I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 27 September 2023

1.00pm

Waiheke Local Board office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Bianca Ranson

 

Members

Kylee Matthews

 

 

Robin Tucker

 

 

Paul Walden

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Lorraine Gropper

Democracy Advisor

 

21 September 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 027 218 6903

Email: lorraine.gropper@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Pam Oliver & Peter Wills; Project Forever Waiheke - Rental housing on Waiheke                                                  5

8.2     Deputation - Katina Conomos - Ōtata / Noises Island HPA                                      6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Chairperson's report                                            9

12        Quick Response Grant round one 2023/2024 grant allocations                                                 21

13        Potential changes to the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land             81

14        Submissions and feedback on the draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023                     113

15        Waiheke Local Board Annual Report 2022/2023                                                                            135

16        Local board feedback on Emergency Management Bill                                               151

17        Biodiversity Credit System – central government discussion document                 161

18        Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024                                                  167

19        Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park – Fisheries New Zealand discussion paper                       175

20        Local board feedback into the council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee                                              183

21        Funding Auckland's Storm Recovery and Resilience                                                          185

22        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Waiheke Local Board meeting schedule                                  193

23        Waiheke Local Board - Resource Consent Applications - September 2023                       197

24        Waiheke Local Board - Workshop record - September 2023                                                203

25        Waiheke Local Board - Community Forum record- September 2023                                   213

26        Waiheke Local Board - Hōtaka Kaupapa Policy Schedule - September 2023                             221

27        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The meeting was opened with a karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 23 August 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 


 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Pam Oliver & Peter Wills; Project Forever Waiheke - Rental housing on Waiheke

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the deputation from Dr. Pam Oliver and Assoc Prof Peter Wills, representatives of Project Waiheke Forever Working Group, on rental housing on Waiheke.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board has received a deputation request from Project Forever Waiheke regarding rental housing on Waiheke.

3.       Project Forever Waiheke proposes regulations to influence the provisions rental homes and the need for holistic analysis of the current supply.

4.       The presentation is attached.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank Dr. Pam Oliver and Assoc Prof Peter Wills, representatives of Project Forever Waiheke Working Group, for their attendance and presentation regarding rental housing on Waiheke.

 

Attachments

a          Project Forever Waiheke - Housing Solutions............................................. 229

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Katina Conomos - Ōtata / Noises Island HPA

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Katina Conomos, Sue Neureuter and Dr. Tim Haggitt will be in attendance to present on the proposed geographical area for the Ōtata / Noises Island High Protection Area (HPA).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board has received a deputation request from Katina Conomos regarding the consideration of the Ōtata / Noises Island HPA.

3.       Katina Conomos is the Programme Director/Kaihautū for Revive Our Gulf and formerly the independent Project Manager for the Noises Marine Protection Project.

4.       Sue Neureuter is a Trustee of The Noises Trust and serves as a custodian of The Noises Islands.

5.       Dr. Tim Haggitt is a marine scientist who specialises in marine protected area research and monitoring. He has conducted marine surveys around The Noises, is a Director at E-Coast and works with the University of Auckland as the Manager of the Discovery Centre.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank Katina Conomos, Sue Neureuter and Dr. Tim Haggitt for their attendance and presentation regarding the Ōtata /Noises Island HPA.

Refer item XX of this agenda.

 

Attachments

a          Report to Waiheke Local Board regarding Noises HPA Boundary....... 241

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

Requests for public forum will be considered at the meeting.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2023/13696

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive Chairperson, Cath Handley’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board - Chair's report - September 2023

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes – Local Area Manager – Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Quick Response Grant round one 2023/2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2023/12687

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund, or decline applications received for Waiheke Local Board for the Quick Response round one 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board adopted the Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 28 June 2023 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board.

3.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

4.       Eleven applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board for the Quick Response grant round one 2023/2024, requesting a total of $16,711.08.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application listed below:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2418-103

Waiheke Island Sustainable Tourism Strategy Local Working Group

Community

Towards wages, prizes and survey techinical management from 1 October 2023 to 30 April 2024

$1,945.50

Eligible

QR2418-104

Emma Brogden

Sport and recreation

Towards basketball equipment at 9 Donald Bruce Road from 1 October 2023 to 30 September 2024

$891.71

Eligible

QR2418-105

Ana Camila Chicon

Community

Towards venue hire of Ostend War Memorial Hall hire from 2 October 2023 to 31 March 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2418-107

Omiha Welfare & Recreation Society Inc

Sport and recreation

Towards materials for the construction of a petanque court at 2 Glenn Brook Road

$1,779.38

Eligible

QR2418-108

Waiheke Health Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of a specialised vaccine fridge at Ostend Medical Centre

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2418-109

Project Reach Out Waiheke

Community

Towards facilitator fees at Surfdale Hall from 2 October 2023 to 30 April 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2418-110

Waiheke Musical Museum Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards website redesign and IT equipment purchase

$1,744.49

Eligible

QR2418-112

Waiheke Spirit Children's Charitable Trust

Community

Towards graphic design, marketing, photography and entertainment activities at location on 18 November 2023

$750.00

Eligible

QR2418-113

Māori Women's Welfare League

Community

Towards administration costs, catering and van hire at Te Motu Arai Roa on 27 October 2023

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2418-114

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards a proportion of overhead costs for Youthline operating on Waiheke from 1 October 2023 to 30 June 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2418-115

Waiheke Writers Group

Arts and culture

Towards filming and editing at Waiheke Community Art Gallery from 17 October 2023 to 1 November 2023

$600.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$16,711.08

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

6.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

7.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements

8.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through support of projects that address food production and food waste, support alternative transport methods, support community energy efficiency education and behaviour change, build community resilience, and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     According to the main focus of the application, each one has received input from a subject matter expert from the relevant department. The main focuses are identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

12.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waiheke Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme

14.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Nga Mātārae has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

17.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

18.     Eleven applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board for the Quick Response grant round one 2023/2024, requesting a total of $16,711.08.

19.     Appropriate financial officers have been consulted.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Following the Waiheke Local Board allocating funding for the round, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2023/2024 Waiheke Local Board Grants Programme

27

b

Waiheke 2023/2024 Quick Response Round One Application Summary

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

James Boyd - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Potential changes to the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land

File No.: CP2023/13678

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board to provide any feedback on the potential changes to the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land came into force in October 2022. The Ministry for the Environment advise that stakeholders have raised two issues about the restrictions on uses and development that do not rely on the soil resource of the land. These are:

·    the lack of a clear consent pathway for construction of new infrastructure on highly productive land. This mostly relates to solar farms from entities than do not have the power to designate land

·    the lack of a clear consent pathway for intensive indoor primary production (e.g. piggeries, poultry farms) and greenhouses (e.g. hydroponic) on highly productive land.

3.       The Ministry for the Environment are consulting on potential changes to the National Policy Statement that would make it easier for new infrastructure, intensive farming operations, and hydroponic greenhouses to locate on highly productive land.

4.       There is potential that the changes to the National Policy Statement could result in the loss of significant areas of highly productive land in Auckland. The necessity of these potential changes is not clear, and they could undermine the purpose of the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land.

5.       Any local board feedback will be included as part of an item to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023 on a potential council submission.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide any feedback to council staff on the potential changes to the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land.

Horopaki

Context Background

6.       The National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land (NPS-HPL) came into force in October 2022. It directs the Auckland Council to introduce maps of highly productive land (HPL) into the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) within three years. In the interim there is a transitional definition of HPL. The areas of land meeting the transitional definition on Waiheke Island are shown in Attachment A to agenda report. The NPS-HPL also adds a layer of policy to be considered by councils for proposals on HPL such as land use and development, subdivision, and rezonings.

Use and development of highly productive land

7.       The NPS-HPL requires council to avoid inappropriate land uses and development on HPL. All land use activities are considered inappropriate unless they are “Land-based primary production” activities, or they are explicitly included in a list of exceptions.

8.       The list of exceptions covers a range of matters including providing for supporting activities to land-based primary production, addressing risks to public health and safety, enhancing indigenous biodiversity, and providing public access. The full list of exceptions is included in Attachment B to the agenda report.

Issues behind potential changes to the National Policy Statement on Highly Productive Land

9.       The Ministry for the Environment advise that stakeholders have raised two issues about the NPS-HPL’s restrictions on non-land-based uses and development. These are:

·    the lack of a clear consent pathway for construction of new specified infrastructure on HPL in clause 3.9(2)(j)(i)

·    the lack of a clear consent pathway for developing and relocating intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses on HPL.

10.     The Ministry for the Environment are currently seeking feedback on potential amendments to the NPS-HPL that would provide a clear consenting pathway for these activities. The Ministry for the Environment discussion document on the potential changes is included in Attachment C to the agenda report.

New specified infrastructure on highly productive land

11.     Specified infrastructure is a defined term in the NPS-HPL and includes (but is not limited to) road and rail networks, wastewater, stormwater, water supply, and electricity generation/distribution. The wording of the NPS-HPL enables the ongoing maintenance, operation, upgrade or expansion of specified infrastructure, but it does not include the construction of new specified infrastructure. This creates a difficult consenting pathway for some new infrastructure on HPL.

12.     It is noted that most infrastructure in Auckland is provided by ‘requiring authorities’. These are entities that have the power under the Resource Management Act 1991 to ‘designate’ land for infrastructure purposes. They essentially bypass the district plan and therefore they are minimally impacted by the wording of this part of the NPS-HPL.

13.     However, there are specified infrastructure providers that do not have designation powers under the RMA and therefore have no apparent consent pathway to develop new infrastructure on HPL. The main example of this is the renewable electricity generation sector where often solar farms and battery energy storage systems are being developed by entities that do not have designation powers.

14.     There is significant demand for additional renewable electricity in New Zealand and solar farms proposals are increasingly common. Solar farm developments often seek to develop on flat rural land because it is more economical, easier to source large blocks of land, and often receives high solar radiation. Auckland’s flat rural land is also where areas of HPL are located.

15.     The Ministry for the Environment see a potential option to provide for activities such as solar farms on HPL is to amend the NPS-HPL by adding in the word “construction” to the exception for specified infrastructure.

 

 

Intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses on highly productive land

16.     Intensive indoor primary production includes uses such as piggeries and poultry farms. Modern greenhouses mostly use artificial media to grow plants (e.g. hydroponics). As these activities do not rely on the soil resource of the land, they are not “land-based primary production”. Therefore, the NPS-HPL considers that these activities are inappropriate and directs that they be avoided on HPL.

17.     The Ministry for the Environment advise that some primary industry stakeholders have argued that the NPS-HPL should specifically provide for intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses on HPL because they have a functional and operational need to operate there (e.g. necessary to locate the activity close to markets, labour sources, supporting infrastructure etc).

18.     They also argue that there are limited alternative locations that would be economically viable for intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses. This is because HPL is flat and therefore more cost-effective to develop. HPL is also often near labour markets, transport routes, nutrient solution management and discharge infrastructure.

