant applications will, during the assessment process, continue to include consideration for positive climate impacts.  

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The Governing Body decision to withdraw regionally followed consideration of ECE against the Service Prioritisation Framework (in which ECE was assessed as ‘could do’). Council officers have met with the six affected local boards to understand their service preferences and provided further detail to support decision making.

20.     Local boards that have decided to retain their ECEs are required to allocate a portion of their LDI operational budgets, to fund the elements of the service that were previously funded on a regional basis.

21.     Local boards that have decided to exit the service of ECEs, will have the relevant Asset Based Services (ABS) budget removed.

22.     Financial savings are anticipated to be achieved but will be fully realised only after all service withdrawals (or alternative service delivery options) are implemented.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Local board views on the withdrawal of ECEs by Auckland Council were resolved on at the 25 July 2023 Hibiscus and Bays Business Meeting (resolution HB/2023/94). These views included the following key resolutions:

e)      express disappointment with the Governing Body’s decision to exit the delivery of Kauri Kids early childhood education centres within three months, noting the difficulties for:

i.        families to find alternative early childhood education providers that have space available for their children;

ii.       families to settle their children into the early childhood education centre before officially starting;

iii.      kaiako / teachers of the centres to explore other employment opportunities

g)      whakaae / approve the continuation of the early childhood education services for the remainder of the calendar year (until 22 December 2023).

24.     Next steps for the engagement process with ECE staff and families are outlined in Attachment A.

25.     Council staff will provide advice around alternative use of assets for centres that are closing and will work with the local board to better understand their aspirations for future use of the sites. Additional information on next steps for facilities is also available in Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Council staff have contacted Ministry of Education for advice and guidance on any further steps council staff could take to support Māori tamariki.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Council staff recommend the reallocation of $25,623 to be made from work programme ID 177: Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays to a new line titled: Operational Costs: Kauri Kids Early Childcare Education services. This will reduce the grants budget from $425,523 to $399,900, an amount which still allows for the local board to hold two contestable grant rounds and a Facilities Grant round.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     Should the local board choose not to support the reallocation of the funding from the work programme line identified above, the funding would need to come from another line with the local boards LDI work programme.

29.     This would risk delivery and completion of a project that was previously committed to by the local board and currently underway. The project may need to be reduced or stopped completely due to reduced funding.

30.     The likelihood of the local board not supporting the staff recommendation is seen as low as the local board indicated support for work programme line 177 to be used as the budget source for the new line at the 25 July 2023 business meeting (resolution HB/2023/100):

ii)       work programme ID 177: Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays, note the budget figure will be adjusted in response to the confidential decision made at the 25 July business meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     The funding will be reallocated according to the local board’s resolution, and the relevant department notified.

32.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2023/2024 work programme will be updated to reflect the board’s formal decision and adjustments will be reflected in the next performance report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local board decisions on Kauri Kids - August 2023 update

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Saskia Coley - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report 2022/2023

File No.: CP2023/12464

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2022/2023 Annual Report for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 28 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2022/2023 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 28 September 2023. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the draft 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 28 September 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its local board agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

4.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area – projects and improvements

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Our performance explained

Highlights of the local board’s work programme which contributed to a performance outcome.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

6.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

8.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.       The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.     The annual report provides a retrospective view on both the financial and service performance in each local board area for the financial year 2022/2023.

11.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2022/2023 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2023

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 28 September 2023

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 29 September 2023

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report (2022/2023)

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Hao Chen - Senior Finance and Performance Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Financial Advisory

Matthew Kerr - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Chairperson's report (Covering report)

File No.: CP2023/13916

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To discuss the future of the Gulf Harbour ferry service.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is a late covering report for the above item. The comprehensive agenda report was not available when the agenda went to print and will be provided prior to the 26 September 2023 meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

The recommendations will be provided in the comprehensive agenda report.

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on Emergency Management Bill

File No.: CP2023/12932

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request local board input into the development of the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Emergency Management Bill is intended to replace the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 and is open for submissions until 3 November 2023. The Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee will make a submission on the bill.

3.       Further to the memo to the Governing Body, local board members and the Independent Māori Statutory Board dated 17 August 2023, this report invites local boards to provide input into the development of the committee’s submission. A high-level overview of the bill is provided, and a more detailed summary of the bill’s more significant changes is detailed in attachment A to the agenda report.

4.       Decisions on the bill, submissions to it and subsequent progress will be made by the government formed after the general election in October 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide input to the development of Auckland Council’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Emergency Management Bill (the Bill) is intended to replace the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (CDEM Act) and is open for submissions until 3 November 2023 and can be accessed via legislation.govt.nz.

6.       The Bill is a part of the programme of policy work known as the Trifecta Work Programme that arose out of the government’s response to the 2017 report of the Technical Advisory Group on Better Reponses to Natural Disasters and other Emergencies.

7.       Local board feedback is sought on the Bill as currently presented. Please note that decision-making on the progress of the Bill will be made by the government formed after the general election in October 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Emergency Management Bill

8.       The Emergency Management Bill updates the emergency management system to improve performance, modernise the current legislative and regulatory framework, and acknowledge the importance of community resilience and preparedness. The Bill builds on the CDEM Act and:

·        restructures the Bill to a more modern approach

·        includes current provisions with minor amendment

·        introduces new language and terminology, as a consequence of the shift from ‘Civil Defence Emergency Management’ to ‘Emergency Management’

·        introduces more significant change consistent with the Technical Advisory Group’s recommendations and the government’s response.

A more modern Bill

9.       The Bill is structured with parts and sub-parts (some accompanied with outlines of their contents) and makes extensive use of headings. Some sections of the CDEM Act are moved to the Schedules of the Emergency Management Bill.

