I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Governing Body will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 28 September 2023

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Tira Hautū / Governing Body

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Wayne Brown

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Councillors

Cr Andrew Baker

Cr Mike Lee

 

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Kerrin Leoni

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Julie Fairey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

Cr Ken Turner

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Lotu Fuli

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Shane Henderson

Cr Maurice Williamson

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Sarndra O'Toole

Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

 

25 September 2023

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8152

Email: sarndra.otoole@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

4          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input                 5

4.1     Public Input:  Muriwai Stickered Residents Group (MSRG) - Issues related to Category 3                                               5

4.2     Public Input:  Piha and Karekare Stickered Residents Group (PKA SRG) - Issues related to Category 2                      5

4.3     Public Input:  Auckland Stickered Residents Group (ASRG) Summary - Issues related to Community Specific Variations                                                     5

4.4     Public Input:  Chris Newman - the Council and its CEO's schemes for Maorification of our city's politics, culture, economy and customs                 5

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input                                                            6

5.1     Local Board Input:  Whau Local Board - Te Hono Funding Options                          6

5.2     Local Board Input:  Waiheke Local Board - Downtown Carpark                                   6

5.3     Local Board Input:  Waitakere Ranges Local Board - Piha and Karekare Stickered Residents                                    6

6          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     6

7          Petition:  Takapuna Residents Association - Takapuna to Milford Coastal Walkway               7

8          Referred from the Audit and Risk Committee - Annual Report on the Performance of the Audit and Risk Committee                                             9

9          Te Hononga Akoranga COMET - request to revoke CCO status                                              11

10        Budget reallocation for the new community facility in Avondale, Te Hono                            17

11        Proposed legislation for transport in Auckland                                                                              29

12        Recovery Office Update                                     37

13        Storm Recovery and Resilience consultation feedback                                                              43

14        Mayor's Report on Recent Overseas Trip        53

15        Report back from Political Working Groups (Covering report)                                                55

16        Summary of Governing Body and Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 28 September 2023                                                  57

17        Preparation of the Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council quarterly performance reports to 30 June 2023                                     61

18        Preparation of the draft Auckland Council Annual Report 2022/2023 and the draft Auckland Council Summary Annual Report 2022/2023                                                             65

19        Acting Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer Update                                    71

20        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


 

 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

21        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                               75

10        Budget reallocation for the new community facility in Avondale, Te Hono

a.      Confidential report to Whau Local Board seeking direction on reallocation            75

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Downtown Carpark strategic transport outcomes and funding                      75

C2       CONFIDENTIAL:  Consideration of potential land acquisition (Covering report)                    76

C3       CONFIDENTIAL: Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council Quarterly Performance Report for the twelve months ending June 2023                                                                      76

C4       CONFIDENTIAL: Adoption of the Auckland Council Annual Report 2022/2023 and the Summary Annual Report 2022/2023                 76

C5       CONFIDENTIAL:  Office of the Auditor-General and Audit New Zealand briefing                        77


1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

 

 

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

 

 

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

            Click the meeting date below to access the minutes.

  

That the Governing Body:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 24 August 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input

 

4.1       Public Input:  Muriwai Stickered Residents Group (MSRG) - Issues related to Category 3

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Muriwai Stickered Residents’ Group will address the Governing Body regarding issues related to Category 3.

 

 

4.2       Public Input:  Piha and Karekare Stickered Residents Group (PKA SRG) - Issues related to Category 2

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Piha and Karekare Stickered Residents’ Group will address the Governing Body regarding issues related to Category 2.

 

 

4.3       Public Input:  Auckland Stickered Residents Group (ASRG) Summary - Issues related to Community Specific Variations

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Auckland Stickered Residents’ Group will address the Governing Body regarding issues related to Community Specific Variations.

 

 

4.4       Public Input:  Chris Newman - the Council and its CEO's schemes for Maorification of our city's politics, culture, economy and customs

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Chris Newman will address the Governing Body regarding the Council and its CEO's schemes for Maorification of our city's politics, culture, economy and customs.

 

 

 

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input

 

5.1       Local Board Input:  Whau Local Board - Te Hono Funding Options

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To address the Governing Body regarding the Te Hono Funding Options.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Whau Local Board Chairperson, Kay Thomas will address the Governing Body.

3.       The Local Board Input relates to Item 10 – Budget Reallocation for the new community facility in Avondale, Te Hono.

 

 

5.2       Local Board Input:  Waiheke Local Board - Downtown Carpark

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To address the Governing Body regarding the Downtown Carpark.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waiheke Local Board Chairperson, Cath Handley and Member Robin Tucker will address the Governing Body on the matter of the Downtown Carpark.

 

 

5.3       Local Board Input:  Waitakere Ranges Local Board - Piha and Karekare Stickered Residents

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To address the Governing Body regarding the Piha and Karekare Stickered residents.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waitakere Ranges Local Board Chairperson, Greg Presland will address the Governing Body.

3.       The Local Board Input has spent a lot of time talking to residents and resident groups in storm damaged areas in the Waitakere Ranges area over the past few months.

 

 

 

6          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

 

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Petition:  Takapuna Residents Association - Takapuna to Milford Coastal Walkway

File No.: CP2023/13632

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Sandra Allen will present a petition to the Governing Body relating to Takapuna to Milford Coastal Walkway - the section known as the Paul Firth Walkway forming part of the Te Araroa Trail.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Sandra Allen will address the Governing Body on behalf of the Takapuna Residents’ Association and present a petition relating to Takapuna to Milford Coastal Walkway, in particular the section known as the Paul Firth Walkway forming part of the Te Araroa Trail.

The petition prayer is as follows:

“We the undersigned request the Mayor and Councillors of Auckland Council achieve an urgent resolution for continued public access to the section of the Coastal Walkway from Takapuna to Milford that crosses private property past the Firth Cottage and forms part of the national Te Araroa Trail.”

3.       The online petition can be accessed at the following link:  https://www.change.org/p/the-takapuna-to-milford-coastal-walkway-is-at-risk-of-closing

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whakaae / accept the petition in relation to the Takapuna to Milford Coastal Walkway, in particular the section known as the Paul Firth Walkway forming part of the Te Araroa Trail

b)      whakamihi / thank Sandra Allen on behalf of the Takapuna Residents’ Association for attending the meeting

c)       tuku ki tangata kē / forward the petition to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee to consider in conjunction with a report on this matter when it is brought before the committee.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authoriser

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Referred from the Audit and Risk Committee - Annual Report on the Performance of the Audit and Risk Committee

File No.: CP2023/13459

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Annual Report on the Performance of the Audit and Risk Committee referred by the Audit and Risk Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Audit and Risk Committee Chair, Bruce Robertson will speak to the Governing Body.

3.       The Audit and Risk Committee considered the Annual Report on the Performance of the Audit and Risk Committee at its meeting on 15 September 2022.

4.       The Audit and Risk Committee resolved as follows:

“Resolution number ARCCC/2023/66

a)      whiwhi / receive this annual report on the performance of the Audit and Risk Committee

b)      tūtohungia / recommend that the chief executive place the report on the next available agenda of the Governing Body

c)      whakanuia / acknowledge and thank independent member Bruce Robertson for his contribution to the effective performance of the committee over the last seven years.

5.       Clause b) of the resolution refers the report to the Governing Body.

6.       The original Annual Report on the Performance of the Audit and Risk Committee to the Audit and Risk Committee can be accessed at the following link:

https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2023/09/20230915_ARCCC_AGN_11385.htm#PDF2_ReportName_95024

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Annual Report on the Performance of the Audit and Risk Committee.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authoriser

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Te Hononga Akoranga COMET - request to revoke CCO status

File No.: CP2023/12058

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Community Education Trust Auckland, Te Hononga Akoranga (Te Hononga Akoranga COMET) have requested Council’s consent to proposed changes to their trust deed, primarily to revoke their council-controlled organisation (CCO) status.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community Education Trust Auckland, Te Hononga Akoranga (Te Hononga Akoranga COMET) is a CCO which promotes educational outcomes in Auckland, with a focus on areas of greatest need.

3.       Te Hononga Akoranga COMET have requested that council agree to changes in their trust deed, which would make them a fully independent charitable trust. Council would no longer appoint their trustees, which would end their status as a CCO. Te Hononga Akoranga COMET believe the changes will allow them to achieve their long-term vision more effectively. Their objective, improving educational outcomes, will remain the same.  

4.       It is recommended that council approves this request and notes the incremental reduction in their funding (that Te Hononga Akoranga COMET have also suggested).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whakaae / agree changes in the Te Hononga Akoranga COMET trust deed, that would revoke their CCO status, remove references to the Local Government Act and remove the restriction on working outside Auckland.

b)      tautapa / delegate to the Director of Governance and CCO Partnerships the authority to execute the amendments to the Deed of Charitable Trust to give effect to a) above

c)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note two further payments for Te Hononga Akoranga COMET are budgeted, $250k in 2024/2025 and $150k in 2025/2026, an incremental reduction in funding from council.

d)      whakamihi / thank Te Hononga Akoranga COMET for their work as an Auckland Council CCO, and their contribution to educational outcomes in Tamaki Makaurau.   

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Te Hononga Akoranga COMET undertake actions, programmes and initiatives to improve educational outcomes for Aucklanders, with a special focus on the areas of greatest educational need. Their purpose, vision and mission are: 

·    purpose – to support education and skills across Auckland, contributing to the relevant social and economic goals in the Auckland Plan. 

·    vision: tino rangatiratanga for everyone through lifelong learning.

·    mission: driving systems change to make education and skills more effective and equitable.

History and CCO Status

6.       Te Hononga Akoranga COMET is the successor to the City of Manukau Education Trust and was originally set up under Manukau City Council in October 1999. Following amalgamation, it was renamed and its remit was expanded from Manukau to all of Auckland.

7.       Te Hononga Akoranga COMET is a charitable trust under the Charities Act 2005, the current Deed of Charitable Trust was signed in June 2012. Charitable trusts (and other entities) are a CCO if at least fifty percent of their trustees are appointed by a local authority.  Auckland Council currently appoints all of Te Hononga Akoranga COMET’s ten trustees, and therefore they are a non-substantive CCO under the Local Government Act 2002. The trustees are unpaid volunteers.

Achievements

8.       Te Hononga Akoranga COMET contributes to council’s strategic goals and to the wellbeing of Aucklanders. They contribute to Auckland Plan outcomes, Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau and I am Auckland. Over the past 23 years this has included:

·    strengthening the skills pipeline in Auckland, mobilising Auckland employers, researchers and young people towards common goals

·    trialling innovative learning, education and skills initiatives, preparing them to succeed on their own

·    creating authentic opportunities, inside and outside classrooms, so learners of all ages can gain the skills they need to succeed.

9.       Specific projects and numbers (as outlined in their Statement of Intent) include:

·    4,600 young people supported in the transition to work through their Youth Employability Programme: Licence to Work. The programme is now nationally available through Youthtown (since 2013).

·    5,300 children and young people engaged in real-world STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) projects, investigating issues relevant to their community (since 2015), a focus on South and West Auckland.

·    400 educators and community leaders have shared effective practice for Māori learners (since 2012).

·    403 whānau have strengthened their babies’ brain development in the first 1,000 days through Talking Matters (since 2017), it is now a stand-alone trust.

·    education and skills data snapshots that are nationally recognised, setting the benchmark for data-driven decision making.

Council funding

10.     Council has funded Te Hononga Akoranga COMET since inception. Te Hononga Akoranga COMET have indicated that funding from council has provided a stable funding base that covers their core overhead costs. Additional funding for specific projects is then sought from a range of funders including government, industry and philanthropic sources.

11.     Previously (2015 – 2023) council has funded Te Hononga Akoranga COMET $558,000 per year. In the annual budget 2023/2024 process, by joint agreement, Te Hononga Akoranga COMET’s funding reduced to $350,000 for 2023/2024 [GB/2023/100].