19.     The Ministry for the Environment see a potential option to provide for intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses on HPL is to add these activities to the list of exceptions. This would provide a bespoke consenting pathway for developing and relocating intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses on HPL.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

New specified infrastructure on highly productive land

20.     The main beneficiary of any change would likely be private entities (who are not requiring authorities) seeking to establish new infrastructure on HPL. This is most likely to be developers of solar farms and battery energy storage systems.

21.     The potential changes to make the NPS-HPL more enabling of new infrastructure on HPL are likely to affect Auckland more than other parts of New Zealand. Due to Auckland’s large population, the region is an attractive location for future solar farm ventures – as the electricity generated is close to the end users. This proximity reduces energy loss that occurs when electricity is transmitted over long distances and increases the resilience of electricity supply.

22.     There are currently three solar farm resource consent applications being processed in Auckland, with a number of other solar farm and battery energy storage system proposals at a pre-application stage. In total these proposals could cover around 2,000 hectares of land. Therefore, there is the potential that the changes to the NPS-HPL could result in the loss of significant areas of HPL in Auckland.

23.     Solar farm proposals often highlight that primary production uses can co-exist with the example of sheep grazing between the panels. However, the presence of a solar farm on HPL inherently reduces the potential range, intensity, and yield of land-based primary production activities.

24.     It is also noted that solar farms are just one of the renewable energy sources in New Zealand, so there may be other methods that can meet the country’s renewable energy goals without losing HPL. The inability of solar farms to establish on HPL is unlikely to threaten New Zealand’s renewable energy goals.

25.     In addition, while solar farms prefer rural locations with flat land, there are other options for solar energy. Solar panels can be located on hillier land, rooftops, industrial land, contaminated land, lower productivity rural land, and even offshore.

 

26.     The specific consultation questions that The Ministry for the Environment seek feedback on in relation to specified infrastructure are:

·    are you aware of any other issues that could impede the development of new specified infrastructure on HPL?

·    do you think the NPS-HPL requires an amendment to provide for the construction of new specified infrastructure on HPL?

·    do you think the proposed amendment to clause 3.9(2)(j)(i) – adding ‘construction’ – will resolve the issues?

·    which option do you prefer? Why?.

27.     The local board may wish to give feedback on these specific questions, or comment on the potential changes overall.

Intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses on HPL

28.     While there are not a high number of new developments for intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses in Auckland, when developments do occur they can be large. For example, poultry farms tend to cover around one hectare in buildings and there is a current application lodged for around two hectares of buildings (made up of eight sheds). Small glasshouse developments start off at around 0.5 hectare but are generally larger than this. There are examples of glasshouses in Auckland that cover over 10 hectares and the largest is around 25 hectares.

29.     These types of activities argue that they have a functional and operational need to locate on HPL so they are close to markets, labour sources, and supporting infrastructure. However, these features apply to much of Auckland’s rural land. To demonstrate a functional and operational need for an activity to locate on HPL, the rationale would more logically revolve around the activity’s need/use of the soil of the site for primary production activities.

30.     The potential change by The Ministry for the Environment could undermine the NPS-HPL by carving out an exception for activities that have no relationship to the soil of the site. If it becomes acceptable for large industrial scale buildings to locate on HPL it will make it difficult for the council when processing applications for non-land-based activities on HPL.

31.     It would also introduce new complexities to the administration of the NPS-HPL. For example, how would the council respond to a proposal for a factory producing synthetic meat or eggs? Hydroponic glasshouses, piggeries, poultry farms and a synthetic meat/egg factory are all activities that operate inside industrial scale buildings, do not rely on the soil resource of the site, and have a final output of food for human consumption. It would be very difficult for the council to make a distinction between these activities for consenting purposes.

32.     Auckland Council’s submission on the draft NPS-HPL in 2019 was supportive of the overall intent of the NPS to protect HPL for only land-based primary production. The council’s submission stated:

“It does not seem logical to protect the HPL soil resource from being paved over from urban expansion, but then allow it to be paved over for a horticulture operation that uses soilless media. Such an activity does not rely on the productive capacity of the soil and therefore does not need to be located on HPL.

The NPS-HPL should be protecting the full HPL resource including the soil. The purpose of the NPS-HPL is not to protect areas of flat land for large scale, industrial-type growing, but rather to protect the land resource which includes the soil.

33.     The Ministry for the Environment acknowledge that there is limited evidence of the extent of this issue given the short time since the NPS-HPL came into effect. They also accept that the potential change is misaligned with the original intent of the NPS-HPL, which was for primary production that does not rely on soil to be excluded from being considered an appropriate use and development of HPL.

34.     The specific consultation questions that The Ministry for the Environment seek feedback on in relation to intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses are:

·    do you think the NPS-HPL requires an amendment to provide a consent pathway for intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses to be developed on HPL? Why?

·    what do you think are the risks with amending the NPS-HPL to provide for intensive indoor primary production and greenhouses on HPL?

·    do you support option 1 (retaining the status quo)? Why?

·    do you support option 2 (a pathway under clause 3.9)? Why?

·    are there any other options we should consider?.

35.     The local board may wish to give feedback on these specific questions, or comment on the potential changes overall.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     Council declared a climate emergency in Auckland, in June 2019.  The decision included a commitment for all council decision-makers to consider the climate implications of their decisions.

37.     Auckland’s Climate Plan (2020) includes a ‘food priority’ with a goal of “a low carbon, resilient, local food system that provides all Aucklanders with access to fresh and healthy food”. The plan recognises the importance of local food production and preserving productive soil. It states that “soils play a critical role in meeting our emissions targets as carbon is stored in soils. The more soil we lose, the less chance we have of meeting our emissions targets.”

38.     A priority action area in the plan is to “Protect our productive soils and move toward regenerative practices to increase food security and carbon sequestration”. This involves the following actions:

·    advocate for and implement regulation that protects Auckland’s productive soils for growing food and supports a change to more regenerative growing of food

·    advocate for the proposed National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land.

39.     The potential changes to the NPS-HPL do not align with Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     Watercare and Auckland Transport are relatively unaffected by the changes around specified infrastructure as they are requiring authorities with the power to designate land (including HPL) for infrastructure purposes. However, they do support the proposed changes as it would enable them to put in new infrastructure via a resource consent pathway (rather than needing to rely on the designation process).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     The Waiheke Local Board area contains under 1 per cent of Auckland’s HPL. The Waiheke Local Board has around 811 hectares of HPL, which is around 5 per cent of the Waiheke Local Board area. A map of the areas within the Waiheke Local Board that meet the transitional definition of HPL is included in Attachment A.

43.     The draft Waiheke Local Board Plan (2023) contains the following statements that may be relevant to the consideration of these potential changes to the NPS-HPL:

The COVID-19 pandemic demonstrated the Waiheke economy’s reliance on tourism and visitors. Fortunately, there are other sectors adding value. This includes exports, viticulture and horticulture, farming, commuter income, technology, and the arts, among others.

Waiheke’s extraordinary natural landscape, its engaging and artistic community, its vineyards and restaurants, and its proximity to mainland Auckland means it is now viewed as a destination of choice.”

44.     The Waiheke Local Board provided formal feedback on the draft NPS-HPL in 2019 stating that the issue was relevant to Waiheke as there are number of highly productive lots in the rural area that support the island’s hill country farms and world-renowned wine industry. Preserving highly productive land was considered consistent with community feedback and would result in the retention of jobs in primary production. The local board sought that wine grape production be specifically mentioned in the NPS-HPL to recognise that this industry (and others such as olives) does not require the most fertile land. The local board also attached (and supported) feedback from the Waiheke Winegrowers Association that reiterated that wine growing areas should be included in the potential NPS-HPL protections.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     The NPS-HPL contains specific clauses directing the council to actively involve tangata whenua (to the extent they wish to be involved) in giving effect to the NPS-HPL. In addition, specified Māori Land is included in the list of exceptions for use and development.

46.     The Ministry for the Environment are not proposing any changes to these parts of the NPS-HPL.

47.     As part of a potential council submission, views from iwi are being sought.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Any council submission will be funded from existing operational budgets. There are no financial implications of the local board providing its views on this matter.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     The process for potential changes to the NPS-HPL is being run by The Ministry for the Environment. There are no significant risks to the Waiheke Local Board in providing feedback to be considered as part of a potential council submission on the NPS-HPL changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     Any local board feedback will be included as part of an item to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023 on a potential council submission. Formal resolutions from the local board will be appended to any council submission. Submissions to the Ministry for the Environment on the potential changes to the NPS-HPL close on 31 October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Areas of Waiheke Local Board meeting the transitional definition of Highly Productive Land

89

b

List of land use exceptions in Clause 3.9(2) of the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land

91

c

The Ministry for the Environment discussion document on the potential changes to the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ryan Bradley - Senior Policy Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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27 September 2023

 

 

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27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Submissions and feedback on the draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023

File No.: CP2023/12348

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of feedback and submissions received from public consultation on the draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board adopt a local board plan by 31 October of the year following election and uses the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with its communities.

3.       In June 2023, the local board approved a draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 for public consultation. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

4.       Auckland Council received 4732 pieces of written and verbal feedback from across the region.

5.       A total of 168 pieces of stakeholder and community feedback was received for Waiheke Local Board, including 60 submissions through the online survey tool, nine hard copy submissions and 87 pieces of feedback through engagement events.

6.       Mana whenua were invited to two online information sessions, provided with a copy of the draft local board plan in June 2023 and encouraged to provide written feedback. No formal feedback was received.

7.       Staff have prepared a Summary of Feedback report (Attachment A) summarising the results of the consultation. This will be made available for the public to view on the AK Have your say website.

8.       All feedback submissions will also be available on the Auckland Council website at https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/local-board-plans-2023-feedback 

9.       Most submitters were generally supportive of the board’s draft plan. Addressing environmental concerns, climate change, community resiliency and preparedness and affordable ferries were key themes of support. Areas of additional focus included housing; safe roads, footpaths and cycleways; less tourism; public transport; and clear deliverables. 

10.     The Waiheke Local Board should consider the submissions and feedback prior to adopting the final local board plan on 25 October 2023. Any changes and/or responses to feedback will be detailed in the report to adopt the plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive submissions and feedback on the draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023.

b)      consider feedback when finalising the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board must:

·    adopt its local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

12.     On 21 June 2023, Waiheke Local Board approved the draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 for public consultation.

13.     Early engagement with the community helped inform the draft local board plan as did feedback from the Annual Budget consultation.

14.     The key features of the draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 were:

·    Māori Outcomes – Working and supporting mana whenua and mātāwaka to increase the wellbeing of all residents, with respect to te ao Māori and recognise the role of mana whenua as kaitiaki of land and water resources.

·    Climate Action - Working with our community and networks to progressively deliver actions from the Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua and integrate actions within the Local Board Plan.

·    Our People - Waiheke residents have a strong sense of identity, connectedness and wellbeing which is enhanced through active community participation.

·    Our Environment - We want to protect, maintain and enhance our unique islands’ land, coastline, bush, wetland and marine environments for future generations.