Current provisions minorly amended

10.     Much of the current CDEM Act is carried over with minor amendment. The placement of these clauses within the Bill’s structure means provisions carried over may be placed in a different order than they appeared in the CDEM Act.

Language and terminology

11.     Changes to language and terminology appear throughout the Bill including:

New terminology

Outgoing terminology

Emergency Management

Civil Defence Emergency Management

Emergency Management Committee

Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee

Emergency Management Committee Plan

Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee Group Plan

Coordinating Executive

Coordinating Executive Group

Area Controller

Group Controller

Area Recovery Manager

Group Recovery Manager

Emergency Designation

A state of emergency or a transition period

 

More significant changes

12.     The more significant changes introduced by the Bill are summarised briefly below, and in more detail in Attachment A.

Greater recognition of the role of Māori and enhancing Māori participation

13.     The role of iwi and Māori has been increasingly recognised in the practice of emergency management since the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes. The Bill recognises the role of iwi and Māori in emergency management at all levels, through representation, requiring each committee to improve its capability and capacity to engage with iwi and Māori, and making involvement consistent nationally.

Changes to the requirements regarding the Emergency Management Committee Plan (currently the Group Plan)

14.     Emergency Management Committees will need to engage with representatives of disproportionately impacted communities (such as seniors and the disabled), iwi and Māori, and other people or groups as appropriate, before it approves a plan. This is to encourage more proactive engagement with communities as a part of plan development.

Critical infrastructure

15.     New requirements are introduced in addition to changing the terminology from ‘lifeline utilities’ to ‘critical infrastructure’ entities/sector. The requirement to share information is made explicit for the purpose of the Bill. A new requirement to develop and publish the planned level of service during emergencies is introduced.

16.     The provisions in the Bill are part of a wider policy development programme to develop a more resilient model led by the Department of Prime Minister and cabinet, that recognises a broader range:

·        of infrastructure (i.e. banks)

·        of potential threats (i.e. cyberattack)

·        and their dependencies and interdependencies.

The role of Emergency Management Committees compared to the functions and duties of local authority members of Emergency Management Committees

17.     The Bill clarifies the different roles of Emergency Management Committees and local authorities. Some new requirements are added, and business continuity is provided for separately. The provisions are expressed in similar terms although the function and duties of local authorities are more oriented towards action.

Changes regarding emergency designation - State of Emergency and Notice of Transition Period

18.     The term ‘emergency designation’ is introduced, meaning either a state of emergency or notice of transition. The Bill also requires the appointment of people able to declare a state of emergency or give a notice of transition period from the representatives on the Emergency Management Committee.

Regulations and Director’s rule-making powers

19.     The Bill expands the range of matters regulations can be made for, including operational matters, infringement offences and breaches of rules. A new power is granted to the Director of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) to make rules regarding roles and responsibilities in specific situations, technical standards, training, qualifications and other matters.

Infringements

20.     The Bill sets up a framework for issuing, serving and payment of infringement notices for offences made under the regulation making powers of the Bill, for the purposes of the Bill.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The definition of emergencies in the CDEM Act and the Bill includes naturally occurring emergencies such as severe weather and drought. It is widely anticipated that these types of emergencies will become more frequent and severe as a consequence of climate change.

22.     The Bill updates the regulatory framework under the CDEM Act. Under the framework emergency management comprises the four R’s - Reduction, Readiness, Response and Recovery. Emergency management practice seeks to:

·        reduce the risk from emergencies

·        raise awareness of and preparedness for emergencies

·        provide a platform for effective response to and recovery from emergencies.

23.     The changes signalled by the Bill will be complemented by the review of the National Emergency Management Plan, the roadmap for the implementation of the National Disaster Resilience Strategy and the wider policy work related to infrastructure.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The Bill and proposed changes to the framework for emergency management has implications across the Auckland Council group, due to our obligations as:

·        managers of critical infrastructure

·        providers of key information during emergencies

·        potential staff to be redirected to support response and recovery activities.

25.     Auckland Emergency Management is working with various parts of Auckland Council and council-controlled organisations including Auckland Plan Strategy and Research, Healthy Waters, Local Board Services, Ngā Matarae, Auckland Transport and Watercare on the development of the submission to the Bill.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report requests input from local boards into the development of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee’s submission on the Bill.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     There is a high level of interest amongst iwi and Māori. The National Emergency Management Agency has held several national hui. Similarly, engagement with marae and related discussions indicate an awareness and interest.

28.     We have written to iwi and Māori to encourage them to both make their own submission on the Bill and provide comment or feedback that can be reflected in the development of Auckland Council’s submission. If there is interest, a hui on this topic may be held.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The changes signalled in the Bill will require amended or additional processes and practices and introduce additional cost across the emergency management system, it is uncertain when they will arise.

30.     It is also unclear how such costs will fall between participating Emergency Management Committees, local authorities, ratepayers, critical infrastructure entities and sectors, their shareholders and consumers. There may also be implications for capacity amongst participants across the emergency management system, critical infrastructure entities and sectors.

31.     The full financial and resource implications may not be known until the Bill is enacted, the National Emergency Management Plan reviewed, the roadmap for the implementation of the National Disaster Resilience Strategy completed and critical infrastructure policy confirmed. These programmes will be subject to the decision-making of the government to be formed after the General Election in October 2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The general direction of policy on which the Bill is based has been signalled for some time. The submission process is the most effective means of managing risk of unfavourable change.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     A workshop of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee to consider the recommendations of the draft submission is scheduled for 18 October 2023. Materials will be circulated to committee members in preparation for the workshop.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of the Emergency Management Bill's more significant changes

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Wayne Brown - Principal Recovery Advisor

Authorisers

Matthew Kerr - Acting Local Area Manager

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Paul Amaral - General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park – Fisheries New Zealand discussion paper

File No.: CP2023/13741

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of central government’s discussion document entitled ‘Proposed options for bottom fishing access zones in the Hauraki Gulf’.