12.     Te Hononga Akoranga COMET have requested that their funding continues to reduce incrementally for the next two years ($250,000 for 2024/25 and $150,000 for 2025/26), this is reflected in current budgets. No funding is allocated after 2025/2026. This is in recognition of council’s financial position and in the expectation that Te Hononga Akoranga COMET will transition away from being a CCO.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Te Hononga Akoranga COMET have requested that council support changes in their trust deed, to make them an independent charitable trust. Independence would enable them to approach funders that have policies not to fund CCOs. It would also make it possible for the organisation to reduce their reporting requirements and eventually extend the geographic reach of their work.

14.     The changes to the trust deed requested are:

·    Council no longer appointing trustees for Te Hononga Akoranga COMET

·    Removing references to the Local Government Act, including the requirement to produce an annual statement of intent (SOI) and half-yearly reports

·    Removing the restriction on working outside Auckland.

The requested changes and implications are outlined in table 1 below.

Table 1: Implications of requested changes to the Te Hononga Akoranga COMET trust deed.

Change 

Implications of requested changes to trust deed

Council no longer appoints Te Hononga Akoranga COMET trustees

This will end Te Hononga Akoranga COMET’s status as a CCO (LGA 2002 section 6). In practice, the appointments process has largely been managed by the Te Hononga Akoranga COMET board, with their recommendations on appointments then considered by the Performance and Appointments committee.

No requirement to produce a statement of intent

 

There may be less impetus for Te Hononga Akoranga COMET to consider direction from Auckland Council strategies to guide their work. However, the objective in the trust deed will remain the same.

Te Hononga Akoranga COMET are a highly focused organisation, committed to achieving educational outcomes. This change may mean that they can respond more quickly to issues raised by stakeholders and the community.

If council decides to fund Te Hononga Akoranga COMET in the future, council can set out the outcomes that it wants to achieve in a funding agreement, rather than in a statement of intent.

No reporting requirements

Te Hononga Akoranga COMET’s will no longer need to produce half-yearly reports or hold two public meetings. This will mean less compliance resources are needed. They have committed to staying publicly visible through media articles, social media and reporting annually. 

Removing restriction on working outside of Auckland 

Te Hononga Akoranga COMET already consider opportunities to extend successful programmes outside Auckland, under the mantle of different organisations. For example, the national version of the Youth Employability Programme is now run by Youthtown.

15.     It is recommended that the changes to the Te Hononga Akoranga COMET trust deed are supported. The implications of the requested changes are likely to be minimal for council. 


 

 

16.     Note that a wider review of non-substantive CCOs and their governance arrangements started in 2020 but has been delayed because of a lack of internal resources. This report has taken into account the factors identified in that previous work (funding, scale, expertise) in the recommendation that Te Hononga Akoranga COMET become an independent charitable trust.

17.     Independence will mean than Te Hononga Akoranga COMET will be able to make their own changes to the trust deed in the future and will no longer need Auckland Council to approve them. This risk is seen as minimal, as noted above, Te Hononga Akoranga COMET are a highly focused organisation, committed to achieving educational outcomes.

Status quo option

18.     The alternative option is that Te Hononga Akoranga COMET could remain as a CCO of Auckland Council. Council is not required to fund entities that have CCO status, however the core funding base that council can provide was part of the logic behind the set-up of Te Hononga Akoranga COMET. In the annual plan 2023/2024 process, by mutual agreement, the funding of Te Hononga Akoranga COMET will be reduced, due to council financial pressures.

19.     It is not recommended that Te Hononga Akoranga COMET remain a CCO if council is no longer able to fund them. As noted above, independence would enable them to approach funders that have policies not to fund CCOs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Te Hononga Akoranga COMET supports community understanding and action on local environmental and climate issues through strategic leadership, data reports, policy advice and key science programmes including Curious Minds South Auckland, WeSTEM and STEM Alliance. As their work will continue, the decision around their CCO status does not have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions and the effects of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Te Hononga Akoranga COMET are committed to continuing to work with the council group where applicable, including their delivery on the ‘I am Auckland’ strategic action plan. Therefore there are no significant impacts on other parts of the council group.

22.     The option for council to partner with Te Hononga Akoranga COMET on programmes in the future remains open.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Te Hononga Akoranga COMET will continue to work with local boards on specific projects as they arise. One area that may not proceed is the education and skills snapshots for each Local Board area, to inform decision-making by educators and officials. Individual local board snapshots could be contracted on request. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Te Hononga Akoranga COMET’s work focuses on making access to education and skills more effective and equitable across Auckland.  They take a cross-sector approach to education and several areas of COMET’s work contribute to uplifting Māori wellbeing or enabling better outcomes for Māori. As their work will continue, the decision around their CCO status does not have an impact on Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     Council funded Te Hononga Akoranga COMET $558,000 per year from 2015 – 2023. Through the annual budget 2023/2024 process, by joint agreement, Te Hononga Akoranga COMET’s funding reduced to $350,000 for 2023/2024.

26.     Te Hononga Akoranga COMET suggested that their funding continues to reduce incrementally for the next two years to $250,000 for 2024/2025 and $150,000 for 2025/2026. These reduced figures are in current budgets. No funding is allocated after 2025/2026. 

27.     Annual funding agreements (for 2024/2025 and 2025/2026) will document agreed deliverables (in the Auckland region) and performance measures as happens currently.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     Te Hononga Akoranga COMET will have to secure alternative funding streams to maintain their core overheads and therefore continue to deliver their programmes for the benefit of Aucklanders. There is a risk that alternative funding sources are not identified and cause the trust to cease its operations. Te Hononga Akoranga COMET is focused on addressing this risk.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     The Director of Governance and CCO Partnerships will sign the amendments to the trust deed in the next month, if approved. Funding agreements and deliverables for 2024/2025 and 2025/2026 will be negotiated with Te Hononga Akoranga COMET.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rachel Wilson - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Budget reallocation for the new community facility in Avondale, Te Hono

File No.: CP2023/13253

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to reallocate existing Whau Local Board funding to the Avondale community centre development (Te Hono Library and Community Hub) budget to enable delivery on the planned timeline.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Avondale community centre development budget (also called community centre replacement (Avondale)) is insufficient to complete the construction of the Te Hono library and community hub.

3.       Staff have reviewed the 2017 indicative business case and there is still a strong case for the development of a community hub in Avondale.

4.       Since 2017, construction costs have increased by approximately 40 per cent[1] and expected sale proceeds from the sale of the current library and community centre site have decreased.

5.       To date, council has spent $1 million on the Te Hono project. Eke Panuku Development Auckland have spent $12.8 million on acquiring land for the development of Te Hono and surrounding public space, design, and town centre street upgrades.

6.       Staff initiated a value engineering exercise in (date) to reduce costs.

7.       The original Te Hono project budget allocation was $21 million. Funding will also be provided through the sale of the current library and community centre site. Revised project costs are estimated to be $41 - $43 million, resulting in a budget shortfall of $11.4 - $15 million (dependant on the sale price of optimised assets).

8.       Funding options to address the budget shortfall were investigated by staff. Options included:

·   Seeking additional Long-term Plan (LTP) funding.

·   Seeking allocation of unallocated LTP funding.

·   Seeking reallocation of future LTP Whau Local Board project budgets, within the same financial year.

9.       The option to reallocate funding in financial year 26/27 from the Whau aquatic and recreation development budget, to the Avondale community centre development budget, produces the most benefits with the least risk. This option is supported by the Whau Local Board.

10.     While local boards have decision making for the number and location of any new facilities, as the budget parameters were set by the Governing Body, a decision from Governing Body is required to reallocate the budget between the Whau aquatic and recreation development project and Te Hono.

11.     The funds in the aquatic and recreation centre development project remains the only budget available for reallocation. There is a risk that reducing the aquatic and recreation centre budget will result in the project being underfunded. Staff will investigate cost mitigations through the design and business case process, as actual costs are better understood.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whakaae / approve the reallocation of $15 million in financial year 2026/2027, from the Whau aquatic and recreation centre development budget to the Avondale community centre development budget with the proviso that any unspent capital budget is reallocated back to the Whau aquatic and recreation centre development budget.

Horopaki

Context

12.     A 2017 indicative business case responded to the need to maintain and improve community centre provision in Avondale. It recommended council provide funding for a multi-purpose community centre and library in Avondale town centre.

13.     The Environment and Community Committee agreed (add date and or resolution) to fund the development, in principle, with a budget of $19 million. The 10-year Budget 2021-2031 increased the budget to $21 million for the development of a community centre in Avondale.

14.     Te Hono is a large and complex project. Complexities, including Covid-19 lockdowns, changes to decision making through the Governance Framework Review and new phases, have created cumulative delays to the timeline. 

15.     Since 2017 construction costs have increased by approximately 40 per cent (per the Reserve Bank CPI for housing).[2]

16.     Funding for the development of Te Hono will also be provided through the sale of the current library and community centre site at 93-99 Rosebank Road, Avondale. An updated market valuation outlined a decrease in the estimated site value.

17.     A recent value engineering exercise was performed to improve the design and reduce complexity and costs and detail of this was reported to the Whau Local Board. The improved design was reviewed by a quantity surveyor who has confirmed that the project has a budget shortfall of $11.4 - $15 million. In August 2023, staff reviewed the 2017 indicative business case and found that the case for improved community services, in Avondale, is still justified.

18.     Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau / Whau Local Board considered if the project could be scaled to fit within available budget. As the case for investment in Te Hono is still justified, there is a need to meet the community service requirements of a growing community, and engagement with community and mana whenua has set expectations that the full project would be delivered. Consequently, the local board decided to continue with the original project scope and seek to address the budget shortfall.

19.     At the request of Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau, staff investigated three options to increase funding so the project can be delivered with minimal delay. The three options were:

·   Seeking additional long-term plan (LTP) funding (new funding is added to the 10-year budget and allocated).

·   Seeking allocation of unallocated LTP funding (funding that was originally intended for other projects (e.g. One Local Initiative projects) is reallocated).

·   Seeking reallocation of future LTP project budgets (funding that is already allocated to Whau projects is reallocated).


 

 

20.     Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau have given staff direction to seek approval from the Governing Body to reallocate budget in financial year 2026/2027, from the Whau aquatic and recreation centre development budget (also called recreation centre development), as it has the most benefits and the least risks.

21.     Local boards have decision making for the number and location of any new facilities within the budget parameters set by the Governing Body. Because the budget for the project is now outside local board parameters (in financial year 2026/2027), a decision from Governing Body is required. Further, it is acknowledged that the budget for this project was initially agreed by the Governing Body.

22.     The project has a planned timeline over multiple years. A funding decision is required now for the 2026/27 financial year to provide project certainty and minimise further cost escalations in outer years.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Findings from the review of the 2017 indicative business case

23.     Staff have reviewed the 2017 indicative business case and cost benefit analysis to ascertain if updated and new data change the outcomes of the case.

24.     The 2017 indicative business case considered two options for the continuation of community centre services in Avondale:

·   Option one: Status quo including replacement of current community centre.

·   Option two: New development of an integrated facility in Avondale town centre.

25.     Option two was recommended as the preferred option and approved by both Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau (confidential resolution number WH/2017/106) and the Environment and Community Committee (confidential resolution number ENV/2017/126).

Avondale Community Centre facility is continuing to deteriorate

26.     Avondale Community Centre is in very poor condition and, without investment, is estimated that it can only remain open for another 18 to 24 months.

27.     The facility changed from a community centre to a venue for hire in January 2013, creating a gap in local community service provision.

There has been no significant change to the Avondale community profile

28.     Avondale[3] has more areas with a deprivation index of 8, 9, and 10 compared to other areas of Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau and Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland, meaning that there are higher levels of socioeconomic deprivation than in many other local board areas.

 

A graph of different colored bars

Description automatically generatedFigure 1: Per cent of population by deprivation index

 

29.     Over half of the visitors to Avondale’s Library and Avondale Community Centre are from deciles eight to ten. Human Mobility Insights (HMI)[4] analysis indicates that 56.6 per cent of visits to Avondale Library (and 49.5 per cent to Avondale Community Centre) are from deciles 8 to 10.

30.     There continues to be a higher proportion of Asian and Pacific people in the study area.

31.     There are more young people (aged 0 to 4) in the study area. The number of older residents will continue to grow, from 10 per cent to 17 per cent of the study area population.