·    Our Facilities and Open Spaces - Our parks, reserves and beaches are enjoyed and respected by residents and visitors. Our community, arts and cultural facilities are well used and accessible.

·    Our Places - The special character and values of Waiheke and inner gulf islands are protected and enhanced in line with the draft Waiheke Area Plan and principles of Essentially Waiheke.

·    Our Economy - Our Waiheke community has a strong, independent, entrepreneurial spirit and our natural assets provide many economic and lifestyle opportunities.

How we consulted

15.     The consultation was held between 13 July and 14 August 2023. A communications campaign encouraged people to “Help Shape the Future’ of the Waiheke Local Board area and to “Tell us what’s important”. This was promoted through libraries and council facilities, media channels such as the Gulf News, social media on the Waiheke Local Board Facebook account, and 11 targeted events with community partners.

16.     A range of engagement activities were undertaken to encourage the public to have their say, with a focus on digital and online platforms:

·    Public submissions: These were hard copy and online collected via email, post, and through libraries, service centres, local board offices, People’s Panel members and the online engagement platform akhaveyoursay/localboardplans.

·    Have Your Say: one face-to-face forum-style engagement event (spoken interaction) was held on 2 August 2023.

·    Translations: the summary of the draft plan was translated into the following languages for the Waiheke Local Board: Spanish. Some information was also available in Te Reo Māori and New Zealand Sign Language through the Ak Have Your Say website.

17.     The following community engagement activities were held:

·    Piritahi Marae Komiti hui

·    Resident Associations

·    W3 (Wonderful Waiheke Women)

·    Waiheke High School

·    Artworks Theatre

·    Community Networks Waiheke

·    Waiheke Resources Trust

·    Kai Cafe

·    Rebus Waiheke

·    Waiheke Collective

·    Bike Hub launch

·    Little Oneroa Playground opening

·    Mātiatia commuters

·    Ostend Markets

18.     In response, the local board received the following feedback:

·    60 submissions through the online survey tool

·    9 hard copy submissions

·    87 pieces of feedback via Have Your Say and engagement events.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of consultation feedback

19.     The results and analysis of the public consultation should be considered by the local board when developing the final local board plan.

20.     Staff have prepared a Summary of Feedback report (Attachment A) summarising the results of the consultation. The key messages of the report are described in Table 1 below.

Consultation question

Themed feedback

Q1 How well do you think our plan reflects the needs and aspirations for our community for the next three years?

 

Supportive themes:

•     Affordable ferries

•     Addressing environmental concerns

•     Good broad coverage of issues

More focus suggested:

•     Public transport – reliable ferries and bus service

•     Availability and affordability of housing

•     Safe roading, footpaths and cycleways

•     More focus on community, less on tourism / commerce

•     Clear deliverables

 

Q2 How well do you think we captured the needs and priorities of Our People in this section?

 

Supportive themes:

•     Affordable and reliable ferries

•     Importance of environment and conservation

•     Connectedness of community

•     Volunteers

More focus suggested:

•     Health facilities and older person services

•     Emergency management and preparedness

•     Worker accommodation and housing accessibility

•     Housing / social services

•     Regulatory and infrastructure restraints

•     Excessive helicopter flights

•     Climate change and improving resiliency (including infrastructure)

 

Q3 How well do you think we captured the needs and priorities of Our Environment in this section?

 

Supportive themes:

•     Stormwater management (strengthen education)

•     Volunteering encouraged

•     Marine, wetland and waterway protection

More focus suggested:

•     Septic tank management and regulatory costs to improve (split of costs)

•     Fire hazards and drought resilience

•     Climate change resiliency

•     Tree protection

•     Waste and composting

•     Emergency management plan (including fire)

•     Road maintenance and run off management

•     Dogs / bird protection (Rakino)

•     Weed free / management

•     Excessive helicopter flights

 

Q4 How well do you think we captured the needs and priorities of Our Facilities and open spaces in this section?

 

Supportive themes:

•     Track network (maintain and extend)

•     Safe cycleways

•     Park and reserve maintenance

More focus suggested:

•     Noxious weed management

•     Cycleways (positives and negatives)

•     Safe pedestrian access

•     Rakino Hall replacement

•     Rangihoua / OSP weed management

•     Mana whenua cultural/interp signs

 

Q5 How well do you think we captured the needs and priorities of Our Places in this section?

 

Supportive themes:

•     Track network (maintain and extend)

•     Affordable ferry services

•     Implementing housing strategy

•     Mātiatia improvements

More focus suggested:

•     Reduced regulatory costs for home improvements

•     Rakino road maintenance

•     Electric transport

•     Ferry infrastructure and parking (KP)

•     Safer pedestrian access (to schools / btw villages)

•     Safe cycleways

•     Reliable / integrated public transport (also Eastern end – Park & ride)

•     Hospital or care facilities for older people

•     Affordable housing / partnerships or alternative ownership models

•     Support electric vehicles / buses / ferries

 

Q6 How well do you think we captured the needs and priorities of Our Economy in this section?

 

Supportive themes:

•     Arts destination

•     Sanctuary in the Gulf

More focus suggested:

•     Visitor numbers

•     Worker accommodation

•     Eco – tourism – biodiversity

•     Pest and predator control

 

Q7 Do you have any other feedback on our proposed Local Board Plan, including how we could better meet our climate change goals or Māori outcome aspirations?

 

•     Appreciate the work the local board is doing – moving forward correctly

•     Increased attention on Rakino

•     Visitor levy for environmental improvements

•     Community sustainability and wellbeing

•     Power supply reliability

•     More local decision-making

•     Emergency planning

•     Mana whenua

•     Waste

•     Regulatory constraints for improving properties

•     Dark Sky Waiheke

•     Bikelane from Mātiatia – Onetangi

•     Reduced car use

•     Climate strategy

•     Housing

•     Ferries

 

 

Publishing the results of public consultation

21.     To conclude the consultation phase of the local board plan development, staff recommend that the local board receive the submissions and feedback for consideration.

22.     All feedback is available on the Auckland Council website at https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/local-board-plans-2023-feedback  

23.     The Summary of Feedback (Attachment A) report will also be available on the AK Have your say website following approval of this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Receiving the submissions and feedback has a neutral climate impact. The submissions are available online to reduce the printing of hard copies. 

25.     The draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 contained a specific Climate Action section, focusing on the scope of challenges posted by climate change. It considered such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

26.      Implementation of the Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua was considered a priority by submitters in line with the overarching objectives:

•        To reduce and eventually eliminate our use of fossil fuels (petrol, oil diesel, gas, coal).

•        To educate, encourage and incentivise changes to our lifestyles, businesses, infrastructure. buildings, consumption patterns, behaviour and environment that reduce or eliminate greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation).

•        To restore the natural environment (taiao on land (whenua) and sea (moana).

•        To increase our ability to respond to the climate changes already locked in by helping tāngata (people) prepare, adapt, and become more resilient.

27.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Waiheke Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Workshops were held with the board and the board had the opportunity to attend briefings on a range of topics including community investment, Māori outcomes, local economy and climate action. Written advice was also provided to the board on a number of topics including strategic context and environmental services.

29.     Subject matter experts from across the council, Auckland Transport and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited were also given the opportunity to peer review the draft local board plan and provide advice.

30.     Staff will work closely with the local board in the development of the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     The Waiheke Local Board should consider all submissions and feedback to the draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 prior to adopting the final local board plan in October 2023. Any changes and/or responses to feedback will be detailed in the report to adopt the plan.

32.     Feedback received from community in the Annual Budget consultation was used to shape the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 was developed with consideration given to existing feedback from mana whenua and mataawaka. This included seeking their views and values throughout the development of the local board plan 2023.

34.     Annual Budget feedback from mana whenua was also considered in the drafting of the plan.

35.     Two online information sessions for mana whenua were held on 8th and 13th June 2023.  These sessions provided an opportunity for mana whenua to hear about Local Board Plans, how the perspective of Māori could be reflected through their input, the feedback process and timelines.

36.     Mana whenua organisations were asked which (of the 21) draft local board plans they wanted to review, and those requested were shared, along with tailored feedback forms.

37.     The draft Waiheke Local Board Plan was shared with Ngāti Paoa, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngaati Whanaunga, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Tamaterā and Te Patukirikiri. No formal mana whenua submissions were received.

38.     The board held a hui with Piritahi Marae Komiti on 4 August 2023 and feedback was captured.

39.     Seven submissions were received from those identifying as Māori, comprising 8% of submissions overall. 

40.     In addition to initiatives woven within the plan that align with Māori aspirations (such as environmental programmes and water quality) the draft plan has objectives to strengthen collaboration and partnership with Māori and to enhance Māori wellbeing and potential. There are also advocacy areas that will be progressed in partnership with mana whenua, such as elimination of the invasive seaweed Caulerpa brachypus from the Hauraki Gulf

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     There are no direct financial implications associated with receiving the submissions and feedback.

42.     The budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     The local board will consider all submissions and feedback before making changes to the draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     The submissions and feedback are available on the Auckland Council AK Have Your Say website.

45.     The Waiheke Local Board will adopt the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 on 25 October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of Feedback report - Waiheke Local Board

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Waiheke Local Board Annual Report 2022/2023

File No.: CP2023/12393

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the Annual Report for the Waiheke Local Board 2022/2023, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 28 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2022/2023 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 28 September 2023. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft Waiheke Local Board Annual Report 2022/2023 as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 28 September 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

4.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area – projects and improvements

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Our performance explained

Highlights of the local board’s work programme which contributed to a performance outcome

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

6.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

8.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.       The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.     The annual report provides a retrospective view on both the financial and service performance in each local board area for the financial year 2022/2023.

11.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2022/2023 Annual Report for the local board are:

·       Audit NZ review during August and September 2023

·       report to the Governing Body for adoption on 28 September 2023

·       release to stock exchanges and publication online on 29 September 2023

·       physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board Annual Report 2022/2023*

139

* Note: Attachment A is no longer confidential.

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Audrey Gan - Lead Financial Advisor Local Boards

David Rose - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on Emergency Management Bill

File No.: CP2023/13708

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request local board input into the development of the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Emergency Management Bill (the Bill) intended to replace the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (CDEM Act) is open for submissions until 3 November 2023. The Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee will make a submission to the Bill.

3.       Further to the Memo to Governing Body, local board members and Independent Māori Statutory Board dated 17 August, this report invites local boards to provide input into the development of the Committee’s submission. A high-level overview of the Bill is provided, and a more detailed summary of the Bill’s more significant changes is attached.

4.       Decisions on the Bill, submissions to it and subsequent progress will be made by the government formed after the general election in October 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide input to the development of Auckland Council’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Emergency Management Bill to replace the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (CDEM Act) is open for submission until 3 November 2023 and can be accessed via legislation.govt.nz

6.       The Bill is a part of the programme of policy work known as the Trifecta Work programme that arose out of the government’s response to the 2017 report of the Technical Advisory Group on Better Reponses to Natural Disasters and other Emergencies.