2.       To offer an opportunity for local boards to input into an Auckland Council submission to Fisheries New Zealand.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Fisheries New Zealand released a discussion paper consulting on options for establishing Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana on 30 August 2023. The proposals follow the June 2021 publication of Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf: Government action on the Sea Change Plan.

4.       The Fisheries New Zealand proposal presents four options for Bottom Fishing Access Zones that vary in closing 74.1 per cent to 87.3 per cent of the Gulf to Danish seining and 77.1 per cent to 89.2 per cent of the Gulf to bottom trawl fishing. Current closures protect on average 35 per cent of predicted suitable habitat.

5.       Staff from Natural Environment Strategy are coordinating an Auckland Council submission and inviting input from local boards and mana whenua. The submission will be considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023.

6.       Council staff appreciate the many demands on local boards and note there is no obligation to provide feedback on this fisheries management proposal. Natural Environment Strategy staff have considerable in-depth background of the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana discussions over the last decade and experience on the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan Advisory Group.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Natural Environment Strategy staff overview of central government’s discussion paper ‘Bottom fishing access zones in the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park’.

b)      whakarite / provide feedback on any of the Fisheries New Zealand consultation questions (Attachment A to the agenda report), to help inform the proposed council submission that will be presented to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background

7.       Auckland Council initiated the sea change marine spatial planning process a decade ago in cooperation with Waikato Regional Council. Natural Environment Strategy (NES) staff played a significant role in resourcing a stakeholder-led process through to the publication of the stakeholder plan in April 2017.

8.       Central government developed Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf: Government action on the Sea Change Plan (June 2021) in response to marine protection (Department of Conservation) and fisheries management (Fisheries New Zealand) proposals in the Sea Change plan. ‘Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf’ addresses the respective Department of Conservation (DOC) and Fisheries New Zealand responsibilities and how the relevant Sea Change plan proposals could be advanced.

9.       An approved Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan was announced on 9 August 2023 setting out a management objective to protect marine benthic (i.e. ocean floor) habitats from any adverse effects of fishing and exclude bottom trawling and Danish seining in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana except within defined areas.

10.     A key technical document (published by Fisheries New Zealand in March 2023) outlines the use of a spatial decision support tool to aid the development of options for the Bottom Fishing Access Zones (BFAZ) proposal.

11.     On 30 August 2023, Fisheries New Zealand released a discussion paper consulting on options for establishing Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana.

12.     The proposals encompassed by the Bottom Fishing Access Zones discussion paper are quite separate from the marine protection proposals outlined in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill in that they are being advanced through existing fisheries legislation. However, both Fisheries New Zealand and DOC have worked closely in the concurrent release of the respective proposals under fisheries and conservation legislation respectively.

13.     The marine protection proposals encompassed by the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill are not further discussed in the context of this report which focuses on the proposals to create Bottom Fishing Access Zones. A separate report will be provided to local boards to provide input on an Auckland Council submission to the Environment Select Committee on the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This report sets out the analysis and advice for local board consideration on the Fisheries New Zealand discussion document. Staff advice to be presented to the Planning Environment and Parks (PEP) Committee will also evaluate and address implications for Māori, considerations of climate impacts, and organisational risks in accordance with formal council reporting expectations.

Bottom trawl and Danish seine fishing methods

15.     Bottom trawling is when a fishing net is towed along the seafloor. Danish seining uses a net that is set out using long ropes in a diamond shape on the seabed. While Danish seine fishing does not tow the fishing gear over the seabed in the same manner as bottom trawling, there are impacts to the benthic habitat inside the diamond area as the ropes are drawn in and the net is retrieved.

16.     Estimates of the historical footprint indicate the vast majority of available and suitable seafloor in the Gulf has been fished by bottom contact fishing methods at some point in time, with varying levels of intensity. There has been a noticeable reduction in overall trawl fishing effort within the Gulf since 2018, with some fishers who previously operated in the Gulf making the choice to fish elsewhere.

17.     Bottom contact fishing can affect seafloor habitats and communities by damaging or removing structure forming species, reducing habitat complexity and altering the seafloor structure. The functioning of these communities can be affected as a result. There have been relatively few assessments of the impacts of Danish seine fishing to benthic habitat and communities. Danish seine fishing does not use ‘trawl doors’, and the ground gear is lighter.

Fisheries economics in the Gulf

18.     About half of all fish caught commercially in the Gulf is sold in Auckland restaurants fish shops and take-away shops. Trawling- and Danish seine-caught fish make up part of this market, but accurate information is not immediately available. The top ten inshore species caught account for 95 per cent of total catch landed by Danish seine and bottom trawl fishing in the Gulf. The top five species account for 90 per cent of the total commercial catch from the Gulf. These include, in descending order, snapper, trevally, john dory, gurnard, terakihi, gemfish, jack mackerel, leatherjacket, school shark and mirror dory.

19.     Of the 222 entities owning the primarily affected quota shares (which can be fished in the Gulf), 21 entities own quota shares allocated to Māori by virtue of Treaty Settlement legislation. This accounts for 12 per cent of the total quota shares for these fish stocks. There are 28 Danish seine or trawl operators (fishing permit holders) that have fished the areas proposed for BFAZ over the last five years, operating 22 trawl vessels and 11 Danish seine vessels. Current revenue generated from these two fishing methods from the Gulf amounts to $7.2 million based on port price, or $10.5 million based on export prices.