32.     The Avondale population grew by around 1,800 residents between the 2013 and 2018 census.

33.     Projected population growth in the area indicates growth of around 6,500 people over the next 30 years (from a base of 20,064 in 2018). This is 37 per cent growth.

34.     New housing in the town centre will be high density and would benefit greatly from public space.

There are no changes to the strategic drivers but the political environment has changed

35.     Policies and plans continue to support investing in community centre services, especially those that are integrated. Key documents are outlined in the following table.

Strategy

Direction

Auckland Plan 2050 | Focus area 1

Create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in, and enjoy community and civic life.

Auckland Plan 2050 | Focus area 2

Provide accessible services and social cultural infrastructure that is responsive in meeting Aucklanders’ evolving needs.

Community Facilities Network Plan

Focus investment on developing fit for purpose, integrated, and connected community facilities.

10-year Budget 2021-2031

Progress towards a new investment approach that is less reliant on council assets and focuses more on alternative ways of service provision. The mahi / work is guided by four key shifts:

·    We tailor services to different communities focusing on growing participation in areas of greatest needs.

·    We invest in a range of delivery approaches so we can adapt and are responsive.

·    We contribute to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri through a sustainable and resilient service network.

·    We operate a fit-for-service and cost-effective service network.

36.     Recent budgetary pressures have meant council has had to consider all elements that improve its financial position meaning that the likelihood of capital works funding being approved has significantly reduced. Additionally, Eke Panuku has reduced the number of town centre upgrades. The opportunity for communities in areas of high deprivation to partner with Eke Panuku on public realm projects in the future, at the scale of Unlock Avondale, may be limited.

The benefits of shifting community services to the town centre remain the same

37.     The benefits of increasing access to community services in Avondale, identified in the indicative business case, included:

·   civic engagement

·   community hauora / wellbeing

·   personal and social benefits

·   social connectedness

·   urban renewal if the facility stimulates private development and town centre revitalisation

·   operational cost savings through integrating library and community centre services

·   additional benefits to the urban environment and timeline are achieved through coordinating Te Hono with Unlock Avondale.

38.     New research[5] has given us a better understanding of the benefits of integrated community services.

·   Benefits to council:

Avoids unnecessary duplication of services.

Lower operational costs through reduced number of assets.

Easier strategic and programme planning.

Flexible spaces allow for flexible service delivery now and in the future.

 


 

·   Benefits to users:

More cohesive experience.

Easier access to a greater range of services.

Community organisations have easier access to additional spaces.

Easier access to services as travel between facilities is not required.

The consequences of construction costs increasing have happened

39.     Key risks, identified in the indicative business case, included:

·    Construction cost overruns (could increase project cost).

·    Magnitude of user benefits (could reduce project benefits).

·    Magnitude of social/community benefits (could reduce project benefits).

·    Urban renewal benefits (could reduce project benefits).

40.     Construction costs have increased and all other risks remain unknown until after opening.

Summary of findings from review of 2017 indicative business case

41.     There has been little change to the information presented in the 2017 indicative business case. Avondale remains an area with high deprivation and an under-provision of community services. Construction costs have increased significantly over the past six years, putting additional pressure on council’s capital works budget.

42.     As council continues to focus investment on communities of need the case for improved community services in Avondale, is still justified.

Reallocation of budget

We understand why there is a funding gap

43.     There are two primary factors that have led to the funding gap for Te Hono:

·   Construction costs have increased by approximately 40 per cent since 2017.

·   A new market valuation for the current library and community centre sites showed a decrease in value.

44.     A value engineering exercise was recently completed. The exercise was successful in reducing the estimated cost of the build, while still respecting input from the community and mana whenua.

Reallocation of local board budget secures important benefits with few costs

45.     Analysis of three funding options were presented to Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau on 13 September 2023. A summary of the key benefits and costs, for the local board, are outlined below.

Criteria

Seek additional LTP funding

Seek allocation of unallocated LTP funding

Seek reallocation of future project budgets

Funding availability

Cost
Governing Body has significant financial challenges which have required a balanced approach to solutioning. Additional funding may not be available

Cost
Unallocated LTP budget is being sought for several large capital projects. Allocation of funding will be prioritised against other important projects

Benefit
Reallocation is within the local board’s 10-year budget

Impact on timeline

Cost
Waiting for a LTP decision will delay construction by nine or more months

Cost
Waiting for a LTP decision will delay construction by nine or more months

Benefit
Minimal delay

Consequences of delay

Cost
Construction costs expected to rise by around $2 million over nine months

Cost
Construction costs expected to rise by around $2 million over nine months

Benefit
Avoids the need to add a further $2 million in cost escalations while LTP decisions are made

Cost
Risk contractors may not be available, causing additional delays

Cost
Risk contractors may not be available, causing additional delays

Benefit
Contractors are available

Cost
Risk to reputation with community and mana whenua

Cost
Risk to reputation with community and mana whenua

Benefit
Minimal delay reduces risk to reputation

Cost
Interdependent civic space project delayed

Cost
Interdependent civic space project delayed

Benefit
Civic space project is not delayed

Impact on other local budgets / projects

Benefit
No impact on the local board’s current project budgets

Benefit
No impact on the local board’s current project budgets

Cost
Decreases the Whau aquatic and recreation centre development budget, meaning the project may be underfunded.

46.     Reallocating Whau aquatic and recreation centre project budget means the Te Hono project does not need to be put on hold until the LTP is adopted in June 2024. Budget reallocation ensures the project can progress with minimal delays. This ensures that:

·    the project can continue to developed and detailed design

·    there is minimal escalation of costs

·    Eke Panuku can move forward with public realm works

·    council's reputation is maintained with the community and mana whenua.

47.     This option also demonstrates a willingness from the local board to work within existing budget envelopes by not requesting additional funding.

48.     If the local board does not receive approval to reallocate budget, they will need to apply for additional funding through the LTP, incurring an additional $2 million in construction costs due to project delays.


 

 

Impact on other Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau budgets / projects

49.     Seeking reallocation of current or future project budgets would directly affect other project budgets.

50.     The 10-year budget for Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau has been reviewed to identify budgets (excluding renewals envelopes) that are over $1 million and where the project has not started. Three budget lines were identified for possible reallocation.

Project

Financial years

Budget

Crown Lynn precinct

2025/2026

$2,529,621

Development (Crown Lynn Park)

2028/2029 to 2030/2031

$5,199,922

Aquatic and recreation centre development

2025/2026 to 2030/2031

$104,025,445

51.     Reallocating budget from either of the Crown Lynn projects would mean these projects would not go ahead and there would still be a funding shortfall for Te Hono. For this reason, staff have dismissed these budgets as feasible options for reallocation.

52.     The funds in the aquatic and recreation centre development project remains the only budget available for reallocation. There is a risk that reducing the aquatic and recreation centre budget will result in the project being underfunded. Staff will investigate cost mitigations through the design and business case process, as actual costs are better understood.

Other financial implications

53.     Council has spent $1 million in direct costs for Te Hono, including building design, planning, quantity surveyor services, and consultation.

54.     Eke Panuku has been closely involved in Te Hono as it is responsible for the development of the public realm in the Avondale town centre. Eke Panuku has spent $12.8 million on design costs, acquisition of Great North Road shops, Racecourse Parade car park, and the Crayford Street upgrade. Eke Panuku has forecast an additional $14.2 million for capital works on the public realm.

55.     The development of a civic space alongside Te Hono cannot move forward while construction of Te Hono is delayed. This delay will lead to cost escalations for Eke Panuku and possibly reduce the scope of deliverable work.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

56.     The location of Te Hono in the Avondale town centre, with improved walking connections between the town centre and train station, will enable increased active and public transport use in the community.

57.     The climate impact of Te Hono includes benefits through the reduced use of utilities. This will be achieved by removing two ageing facilities (Avondale Library and Avondale Community Centre) and replacing them with one facility that has committed to have a minimum Greenstar 5 Star rating and carbon neutral growth. However, there are also significant climate impacts from the construction of a new facility. These will be mitigated during the project construction phase through a construction management plan and environmental plan with measurable KPIs, reviewed by Greenstar Accredited Professionals and council group sustainability teams. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

58.     Staff from departments across the council group have been involved in the development of Te Hono, including:

·    Community and Social Policy

·    Parks and Community Facilities

·    Connected Communities

·    Regional Services and Strategy

·    Finance and Performance

·    Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     Findings from the community engagement process on the Avondale Multipurpose Community and Public Realm Design Brief were endorsed by Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau in August 2019. Members of the community have been involved in defining service requirements and inputting into the design brief. As a result, there is an expectation by the community that Te Hono should be completed as soon as possible.

60.     Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau has prioritised progressing the building of a multi-purpose facility in Avondale town centre since funding was approved by council’s Governing Body in 2017.

61.     Councillor Kerrin Leoni and Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau have expressed their commitment to finding the funds to enable the development of Te Hono. They recently met with the Mayor and Deputy Mayor to advocate for additional funding to be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

62.     At a workshop on 13 September 2023 Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau gave direction to seek reallocation of future Whau local board project budgets from the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee at their October hui. The board have since been informed that the budget reallocation must be approved by the Governing Body.

63.     Resolutions from the 27 September 2023 Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau business hui are tabled for the committee’s information and consideration. The confidential local board report is at Attachment A.  The open report seeking approval of the preliminary design is at Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

64.     In 2016, staff engaged with mana whenua Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua and residents within the community who identify as Māori. Over 200 people who identified as Māori participated in the development of a community needs assessment.

65.     Discussions with representatives from Te Kawerau a Maki, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, and Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua continued in 2019, and led to the Mana Whenua Project Vision for the facility. This included the underlying principle of hononga – connection, relationship, and bond.

66.     The vision outlined the desire for the project to:

·    remember and celebrate the local and wider cultural landscape

·    express cultural identity and sense of place

·    provide for cultural welcoming processes and protocol.

 

 

 

67.     Mana whenua gifted the name of Te Hono to the Avondale multipurpose community facility in 2022. There is a risk to council’s reputation with mana whenua should Te Hono continue to be delayed. .

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     Funding of $21 million for the multipurpose community facility is included in the local board’s budget and distributed over the financial years 2022/2023 to 2026/2027. The funding was allocated to deliver benefits including urban renewal, improved service, enhanced community hauora, and improved social connectedness.

69.     The Finance and Performance Committee resolved at its November 2017 committee meeting (resolution number FIN/2017/168) to sell the current library and community centre site at 93-99 Rosebank Road. Sale proceeds have been ring-fenced and made available to implement this project.

70.     Eke Panuku holds all funding for public space land acquisition and improvements to the public realm for Unlock Avondale.

71.     Operational costs for Te Hono will be covered from the existing library and community centre budgets and additional consequential opex is provided for in the Long-term Plan associated with the new build.

72.     Because there is no request for additional funding, the consequential opex, interest expense (borrowing cost) and depreciation expense is budgeted for within the Long-term Plan. Providing that the budget is transferred between the projects in the same financial year, there will not be material impact to any of these costs for that year. The reallocation is not anticipated to have any development contributions implications to either Te Hono or the Whau aquatic and recreation development.

73.     There are multiple and cumulative reasons for the cost increases. These include:

·    the cost estimate for the concept design was $10 million greater than allocated budget due to construction cost increases

·    delays through Covid-19 lockdowns

·    delays in the procurement process (due to the increased budget triggering additional governance gates)

·    the cost of construction materials (most significantly timber, concrete, and steel) have increased globally

·    labour shortages in the construction sector pushed up the cost of labour

·    increased demand for construction services in Aotearoa / New Zealand

·    changes to building codes, environmental regulations, and hauora and safety requirements have increased compliance costs.

74.     A value engineering exercise was initiated when the preliminary design phase indicated a likely funding gap. The building design was changed to reduce costs and the funding gap. The key cost-saving changes include a proposed reduction in the number of stories and changing the construction materials from timber to concrete and steel.