7.       Comment is sought on the Bill as currently presented. Please note that decision-making on the progress of the Bill will be made by the government formed after the general election in October 2023.

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Emergency Management Bill

8.       The Emergency Management Bill updates the emergency management system to improve performance, modernise the current legislative and regulatory framework, and acknowledge the importance of community resilience and preparedness. The Bill builds on the CDEM Act and:

·        restructures the Bill to a more modern approach

·        includes current provisions with minor amendment

·        introduces new language and terminology, as a consequence of the shift from ‘Civil Defence Emergency Management’ to ‘Emergency Management’

·        introduces more significant change consistent with the Technical Advisory Group’s recommendations and the government’s response.

A more modern Bill

9.       The Bill is structured with parts and sub-parts (some accompanied with outlines of their contents) and makes extensive use of headings. Some sections of the CDEM Act are moved to the Schedules of the Emergency Management Bill.

Current provisions minorly amended

10.     Much of the current CDEM Act is carried over with minor amendment. The placement of these clauses within the Bill’s structure means provisions carried over may be placed in a different order than they appeared in the CDEM Act.

Language and terminology

11.     Changes to language and terminology appear throughout the Bill including:

New terminology

Outgoing terminology

Emergency Management

Civil Defence Emergency Management

Emergency Management Committee

Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee

Emergency Management Committee Plan

Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee Group Plan

Coordinating Executive

Coordinating Executive Group

Area Controller

Group Controller

Area Recovery Manager

Group Recovery Manager

emergency designation

a state of emergency or a transition period

 

More significant changes

12.     The more significant changes introduced by the Bill are summarised briefly below, and in more detail in Attachment A.

Greater recognition of the role of Māori and enhancing Māori participation

13.     The role of iwi and Māori has been increasingly recognised in the practice of emergency management since the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes. The Bill recognises the role of iwi and Māori in emergency management at all levels, through representation, requiring each committee to improve its capability and capacity to engage with iwi and Māori, and making involvement consistent nationally.

Changes to the requirements regarding the Emergency Management Committee Plan (currently the Group Plan)

14.     Emergency Management Committees will need to engage with representatives of disproportionately impacted communities (such as seniors and the disabled), iwi and Māori, and other people or groups as appropriate, before it approves a Plan. This is to encourage more proactive engagement with communities as a part of Plan development.

Critical infrastructure

15.     New requirements are introduced in addition to changing the terminology from ‘lifeline utilities’ to ‘critical infrastructure’ entities/sector. The requirement to share information is made explicit for the purpose of the Bill. A new requirement to develop and publish the planned level of service during emergencies is introduced.

16.     The provisions in the Bill are part of a wider policy development programme to develop a more resilient model led by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, that recognises a broader range:

·        of infrastructure (i.e. banks)

·        of potential threats (i.e. cyberattack)

·        and their dependencies and interdependencies.

The role of Emergency Management Committees compared to the functions and duties of local authority members of Emergency Management Committees

17.     The Bill clarifies the different roles of Emergency Management Committees and local authorities. Some new requirements are added, and business continuity is provided for separately. The provisions are expressed in similar terms although the function and duties of local authorities are more oriented towards action.

Changes regarding emergency designation - State of Emergency and Notice of Transition Period

18.     The term ‘emergency designation’ is introduced, meaning either a state of emergency or notice of transition. The Bill also requires the appointment of people able to declare a state of emergency or give a notice of transition period from the representatives on the Emergency Management Committee.

Regulations and Director’s rule-making powers

19.     The Bill expands the range of matters regulations can be made for, including operational matters, infringement offences and breaches of rules. A new power is granted to the Director of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) to make rules regarding roles and responsibilities in specific situations, technical standards, training, qualifications and other matters.

Infringements

20.     The Bill sets up a framework for issuing, serving and payment of infringement notices for offences made under the regulation making powers of the Bill, for the purposes of the Bill.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The definition of emergencies in the CDEM Act and the Bill includes naturally occurring emergencies such as severe weather and drought. It is widely anticipated that these types of emergencies will become more frequent and severe as a consequence of Climate Change.

22.     The Bill updates the regulatory framework under the CDEM Act. Under the framework emergency management comprises the four R’s - Reduction, Readiness, Response and Recovery. Emergency management practice seeks to:

·        reduce the risk from emergencies

·        raise awareness of and preparedness for emergencies

·        provide a platform for effective response to and recovery from emergencies.

23.     The changes signalled by the Bill will be complemented by the review of the National Emergency Management Plan, the roadmap for the implementation of the National Disaster Resilience Strategy and the wider policy work related to infrastructure.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The Bill and proposed changes to the framework for emergency management has implications across the Auckland Council group, due to our obligations as:

·    managers of critical infrastructure

·    providers of key information during emergencies

·    potential staff to be redirected to support response and recovery activities.

25.     Auckland Emergency Management is working with various parts of Auckland Council and CCO’s including Auckland Plan Strategy and Research, Healthy Waters, Local Board Services, Ngā Matarae, Auckland Transport and Watercare on the development of the submission to the Bill.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report requests input from local boards into the development of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee’s submission on the Bill.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     There is a high level of interest amongst iwi and Māori. NEMA has held several national hui. Similarly, engagement with marae and related discussions indicate an awareness and interest.

28.     We have written to iwi and Māori to encourage them to both make their own submission on the Bill and provide comment or feedback that can be reflected in the development of Auckland Council’s submission. If there is interest, a hui on this topic may be held.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The changes signalled in the Bill will require amended or additional processes and practices and introduce additional cost across the emergency management system, it is uncertain when they will arise.

30.     It is also unclear how such costs will fall between participating Emergency Management Committees, local authorities, ratepayers, critical infrastructure entities and sectors, their shareholders and consumers. There may also be implications for capacity amongst participants across the emergency management system, critical infrastructure entities and sectors.

31.     The full financial and resource implications may not be known until the Bill is enacted, the National Emergency Management Plan reviewed, the roadmap for the implementation of the National Disaster Resilience Strategy completed and critical infrastructure policy confirmed. These programmes will be subject to the decision-making of the government to be formed after the General Election in October 2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The general direction of policy on which the Bill is based has been signalled for some time. The submission process is the most effective means of managing risk of unfavourable change.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     A workshop of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee to consider the recommendations of the draft submission is scheduled for 18 October 2023. Materials will be circulated to Committee members in preparation for the workshop.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of the Emergency Management Bill's more significant changes

157

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Wayne Brown - Principal Recovery Advisor

Authorisers

Paul Amaral - General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Biodiversity Credit System – central government discussion document

File No.: CP2023/13669

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of central government’s discussion document entitled ‘Helping nature and people thrive – Exploring a biodiversity credit system for Aotearoa New Zealand’, and its potential implications for Auckland Council should such a system be advanced.

2.       To provide an opportunity for Local Boards to offer any feedback to council staff to help inform the preparation of a council submission on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Central government (Ministry for the Environment, Department of Conservation) published a discussion document on 7 July 2023 (weblink: Biodiversity Credit System) which is exploring the potential for a ‘biodiversity credit system’ that could be developed for Aotearoa New Zealand. Central government is seeking feedback on the need for and possible design of a biodiversity credit system, and the potential roles of government and Māori in implementing it.

4.       Staff from Natural Environment Strategy (NES) are coordinating the development of a proposed Auckland Council submission. Staff are inviting feedback from local boards, mana whenua and the Rural Advisory Panel, to help shape the proposed Auckland Council submission which will be considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023.

5.       NES staff provided a webinar to overview the discussion document with approximately 40 local board members on 21 August 2023. Local board feedback to NES staff is due no later than 29 September 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide any feedback to council staff to help inform a council submission on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System by 29 September 2023

Horopaki

Context

6.       The development of a national biodiversity credit system is intended to be used to increase funding opportunities from the private sector towards restoration efforts. This could be a catalyst to, or supplement, council activities, such as the regulatory implementation of the National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity (NPSIB) and the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM).

7.       The government’s discussion document is very much an initial consultation to start the national conversation about a potential biodiversity credit system that could be developed for Aotearoa New Zealand. Consequently, the government’s discussion document is very exploratory in nature and does not set out a specific proposed system with clear scope, roles and implementation mechanisms to provide feedback on, rather it discusses a number of different approaches that could be taken to different aspects of designing and implementing such a system.

Main points covered in discussion document

8.       The discussion document explains:

a)      what biodiversity credits and a biodiversity credit system are with some international examples that are emerging

b)      what the benefits could be in the Aotearoa New Zealand context

c)      different approaches that could be taken to the scope and design of a system, and

d)      the distinct roles that government could play.

9.       The discussion document includes consultation questions that seek views on the different approaches and roles for a biodiversity credit system.

10.     Biodiversity credits are a way of attracting funding from the private sector, to invest in efforts by landowners to protect, maintain and enhance indigenous vegetation and habitats, including shrublands, grasslands, wetlands and natural and regenerating native forests. The credits are intended to recognise, in a transparent and consistent way, landholder projects or activities that protect, maintain and enhance indigenous biodiversity, or positive outcomes, e.g., a 1 % increase (or avoided decrease) in the indigenous biodiversity of a hectare.

11.     By purchasing credits, people and organisations can finance and claim credit for their contribution to ‘nature-positive’ actions and outcomes. This is an emerging approach that is gaining considerable interest internationally. In Aotearoa New Zealand, credits could relate to protecting, restoring, and enhancing nature on public and private land, including whenua Māori (Māori land).

12.     A biodiversity credit system could recognise efforts to protect, enhance and restore indigenous biodiversity in any habitat (on land, in freshwater, and / or coastal and marine environments) or only in some. Biodiversity credits could represent work on whole ecosystems or catchments or focus on endangered or taonga species or remnant habitats.

13.     The discussion document suggests seven principles that could apply to the design of a government supported biodiversity credit system. The principles would let people know what they can expect when they participate in a biodiversity credit system and what is expected of them. For example, the system should have clear rules for the claims investors can make to avoid ‘greenwashing,’ should reward nature-positive activities additional to business as usual, and the system should maximise positive impact on biodiversity (including uplifting mauri and mana of biodiversity).

14.     The discussion document also explains the components of a fully functioning system, including measurement, verification and reporting, legal recognition, potential ways credits can be traded and the roles of industry experts. It notes that regional and district councils could potentially play a role in providing expertise to landowners for biodiversity credit activities and / or projects.

15.     The Government is exploring the possible roles it could play to support the establishment of a biodiversity credit system for Aotearoa New Zealand that would operate with both integrity and impact. It suggests the following two roles but notes that a blend of these options may be appropriate, which could evolve over time:

a)      market enablement: where it provides policies and guidance for the development and uptake of voluntary schemes in Aotearoa New Zealand, and potentially funding for system development as the market is established. An enablement role seeks to influence the outcomes and operation of the market, using non-regulatory tools such as good practice guidance and optional standards.

b)      market administration: where it establishes and manages a voluntary biodiversity scheme and is active in the ongoing management and administration. A market administration role includes setting a regulatory framework, with tools to direct the outcomes and the operation of the market.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Potential implications for Auckland Council

16.     Given the nature of the government’s discussion document, it is difficult to be certain about the potential implications of a biodiversity credit system for Auckland Council as no clear proposals have been made about its scope, design and implementation or different roles central government and councils will have within the system.