Legislative context

20.     The proposed implementation of BFAZs is one part of an overall management approach being taken to improve the health and mauri of the Gulf. Other initiatives have been identified at both a national and regional level that complement the BFAZ proposals. Increasing the health of the Gulf will also be dependent on improved land management activities administered by councils.

21.     Fisheries New Zealand are responsible for administering the Fisheries Act 1996 and its supporting regulations. The Act gives commercial, recreational, and customary Māori fishers access to resources while ensuring fisheries are managed sustainably and that the effects on the aquatic environment are managed. People making decisions under the Act are to ensure that they do so in a manner that is consistent with the Treaty of Waitangi (Fisheries Claims) Settlement Act 1992.

Engagement prior to formal proposals

22.     Engagement by Fisheries New Zealand and the Department of Conservation with tangata whenua and iwi representatives (from adjacent areas as well as from within the Gulf) has indicated that the majority of iwi primarily support the removal of some or all mobile bottom contact fishing methods from the Gulf. Consultation is ongoing with tangata whenua throughout the region and with iwi fisheries forums in areas that could receive displaced fishing efforts resulting from the proposed changes.

23.     Public submissions preceding the approval (August 2023) of the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan supported the removal of bottom trawling and Danish seining from the Gulf, or the establishment of BFAZs. Commercial interests noted that the sector was working towards reducing the impact of bottom trawling through innovative methods and gear trials, and that fishers trawl over soft seabed sediment forms, as opposed to reefs which are associated with high biodiversity. Commercial interests were concerned about the impacts of restricting bottom fishing and Danish seining on fishing operations and the potential displacement of effort that could occur.

Using a spatial planning approach to determine options for public engagement

24.     A Fisheries New Zealand science project (ZBD2020-06) was contracted to NIWA in 2020 to collate spatial information on habitat forming species, to develop models predicting the distribution of biogenic habitats, and to test a spatial planning approach. Current closures protect on average 35 per cent of predicted suitable habitat for the 20 biogenic habitat groups, although this ranged from 10 to 94 per cent for the nine most vulnerable biogenic habitat groups.

25.     A Hauraki Gulf Benthic Spatial Planning Advisory Group (HGBSPAG) was formed in 2022 to facilitate collaboration on the process of collating spatial information on, modelling the distribution of and testing spatial planning approaches for managing habitat forming species. A spatial decision-support tool, Zonation, was used to identify priority areas for particular objectives (i.e. those areas with high fisheries importance and low importance for biogenic habitats).

26.     The findings of the science project (ZBD2020-06) were presented to the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan Advisory Group (HGFPAG) in August 2022. These inputs were further refined by Fisheries New Zealand and Department of Conservation, prior to a final opportunity for review by the HGPFAG. The proposals were subsequently finalised and endorsed by Cabinet for public engagement.

Discussion paper proposed options

27.     There are four BFAZ options proposed which vary in degrees of protection to biodiversity and impact to bottom trawl and Danish seine fisheries. The status quo or a complete ban are not proposed options. Ordered in increasing impact to bottom trawl and Danish seine fisheries the options are:

 

 

Option 1

Close 74.1 per cent of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 77.1 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish six BFAZ

Option 2

Close 79.4 per cent of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 82.4 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish five BFAZ

Option 3

Close 86.6 per cent of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 88.5 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish four BFAZ

Option 4

Close 87.3 per cent of the Gulf shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 89.2 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish four BFAZ

 

28.     Fisheries New Zealand considers that each of the four proposed options addresses the problem of adverse impacts of bottom contact fishing on benthic habitats in the Gulf. They each address the Crown’s obligations under section five (Treaty of Waitangi), section eight (the Purpose of the Fisheries Act), section nine (environmental principles) and section 10 (information principles) of the Act by allowing for continued sustainable utilisation. Each option provides for different levels of fishing utilisation and has different potential resulting impacts depending on the scale of reduced access. There remains uncertainty around expected changes to landings and revenue, displacement of fishing effort to other areas not affected by the closures and the substitution of fishing methods other than Danish seine and trawl.

29.     Specific assessment of each proposed option is outlined in the discussion paper with reasonable detail, with an emphasis on envisaged biodiversity outcomes and economic outcomes. Economic impacts may fall disproportionately on a small number of permit holders. This manifests itself as impacts on landings and revenue (based on port prices received), export revenue, reduced incomes for Licenced Fish Receivers (including wholesalers and/or processors) and retailers.

Key consultation questions

30.     There are 13 questions asked in the discussion paper (reproduced in Attachment A), and NES staff have highlighted the following key consultation questions of anticipated interest to local boards to support the feedback process:

·        which option do you support for proposed Bottom Fishing Access Zones? Why?

·        if you do not support any of the options listed, what alternative(s) should be considered? Why?

·        do you have any ideas or alternative approaches to the management of bottom fishing impacts, apart from the proposed Bottom Fishing Access Zones?

·        do you think the proposed options adequately provide for social, economic and cultural wellbeing?

·        do you think the criteria outlined in section five (of the discussion paper) will provide a suitable basis to assess the options and their impacts?

·        do you think the proposed options appropriately consider the effects on the benthic environment?

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Council staff will be taking an agenda report and proposed draft submission to the Planning Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023. In addition to an assessment of the proposals as they further the council’s obligations to biodiversity management in the coastal marine area (cf. fisheries management), the themes of the internal input will be summarised in the agenda report and incorporated into the proposed submission as appropriate.

32.     Local board feedback received by 29 September 2023 will be considered by NES staff in shaping the proposed council submission. While that early input is encouraged where possible, all local board feedback received by 16 October 2023 will be appended to the committee report. Natural Environment Strategy staff will make relevant observations to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee about the local board input received as that informs the proposed council submission.