 

 

75.     The following table outlines current budget state.

 

2021/
2022

2022/
2023

2023/
2024

2024/
2025

2025/
2026

2026/
2027

Total ($millions)

CAPEX budget ($millions)

0.4

0.6

4.5

2.9

14.0

8.2

30.6*

Adjusted remaining budget (after actual spend and reduced sale proceeds)

28.6 - 27.0

Total remaining budget required

40.0 - 42.0

Shortfall in outer years

$11.4 - $15.0

*Includes estimated sales proceeds

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

76.     The following table outlines the risks of reallocating $15 million from the Whau aquatic and recreation centre development budget to the Avondale community centre development budget.

Risk

Impact

Mitigation

If the Whau aquatic and recreation centre development budget is reduced, then …

… there is a risk that the aquatic and recreation centre budget will be insufficient to implement the work, noting that the proposed budget reallocation would be a 14% reduction in available budget for the aquatic and recreation centre.

Some risk can be mitigated through the design and business case process as actual costs are better understood and options analysed.

If the Governing Body approves the Governance Framework Review proposal to achieve local board funding equity within three years, additional capital budget may be available to Te Poari ā-Rohe o Whau to allocate to the Whau aquatic and recreation centre development, however this is unconfirmed at this stage.

If there is continued escalation of costs and unexpected delay in construction, then…

… there is a high risk that the funding gap would increase to more than $15 million.

This risk has been mitigated through an estimated construction start date of January 2025, and through asking for the higher range of potential costs.

Should the funding gap increase again, the local board has the opportunity to look again at other funding options or reduced scope to complete the project.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

77.     If the Governing Body approves the reallocation of $15 million from the Whau aquatic and recreation centre development budget to the Avondale community centre development budget, the reallocation will be built into the baseline budget of the 2024 – 2034 Long-term Plan.

78.     Any unspent capital will be reallocated back to the Whau aquatic and recreation centre development budget upon completion of Te Hono.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Confidential report to Whau Local Board seeking direction on reallocation - Confidential

 

b

Report to Whau Local Board seeking approval of preliminary design

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Hannah Alleyne - Service & Asset Planning Team Leader

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services & Strategy

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Peter Gudsell - Group Chief Financial Officer

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Proposed legislation for transport in Auckland

File No.: CP2023/13243

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the key elements of a draft Bill for the incoming government to consider.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In August 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee (TICCC/2023/88) requested that the Mayor advocate for change to transport governance arrangements in Auckland and that staff draft a local Bill in support of this. The draft Bill was to provide for:

·    joint decision-making between Auckland Council and the Crown on a long-term integrated transport plan for Auckland, and on the funding and implementation of that plan

·    a lead role for Auckland Council in preparing and approving the Regional Land Transport Plan, which sets the strategic direction for transport and the allocation of funding in support of that direction

·    Auckland Council to be able to make other key regulatory decisions about the Auckland transport system, including setting parking fines.

3.       Staff have drafted a Bill to address the first two of these priorities. Further work is required in relation to Auckland Council being able to set parking fines and deal with other regulatory issues and this will be incorporated, as appropriate, in the final bill provided to the incoming government.

4.       Staff engaged with the Office of the Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel Office on this draft bill and received advice that the draft Bill cannot be progressed as a local bill and that it would need to proceed as either a member’s bill or a government bill.

5.       A workshop was held with the Governing Body on 20 September 2023 to discuss the key elements of the draft Bill.

6.       Separate engagements took place with Auckland Transport board members (15 September 2023). Their feedback is set out in this report.

7.       The draft Bill proposes a two-tier governance structure for transport planning and management in Auckland as follows:

A Joint Transport Committee with equal Crown and council representation, and one non-voting member from the Independent Māori Statutory Board. The Joint Transport Committee would be responsible for preparing and adopting an Integrated Transport Plan for Auckland. It would also be charged with providing an annual report on its activities and various entities would be able to delegate responsibilities, duties and powers to it.

An Auckland Regional Transport Committee, established by Auckland Council. The Committee is a regional transport committee as defined in the Land Transport Management Act 2003 (LTMA). However, along with the four councillors and the representatives appointed by Waka Kotahi and KiwiRail as provided for in the LTMA, to reflect Auckland Council’s unique arrangements and the proposed Joint Transport Committee, this committee would also include 1 person appointed by the Independent Māori Statutory Board. The Auckland Regional Transport Committee would prepare and approve a regional land transport plan for Auckland.

8.       This paper seeks approval of the key elements of the draft Bill and recommends that the Mayor promotes it to the incoming government to pick up as a government bill.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the advice received from the Office of the Clerk of the House that as proposed the draft Bill cannot be progressed as a local bill

b)      whakaae / approve the key elements of the draft Bill attached to this report, which will:

i)       facilitate integrated long-term transport planning and decision making for the Auckland region

ii)       enable joint decision-making between Auckland Council and the Crown for the delivery of transport priorities that give effect to agreed strategic outcomes

iii)      establish a two-tiered governance structure, the Joint Transport Committee for Auckland and the Auckland Regional Transport Committee, for transport planning and management in Auckland

iv)      provide in statute for an Integrated Transport Plan to be developed between the Council and the Crown

v)      enable Auckland Council to lead development of the Regional Land Transport Plan

vi)      provide for the Auckland Regional Transport Committee to comprise primarily of elected members

c)       tono / request the Mayor to engage with the incoming government on progressing the draft Bill as a government bill

d)      tono / request that staff continue to work on options for legislative change to enable Auckland Council to set parking fines and deal with other regulatory issues such as parking on berms, and to provide for this in the draft Bill as appropriate

e)      whakamana / authorise the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Chair of Transport and Infrastructure committee to approve any final material to be provided to the incoming government.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In August the Transport and Infrastructure Committee (TICCC/2023/88) unanimously agreed to support legislative change that, at a high level, provides for:

i)       joint decision-making between Auckland Council and the Crown on a long-term integrated transport plan for Auckland, and on the funding and implementation of that plan

ii)       Auckland Council taking the lead role in preparing and approving the Regional Land Transport Plan, which sets the strategic direction for transport and the allocation of funding in support of that direction

iii)      enabling Auckland Council to make other key regulatory decisions about the Auckland transport system, including setting parking fines.

10.     The Committee requested staff to draft a local bill consistent with these principles; to engage with the Office of the Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel Office on the possibility of Auckland Council proceeding with the promotion of the local bill; and to report back to the Governing Body with a draft local bill and further advice on next steps in September 2023.

 


 

 

11.     Advice from the Office of the Clerk Staff is that the Bill as proposed cannot be progressed as a local bill because:

·        it seeks to make changes to policy implemented through a public act; and

·        it seeks to assign duties/responsibilities to Ministers/government departments.

12.     The advice is that the Bill would need to be progressed as either a government bill or a member's bill - either of which would ultimately need the support of the government to pass through the legislative process.

13.     The Transport and Infrastructure Committee in August also requested that the Mayor advocate for legislative change giving effect to the principles above (paragraph 10) to be a priority for the incoming government.

14.     Potential elements of the draft Bill were workshopped with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee on the 9 August 2023 and the 20 September 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     There are two key interrelated issues that the draft Bill is intended to address. The first is the recognised need for a mechanism to allow Auckland Council, the government and transport agencies to work together and undertake joint decision-making on Auckland’s transport priorities. The second is addressing the loss of democratic and council oversight of the Regional Land Transport Plan that arose from changes made to the Land Transport Management Act in 2013. Transport is a key area of concern for many Aucklanders and currently makes up a third of rates collected. This percentage will only increase with water reform and the council is accountable to ratepayers for transport spend.

16.     Given their roles as joint funders and strategic direction setters Auckland Council and the government both need to work together to ensure that Auckland has a well-functioning transport system that supports both regional and national objectives.

17.     With the support of Auckland Transport, Auckland Council needs to take the lead role in ensuring transport plans are integrated with other key and related functions such as land use, spatial and infrastructure planning and funding.

18.     The current arrangements are not delivering the integrated decision-making or outcomes Auckland needs. They also do not provide for democratic oversight of key planning decisions in Auckland.

19.     The following sections of this report outline the key elements of the draft Bill.

Purpose of the proposed draft Bill

20.     The purpose of the proposed draft Bill would be to –

a)   facilitate integrated long-term transport planning and decision-making for the Auckland region

b)   enable joint decision-making between Auckland Council and the Crown for the delivery of transport priorities that give effect to agreed strategic outcomes

c)   establish a two-tiered governance structure for transport planning and management in Auckland

d)   enable Auckland Council to make decisions in relation to the setting of parking fines.

21.     The draft Bill consists of two key governance arrangements - a new joint transport committee and a new bespoke Auckland Regional Transport Committee (refer Figure A).

 

 

 

Figure A: Proposed governance structure to be set out in draft Bill

A diagram of a transportation company

Description automatically generated

 

Joint Transport Committee

22.     The purpose of the joint committee would be to:

·        take a long-term, integrated view of Auckland’s transport planning and funding 

·        provide for joint decision-making between the Crown and Auckland Council

·        monitor and report on progress against key transport priorities in the Integrated Transport Plan for Auckland

23.     The functions of this committee would be to:

·        prepare and approve an Integrated Transport Plan for Auckland (discussed below)

·        oversee and report on the performance of Auckland’s transport system against outcomes in the Integrated Auckland Transport Plan, including progress on key projects and the availability of funding

·        make recommendations to partner agencies in respect of performance of Auckland’s transport system, including planning, funding and regulation

·        provide oversight of planning and delivery of significant transport projects and make recommendations to improve the integration of those projects with the existing transport system in Auckland and other proposed projects from partner agencies and approved organisations.

24.     The draft Bill also provides for Waka Kotahi or other government transport agencies to delegate powers and functions to the Joint Committee. This could enable, for example the Joint Committee to approve funding decisions up to a specified limit. However, this would need agreement of the relevant government entity.

25.     The Joint Committee would also be able to commission advice and to obtain information from key stakeholders to undertake its functions.


 

 

26.     The Joint Transport Committee for Auckland would consist of the following:

a)   The Mayor of Auckland

b)   The Minister of Transport

c)   2 representatives appointed by Auckland Council

d)   2 representatives appointed by the Minister of Transport.

e)   1 non voting member appointed from the Independent Māori Statutory Board

27.     At the request of the Joint Transport Committee, Auckland Council and the Minister of Transport would each be able to appoint up to two additional representatives to be members of this Committee.

28.     The general operating costs of the committee are proposed to be shared equally between Auckland Council and the Crown.

New Auckland Regional Transport Committee

29.     The functions of the Auckland Regional Transport Committee would be the same as other Regional Transport Committees in New Zealand, but the membership of the Auckland Regional Transport Committee would reflect the different governance structures in Auckland and the proposed Joint Transport Committee.

30.     The proposed membership for this committee is based on the requirements set out in the Land Transport Management Act 2003 - sections 105(3) and 105A. Auckland Council as a unitary authority will appoint four persons to represent itself, including appointing the Chair and Deputy Chair. As with other regional transport committees, membership will also include one person from Waka Kotahi and Kiwi Rail (non-voting). However, reflecting Auckland’s unique governance arrangements, the Chair of Auckland Transport and one person appointed by the Independent Māori Statutory Board will also be members.

31.     The functions of this committee would be to:

·        approve a regional land transport plan for Auckland

·        provide the Joint Transport Committee for Auckland with advice and assistance as required.

32.     Under the draft Bill, Auckland Council would be responsible for approving the regional land transport plan for Auckland in accordance with section 13(1) of the Land Transport Management Act 2003. This would enable councillors to make clearer trade-offs between levels of investment in transport against other council responsibilities, and better enable integration of transport with other council planning functions.

33.     It would also improve and simplify alignment issues between the Regional Land Transport Plan and council’s long-term plan that both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport currently navigate.

Integrated Transport Plan for Auckland

34.     The purpose of the Integrated Transport Plan, prepared by the Joint Committee for Auckland, is to set the strategic direction and enable coherent and coordinated decision-making by Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi and other parties. It will establish 10 and 30-year indicative investment priorities to inform the development of:

·        the national land transport plan

·        the regional land transport plan for Auckland

·        Auckland Council’s long-term plan, including council’s infrastructure strategy. 