17.     There are potential benefits that a biodiversity credit system could have for funding protection, restoration, and enhancement of indigenous biodiversity on public and private land in the Auckland region. Depending on the scope and design of a biodiversity credit system (which will be developed following feedback on this initial consultation being undertaken by central government), it could be of relevance to initiatives undertaken locally seeking to achieve positive biodiversity and freshwater outcomes as they complement regulatory requirements (e.g. tree planting, stream restoration etc). However, as discussed in paragraph 13 above, one of the suggested principles for a biodiversity credit system is ‘it should reward nature-positive activities additional to business as usual’. For example, this suggests that funding derived from a credit should not serve to substitute funding provided to existing council programmes.

18.     As the discussion document is at an early, exploratory stage, it is not clear yet what role councils should play or how the council group including local boards might benefit. MfE stated in a recent presentation to the Te Uru Kahika Resource Managers Group on 31 August that it is very open to hearing suggestions from councils.

19.     Our feedback is likely to include a number of our own questions and different views from the council group about the system scope, design and implementation. In some instances, we may also be able to suggest different options for consideration by central government, e.g. in relation to the role councils could play:

a)      little or no involvement by council?

b)      some partnership with central government to help identify focus areas for achieving best biodiversity outcomes?

c)      council acts as a translator / navigator providing advice to landowners in the region about use of biodiversity credits and where to focus efforts?

20.     There are 23 questions asked in the discussion document. NES staff have identified the key questions that are more about the system design and overall approaches that could be taken, which we thought local boards may want to focus any feedback on. These can be found in Attachment A of the agenda report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Feedback from Waiheke Local Board is due no later than 29 September, to help inform the proposed council submission that will be presented to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023.

22.     As part of preparing the council submission, staff will consider and present the potential impacts on climate, Māori and local board views as well as the financial implications, risks and mitigations in the report to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee. Due to this being an initial consultation to start the national conversation about a potential biodiversity credit system, central government’s discussion document is very exploratory in nature and does not set out a specific proposed system with clear scope, roles and implementation mechanisms to provide feedback on. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the potential impacts and implications at this stage, and this may become more evident in subsequent central government consultations when a more defined approach to the design and implementation of a biodiversity credit system has been developed and proposed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key consultation questions

165

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Taran Livingston - Lead Analyst Natural Environment Strategy

Authorisers

Dave Allen - Manager Natural Environment Strategy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024

File No.: CP2023/13701

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback on the proposed direction of the 2024 draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2023/24-2033/34 (draft GPS 2024).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry of Transport has released the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2023/24-2033/34 (draft GPS 2024) for public consultation.

3.       The draft GPS 2024 sets out the priorities for a 10-year period to 2034 and is updated every three years.  It outlines what the government wants to achieve in land transport, and how it expects to see funding allocated between types of activities across the land transport system.

4.       The draft GPS 2024 identifies six strategic priorities that the government wants its investment programme to achieve:

a.   Maintaining and Operating the System: Focuses on efficiently maintaining the condition of the existing transport system to meet the current and future needs of users.

b.   Increasing Resilience: Aims to enhance the transport system's ability to withstand natural and human-made hazards.

c.   Reducing Emissions: Aims for a transition to a lower carbon transport system to address climate change.

d.   Safety: Aims to significantly improve safety across all modes of transportation.

e.   Sustainable Urban and Regional Development: Aims to provide accessible and reliable transport options to support social, cultural, and economic opportunities. Also emphasizes developing low-emission transport and reducing congestion.

f.    Integrated Freight System: Focuses on designing and operating efficient, resilient, and low-carbon transport corridors and hubs to support economic activities.

5.       The draft GPS proposes an increase in National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) revenue from $15.5 billion in 2021/22-2023/24 to $20.8 billion in 2024/25- 2026/27, an increase of $5.3 billion (34 per cent). 

6.       Submissions are due on Friday 15 September 2023, which is after Parliament rises for the 2023 General Elections. Submissions will therefore be received by the incoming government, and it is likely that changes will be made to the GPS 2024 as a result.

7.       As the submission date was prior to the next meeting of the local board, feedback was approved via the urgent decision process as per Attachment A.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on the proposed direction of the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024 as attached (Attachment A).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The draft GPS 2024 outlines what the government wants to achieve in land transport, and how it expects to see funding allocated between types of activities (for example, roading, public transport and road safety) across the land transport system. The GPS 2024 sets out the priorities for a 10-year period to 2034 and is updated every three years. Auckland Council made a submission on the GPS 2021 in May 2020.

Discussion

Summary of strategic priorities

9.       The draft GPS 2024 identifies six strategic priorities that the government wants its investment programme to achieve (Attachment A):

·   Maintaining and operating the system – the condition of the existing transport system is efficiently maintained at a level that meets the current and future needs of users.

·   Increasing resilience – the transport system is better able to cope with natural and anthropogenic hazards.

·   Reducing emissions – transitioning to a lower carbon transport system.

·   Safety – transport is made substantially safer for all.

·   Sustainable urban and regional development – people can readily and reliably access social, cultural, and economic opportunities through a variety of transport options. Sustainable urban and regional development is focused on developing resilient and productive towns and cities that have a range of low-emission transport options and low congestion.

·   Integrated freight system – well-designed and operated transport corridors and hubs that provide efficient, reliable, resilient, multi-modal, and low carbon connections to support productive economic activity.

Discussion of strategic priorities

10.     The government’s priorities for GPS 2021 are safety; better travel options; improving freight connections; and climate change. An overview of the draft GPS and related documents can be found here

11.     The draft GPS 2024 removes the specific priority around travel options with this largely, although less explicitly, being incorporated into the urban development strategic priority.

12.     Sustainable urban and regional development is a new strategic priority in the draft GPS 2024. Previously, economic and development objectives were less explicit and were spread across the freight and travel options priorities.

13.     Maintaining and operating the system is also a new priority. In contrast to GPS 2021 which emphasises transformation (as opposed to “business as usual”), the draft GPS 2024 seeks to boost funding for maintenance to address what it sees as significant under-investment. 

14.     The climate change priority in GPS 2021 has been separated into two components, reflecting the need to both mitigate (reducing emissions) and adapt to climate change and other events (increasing resilience).

15.     The priorities guide investment decisions by Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) and the crown.

 

 

 

 

Summary of GPS funding

16.     The draft GPS proposes an increase in NLTF revenue from $15.5 billion in 2021/22-2023/24 to $20.8 billion in 2024/25- 2026/27, an increase of $5.3 billion (34 per cent).

17.     This requires a funding package of $7.7 billion, because revenue over 2021/22-2023/24 was augmented by a $2 billion Crown loan.

18.     The proposed between $7-8 billion funding package is made up of:

·     Increases in fuel taxes over three years ($1.4 billion)

·     Crown grants of $2.9 billion, including $500 million from the Climate Emergency Recovery Fund (CERF), which would be added to the walking and cycling activity class

·     Hypothecating traffic infringement fee revenue to the NLTF to increase the safety activity class

·     A $3.1 billion Crown loan.

19.     Key changes in activity class allocations include:

·     The public transport services activity class increases by 50 per cent

·     The local road maintenance and renewals activity class increases by 35 per cent

·     The safety activity class decreases by 37 per cent.  Note that this is due to the reallocation of funding for safety related infrastructure improvements to the State Highway and Local Road Maintenance activity classes. The government expects this will enable safety improvements to be delivered as part of a wider improvement programme.

Strategic Investment Programme

20.     The draft GPS 2024 also sets out a series of projects that the government considers strategically important for the development of New Zealand’s transport system in the coming decades. Projects identified in the Auckland region are:

· Warkworth to Whangārei – State Highway 1

· Auckland Northwest Rapid Transit

· Auckland rail third and fourth Mains Expansion

· Avondale to Onehunga rail link

· Level Crossing Upgrade and Removal Programme.

21.     The Waka Kotahi Board approves projects funded from the NLTF, but by highlighting these projects, the government expects that their strategic importance will be given particular consideration during the development of the National Land Transport Plan.

Auckland Council submission process

22.     The Ministry of Transport has provided four weeks for consultation on the draft GPS 2024, with submissions closing on Friday, 15 September 2023.

23.     Auckland Council staff will draft the submission, with input from AT.  Because submissions close before the next Transport & Infrastructure Committee meeting on 21 September, staff will propose that members of the Governing Body and representatives of the AT Board and IMSB, be given delegation to approve the submission. 

24.     A report summarising the draft GPS 2024 and proposing approval delegations to a sub-committee will be presented to the Governing Body at its next meeting on 24 August 2023. 

 

 

Government consideration of feedback

25.     The delay in publication of the draft GPS 2024 means that the consultation period overlaps with Parliament rising on 31 August 2023, in the lead-up to the 14 October 2023 General Election. This means that feedback will be received by the next government.

26.     The Green, National and Act parties have all identified different transport priorities to those outlined in the draft GPS 2024. Changes, potentially of a substantial nature, could be made by the incoming government.  It is not clear whether an additional round of consultation will be held should substantive changes be made.  Accordingly, staff advise proceeding on the assumption that this may be the only formal opportunity for council to provide feedback to the government on GPS priorities, issues and opportunities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The timeframe for next steps in the submission process are set out in the table below:

Dates

Events

24 August

·    Governing Body meets:

Approval sought to delegate approval of the submission to members of the Governing Body and representatives of the AT Board and IMSB

1 September

·    Anticipated first draft to all elected members and IMSB members for feedback, and Local Board members for information and feedback

6 September

·    Councillors and IMSB members feedback due

14 September

·    Delegated group feedback on second draft due

·    Local Board views to append to Governing Body submission due

15 September

·    Finalise submission

·    Delegated group approval

·    Lodge submission

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board feedback on the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2023/24-2033/34

171

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacob van der Poel - Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024

“The priority for available funding from the National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) is to ensure the ongoing operation and maintenance of the system.”

There is one fundamental oversight within the framing of the GPS LT 2024 and that is what it excludes by the way of transport functions, and then how those exclusions, and connections to these exclusions, are to receive the same policy focus and consequential funding as all the functions that are included within the definition of Land Transport.

·    Included are all roads, cycleways, footpaths, and rail systems and their users. Mode shifts are comprehensively covered.  Private and public transport modes and their needs are core considerations.

·    Excluded are all ferry services – yet these are integral to national public transport strategies, Waka Kotahi funding and mode shift considerations. By virtue of calling this a Land Transport GPS, ferries are only ever going to be considered in isolation, and not as core to national transport policy and funding strategies.

·    The Waiheke Local Board asks that public transport ferries are included in the Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024, as they are critical to the networks under consideration.

·    Note: All forms of air transport are also excluded. However, unlike ferries, none of those are provided and/or funded as part of significant over-arching transport strategies within this plan or are integral to the public transport system, except where the two systems intersect at air transport hubs.