33.     A separate report will be provided to local boards to provide input on an Auckland Council submission to the Environment Select Committee on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park - questions for submitters

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dave Allen - Manager Natural Environment Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Matthew Kerr - Acting Local Area Manager

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Local board feedback into the council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee

File No.: CP2023/13157

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback into the council submission on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Environment Select Committee is seeking views on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

3.       The purpose of the Bill is to address environmental decline in the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana due to human activities.

4.       This Bill also seeks to contribute to the restoration of the health and mauri of the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana. It proposes to do this by establishing two marine reserves, five seafloor protection areas, and 12 high protection areas in the Hauraki Gulf, and acknowledging customary rights within seafloor protection areas and high protection areas.

5.       The council will be providing a submission to the Environment Select Committee on this matter and the local board has an opportunity to provide their feedback into this submission.

6.       A memo (Attachment A to the agenda report) has been circulated to local board members with further information about the opportunity to provide input into the council submission on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

7.       Local Board feedback received by 29 September 2023 will be incorporated into the council submission. Feedback received after this and before 16 October 2023 will only be appended to the submission. The consultation closes 1 November 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to be incorporated into the council’s submission to the Environment Select Committee.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo: Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill - 15 September 2023

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Saskia Coley - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Matthew Kerr - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Funding Auckland's Storm Recovery and Resilence

File No.: CP2023/13466

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local boards with an opportunity to provide input regarding the funding package that has been provisionally agreed with central government.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Seven months on from severe weather events in January and February 2023, many Aucklanders with impacted homes are still facing a challenging and uncertain future.

3.       Auckland Council has worked with central government to secure a funding package that would enable people in the region to move forward with certainty, as quickly as possible.

4.       The proposed funding package includes just under $2 billion of investment in storm recovery efforts for three key activities:

·        repairing storm damage to the transport network

·        Making Space for Water (the council’s flood mitigation programme) and other resilience projects

·        Category 3 property buyouts.

5.       If we do not accept the funding package, we will still need to fund the necessary infrastructure improvements but would not be in a position to buy out Category 3 homes.

6.       Public consultation is underway from 11 - 24 September 2023.

7.       Local board feedback will be provided to the Governing Body along with public feedback ahead of its decision-making on 6 October 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that input is being sought from local boards at the same time as public consultation due to the very tight timelines involved and the need to provide certainty for impacted Aucklanders

b)      whakarite / provide feedback on whether the local board supports Auckland Council agreeing to the funding package

c)      whakarite / provide feedback on features of the package that you would like to comment on

d)      whakarite / provide feedback on the design of the Category 3 buyout process.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Severe weather events in January and February 2023 have had a devastating and lasting impact on many communities and thousands of individuals across Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland. Flooding and land slips have damaged or destroyed thousands of homes and up-ended lives and communities. Essential lifeline infrastructure and facilities have been impacted and are in urgent need of repair. This includes roads, bridges, stormwater systems and community facilities.

9.       Seven months on, many Aucklanders with impacted homes are still facing a challenging and uncertain future. We need to support these Aucklanders and improve the resilience of our infrastructure so that we are better prepared and can mitigate the impacts of severe weather events.

10.     Auckland Council has worked with central government to secure a funding package that would enable people in the region to move forward with certainty, as quickly as possible.

11.     To achieve all the outcomes of the package the government would provide just under $1.1 billion of new and reprioritised existing funding, with the council investing around $900 million. This is the same “locally-led, centrally-supported” approach that has been taken with other regions affected by the January and February 2023 storm events, just at a larger scale. It is different from the Christchurch earthquake recovery, where central government funded all the purchase of properties.

12.     As a locally-led effort, Auckland Council is expected to take the lead on the design and implementation of any package. This means we have a number of detailed decisions to make as part of our main decision whether to proceed with the co-funded package.

13.     Public consultation is taking place from 11 - 24 September 2023. Details can be found at https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/recoveryfunding

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The proposed funding package includes just under $2 billion of investment in storm recovery efforts for three key activities, as outlined in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Proposed central government and Auckland Council contribution to recovery

 

Central government funding

Auckland Council funding

Total

Transport network recovery

$309 million

$81 million

$390 million

Making space for water and other resilience projects

$380 million

$440 million

$820 million

Category 3 home buyouts

$387 million

$387 million

$774 million

Total

$1,076 million

$908 million

$1,984 million

 

Transport network recovery

15.     Auckland Council is projecting that $390 million will be needed to make repairs to roads and bridges that were damaged by the severe weather. This includes the Mill Flat Road bridge, access to Karekare and Piha, and a number of roads in the west, the north and on Aotea / Great Barrier Island that were significantly damaged. The funding would ensure that repairs can be undertaken with greater certainty.

Making Space for Water and other resilience projects

16.     A critical part of recovery is making sure we are better prepared for future severe weather. Improving resilience is essential to provide security for those who will continue to live in hazard-prone areas. This includes the flood risk management projects such as those that we have outlined in the Making Space for Water programme that we consulted on last month.

17.     This programme would allow us to create new ‘blue-green networks’ in areas with critical flood risks, and to rehabilitate streams so that they are more resilient to floods. We would be able to increase our stormwater maintenance and overland flow path management.

18.     This portion of the funding package could also be used for other resilience projects, such as community based geotechnical projects where risks can be mitigated. Importantly, the funding package would allow us to move more quickly with our efforts to build resilience.

Category 3 property buyouts

19.     Homes in Category 3 are not safe to live in because the risk from future flooding or landslips is intolerably high. Options to reduce this risk at a property or community level are not available or affordable. Homes in these areas should not be rebuilt or remain on their current sites.