The ability for Auckland to set its own parking fines

35.     Further work is required by staff on incorporating provisions into the draft Bill that would enable Auckland Council to set its own parking fines.

36.     It is recommended that the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Chair of Transport and Infrastructure committee are delegated the authority to approve any final material to be provided to the incoming government.

37.     As the draft Bill is primarily focussed on improving governance arrangements for transport in the Auckland context, there is a risk that the government may consider that parking regulation provisions sit more appropriately in another bill or are better progressed through some other mechanism. Including them in the draft Bill does, however, allow engagement to occur at the same time.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     There are no climate impacts as a result of this report. If successful, the council’s ability to approve the regional land transport plan, should ensure closer alignment with council’s agreed climate objectives.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     Council staff have advised Auckland Transport on the content of this report and met with the Board Chair and Chief Executive to discuss. Auckland Transport supports the proposed Auckland Integrated Transport Plan and notes that this should be led by Auckland under the direction of the Mayor and Minister. They are, however, concerned that the role of the Auckland Transport Board is diminished. Their support of the shift of the Regional Land Transport Plan responsibility to the proposed Auckland Regional Transport Committee is dependent on their being overall improvement in the process as a result of the Bill.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     Early engagement with the local boards was provided at a briefing on Friday 22 September. The proposed changes, if taken up by the incoming government will involve public consultation and opportunities for further local board engagement.

41.     If successful, the changes should provide both the Governing Body and local boards with a stronger mandate for setting the direction for transport in Auckland.<Enter text>

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     Staff and the Mayoral Office have offered to discuss this proposal with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. IMSB members have been invited to all workshops.

43.     If successful, the changes proposed will strengthen representation as both the proposed governance tiers have members of the IMSB on the committees.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     There are no immediate financial implications in undertaking the proposed work.

45.     Any future financial decisions can be considered through the appropriate Long-term Plan and Annual Plan decision making process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     There is a risk that this will not be a priority for the new government. The Mayor’s and council’s role in advocating for this change is key to mitigating this risk.

47.     It is likely that the legislative process will result in changes to the draft Bill. While this could improve the legislation in response to public submissions and scrutiny, there is also a risk that the policy basis could shift away from that agreed by the Council.  Auckland Council would engage actively in the legislative process to respond to any proposed changes to the draft Bill to make sure that the council’s position is clear.

48.     If successful, there may be some integration risks resulting from functions shifting from Auckland Transport to Auckland Council. These can be mitigated by clear communications that the changes are not reducing any current functions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     If approved, staff will support the Mayor to engage with the incoming government for the bill to be progressed as a government bill.  Any Auckland Council submission to a bill (such as at select committee) would follow usual Auckland Council processes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Anna Bray - Acting Director - Governance and CCO Partnerships

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Recovery Office Update

File No.: CP2023/13128

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report  

1.       To provide an update on progress with the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery and to seek an extension of the delegations of the Storm Recovery Political Advisory Group.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

2.       Recovery efforts are continuing, with progress being made on infrastructure repairs, mechanisms for community support, and the negotiations between the council and central government. Key recovery data is provided in Attachment A.

3.       Given the scale, pace and scope of the recovery programme, it is proposed to extend the delegations of the Storm Recovery Political Advisory Group, to provide guidance to staff for the duration of the recovery effort and to make recommendations to the Governing Body as set out in Attachment B. The Governing Body may wish to consider the membership of the Political Advisory Group.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi-ā-taipitopito / note progress with the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery efforts.

b)      whakaae / agree to extend the delegations of the Storm Recovery Political Advisory Group established at the 22 June 2023 Governing Body meeting, to provide guidance to staff for the duration of the recovery effort and to make recommendations to the Governing Body as set out in Attachment B of the agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

Recovery efforts are a significant and necessary commitment

4.       After the devastating storms of January and February 2023, the Recovery Office was established to coordinate the region’s recovery efforts across Auckland Council group, New Zealand Government, and other partners.

5.       Recovery from such significant events is complex and multi-faceted, with responses needing to cater for communities and individuals, infrastructure and homes. To give a sense of the scale of the challenge, more than 4,500 households have needed storm-related assistance to date this year. Access to around 3,000 homes has been restricted or prohibited, with many still under investigation.

6.       For the Auckland Council Group, coordinating the recovery is a significant commitment, requiring unplanned expenditure and generating a significant additional workload for some parts of its operations. It requires the coordination of resources across the council group and oversight from Auckland Council’s Governing Body.

7.       Coordination is being supported through the Tāmaki Makaurau Interim Recovery Plan, as provided to the Governing Body on 22 June 2023 (available at https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2023/06/20230622_GB_AGN_11263_files/20230622_GB_AGN_11263_Attachment_93256_1.PDF) . This plan established four whenu (strands) for recovery: community and social wellbeing, Māori partnership and participation, economic growth, and natural and built environment.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Recovery dashboard being improved to track progress

8.       Key monthly recovery data is provided in Attachment A. The key performance indicators of the recovery dashboard are currently being reviewed to ensure that they provide a clear and relevant overview of progress, as we moved from response to recovery.

Activity in August and September

9.       Recovery office activities of note since the 28 August Governing Body update report include:

·    52 per cent of roading projects and 48 per cent of parks and community facilities repair projects have been completed.  Other projects are in design and investigation phases.

·    Progress on categorisation: The Muriwai geotechnical assessments are scheduled to be complete by the end of October 2023. Region-wide, 226 houses have received interim categorisations (as of 11 September).

·    Storm recovery and resilience consultation: The consultation for the Tamaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water ran from 3 – 31 August and received 2051 submissions. Feedback from the consultation is reported in a separate Governing Body report on this agenda.

·    Community events continue to be an important part of the Recovery Office’s activities. Twenty Have Your Say events were organized for the Storm Recovery and Resilience consultation. A webinar for storm-affected properties was held on 5 September with over 700 participants – the video will be available shortly.

·    A Storm Recovery Navigation Service is being established to provide support to impacted homeowners going through the categorisation and buy-out process. We now have 15 Storm Recovery Navigators to connect individuals and households to the information, services and support they need to plan their recovery. Additional roles will be recruited as categorisation continues.

·    $500,000 has been confirmed through the Social Sector Recovery Plan Future of Severely Affected Land (FOSAL) Navigators Support fund. This will be used to recruit four Storm Recovery Navigators within the Recovery Office. A further proposal has been submitted for the Social Sector Recovery Plan Iwi and Community Fund to establish contracts with local community groups, NGO’s and marae to deliver the Storm Recovery Navigation Service.

·    Five Community Recovery Liaisons have been recruited to support community-led recovery in North, West, West Coast, Central East and South Auckland regions.

·    Engagement with key mana whenua and iwi, community partners and stakeholders is planned throughout September and October to inform the Community and Social Recovery Roadmap. This roadmap along with other recovery plans will provide guidance to agencies, organisations and community groups to develop, target and coordinate their activities for the community and social recovery of Tāmaki Makaurau communities.

·    565 homeowners with uninhabitable properties have been granted rates relief, at a value of $2.1 million (as of 18 September 2023), following the June decision by the Governing Body (GB/2023/137). We have revisited the criteria for rates relief, to ensure they are appropriate for assessing habitability across all households, regardless of their placard status. 

 


 

 

Receipt of Crown’s co-funding offer

10.     On 24 August 2023, the Governing Body endorsed an in-principle agreement with the Crown, subject to public consultation, to co-fund storm recovery costs for affected properties and infrastructure as set out in the offer made by the Crown on 23 August 2023 (GB/2023/160). Policy work is underway to support Governing Body consideration of the agreement alongside public feedback. A report will be provided at the Extraordinary Governing Body meeting on 6 October 2023.

Consultation on Storm Recovery and Resilience Funding

11.     On 24 August 2023, the Governing Body agreed to a two-week public consultation process on the proposed Crown-council co-funding of storm recovery and affected property buy-out, to commence mid-September 2023 (GB/2023/160). The two-week timeframe was approved in recognition of the need to provide certainty to affected communities as quickly as possible.

12.     Given the short time frames, final approval of the engagement plan and public consultation materials was delegated to the Political Advisory Group. The group met and carried out this delegation on 6 September 2023.

13.     The consultation, ‘Funding Auckland’s Storm Recovery and Resilience’ was open from 11 September – 24 September 2023. The consultation was promoted through a marketing campaign and various council channels, including community networks, local board networks and the Peoples’ Panel. Submitters from the (phase 1) Storm Recovery and Resilience consultation were invited to provide their feedback, as were directly impacted individuals in the Recovery Office mailing lists. Engagement included static displays in libraries, a webinar, and two drop-in library sessions. Feedback forms were provided in NZ Sign Language, Māori, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Korean, Samoan, Tongan and Hindi.

14.     Feedback from the consultation will be reported to the 6 October Extraordinary Governing Body meeting.

Extension of delegations to the Storm Recovery Political Advisory Group

15.     The Political Advisory Group was established at the 22 June 2023 Governing Body meeting, in the context of the establishing the parameters for the Council’s engagement with Government around storm recovery. The Political Advisory Group was delegated ‘to provide guidance to staff and recommend decisions to the Governing Body’ (Resolution GB/2023/115).

16.     The Political Advisory Group’s remit was extended on 24 August 2023, to provide ‘final approval of the engagement plan and public consultation materials to the Political Advisory Group established at the 22 June 2023 Governing Body meeting’ (resolution GB/2023/160). This delegation was carried out on 6 September 2023.

17.     Given the scale, pace and scope of the recovery programme, officers recommend that the delegation of the Political Advisory Group be extended beyond the Crown negotiation process, to cover the implementation of any agreed funding package (subject to agreement by the Governing Body on 6 October 2023), and wider recovery efforts, including the development and implementation of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan.

18.     A proposed terms of reference for the Storm Recovery Political Advisory Group is provided  at Attachment B. The Governing Body may wish to consider the membership of the Group.

 


 

 

Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan in development

19.     The Tāmaki Makaurau Interim Recovery Plan is being updated to become a final Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan. Consultation on community ambitions for recovery has been reported in a separate report on this agenda and is being used to inform development of the Recovery Plan.

20.     The Recovery Office has been undertaking specific engagement with Māori to gather insights to inform the development of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan.  One on one meetings with mana whenua representatives have been scheduled throughout September. Feedback to date is included in the Storm Resilience and Recovery consultation feedback report. Further insights will be gathered as mana whenua engagement continues.

21.     Earlier indications were that the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan would be ready to report back to the Governing Body in September 2023, with a final approval of regional sections by October 2023. It has become apparent that this timeframe will be unachievable. It is now expected that the Recovery Plan will be reported to the Governing Body for approval by December 2023. In the meantime, the Interim Plan will continue to guide recovery priorities and efforts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out two core goals: achieving net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and adapting to the impacts of climate change. The risk of more frequent and extreme weather events is rising with the effects of climate change. The impacts of individual events compound – making communities more vulnerable to crises and undermines resilience building efforts. This compound risk puts our communities, natural environment, infrastructure, utilities, and services under further pressure. Responding and recovering from extreme weather events becomes harder if communities are still coping with the impacts of the last event.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Recovery Office is working across the council group to ensure alignment with council policy and priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Local boards have provided their feedback on the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water programme. This is reported in the Storm Recovery and Resilience report on this agenda. Local boards have now been invited to provide their feedback on the proposed government funding package. This will be reported to the 6 October Extraordinary Governing Body meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Mana whenua and mataawaka living in Auckland were impacted by the January Floods and Cyclone Gabrielle as individuals and whānau and through impacts on marae and sites of cultural significance. Many marae acted as community hubs providing support to those impacted by the weather event.

 


 

 

26.     The recovery is an opportunity to partner with iwi, mataawaka, marae and Māori businesses. Regular contact from Auckland Council will be important moving forwards to strengthen relationships with mana whenua, and ensure they are able to meaningfully participate in the recovery effort. Engagement to date has been reported in the separate report on the Storm Recovery and Resilience consultation.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     A budget update will be reported to the Extraordinary Governing Body on 6 October 2023.

28.     Central government has announced a funding commitment to support Aucklanders impacted by severe weather. The proposal is currently out for consultation and will come back to the Extraordinary Governing Body meeting on 6 October for consideration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     The risks and mitigations for the recovery effort are identified in Table 1.