The six strategic priorities for GPS 2024

The Waiheke Local Board supports the six strategic priorities and supports Auckland Council’s submissions with respect to each of these, namely:

1.    Maintaining and operating the system – supports:

a.    the increased emphasis on maintaining and operating the system and building back better.

b.    Funding maintenance and renewals at a sustainable rate to improve the condition of the road network.

c.    Aligning safety or other mode shift initiatives with renewals for enhanced cost savings.

d.    Identifying and making low-costs sensible interventions simultaneous to renewals and maintenance e.g., drainage improvements.

e.    Not necessarily replacing like for like where there are forward thinking initiatives that will repurpose for greater benefit e.g., for mode shifts.

f.     Improving the GPS by more clearly emphasising the need to align implementation of projects across various activities.

 

2.    Increasing resilience – supports:

a.    Building capability at central and local government levels to assess, plan and deliver the necessary investments to achieve a resilient, well adapted and multi-purposed transport network.

b.    Sorting funding support to enable Auckland Council to deliver on its functions within a partnership approach with central government.

c.    Giving consideration to significantly improving the balance of road funding between urban and rural,

and Notes:

i. Waiheke Island has significant unsealed roading that contributes to health risks to people and the natural environment, and causes economic harm to productive land (agricultural, viticultural, horticultural), aside from contributing to a higher rate of accidents and safety risks, particularly to visitors including overseas drivers unused to unsealed roads.

ii. The Waiheke Local Board would welcome central government co-funding Auckland Council’s unsealed road improvement programmes.

3.    Reducing Emissions – supports

a.    Strengthening government’s commitment to emissions reduction targets which have been weakened in the draft GPS 2024.

b.    Reinstating government’s intended strategic priorities for land transport issued in December 2022 so there are high thresholds for potential investments that are inconsistent with the emissions reduction objectives under the ERP.

c.    The inclusion of transport related air pollution as a wider transport related harm which could be improved through reducing VKT by conventional combustion vehicles.

and notes:

d.    The Waiheke Local Board has endorsed community advocacy group Electric Island Waiheke since its inception. Their advocacy within the community, and through both regional local government and nationally (ECCA and more recently Are Ake), as well as through power supply company Vector, has seen the uptake of electric vehicles at the highest rate of any area in Aotearoa New Zealand.

e.    It is critical in our view that our community sees central government incentivising initiatives that accelerate the uptake of EVs such as those here on Waiheke Island.

f.     It is important that central government agencies recognise the flexibility and shifts required in road type and infrastructure to realise innovative low emissions transport modes as they are further developed e.g., autonomous vehicles, on-call personal passenger service vehicles.

4.    Safety – supports:

a.    The retention of the safety wording in GPS2021 where ‘nobody is killed or seriously injured’ rather than the watered-down suggestion in GPS2024 ‘Transport is made substantially safer for all’,

b.    Retaining the interim 2030 target of a 40% reduction in Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI).

c.    The inclusion of safe facilities around public transport to encourage update including pedestrian crossings, lighting and CCTV,

d.    Supports using a DSI metric for vulnerable road users in line with the overall 40% reduction target.
Note: c) and d) above are taken from Auckland Council’s feedback on Sustainable Urban and Regional Development.

but Notes:

e.    The silence of this report (and Auckland Council’s own submission) on enabling better and safe access for those with mobility challenges, and the need for the disability sector to have an opportunity to review and advise improvements to this policy document that is inclusive of their diverse needs.

5.      Sustainable urban and regional development - Supports:

a.    A land transport system which contributes to sustainable urban and regional development by investing in networks for rapid transit/public transport, metropolitan rail, cycling, walking and freight, and maintaining them at a good level of service,
 
but Notes:

b.    That any land transport system must allow for and promote mode share to other forms of transport that don’t operate on roadways and/or use land transport, especially ferries in major urban areas of New Zealand, and to connect island populations.

c.    Investments that more effectively promote mode shift in existing urban areas.

6.    Integrated Freight System – Supports:

a.    Investment in the rail network to increase freight capacity, reduce conflicts with passenger rail services, reduce transport emissions, as well as targeted road upgrades to address critical bottlenecks.

Strategic Investment programme – Supports:

b.    Government’s commitment to strategic investment in Auckland, north-west rapid transit and heavy rail improvements, including level crossing removals.

c.    Government’s proposal to develop a framework for funding financing, and integrated decision-making processes into current statutory processes for rapid transport projects.

d.    Central government taking responsibility for the funding required to build the Rapid Transit Network in Auckland, as an asset of national significance, at a time when Auckland Council is fiscally too constrained by funding access, to bear the funding load of the RTN network.

 

Waiheke Local Board Chairperson Cath Handley


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park – Fisheries New Zealand discussion paper

File No.: CP2023/13675

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of central government’s discussion document entitled ‘Proposed options for bottom fishing access zones in the Hauraki Gulf’.

2.       To offer an opportunity for local boards to input into an Auckland Council submission to Fisheries New Zealand.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Fisheries New Zealand released a discussion paper consulting on options for establishing Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana on 30 August 2023. The proposals follow the June 2021 publication of Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf: Government action on the Sea Change Plan.

4.       The Fisheries New Zealand proposal presents four options for Bottom Fishing Access Zones (BFAZ) that vary in closing 74.1 per cent to 87.3 per cent of the Gulf to Danish seining and 77.1 per cent to 89.2 per cent of the Gulf to bottom trawl fishing. Current closures protect on average 35 per cent of predicted suitable habitat.

5.       Staff from Natural Environment Strategy (NES) are coordinating an Auckland Council submission and inviting input from local boards and mana whenua. The submission will be considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023.

6.       Council staff appreciate the many demands on local boards and note there is no obligation to provide feedback on this fisheries management proposal. NES staff have considerable in-depth background of the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana discussions over the last decade and experience on the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan Advisory Group.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Natural Environment Strategy staff overview of central government’s discussion paper ‘Bottom fishing access zones in the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park’.

b)      whakarite / provide feedback on any of the Fisheries New Zealand consultation questions, to help inform the proposed council submission that will be presented to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Background

7.       Auckland Council initiated the Sea Change marine spatial planning process a decade ago in cooperation with Waikato Regional Council. Natural Environment Strategy staff played a significant role in resourcing a stakeholder-led process through to the publication of the stakeholder plan in April 2017.

8.       Central government developed Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf: Government action on the Sea Change Plan (June 2021) in response to marine protection (Department of Conservation) and fisheries management (Fisheries New Zealand) proposals in the Sea Change plan. Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf addresses the respective DOC and Fisheries New Zealand responsibilities and how the relevant Sea Change plan proposals could be advanced.

9.       An approved Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan was announced on 9 August 2023 setting out a management objective to protect marine benthic (i.e. ocean floor) habitats from any adverse effects of fishing and exclude bottom trawling and Danish seining in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana except within defined areas.

10.     A key technical document (published by Fisheries New Zealand in March 2023) outlines the use of a spatial decision support tool to aid the development of options for the Bottom Fishing Access Zones (BFAZ) proposal.

11.     On 30 August 2023, Fisheries New Zealand released a discussion paper consulting on options for establishing Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana.

12.     The proposals encompassed by the Bottom Fishing Access Zones discussion paper are quite separate from the marine protection proposals outlined in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill in that they are being advanced through existing fisheries legislation. However, both Fisheries New Zealand and DOC have worked closely in the concurrent release of the respective proposals under fisheries and conservation legislation respectively.

13.     The marine protection proposals encompassed by the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill are not further discussed in the context of this report which focuses on the proposals to create Bottom Fishing Access Zones. A separate report will be provided to local boards to provide input on an Auckland Council submission to the Environment Select Committee on the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This report sets out the analysis and advice for local board consideration on the Fisheries New Zealand discussion document. Staff advice to be presented to the Planning Environment and Parks (PEP) Committee will also evaluate and address implications for Māori, considerations of climate impacts, and organisational risks in accordance with formal council reporting expectations.

Bottom trawl and Danish seine fishing methods

15.     Bottom trawling is when a fishing net is towed along the seafloor. Danish seining uses a net that is set out using long ropes in a diamond shape on the seabed. While Danish seine fishing does not tow the fishing gear over the seabed in the same manner as bottom trawling, there are impacts to the benthic habitat inside the diamond area as the ropes are drawn in and the net is retrieved.

16.     Estimates of the historical footprint indicate the vast majority of available and suitable seafloor in the Gulf has been fished by bottom contact fishing methods at some point in time, with varying levels of intensity. There has been a noticeable reduction in overall trawl fishing effort within the Gulf since 2018, with some fishers who previously operated in the Gulf making the choice to fish elsewhere.

17.     Bottom contact fishing can affect seafloor habitats and communities by damaging or removing structure forming species, reducing habitat complexity and altering the seafloor structure. The functioning of these communities can be affected as a result. There have been relatively few assessments of the impacts of Danish seine fishing to benthic habitat and communities. Danish seine fishing does not use ‘trawl doors’, and the ground gear is lighter.

Fisheries economics in the Gulf

18.     About half of all fish caught commercially in the Gulf is sold in Auckland restaurants fish shops and take-away shops. Trawling- and Danish seine-caught fish make up part of this market, but accurate information is not immediately available. The top ten inshore species caught account for 95 per cent of total catch landed by Danish seine and bottom trawl fishing in the Gulf. The top five species account for 90 per cent of the total commercial catch from the Gulf. These include, in descending order, snapper, trevally, john dory, gurnard, terakihi, gemfish, jack mackerel, leatherjacket, school shark and mirror dory.

19.     Of the 222 entities owning the primarily affected quota shares (which can be fished in the Gulf), 21 entities own quota shares allocated to Māori by virtue of Treaty Settlement legislation. This accounts for 12 per cent of the total quota shares for these fish stocks. There are 28 Danish seine or trawl operators (fishing permit holders) that have fished the areas proposed for BFAZ over the last five years, operating 22 trawl vessels and 11 Danish seine vessels. Current revenue generated from these two fishing methods from the Gulf amounts to $7.2 million based on port price, or $10.5 million based on export prices.

Legislative context

20.     The proposed implementation of BFAZs is one part of an overall management approach being taken to improve the health and mauri of the Gulf. Other initiatives have been identified at both a national and regional level that complement the BFAZ proposals. Increasing the health of the Gulf will also be dependent on improved land management activities administered by councils.

21.     Fisheries New Zealand are responsible for administering the Fisheries Act 1996 and its supporting regulations. The Act gives commercial, recreational, and customary Māori fishers access to resources while ensuring fisheries are managed sustainably and that the effects on the aquatic environment are managed. People making decisions under the Act are to ensure that they do so in a manner that is consistent with the Treaty of Waitangi (Fisheries Claims) Settlement Act 1992.

Engagement prior to formal proposals

22.     Engagement by Fisheries New Zealand and the Department of Conservation with tangata whenua and iwi representatives (from adjacent areas as well as from within the Gulf) has indicated that the majority of iwi primarily support the removal of some or all mobile bottom contact fishing methods from the Gulf. Consultation is ongoing with tangata whenua throughout the region and with iwi fisheries forums in areas that could receive displaced fishing efforts resulting from the proposed changes.