20.     Central government’s co-funding conditions for Category 3 properties are that they must be:

·        residential

·        impacted by the severe weather events of January and February 2023

·        subject to ongoing intolerable risk to life, and

·        without an economic way to mitigate the risk.

21.     The proposed funding package would provide up to $774 million to buy Category 3 homes and allow people affected by the January and February 2023 severe weather events to move on with their lives. The funding for this would be split evenly between Auckland Council and central government.

22.     The $774 million is based on current estimates of around 700 homes to be included in this category. If this maximum amount is exceeded, central government and the council have agreed to work together in good faith to decide next steps.

23.     Auckland Council would need to administer the buyout process from start to finish, including the purchase and removal of homes, and the ongoing management of the land. We know that there would be extra costs that wouldn’t be fully co-funded through the proposed funding package, including the costs of demolishing buildings, and any costs arising from the ongoing management of the land. We will also need to consider how we best make use of the newly acquired land, for example public parks and blue-green networks.

24.     We need to make some decisions about how the buyout process would work, including the price we pay for Category 3 houses, how this works with insurance, and any conditions (e.g. price caps or exclusions) that might need to be put in place. Given the complexity of the task, we are proposing to take an approach where we work towards decisions that are simple, fair, cost-effective, timely, and give certainty to affected Aucklanders.

Accepting the funding package

25.     If Auckland Council accepts the funding package:

·        we will receive additional government funding to accelerate our efforts to increase the resilience of our infrastructure

·        we can get on with making improvements that would otherwise take decades to achieve

·        we can offer a process forward for Category 3 property owners

·        we will need to find extra revenue to meet the council funding commitment.

26.     If Auckland Council does not accept the funding package:

·        we won’t receive all the proposed funding from central government, although we could still anticipate receiving some of the transport funding in the normal way, and could apply to the National Resilience Plan for further funding without a guarantee of our applications being successful

·        we will still need to fund the necessary infrastructure improvements and may need to take longer to do this using the available council funding methods

·        we won’t be in a position to buyout Category 3 homes: some property owners would face severe hardship and people would remain at risk.

27.     Accepting the funding package would be a significant step in the recovery process. We acknowledge that recovery is not happening as quickly as affected communities would like. There is a difficult balance between moving quickly and moving accurately, especially with so many thousands of potentially affected homes needing individual technical assessments. It’s important that everyone can have confidence in the information and evidence available so that we can make robust, defensible, and enduring decisions.

28.     We also need to balance the needs of impacted homeowners with the needs of the wider community and consider the affordability and hazard management impacts for all Aucklanders.

Methodology of Category 3 buyouts

29.     If we go ahead with the funding package, the details of the purchase methodology for Category 3 properties would need to be determined, and would have a strong influence on how simple, fair, cost-effective and timely our process could be, and how much certainty we could offer affected homeowners.

30.     Some of the policy details we need to consider include:

·        how we define Category 3 residential properties. We need to consider whether we should make different provisions for holiday homes and rentals that are assessed as being in Category 3, compared to primary residences. We will not be purchasing non-residential properties

·        how we set the buyout price. If our starting point is to take a ‘fair value’ approach, we need to decide how we assess that. Using capital value (the valuation that helps us to assess rates bills) would be the quickest option but wouldn’t necessarily reflect the true market value of every individual house. Establishing market value would be a much slower option: it could delay the process and would add further administrative costs. We could adopt a hybrid approach that gets most of the money to homeowners sooner and allows the balance to be resolved through valuation. Other alternatives would be to offer a fixed sum to all Category 3 homeowners or establish a sliding scale of payment based on hardship

·        the size of owner contributions. Like all investments, property ownership carries risks. Aucklanders, through Auckland Council, do not guarantee owners against loss. Auckland Council will need to consider whether to offer 100 per cent of the value of the property, or a lesser amount, provided we can meet our objective of removing people from situations of intolerable risk. This could take the form of a cap on buyout offers above a certain amount

·        what we do about insurance settlements, and uninsured and underinsured properties. Government and council contributions are intended to ‘top up’ rather than replace any amounts received through private insurance or Earthquake Commission (EQC). We still need to decide how this would work in practice. We also need to determine a fair outcome both for homeowners and for the Aucklanders who will have to fund buyouts. This will mean we need to consider if Aucklanders who had no insurance or limited insurance should receive more, less or the same as other Category 3 homeowners.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The response that is being proposed in this funding package is a one-off, made necessary by the urgent and extraordinary scale of events.

32.     As climate change increases the risk of severe weather events, Auckland Council will not be in a position to continue to buy out other flood and slip affected homes. We are working to improve public awareness of hazards, so that Aucklanders are better able to manage their risks. We are also reviewing our approach to the planning and development of homes in areas with natural hazards, however the impact of this is confined largely to new development, and doesn’t address the legacy of thousands of homes that are already built in higher-risk areas.

33.     We are strongly advocating to central government to establish a national scheme to support recovery from future events, and to put in place better processes for managed retreat in advance of disaster.

34.     Both the Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan advocate for greater resilience to severe storms and flood events. A key principle of the proposed Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan is ‘Opportunities to build resilience and avoid future harm are sought proactively’.

35.     The funding received from central government for Making Space for Water and other resilience projects will enable Auckland Council to implement the initiatives within these plans in a way that both builds resilience to the impacts of climate change and has a lower carbon impact than the solutions that have historically been utilised.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The Recovery Office is working with Legal, Finance, the Chief Planning Office and the Mayoral Office to consider the approach set out by the Crown, the implications for council, and the appropriate parameters for council’s actions at each stage of the negotiations and potential implementation process. The executive leadership team sub-group also spans the relevant parts of the council that are necessary to input and/or be involved in this process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     During August 2023, local boards and local communities provided feedback on the draft Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan (the Plan), which will inform how government funding for infrastructure will be allocated. Staff are currently analysing the feedback to inform the final content of the Plan.