Risk

Mitigation

Vulnerable Communities: Risk of inadequate service provision to prevent further hardship.

Undertaking community needs assessments to inform approach (scale and scope) required for Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan development.

Working with Government to agree how funding the Government’s Social Sector Recovery Plan will be allocated to Auckland to deliver on the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan.

Reputational: Risk of losing social license to operate and deliver Recovery outcomes

Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan developed to define recovery activities and ensure coordination and integration within council teams and across the council group.

Utilising community groups to convey key messages and information, and to understand from the community what the communication and engagement needs are.

Resourcing recovery communications function to enable proactive media and communication across all key stakeholders.

Funding: Risk of funding sources (local and central govt) and levels of funding being inadequate.

Crown co-funding package to be considered at the Extraordinary Governing Body meeting on 6 October. Subject to agreement, FY23/24 requirements would be debt funded and then options for how to fund Council portion will be considered through Long Term Plan 2024 – 2034 process.

Māori partnership and participation: Risk of losing endorsement, trust, and confidence from mana whenua and Māori communities.

Dedicated resourcing for Māori engagement implemented and engagement underway.

Governance, decision-making, mandate, and scope: Risk of changes to or incorrect scope for Recovery, unclear decision-making processes, ambiguity of owners and influencers, unclear mandate

Being clear about what is in and out of the council’s scope to address and the anticipated timeframes for resolution.

Developing tailored solutions for affected communities with dedicated liaison officers for priority communities.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The Crown co-funding package will be considered at the Extraordinary Governing Body meeting on 6 October.

31.     An update on progress with the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan will be provided in October, with a final draft plan expected before the end of 2023. The Recovery Office will continue to engage with mana whenua and Māori communities, gathering feedback on the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan.  These insights will be compiled to assist in the development of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan, and to develop a Mana Whenua Engagement Guide.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key Recovery Data

 

b

Storm Recovery Political Advisory Group: proposed terms of reference

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mace Ward - Deputy Group Recovery Manager

Authorisers

Mat Tucker - Group Recovery Manager

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Storm Recovery and Resilience consultation feedback

File No.: CP2023/02801

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present feedback received through the Storm Recovery and Resilience consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Throughout August 2023 the council sought feedback from Aucklanders on the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and the proposed Making Space for Water programme.

3.       In preparing the consultation material and programme scope, staff from the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Office and Healthy Waters worked with staff across Auckland Council to ensure alignment of the consultation with other relevant processes.

4.       The consultation document and supporting material were approved on 27 July 2023 (GB/2023/138), outlining the purpose of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and proposals for the Making Space for Water programme. A high-level indication of programme cost was also included, with the understanding that this would be subject to further consultation and agreement with the Crown.

5.       The Storm Recovery and Resilience consultation was open from 3 August to 31 August 2023 for submissions to be made in person, through feedback forms, and other online mechanisms. In total, the council received 2051 submissions. A summary of the feedback is provided in Attachment A.

6.       Local board feedback was sought at the same time as community feedback. Local board feedback has been provided in Attachment B.

7.       Generally, key themes arising from this consultation were consistent across communities, local boards, and demographic advisory panel representatives. These themes include:

·    the extensive damage and impacts experienced by residents and communities, and the ongoing challenges and hardships faced by many on the long road to recovery

·    the benefits and importance of community spirit and connections, as well as personal resilience, both during and after severe weather events

·    desire for Auckland to improve its stormwater infrastructure and flood mitigation

·    support for increased investment in stormwater network maintenance and enhancement

·    concern for ongoing well-being and access to support in the long-term

·    need for diverse funding sources to reduce the burden on ratepayers

·    advocacy for increased connection between communities and the council in recovery, planning, and preparation for weather events.

8.       Verbal feedback was provided by 29 mana whenua representatives representing 15 iwi, who attended the Wai Tāmaki Wai Ora hui on 10 August 2023 to provide their views on the Making Space for Water programme. We did not receive any detailed written submissions from mana whenua. One marae made a written submission. Staff from Healthy Waters and the Recovery Office have attended individual hui with mana whenua representatives.

9.       Representatives from the demographic advisory panels attended a cross-panel session to provide advice on how diverse communities were impacted by the storm events. This feedback has been summarised and provided in Attachment C.

 

10.     All feedback has been considered by staff to refine the Making Space for Water programme. It will also inform the development of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and local recovery plans.

11.     The Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water programme will be reported to the Governing Body for its consideration in the coming months.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the feedback received through consultation on the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and proposed Making Space for Water programme

b)      whakamihi / thank the demographic advisory panels cross-panel representatives for their presentation

c)       whakarite / provide this report and attachments to the local boards.

Horopaki

Context

12.     The Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan will set out how Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland will recover from the extreme weather events that have affected the region through 2023. Making Space for Water is an operational aspect of this plan and identifies a series of initiatives that can be implemented to improve flood management in Auckland.

13.     Public consultation will be important to shaping the structure and content of these plans to meet the needs and expectations of Aucklanders to support their long-term recovery and resilience. It will also inform the development of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 in order to identify ways to fund the necessary flood interventions.

14.     From 3 to 31 August 2023, the council consulted with the public on the Storm Recovery and Resilience options. Feedback comprised:

·        written feedback – 1968 hard copy and online forms, emails and letters

·        in person – 83 pieces of feedback from 20 Have Your Say events

·        eight regional stakeholder groups presented to elected members on 31 August 2023 at a Have Your Say event for regional organisations.

15.     Local boards considered interim consultation feedback related to their local board area and then passed resolutions detailing their feedback and advocacy for the Storm Recovery and Resilience plans at their business meetings between 15 and 30 August 2023. 

16.     Representatives from the six demographic advisory panels provided advice to staff on the Storm Recovery and Resilience Plan and the Auckland Council Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Plan at a cross-panel event on 24 August 2023.

17.     This report provides an opportunity for the Governing Body to formally consider public, mana whenua, demographic advisory panel and local board views in their decision-making on the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water programme.

18.     The attachments to this report provide feedback summaries from public consultation (Attachment A), local board resolutions (Attachment B), and the demographic advisory panels’ joint feedback report (Attachment C).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The Storm Recovery and Resilience consultation document gave an overview of the impacts of the storms, and an outline of nine initiatives proposed through the Making Space for Water programme. Aucklanders were asked for their views on Auckland’s storm recovery, including how they have been impacted, support they have received, aspirations for longer-term recovery and resilience, and views on the Making Space for Water initiatives.

20.     Feedback from public, mana whenua, and local boards on the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water programme has been analysed and themed below. This summary focuses on common themes and does not include all the matters raised in the consultation. Analysis has considered the feedback variation between different demographics, geographic areas, and individuals that were impacted by the weather events compared to those that were not.

Communities experienced a wide range of impacts

21.     The most commonly mentioned impacts were damage to community and neighbourhood facilities, infrastructure, parks, roads and buildings. Comments relating to this theme mainly talked about the impact of flooding and slips on neighbouring properties and facilities. Other impacts included transport disruptions, extensive damage to submitters’ homes, properties and contents, as well as emotional distress.

22.     Participants from the Waitākere Ranges, Rodney and Franklin local board areas were more affected by transport disruptions and cable outages (power, phone and internet) than other residents. Māngere-Ōtāhuhu respondents were more likely to experience damage to their home and contents than other residents. It is important to note that these impacts were not just felt by property owners – during the roadshow events many tenants talked about the impacts they had experienced.

23.     While 60 per cent of submitters did not experience damage to their home, almost a third (30 per cent) were affected by flooding, and 5 per cent were affected by slips or landslides. Māori participants were more affected, with 43 per cent affected by floods and 23 per cent sustaining other damage to their homes.

24.     Those aged 15-24 years were most affected by the transport disruptions (62 per cent) likely reflecting their increased reliance on public transport rather than private vehicles, and the timing of the 27 January storm. 

Community support is key to recovery

25.     In the months following the storms, the biggest source of help and support mentioned was community spirit. People talked about neighbours and neighbourhoods coming together to clear up damage, share experiences and provide help to those in need. Among those personally affected, the most frequently mentioned theme was self-reliance – having to rely on their own resilience and hard work to get them through. At the community roadshow sessions, many stories were told of the hardships and long-term impacts people are experiencing, and their ongoing efforts to recover. A number of respondents may not have engaged with the support services available, either because they did not think it was necessary, did not know about available services, or did not think they needed them. 12 per cent were dissatisfied with the council’s response.

26.     When asked what would help people to feel they had recovered from the events, the most common theme related to maintaining (34 per cent) and improving (21 per cent) Auckland’s stormwater infrastructure. Likewise, when asked how Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland can be more prepared for events like these in the future, the most common themes were improving (41 per cent) and maintaining (37 per cent) stormwater infrastructure, along with better planning around flood mitigation (32 per cent). This theme came through strongly during the face-to-face roadshow events, with participants talking about the need to better manage stormwater. This feedback will be particularly relevant to the Resilient Auckland kaupapa.

27.     The next most common theme was the need for an improved Auckland Emergency Management response and planning, including the need for better information and communications during an event. This feedback will be more relevant to the Civil Defence and Emergency Management (CDEM) group plan development and will be passed on to staff developing that plan for consideration. Pasifika communities appear to have been the most engaged with the CDEM network, with 28 per cent of respondents referencing that support, compared to average 8 per cent for other demographics. Advice from local boards and the demographic advisory panel encouraged working with community organisations and advocacy groups to share accurate messages from a single source of truth.

28.     Overall, Aucklanders focused predominantly on infrastructure-based solutions and improvements, but there was mention of community-led support activities (particularly among Pasifika participants), and the need to improve financial support to affected families, support for community groups and stronger community connections.

Broad support for Making Space for Water

29.     The Making Space for Water questions sought feedback on specific initiatives and the funding requirements. 1580 submitters provided feedback on this topic. Overall, 697 submitters (46 per cent) supported the proposal. 291 submitters (19 per cent) were neutral or had mixed sentiments or supported it but had concerns about funding. 104 submitters (7 per cent) did not support the proposal. Based on this, 28 per cent of respondents to this question did not provide a clear position on the programme.

30.     Comments were analysed by staff to determine their sentiment about the programme. Not all comments clearly demonstrated a position on the programme, instead providing suggestions on how they thought council should respond to these events

31.     Submitters that were neutral or mixed raised queries about the affordability and impact on rates, but supported the general intent of the Making Space for Water proposals and urged practical responses to storm events.

32.     Submitters that did not support the programme were concerned about the affordability and benefits of the programme. There was a trend in this feedback encouraging council to focus instead on basics, such as road drainage maintenance. Submitters also preferred for property-related costs to be funded by property owners and insurance companies rather than by ratepayers.

33.     As in questions focussed on recovery, there was strong support from all submission types to better maintain and upgrade our stormwater network, and to involve communities in planning for storm events.

34.     Some written submissions made specific reference to one or more of the Making Space for Water initiatives. The comments on these initiatives, especially where comments indicated people strongly supported the work, wanted to see it in their area, or did not understand the work, have enabled staff to better tailor content in the programme plan. The level of support was consistent regardless of whether submitters had been directly affected by the storms.

35.     The most commonly referenced initiatives in written submissions were ‘increased maintenance’ (18 per cent), ‘stream rehabilitation’ (nine per cent), and ‘blue-green networks’ (seven per cent). However, at public meetings there was a much stronger focus on blue-green networks, particularly advocating for additional blue-green project locations. This feedback, where communities have identified high-risk streams in their area, will be used to inform future catchment planning and prioritisation. The final selection of blue-green networks will depend on feasibility studies and may require more small-scale projects than previously identified.

36.     Feedback from public meetings was also heavily focussed on the role of communities in planning for storm events, providing local knowledge to the council on high-risk areas, and individual on-going experiences. Responding to this feedback will be a combined effort between the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan, Making Space for Water, and the Auckland Council CDEM Group Plan as these teams continue to work together.