23.     Public submissions preceding the approval (August 2023) of the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan supported the removal of bottom trawling and Danish seining from the Gulf, or the establishment of BFAZs. Commercial interests noted that the sector was working towards reducing the impact of bottom trawling through innovative methods and gear trials, and that fishers trawl over soft seabed sediment forms, as opposed to reefs which are associated with high biodiversity. Commercial interests were concerned about the impacts of restricting bottom fishing and Danish seining on fishing operations and the potential displacement of effort that could occur.

Using a spatial planning approach to determine options for public engagement

24.     A Fisheries New Zealand science project (ZBD2020-06) was contracted to NIWA in 2020 to collate spatial information on habitat forming species, to develop models predicting the distribution of biogenic habitats, and to test a spatial planning approach. Current closures protect on average 35 per cent of predicted suitable habitat for the 20 biogenic habitat groups, although this ranged from 10 to 94 per cent for the nine most vulnerable biogenic habitat groups.

25.     A Hauraki Gulf Benthic Spatial Planning Advisory Group (HGBSPAG) was formed in 2022 to facilitate collaboration on the process of collating spatial information on, modelling the distribution of and testing spatial planning approaches for managing habitat forming species. A spatial decision-support tool, Zonation, was used to identify priority areas for particular objectives (i.e. those areas with high fisheries importance and low importance for biogenic habitats).

26.     The findings of the science project (ZBD2020-06) were presented to the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan Advisory Group (HGFPAG) in August 2022. These inputs were further refined by Fisheries New Zealand and Department of Conservation, prior to a final opportunity for review by the HGPFAG. The proposals were subsequently finalised and endorsed by Cabinet for public engagement.

Discussion paper proposed options

27.     There are four BFAZ options proposed which vary in degrees of protection to biodiversity and impact to bottom trawl and Danish seine fisheries. The status quo or a complete ban are not proposed options. Ordered in increasing impact to bottom trawl and Danish seine fisheries the options are:

Option 1

Close 74.1 per cent of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 77.1 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish six BFAZ.

Option 2

Close 79.4 per cent of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 82.4 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish five BFAZ.

Option 3

Close 86.6 per cent of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 88.5 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish four BFAZ.

Option 4

Close 87.3 per cent of the Gulf shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 89.2 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish four BFAZ.

 

28.     Fisheries New Zealand considers that each of the four proposed options addresses the problem of adverse impacts of bottom contact fishing on benthic habitats in the Gulf. They each address the Crown’s obligations under section five (Treaty of Waitangi), section eight (the Purpose of the Fisheries Act), section nine (environmental principles) and section 10 (information principles) of the Act by allowing for continued sustainable utilisation. Each option provides for different levels of fishing utilisation and has different potential resulting impacts depending on the scale of reduced access. There remains uncertainty around expected changes to landings and revenue, displacement of fishing effort to other areas not affected by the closures and the substitution of fishing methods other than Danish seine and trawl.

29.     Specific assessment of each proposed option is outlined in the discussion paper with reasonable detail, with an emphasis on envisaged biodiversity outcomes and economic outcomes. Economic impacts may fall disproportionately on a small number of permit holders. This manifests itself as impacts on landings and revenue (based on port prices received), export revenue, reduced incomes for Licenced Fish Receivers (including wholesalers and/or processors) and retailers.

Key consultation questions

30.     There are 13 questions asked in the discussion paper (reproduced in Attachment A), and NES staff have highlighted the following key consultation questions of anticipated interest to local boards to support the feedback process:

·        Which option do you support for proposed Bottom Fishing Access Zones? Why?

·        If you do not support any of the options listed, what alternative(s) should be considered? Why?

·        Do you have any ideas or alternative approaches to the management of bottom fishing impacts, apart from the proposed Bottom Fishing Access Zones?

·        Do you think the proposed options adequately provide for social, economic and cultural wellbeing?

·        Do you think the criteria outlined in section five (of the discussion paper) will provide a suitable basis to assess the options and their impacts?

·        Do you think the proposed options appropriately consider the effects on the benthic environment?

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Council staff will be taking an agenda report and proposed draft submission to the Planning Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023. In addition to an assessment of the proposals as they further the council’s obligations to biodiversity management in the coastal marine area (cf. fisheries management), the themes of the internal input will be summarised in the agenda report and incorporated into the proposed submission as appropriate.

32.     Local board feedback received by 29 September will be considered by NES staff in shaping the proposed council submission. While that early input is encouraged where possible, all local board feedback received by 16 October 2023 will be appended to the committee report. NES staff will make relevant observations to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee about the local board input received as that informs the proposed council submission.

33.     A separate report will be provided to local boards to provide input on an Auckland Council submission to the Environment Select Committee on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park: Questions for submitters

181

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dave Allen - Manager Natural Environment Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Local board feedback into the council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee

File No.: CP2023/13692

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback into the council submission on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Environment Select Committee is seeking views on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

3.       The purpose of the Bill is to seek to address environmental decline in the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana due to human activities.

4.       This Bill also seeks to contribute to the restoration of the health and mauri of the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana. It proposes to do this by establishing two marine reserves, five seafloor protection areas, and 12 high protection areas in the Hauraki Gulf, and acknowledging customary rights within seafloor protection areas and high protection areas.

5.       The council will be providing a submission to the Environment Select Committee on this matter and the local board has an opportunity to provide their feedback into this submission.

6.       A memo will be circulated to local board members prior to providing their feedback with further information about the opportunity to provide input into the council submission on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

7.       Local Board feedback received by 29 September 2023 will be incorporated into the council submission. Feedback received after this and before 16 October 2023 will only be appended to the submission. The consultation closes 1 November 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)    whakarite / provide feedback on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to be incorporated into the council’s submission to the Environment Select Committee.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Funding Auckland's Storm Recovery and Resilience

File No.: CP2023/13710

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local boards with an opportunity to provide input regarding the funding package that has been provisionally agreed with central government.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Seven months on from severe weather events in January and February 2023, many Aucklanders with impacted homes are still facing a challenging and uncertain future.

3.       Auckland Council has worked with central government to secure a funding package that would enable people in the region to move forward with certainty, as quickly as possible.

4.       The proposed funding package includes just under $2 billion of investment in storm recovery efforts for three key activities:

·        repairing storm damage to the transport network

·        Making Space for Water (the council’s flood mitigation programme) and other resilience projects

·        Category 3 property buyouts.

5.       If we do not accept the funding package, we will still need to fund the necessary infrastructure improvements but would not be in a position to buy out Category 3 homes.

6.       Public consultation is underway from 11-24 September.

7.       Local board feedback will be provided to the Governing Body along with public feedback ahead of its decision-making on 6 October 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that input is being sought from local boards at the same time as public consultation due to the very tight timelines involved and the need to provide certainty for impacted Aucklanders

b)      whakarite / provide feedback on whether the local board supports Auckland Council agreeing to the funding package

c)       whakarite / provide feedback on features of the package that you would like to comment on

d)      whakarite / provide feedback on the design of the Category 3 buyout process.

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Severe weather events in January and February 2023 have had a devastating and lasting impact on many communities and thousands of individuals across Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland. Flooding and land slips have damaged or destroyed thousands of homes and up-ended lives and communities. Essential lifeline infrastructure and facilities have been impacted and are in urgent need of repair. This includes roads, bridges, stormwater systems and community facilities.

9.       Seven months on, many Aucklanders with impacted homes are still facing a challenging and uncertain future. We need to support these Aucklanders and improve the resilience of our infrastructure so that we are better prepared and can mitigate the impacts of severe weather events.

10.     Auckland Council has worked with central government to secure a funding package that would enable people in the region to move forward with certainty, as quickly as possible.

11.     To achieve all the outcomes of the package the government would provide just under $1.1 billion of new and reprioritised existing funding, with the council investing around $900 million. This is the same “locally-led, centrally-supported” approach that has been taken with other regions affected by the January and February storm events, just at a larger scale. It is different from the Christchurch earthquake recovery, where central government funded all the purchase of properties.

12.     As a locally-led effort, Auckland Council is expected to take the lead on the design and implementation of any package. This means we have a number of detailed decisions to make as part of our main decision whether to proceed with the co-funded package.

13.     Public consultation is taking place from 11-24 September. Details can be found at https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/recoveryfunding

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The proposed funding package includes just under $2 billion of investment in storm recovery efforts for three key activities, as outlined in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Proposed central government and Auckland Council contribution to recovery

 

Central government funding

Auckland Council funding

Total

Transport network recovery

$309 million

$81 million

$390 million

Making space for water and other resilience projects

$380 million

$440 million

$820 million

Category 3 home buy-outs

$387 million

$387 million

$774 million

Total

$1,076 million

$908 million

$1,984 million

 

Transport network recovery

15.     Auckland Council is projecting that $390 million will be needed to make repairs to roads and bridges that were damaged by the severe weather. This includes the Mill Flat Road bridge, access to Karekare and Piha, and a number of roads in the west, the north and on Aotea / Great Barrier Island that were significantly damaged. The funding would ensure that repairs can be undertaken with greater certainty.

Making Space for Water and other resilience projects

16.     A critical part of recovery is making sure we are better prepared for future severe weather. Improving resilience is essential to provide security for those who will continue to live in hazard-prone areas. This includes the flood risk management projects such as those that we have outlined in the Making Space for Water programme that we consulted on last month.

17.     This programme would allow us to create new ‘blue-green networks’ in areas with critical flood risks, and to rehabilitate streams so that they are more resilient to floods. We would be able to increase our stormwater maintenance and overland flow path management.

18.     This portion of the funding package could also be used for other resilience projects, such as community based geotechnical projects where risks can be mitigated. Importantly, the funding package would allow us to move more quickly with our efforts to build resilience.

Category 3 property buy-outs

19.     Homes in Category 3 are not safe to live in because the risk from future flooding or landslips is intolerably high. Options to reduce this risk at a property or community level are not available or affordable. Homes in these areas should not be rebuilt or remain on their current sites.

20.     Central government’s co-funding conditions for Category 3 properties are that they must be:

·        residential

·        impacted by the severe weather events of January and February 2023

·        subject to ongoing intolerable risk to life, and

·        without an economic way to mitigate the risk.

21.     The proposed funding package would provide up to $774 million to buy Category 3 homes and allow people affected by the January and February severe weather events to move on with their lives. The funding for this would be split evenly between Auckland Council and central government.

22.     The $774 million is based on current estimates of around 700 homes to be included in this category. If this maximum amount is exceeded, central government and the council have agreed to work together in good faith to decide next steps.

23.     Auckland Council would need to administer the buy-out process from start to finish, including the purchase and removal of homes, and the ongoing management of the land. We know that there would be extra costs that wouldn’t be fully co-funded through the proposed funding package, including the costs of demolishing buildings, and any costs arising from the ongoing management of the land. We will also need to consider how we best make use of the newly acquired land, for example public parks and blue-green networks.