38.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to give feedback specifically on the funding agreement that has been agreed in-principle with central government.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The Recovery Office is engaging with mana whenua representatives to discuss the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan. Meetings are underway and will continue throughout September 2023. These meetings also provide opportunity to discuss the government funding package.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     Auckland’s recovery from the severe weather events of early 2023 is going to require significant investment, with or without central government co-funding. The proposed package increases the total investment into Auckland, with over $1 billion in new and reprioritised central government funding.

41.     Significant funding from Auckland Council would still be required to deliver on the activities described in this package.

42.     If we agree to proceed with the funding package, we would initially use borrowing to fund Auckland’s share of the proposal, until we can make more considered funding decisions in the next Long-term Plan 2024-2034. This is due to be consulted on in early 2024.

43.     Using borrowing in the short term would mean we could get the infrastructure repairs and the Category 3 buyout process moving quickly.

44.     Based on initial timing projections the additional council debt required is likely to peak at $650 million. This would increase the debt-to-revenue ratio by 7 – 9 per cent over the next five to seven years, remaining within current debt limits.

45.     The council has a number of options to fund the proposed package in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, including reducing or deferring other capital spending, sale of assets, service reductions, and rates. These decisions may also be impacted by the outcomes of the government’s water reform process.

46.     If the council were to proceed with the full proposed programme and fund it using only rates, then this would require an additional rates increase equivalent to 3.1 per cent of general rates, which could be phased in over two years. Any rates increase would be on top of other significant budget pressures the council is facing. Current indications suggest overall rates increases of over 10 per cent for 2024/2025 for residential ratepayers, if cost reductions or funding sources are not found.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     Risks and mitigations with the Crown offer process are identified in Table 2.

Table 2. Risks and mitigations with the Crown offer process

Risk

Mitigations

More than 700 properties are identified as category 3

Good faith commitment with the Crown to develop a joint response if this situation arises.

Eligibility criteria for the National Resilience Plan have not yet been defined, meaning there is a risk to accessing the pre-committed funding for resilience

Address within terms of the agreement

Significant additional funding required from Auckland Council

An existing risk that will need to be addressed in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, regardless of the Crown offer.

Terms of the Crown offer do not adequately provide for the complexity of the council processes needed to undertake buyouts

Policy and legal analysis is underway to consider the implications of the terms of the agreement, to be reported to the Governing Body

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Technical assessment of affected homes and remediation of damaged infrastructure will continue throughout the decision-making process.

49.     Public consultation is underway from 11 - 24 September 2023.

50.     The Governing Body will meet on 6 October 2023 to consider input from local boards and feedback from public consultation and will decide whether to agree to the proposed funding package.

51.     If the package is agreed, the council will begin conversations with confirmed Category 3 homeowners at the end of October 2023.

52.     From November 2023, voluntary buyouts for Category 3 properties will begin, as technical assessments are confirmed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Megan Howell - Programme Manager

Authorisers

Mat Tucker - Group Recovery Manager

Matthew Kerr - Acting Local Area Manager

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Biodiversity Credit System – central government discussion document

File No.: CP2023/13573

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of central government’s discussion document entitled ‘Helping nature and people thrive – Exploring a biodiversity credit system for Aotearoa New Zealand’, and its potential implications for Auckland Council should such a system be advanced.

2.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to offer any feedback to council staff to help inform the preparation of a council submission on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Central government (Ministry for the Environment, Department of Conservation) published a discussion document on 7 July 2023 (weblink: Biodiversity Credit System) which is exploring the potential for a ‘biodiversity credit system’ that could be developed for Aotearoa New Zealand. Central government is seeking feedback on the need for and possible design of a biodiversity credit system, and the potential roles of government and Māori in implementing it.

4.       Staff from Natural Environment Strategy are coordinating the development of a proposed Auckland Council submission. Staff are inviting feedback from local boards, mana whenua and the Rural Advisory Panel, to help shape the proposed Auckland Council submission which will be considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023.

5.       Natural Environment Strategy staff provided a webinar to overview the discussion document with approximately 40 local board members on 21 August 2023. Local board feedback is due no later than 29 September 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide any feedback to council staff to help inform a council submission on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System by 29 September 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The development of a national biodiversity credit system is intended to be used to increase funding opportunities from the private sector towards restoration efforts. This could be a catalyst to, or supplement, council activities, such as the regulatory implementation of the National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity (NPSIB) and the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM).

7.       The government’s discussion document is very much an initial consultation to start the national conversation about a potential biodiversity credit system that could be developed for Aotearoa New Zealand. Consequently, the government’s discussion document is very exploratory in nature and does not set out a specific proposed system with clear scope, roles and implementation mechanisms to provide feedback on, rather it discusses a number of different approaches that could be taken to different aspects of designing and implementing such a system.

Main points covered in discussion document

8.       The discussion document explains:

a)      what biodiversity credits and a biodiversity credit system are with some international examples that are emerging

b)      what the benefits could be in the Aotearoa New Zealand context

c)      different approaches that could be taken to the scope and design of a system, and

d)      the distinct roles that government could play.

9.       The discussion document includes consultation questions that seek views on the different approaches and roles for a biodiversity credit system.