Funding must be equitable

37.     There is strong support to seek funding from other sources, rather than relying on rates (22 per cent). This theme was more strongly supported by Māori (38 per cent), Pasifika (41 per cent), and Asian (35 per cent) submitters than Pākehā (21 per cent). Given the consultation occurred before the central government announced its relief package for Auckland, some of these concerns may be reduced through subsequent consultation and once a funding agreement is reached.

38.     The demographic advisory panels emphasised the need for equitable funding, as noted in the demographic advisory panels’ joint feedback report: “All of Auckland should share the cost of finding solutions and fixing damage to property and land, not only those impacted owners. This recognises that when disasters hit, there is a social interest in supporting those most impacted.”  

39.     Local boards also advocated for equitable funding, generally favouring a regional targeted rate approach.

Local board feedback

40.     All local boards supported the principles of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water. Generally, all boards advocated for a combination of community support and infrastructure solutions.

41.     Fifteen of 21 local boards referred to the need for diverse funding streams to reduce impacts on ratepayers given current cost pressures residents are facing. This includes several explicit recommendations to work with central government to secure substantial funding in order to reduce the burden on ratepayers, or prevent significant reprioritisation in other areas. Where rates are used, the preference generally was for a regional rate, rather than local.

42.     Using local knowledge was an important theme in workshops and formal resolutions. Many local boards have advocated for more locally driven resilience and response capacity. This aligns with proposals from Auckland Emergency Management that are also subject to consultation. This includes utilising local facilities, communications channels, and community groups in preparation and building resilience, as well as to support recovery (10 of 21).

43.     Most local boards (17 of 21) were strongly opposed to continued development in high-risk areas and development without appropriate flood mitigations, with these boards recommending some change to how development in flood-prone areas is consented or seeking a better understanding of how they can influence intensification and development decisions.

44.     As with other groups, communication at every stage of an emergency event was a concern for several boards (eight of 21). Boards that made resolutions on this recommended more consistent, accessible, and timely communications during and after an event, and to be more involved in that communication. Boards also sought more ongoing communication on where to access support, how projects will be delivered and progress in the buy-out process.

45.     A full copy of all resolutions is included in Attachment B.

Mana whenua and Māori engagement

46.     Engagement with mana whenua and Māori has been approached differently through this consultation process. The focus has been more on deliberate kanohi ki te kanohi (face to face) discussions with mana whenua, rather than a broad approach. This enables staff and mana whenua to build relationships that will be necessary to deliver the mahi required for recovery and future resilience. Staff have provided several opportunities for mana whenua to provide detailed verbal feedback through the consultation period and into the future.

47.     This has included hui with several mana whenua by Healthy Waters and Recovery Office staff since June and will continue in the coming months. The offer for these kanohi ki te kanohi hui remains open to all mana whenua. 

48.     The Wai Tāmaki Wai Ora Collective Hui was held on 10 August 2023 and attended by 29 Tāmaki Makaurau iwi representatives from across 15 iwi. Organisation of the hui was a collaboration between Chief Planning Office and Healthy Waters, with Healthy Waters presenting and discussing the Making Space for Water programme. Brief in-person feedback was received, as well as a written statement from Ngāti Tamaoho.

49.     The main high-level themes from the in-person feedback received at the Wai Tāmaki Wai Ora Hui were:

·        support for acquisition of private property with a focus on Māori homeowners

·        regulations of current aquifer supply levels, future planning for drought events

·        the significant impact of West Auckland flooding events on the community, specifically Māori

·        inclusion of Te Ao Māori perspectives in overland flow path designs

·        interest in scheduling individual hui

·        opportunities to partner with mana whenua on specific projects and initiatives.

50.     The Recovery Office has also been undertaking specific engagement with Māori to gather insights to inform the development of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan. On 23 August, the Recovery Office met with a collection of Māori community liaisons from West Auckland (the West Auckland Māori Thought Leadership Group). Time constraints have made it difficult to arrange meetings with other Māori community groups.

51.     One on one meetings with mana whenua representatives are being scheduled for September. In these hui, mana whenua are invited to share their experience on recent weather events, their aspirations for the recovery effort, and to provide more specific feedback on the Interim Recovery Plan itself, including how the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan could or should be developed further. Consistent themes from mana whenua engagements to date include:

·        The Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan should be framed from a perspective that is based on Te Ao Māori. This includes referring to Māori interests in all four outcome areas (not just the Māori Partnership and Participation outcome area) and placing greater emphasis on the wellbeing of the environment.

·        Mana whenua have kaitiakitanga obligations to support the environment and the community – the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan needs to capture how Auckland Council can support Mana Whenua to meet their obligations.

·        The success of the plan depends on the amount of resources Auckland Council are willing to invest – the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan needs clear resourcing commitments for the activities that are ultimately identified.

·        How Auckland Council should engage with mana whenua in relation to recovery activities was also discussed during the one-on-one hui. The feedback suggests there is a common perception that meaningful engagement from Auckland Council has been limited following the recent weather events. The intention is to create an engagement guide to support Auckland Council’s interactions with mana whenua moving forwards.

52.     Both the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water programme are identifying specific ways to meet the needs of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau, and enable opportunities for council to partner with Māori in delivery as engagement continues.

Demographic advisory panels cross-panel advice

53.     The six council demographic advisory panels are: Disability, Ethnic Communities, Pacific Peoples, Rainbow Communities, Seniors, and Youth. The panels are established to provide advice to the Mayor and council to develop inclusive plans and policies.

54.     During a four-hour session, 27 representatives from the six demographic advisory panels received information about the council’s proposals on recovery, stormwater, and emergency management.

55.     In small round-table groups, open discussions on each topic enabled participants to share some of the experiences and aspirations of their communities. This feedback was recorded by staff, and has been summarised by panel representatives and included in full in Attachment C. The main themes overall were advocacy for partnering and community engagement, equitable recovery, a coordinated and inclusive approach, and building capability.

56.     Partnering and community engagement positions communities as partners in recovery, building trust in council, and empowering communities to provide support in future emergency events. This is relevant to the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water and reflects the current approach.

57.     Equitable recovery refers to supporting those most in need, and sharing the costs of recovery equally. Support from the Recovery Office is currently targeted to priority areas based on impact, whereas Making Space for Water establishes initiatives that can benefit all Aucklanders, as well as local infrastructure solutions.

58.     A coordinated and inclusive approach requires clear and accessible communication to all groups, particularly vulnerable communities, throughout events into rebuild. The expectation is that a single source of truth is accessible to diverse communities. Communications will be a significant part of Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water, but staff recognise the need for improvement to current practices.

59.     Building capability reflects the need for council and community groups to be better resourced to respond to emergency events, in terms of personnel, funding, and support services. This is most relevant to the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Plan, and will be considered through Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water.

60.     The feedback received during the event and as highlighted in the panels’ report is broadly supportive of the approach for both the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

61.     This report summarises feedback received through the Storm Recovery and Resilience consultation and as such has no specific climate impacts.

62.     There were 227 pieces of public feedback which explicitly connected the storm events to climate change, although many more referenced the increased frequency of heavy rain events recently, and generally advocated for future planning to consider climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

63.     The need for better planning rules to reduce development in flood prone areas was raised in written and verbal feedback. Staff will continue to work with the wider council whānau where feedback is relevant to other work, or where there is overlap. This includes council-controlled organisations, such as Watercare and Auckland Transport, as well as Regulatory Compliance, and Planning.

64.     This consultation occurred alongside consultation on the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Plan. Some feedback received is relevant to this work, such as expectations for civil defence centres to be established and ways to improve communication.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

65.     Analysis of the public consultation feedback considered the feedback variation between different demographics and geographic areas. Feedback specific to particular local areas, including feedback on local needs and aspirations, will be taken into account as the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water programme are further developed.  

66.     Staff workshopped the consultation content with local boards in early August 2023. Interim feedback data was provided to each local board to inform their business meeting discussions. Local boards then provided formal feedback resolutions through their August business meetings (Attachment B).

67.     Local board members and staff have regular and ongoing dialogue regarding local issues that may require more urgent response, or to elevate the concerns their communities are raising with them. Often this includes advocacy for additional interventions in specific areas, requiring technical assessment, or concern about a lack of recovery support for individuals.

68.     Some local boards have provided names of streams and streets that need additional maintenance, repairs, or improvement. These are being considered by planning and operations staff to understand pressures on the catchments.

69.     Staff will continue to work with local boards to respond to local issues through business as usual and development of storm recovery and resilience projects.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

70.     There were 105 written submissions (or 7 per cent of the total number of submissions) received from people identifying as Māori.

71.     There were no written submissions from mana whenua received through AK Have Your Say channels. This is likely because mana whenua were encouraged to provide feedback through individual hui to enable a more open dialogue approach. One submission was received from a marae organisation. Staff from Healthy Waters and the Recovery Office have attended individual hui with mana whenua representatives.

72.     As above, mana whenua input on the programmes is still being gathered. However, some initial insights include:

·        mana whenua are interested in genuine partnership opportunities with Auckland Council (specifically a preference for a seat at the decision-making table rather than simply being consulted with)

·        working with mana whenua one on one may be more appropriate for work programmes related to specific areas and/or communities

·        group engagement with mana whenua may be more appropriate for matters of regional recovery.

73.     This feedback will inform the refinement, development and delivery of the programme in partnership with mana whenua. Staff will continue to work directly with mana whenua as specific projects within the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and Making Space for Water are developed. This will include creating opportunities to ensure the needs and aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka are adequately included.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

74.     The estimated consultation cost was $125,000. This amount does not include staff time to prepare for and attend the consultation events which was met from a reprioritisation of existing operational budgets.

75.     The consultation document referenced estimated costs for delivering the Making Space for Water programme. Many submitters were supportive of the work, but were concerned about the impact on rates which was indicated as being up to an 8 per cent increase. An example is: “The initiatives are good hopefully but they will add up my rates, which will be definitely out of my financial ability.” This type of feedback has been considered ‘neutral or mixed’ sentiment in the feedback analysis.

76.     At the end of the consultation period, Auckland Council and the Crown agreed in principle, and subject to public consultation, to a package of just under $2 billion to support Auckland’s recovery. This includes $1 billion in new and reprioritised central government funding. Auckland Council will need to contribute around $900 million to the co-funded package. The council will consider whether to accept this funding package, following further public consultation, in October 2023. The agreed package includes funding for investment to provide resilience to future weather events. Specific projects funded will be determined through the development of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 and may include Making Space for Water initiatives.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

77.     The consultation process and feedback have not resulted in any new risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

78.     Staff have considered the feedback in preparing further programme information.

79.     Both the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan structure and Making Space for Water programme have been further developed following this feedback and will be reported to the Governing Body following the October consideration of the central government funding package. Regular progress reports will be provided through the monthly Recovery Office updates.

80.     Staff are providing financial information on the programmes to inform the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 consultation process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of public consultation feedback

 

b

Local board resolutions

 

c

Demographic Advisory Panels – cross panels feedback report

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nicholas Vigar – Head of Planning, Heaythy Waters

Mace Ward - Deputy Group Recovery Manager

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Mat Tucker - Group Recovery Manager

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Mayor's Report on Recent Overseas Trip

File No.: CP2023/13244

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report back to the Governing Body on the Mayor’s recent trip to India (26 August to 3 September).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Mayor was invited by the Indian New Zealand Business Council to appear as a panellist at the India and New Zealand Business Summit, to discuss collaboration opportunities in New Zealand. The Mayor travelled with a significant contingent of Auckland business leaders as part of the delegation.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whiwhi / receive the report on the Mayor’s recent trip to India.

Horopaki

Context

3.       At the 2018 Census, over 150,000 Aucklanders identified as being of Indian decent. The Mayor’s attendance as part of this delegation supported its mission of building stronger business and investment ties between India and Auckland. As such, it contributes to the Auckland Plan’s direction to attract and retain skills, talent and investment.

4.       The Mayor of Auckland has a statutory role to articulate and promote a vision for Auckland; and to provide leadership for the purpose of achieving objectives that will contribute to that vision. This can include supporting key Government strategies relevant to Auckland’s diverse communities and international relationships, and our national interest. The trip contributed to all six goals of the Government strategy India-New Zealand 2025.