24.     We need to make some decisions about how the buy-out process would work, including the price we pay for Category 3 houses, how this works with insurance, and any conditions (e.g. price caps or exclusions) that might need to be put in place. Given the complexity of the task, we are proposing to take an approach where we work towards decisions that are simple, fair, cost-effective, timely, and give certainty to affected Aucklanders.

Accepting the funding package

25.     If Auckland Council accepts the funding package:

·        We will receive additional government funding to accelerate our efforts to increase the resilience of our infrastructure.

·        We can get on with making improvements that would otherwise take decades to achieve.

·        We can offer a process forward for Category 3 property owners.

·        We will need to find extra revenue to meet the council funding commitment.

26.     If Auckland Council does not accept the funding package:

·        We won’t receive all the proposed funding from central government, although we could still anticipate receiving some of the transport funding in the normal way, and could apply to the National Resilience Plan for further funding without a guarantee of our applications being successful.

·        We will still need to fund the necessary infrastructure improvements and may need to take longer to do this using the available council funding methods.

·        We won’t be in a position to buy out Category 3 homes: some property owners would face severe hardship and people would remain at risk.

27.     Accepting the funding package would be a significant step in the recovery process. We acknowledge that recovery is not happening as quickly as affected communities would like. There is a difficult balance between moving quickly and moving accurately, especially with so many thousands of potentially affected homes needing individual technical assessments. It’s important that everyone can have confidence in the information and evidence available so that we can make robust, defensible and enduring decisions.

28.     We also need to balance the needs of impacted homeowners with the needs of the wider community and consider the affordability and hazard management impacts for all Aucklanders.

Methodology of Category 3 buy-outs

29.     If we go ahead with the funding package, the details of the purchase methodology for Category 3 properties would need to be determined, and would have a strong influence on how simple, fair, cost-effective and timely our process could be, and how much certainty we could offer affected homeowners.

30.     Some of the policy details we need to consider include:

·        How we define Category 3 residential properties. We need to consider whether we should make different provisions for holiday homes and rentals that are assessed as being in Category 3, compared to primary residences. We will not be purchasing non-residential properties.

·        How we set the buy-out price. If our starting point is to take a ‘fair value’ approach, we need to decide how we assess that. Using capital value (the valuation that helps us to assess rates bills) would be the quickest option but wouldn’t necessarily reflect the true market value of every individual house. Establishing market value would be a much slower option: it could delay the process and would add further administrative costs. We could adopt a hybrid approach that gets most of the money to homeowners sooner and allows the balance to be resolved through valuation. Other alternatives would be to offer a fixed sum to all Category 3 homeowners or establish a sliding scale of payment based on hardship.

·        The size of owner contributions. Like all investments, property ownership carries risks. Aucklanders, through Auckland Council, do not guarantee owners against loss. Auckland Council will need to consider whether to offer 100% of the value of the property, or a lesser amount, provided we can meet our objective of removing people from situations of intolerable risk. This could take the form of a cap on buy-out offers above a certain amount.

·        What we do about insurance settlements, and uninsured and underinsured properties. Government and council contributions are intended to ‘top up’ rather than replace any amounts received through private insurance or EQC (Earthquake Commission). We still need to decide how this would work in practice. We also need to determine a fair outcome both for homeowners and for the Aucklanders who will have to fund buy-outs. This will mean we need to consider if Aucklanders who had no insurance or limited insurance should receive more, less or the same as other Category 3 homeowners.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The response that is being proposed in this funding package is a one-off, made necessary by the urgent and extraordinary scale of events.

32.     As climate change increases the risk of severe weather events, Auckland Council will not be in a position to continue to buy out other flood- and slip-affected homes. We are working to improve public awareness of hazards, so that Aucklanders are better able to manage their risks. We are also reviewing our approach to the planning and development of homes in areas with natural hazards, however the impact of this is confined largely to new development, and doesn’t address the legacy of thousands of homes that are already built in higher-risk areas.

33.     We are strongly advocating to central government to establish a national scheme to support recovery from future events, and to put in place better processes for managed retreat in advance of disaster.

34.     Both the Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan advocate for greater resilience to severe storms and flood events. A key principle of the proposed Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan is ‘Opportunities to build resilience and avoid future harm are sought proactively’.

35.     The funding received from central government for Making Space for Water and other resilience projects will enable Auckland Council to implement the initiatives within these plans in a way that both builds resilience to the impacts of climate change, and has a lower carbon impact than the solutions that have historically been utilised.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The Recovery Office is working with Legal, Finance, the Chief Planning Office and the Mayoral Office to consider the approach set out by the Crown, the implications for council, and the appropriate parameters for council’s actions at each stage of the negotiations and potential implementation process. The Executive Leadership Team sub-group also spans the relevant parts of the council that are necessary to input and/or be involved in this process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     During August, local boards and local communities provided feedback on the draft Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan, which will inform how government funding for infrastructure will be allocated. Staff are currently analysing the feedback to inform the final content of the Plan.

38.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to give feedback specifically on the funding agreement that has been agreed in-principle with central government.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The Recovery Office is engaging with mana whenua representatives to discuss the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan. Meetings are underway and will continue throughout September.  These meetings also provide opportunity to discuss the government funding package.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     Auckland’s recovery from the severe weather events of early 2023 is going to require significant investment, with or without central government co-funding. The proposed package increases the total investment into Auckland, with over $1 billion in new and reprioritised central government funding.

41.     Significant funding from Auckland Council would still be required to deliver on the activities described in this package.

42.     If we agree to proceed with the funding package, we would initially use borrowing to fund Auckland’s share of the proposal, until we can make more considered funding decisions in the next long-term plan. This is due to be consulted on in early 2024.

43.     Using borrowing in the short term would mean we could get the infrastructure repairs and the Category 3 buy-out process moving quickly.

44.     Based on initial timing projections the additional council debt required is likely to peak at $650 million. This would increase the debt-to-revenue ratio by 7 – 9 per cent over the next five to seven years, remaining within current debt limits.

45.     The council has a number of options to fund the proposed package in the long-term plan, including reducing or deferring other capital spending, sale of assets, service reductions, and rates. These decisions may also be impacted by the outcomes of the government’s water reform process.

46.     If the council were to proceed with the full proposed programme and fund it using only rates, then this would require an additional rates increase equivalent to 3.1 per cent of general rates, which could be phased in over two years. Any rates increase would be on top of other significant budget pressures the council is facing. Current indications suggest overall rates increases of over 10 per cent for 2024/2025 for residential ratepayers, if cost reductions or funding sources are not found.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     Risks and mitigations with the Crown offer process are identified in Table 2.

Table 2. Risks and mitigations with the Crown offer process

            Risk

Mitigations

More than 700 properties are identified as category 3.

Good faith commitment with the Crown to develop a joint response if this situation arises.

Eligibility criteria for the National Resilience Plan have not yet been defined, meaning there is a risk to accessing the pre-committed funding for resilience

Address within terms of the agreement

Significant additional funding required from Auckland Council

An existing risk that will need to be addressed in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, regardless of the Crown offer.

Terms of the Crown offer do not adequately provide for the complexity of the council processes needed to undertake buy outs.

Policy and legal analysis is underway to consider the implications of the terms of the agreement, to be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Technical assessment of affected homes and remediation of damaged infrastructure will continue throughout the decision-making process.

49.     Public consultation is underway from 11-24 September.

50.     The Governing Body will meet on 6 October to consider input from local boards and feedback from public consultation and will decide whether to agree to the proposed funding package.

51.     If the package is agreed, the council will begin conversations with confirmed Category 3 home-owners at the end of October.

52.     From November, voluntary buy-outs for Category 3 properties will begin, as technical assessments are confirmed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Megan Howell - Programme Manager

Authorisers

Mat Tucker - Group Recovery Manager

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Waiheke Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2023/13769

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for two meeting dates to be added to the 2023-2024 Waiheke Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (the Long-Term Plan) and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 (Annual Plan) timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Wednesday, 7 December 2022.

3.       At that time, the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision-making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unknown. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve two meeting dates as an addition to the Waiheke Local Board meeting schedule so that the modified 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes can be met.

5.       It is also proposed to move the 22 November 2023 business meeting to 29 November 2023 in order to provide input into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 regional topics.

6.       The board may also choose to reschedule the 6 December 2023 business meeting to 13 December 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve the addition of two meeting dates to the 2022-2025 Waiheke Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes as follows:

i)       Wednesday, 1 May 2024, 3:30pm

ii)       Wednesday, 12 June 2024, 3:30pm.

b)      approve rescheduling of the 22 November 2023 board meeting to 29 November 2023 in order to provide input into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 regional topics.

c)       consider rescheduling the 6 December 2023 business meeting to 13 December 2023.


 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

8.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

9.       The Waiheke Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its Wednesday, 7 December 2022 business meeting.

10.     The timeframes for local board decision-making in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

11.     The local board is being asked to make decisions in late-November 2023 and late-April and early-June 2024 to feed into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 processes. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meetings as additions to the meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meetings as extraordinary meetings.

13.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

14.     For option two, only the specific topic the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 process could be considered at this meeting.

15.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Waiheke Local Board - Resource Consent Applications - September 2023

File No.: CP2023/13693

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Attached is the list of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island and inner Hauraki Gulf islands received from 13 August to 12 September 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the list of resource consents applications (Attachment A) related to Waiheke Island and inner Hauraki Gulf islands 13 August to 12 September 2023. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board - Resource consents - September 2023

199

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Waiheke Local Board - Workshop record - September 2023

File No.: CP2023/13694

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waiheke Local Board proceedings taken at the workshops held on 31 August and 6, 13 and 20 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/ExecutiveSummary.aspx

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion.  No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held on 31 August and 6, 13 and 20 September 2023 is appended to the report.

5.       These can also be viewed at this link https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on 31 August and 6, 13 and 20 September 2023. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board - Workshop proceedings - September 2023

205

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Waiheke Local Board - Community Forum record- September 2023

File No.: CP2023/13715

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a record of proceedings from the Community Forum session held on 13 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community forums are held monthly on the second Wednesday of the month. They provide opportunity for the public to raise and discuss local issues with board members.

3.       The forum also provides an opportunity to provide feedback on workshop agenda items.

4.       Further information and copies of presentations can be found at the link below:

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-councilworks/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-publicand-business-meetings.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the Community Forum record of proceedings dated 13 September 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board - Community Forum proceedings - September 2023

215

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

Waiheke Local Board - Hōtaka Kaupapa Policy Schedule - September 2023

File No.: CP2023/13005

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waiheke Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule, formerly called the Waiheke Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar, is appended to the report as Attachment A. The policy schedule is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff for reference and information only.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendars aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note / tuhi ā-taipitopito the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for the political term 2022-2025 as at 27 September 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board - Hōtaka Kaupapa Policy Schedule - September 2023

223

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager - Waiheke Local Board

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Project Forever Waiheke - Housing Solutions       Page 229

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Report to Waiheke Local Board regarding Noises HPA Boundary      Page 241


Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

27 September 2023

 

 

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