10.     Biodiversity credits are a way of attracting funding from the private sector, to invest in efforts by landowners to protect, maintain and enhance indigenous vegetation and habitats, including shrublands, grasslands, wetlands and natural and regenerating native forests. The credits are intended to recognise, in a transparent and consistent way, landholder projects or activities that protect, maintain and enhance indigenous biodiversity, or positive outcomes, e.g., a one per cent increase (or avoided decrease) in the indigenous biodiversity of a hectare.

11.     By purchasing credits, people and organisations can finance and claim credit for their contribution to ‘nature-positive’ actions and outcomes. This is an emerging approach that is gaining considerable interest internationally. In Aotearoa New Zealand, credits could relate to protecting, restoring, and enhancing nature on public and private land, including whenua Māori (Māori land).

12.     A biodiversity credit system could recognise efforts to protect, enhance and restore indigenous biodiversity in any habitat (on land, in freshwater, and / or coastal and marine environments) or only in some. Biodiversity credits could represent work on whole ecosystems or catchments or focus on endangered or taonga species or remnant habitats.

13.     The discussion document suggests seven principles that could apply to the design of a government supported biodiversity credit system. The principles would let people know what they can expect when they participate in a biodiversity credit system and what is expected of them. For example, the system should have clear rules for the claims investors can make to avoid ‘greenwashing,’ should reward nature-positive activities additional to business as usual, and the system should maximise positive impact on biodiversity (including uplifting mauri and mana of biodiversity).

14.     The discussion document also explains the components of a fully functioning system, including measurement, verification and reporting, legal recognition, potential ways credits can be traded and the roles of industry experts. It notes that regional and district councils could potentially play a role in providing expertise to landowners for biodiversity credit activities and / or projects.

15.     The government is exploring the possible roles it could play to support the establishment of a biodiversity credit system for Aotearoa New Zealand that would operate with both integrity and impact. It suggests the following two roles but notes that a blend of these options may be appropriate, which could evolve over time:

a)      market enablement: where it provides policies and guidance for the development and uptake of voluntary schemes in Aotearoa New Zealand, and potentially funding for system development as the market is established. An enablement role seeks to influence the outcomes and operation of the market, using non-regulatory tools such as good practice guidance and optional standards.

b)      market administration: where it establishes and manages a voluntary biodiversity scheme and is active in the ongoing management and administration. A market administration role includes setting a regulatory framework, with tools to direct the outcomes and the operation of the market.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Potential implications for Auckland Council

16.     Given the nature of the government’s discussion document, it is difficult to be certain about the potential implications of a biodiversity credit system for Auckland Council as no clear proposals have been made about its scope, design and implementation or different roles central government and councils will have within the system.

17.     There are potential benefits that a biodiversity credit system could have for funding protection, restoration, and enhancement of indigenous biodiversity on public and private land in the Auckland region. Depending on the scope and design of a biodiversity credit system (which will be developed following feedback on this initial consultation being undertaken by central government), it could be of relevance to initiatives undertaken locally seeking to achieve positive biodiversity and freshwater outcomes as they complement regulatory requirements (e.g. tree planting, stream restoration etc). However, as discussed in paragraph 12 above, one of the suggested principles for a biodiversity credit system is ‘it should reward nature-positive activities additional to business as usual’. For example, this suggests that funding derived from a credit should not serve to substitute funding provided to existing council programmes.

18.     As the discussion document is at an early, exploratory stage, it is not clear yet what role councils should play or how the council group including local boards might benefit. The Ministry for the Environment (MfE), stated in a recent presentation to the Te Uru Kahika Resource Managers Group on 31 August 2023 that it is very open to hearing suggestions from councils.

19.     Our feedback is likely to include a number of our own questions and different views from the council group about the system scope, design and implementation. In some instances, we may also be able to suggest different options for consideration by central government, e.g. in relation to the role councils could play:

a)      little or no involvement by council?

b)      some partnership with central government to help identify focus areas for achieving best biodiversity outcomes?

c)      council acts as a translator / navigator providing advice to landowners in the region about use of biodiversity credits and where to focus efforts?

20.     There are 23 questions asked in the discussion document. Natural Environment Strategy staff have identified the key questions that are more about the system design and overall approaches that could be taken, which we thought local boards may want to focus any feedback on. These can be found in Attachment A to the agenda report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Feedback from Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is due no later than 29 September 2023, to help inform the proposed council submission that will be presented to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023.

22.     As part of preparing the council submission, staff will consider and present the potential impacts on climate, Māori and local board views as well as the financial implications, risks and mitigations in the report to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee. Due to this being an initial consultation to start the national conversation about a potential biodiversity credit system, central government’s discussion document is very exploratory in nature and does not set out a specific proposed system with clear scope, roles and implementation mechanisms to provide feedback on. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the potential impacts and implications at this stage, and this may become more evident in subsequent central government consultations when a more defined approach to the design and implementation of a biodiversity credit system has been developed and proposed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key consultaton questions

87

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Taran Livingston - Lead Analyst Natural Environment Strategy

Authorisers

Dave Allen - Manager Natural Environment Strategy

Matthew Kerr - Acting Local Area Manager

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa - Policy Schedule August 2023

File No.: CP2023/13580

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule, a schedule of items that will come before the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at business meetings over the coming months.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is included as attachment A to the agenda report.

4.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

5.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed, and the schedule is subject to change.  Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for September 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for September 2023

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Matthew Kerr - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2023/13575

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for September 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the workshop records for September 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for September 2023

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Matthew Kerr - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Presentation - Proposed Manly Sports Centre Page 101

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Presentation - Heatstroke: climate change killer Page 123

Item 8.3      Attachment b    The path from Heat Stress to Heat Stroke    Page 137

Item 9.1      Attachment a    Supporting information                                  Page 139


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 




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26 September 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

26 September 2023

 

 

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