5.       The official programme included;

Day 1:    Dinner hosted by Redstone Ventures

Day 2:    Visit with Tata Consultancy Services; Tour & briefing of Indian Government Passport Centre; TCS Future of the Public Sector & Council briefing at Noida Campus hosted by Shalini Mathur, Head of TCS Global Public Services Unit; Official reception hosted by NZ High Commission

Day 3:    Visits in Bengaluru accompanied by NZ Trade & Enterprise; Visit to Rakon Office; Visit to C-Camp Agritech Cluster; Visit to IT/BT Department – State Government of Bengaluru.

Day 4:    India New Zealand Business Council Summit

Day 5:    Speaking on ‘Business Insights’ with New Zealand Trade and Enterprise

Day 6:    Meeting with HCL (technology firm); Meeting with BLSI (Indian government technology outsourcing provider); Meeting with Chairman of Rajasthan Royals (IPL cricket team).

The Mayor then travelled on to France at his own cost, at the invitation of the President of the Paris Region, then returned to New Zealand at his own cost.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       Further information is included as Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       Air travel creates carbon emissions.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The total cost (including a one-way flight to India and accommodation) was met from the Mayoral Office budget, at a total of $5,973.23. This was approved by the CEO and independent chair of the Audit & Risk Committee.

12.     On 3 September the Mayor carried on from India to France at his own cost, at the invitation of the President of the Paris region, returning home to New Zealand at his own cost on 10 September.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Report on Mayor's Trip to India

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mayor Wayne Brown

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Report back from Political Working Groups (Covering report)

File No.: CP2023/14175

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report back on the activities of five political working groups established in July 2023 (Resolution number GB/2023/134).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is a late covering report for the above item. The comprehensive agenda report was not available when the agenda went to print and will be provided prior to the 28 September 2023 Governing Body meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

The recommendations will be provided in the comprehensive agenda report.

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Summary of Governing Body and Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 28 September 2023

File No.: CP2023/12036

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To whiwhi / receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda, workshop and briefing papers that may have been held or been distributed to Governing Body members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to Governing Body members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       This report also includes the Forward Work Programme for the Governing Body.  Specific adjustments to the forward work programme are highlighted as follows:

i)       any new additions will be highlighted in red text

ii)       any deletions will be shown in strikethrough.

iii)      reporting on several matters has been moved to the “completed” section of the document

iv)      items that do not require a decision have not been included and will be communicated via briefings or memos

5.       The following memos or information were circulated to members of the Governing Body:

Date

Subject

22.8.23

Information Memorandum:  Consultation on the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024

23.8.23

Ministerial Letter to Mayor Brown regarding Kainga Ora and Auckland Light Rail

30.8.23

Information Only:  Acton from Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting of 15 August - Local board feedback on current proposals for achieving funding equity through the Long-term Plan

30.8.23

Information Only:  Acton from Kaipātiki Local Board meeting of 16 August - Local board feedback on current proposals for achieving funding equity through the Long-term Plan

 


 

 

6.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place for the Governing Body:

Date

Subject

22.8.23

CONFIDENTIAL Category 3 Storm Recovery (no attachment)

23.8.23

CONFIDENTIAL Consultation requirements for any central-local co-funding for storm affected properties (no attachment)

31.8.23

Storm Recovery: Regional Organisation / Interest Group Have Your Say Event

1.9.23

CONFIDENTIAL Category 3 Storm Recovery (no attachment)

6.9.23

CONFIDENTIAL Category 3 Storm Recovery (no attachment)

20.9.23

CONFIDENTIAL Category 3 Storm Recovery (no attachment)

20.9.23

CONFIDENTIAL Transport Legislative Reform (no attachment)

20.9.23

CONFIDENTIAL Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan (no attachment)

 

7.       This document can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/Te hui “Governing Body” from the drop-down tab and click “View”;

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

8.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Summary of Governing Body information memoranda and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) – 28 September 2023.

 

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

 

b

Information Memorandum:  Consultation on the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Ministerial Letter to Mayor Brown regarding Kainga Ora and Auckland Light Rail (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Information Only:  Acton from Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting of 15 August - Local board feedback on current proposals for achieving funding equity through the Long-term Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Information Only:  Acton from Kaipātiki Local Board meeting of 16 August - Local board feedback on current proposals for achieving funding equity through the Long-term Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Storm Recovery: Regional Organisation / Interest Group Have Your Say Event (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authoriser

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Preparation of the Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council quarterly performance reports to 30 June 2023

File No.: CP2023/12877

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the preparation of the Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council performance reports and provide a summary of key highlights for the quarter ended 30 June 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The committee is provided with results on a quarterly basis to review performance against the Recovery Budget 2021-2031 (our current Long-term Plan) and the prior year. Entities across the group are involved in the preparation of this information.

3.       Due diligence was performed by obtaining detailed explanations from all business units and group entities supplemented by management representation letters provided by the substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) and Port of Auckland Limited’s (POAL) Audit and Risk chairs and chief executives.

4.       Details of the council’s financial performance must remain confidential until the audit is completed and results are due to be published on the NZX on 29 September 2023. As such, the full performance reports are contained in a confidential report on this agenda.

5.       Representatives of the Port of Auckland and CCO boards, chief executives and chief financial officers have presented their 30 June 2023 results at the 14 September 2023 CCO Direction and Oversight Committee and the 21 September 2023 Transport and Infrastructure Committee as appropriate.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the update on the Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council quarter four performance reports.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council quarter four performance reports are included in the confidential part of this meeting.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Annual Budget 2022-2023 was adopted in June 2022. The budget focused on tackling the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and emerging economic factors. This created a substantial ongoing gap between costs and revenue, which for 2022/2023 was primarily managed through the use of Better-off Funding from central government as part of water reform.

7.       The committee is provided with management and statutory results on a quarterly basis to review performance against the annual budget and the prior year.

8.       The council group is subject to the NZX listing rules which require that material information be disclosed to the market via the NZX. As a result, details of the group’s quarter four performance must remain confidential until the audit is completed, and the Annual Report and Summary Annual Report are published on the NZX on 29 September 2023. To maintain confidentiality, the performance reports for Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council are contained in a confidential report on this agenda.

9.       Representatives of the CCO boards, chief executives and chief financial officers have presented their 30 June results at the September 2023 CCO Direction and Oversight Committee and Transport and Infrastructure Committee as appropriate.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Key achievements across the Auckland Council Group for the quarter ended 30 June 2023 include:

·    Work continued on the City Rail Link with heavy civil works for the station and ventilation buildings at Maungawhau (Mount Eden) completed and construction of the remaining portions of the North Auckland Line rail continuing. At Karanga a Hape, the heavy civils team progressively handed over to the architectural, building and systems fit-out teams to progress the works. At Te Wai Horotiu, work continued with the architectural, hydraulic, fire, and ventilation fit-out activities.

·    The cleaner buses programme added 12 battery electric buses to the fleet.

·    Opening of the new Ara Tūhono – Pūhoi to Warkworth motorway and Te Honohono Ki Tai Road-Matakana link road in partnership with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency.

·    For the Central Interceptor project, the tunnel boring machine has now completed 6.7km with only 0.8km to go to reach May Road, Mount Roskill. Subsequently in September 2023, it has reached the halfway point of the 14.7km journey to Central Auckland by breaking through into a shaft at May Road, Mount Roskill.

·    The FIFA Womens World Cup saw final planning conducted and the running of the actual tournament where nine matches played at Eden Park with an average attendance of 38,047. Host city obligations were successfully delivered including:

a)   Eleven training venues were upgraded to FIFA standards with over 120 training sessions held in Auckland over the tournament period. 

b)   Over 85,000 attended the FIFA Fan Festival, which was open for the duration of the tournament and free for all ages.

c)   Integrated ticketing and supplementary event transport services for Auckland match days, temporary traffic management to support Eden Park event delivery, and complimentary accredited travel for FIFA workforce and volunteers.

11.     Key achievements across Auckland Council for the quarter ended 30 June 2023 include:

·    The Glen Innes Town Centre water quality improvements project was completed. The project piloted installation of five devices to improve stormwater quality, in response to significant growth in the area and the resulting increase of gross pollutants.

·    Shovel-ready funded upgrades for Warkworth, Helensville and Devonport community recycling centres have been completed, and the upgraded sites will be officially opened in October and November 2023.

·    Pool and leisure centre visits remained at 1.7 million for the quarter and memberships finished on a high in June at 22,728.

·    Library visits finished the quarter up at 1.8 million and the number of active memberships showed signs of recovery finishing at 376,462.

·    Customer satisfaction for swimming pool inspections (93 per cent) and food and alcohol licensing (88 per cent) remained high in quarter four. Resource consents increased from 69 per cent to 71 per cent compared to the same period last year.

·    Tracks in popular local parks such as Alice Eaves, Gills and Kowhai reserves have recently re-opened to the public after work to decrease the risk of the spread of kauri dieback disease.  

·    Rabbit control and monitoring across 800 hectares on Aotea Great Barrier Island showed rabbit numbers are at their lowest since management began in 2013.

·    Most of our stormwater targets, while lower than previous years, were met with one notable exception - the number of flooding events and associated number of habitable floors per 1000 properties - due to the severe weather events.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     This is an information report providing an update on performance across the Auckland Council Group. No decision is sought in this report that has a direct impact on the group’s greenhouse gas emissions nor the group’s approach to preparing for climate change. Climate action is a strategic focus area for the group and an update on the progress of climate action projects is provided in the associated confidential report. Further, details of statutory climate reporting, which reports on the impact of climate risks and opportunities on the group, is also included in the associated confidential report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The group quarterly performance report reflects the results of the group for the year ended 30 June 2023. CCOs and POAL provide input into the preparation of these reports.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     Community investment is one of Auckland Council’s strategic focus areas. The associated confidential report provides highlights, issues and risks related to local and regional projects.

15.     No decisions are being sought in this report that could have an impact on local communities or on local board decision-making.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     Māori outcomes are a group and council strategic focus area. The associated confidential report provides key information and progress on delivery of the agreed programmes for the group and the council respectively.

17.     No decisions are being sought in this report that could have an impact on Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     No financial decisions are sought and accordingly there are no financial implications directly arising from the information contained in the report.

19.     The council’s overall financial performance is discussed in the associated confidential report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The quarterly performance report also highlights key risks and issues that might affect the performance information and is attached to the confidential report titled Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council quarterly performance report for the twelve months ending June 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     The Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council quarterly performance reports to 30 June 2023 will be released to the public following the Governing Body adopting the Annual Report on 28 September 2023 and the release of this information to the NZX and the public on 29 September 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Karuna Dahya - Manager Group Performance Reporting

Kent Annear - Senior Group Performance Advisor

Tracy Gers - Group Accounting & Reporting Manager

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Peter Gudsell - Group Chief Financial Officer

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Preparation of the draft Auckland Council Annual Report 2022/2023 and the draft Auckland Council Summary Annual Report 2022/2023

File No.: CP2023/13267

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Governing Body of the basis for preparation of the draft Auckland Council Annual Report 2022/2023 and the draft Auckland Council Summary Annual Report 2022/2023 (together referred to as the annual reports) and the process followed.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 requires the council to prepare and adopt an annual report and a summary of the annual report each year. Preparing and publishing the annual reports is a legislative requirement and ensures that we are transparent about our operations with investors and ratepayers.

3.       The annual reports, covering the 12 months to 30 June 2023, have been prepared by council staff and audited by Audit New Zealand on behalf of the Auditor-General. The Auditor-General’s representatives will attend this Governing Body meeting for the adoption of the annual reports and may wish to address the Governing Body on the audit of the annual reports and other matters of interest during the confidential section of this meeting.

4.       The annual reports compare and comment on the performance of Auckland Council and the Auckland Council Group against the budgets and operating targets set in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (Recovery Budget) and Annual Budget 2022/2023.

5.       At its meeting on 15 September 2023, the Audit and Risk Committee reviewed the annual reports and the preparation processes and recommended the annual reports for adoption by the Governing Body (Attachment A).

6.       The Deputy Auditor-General attended the Audit and Risk Committee on 15 September 2023 to comment on the:

·    audit process

·    draft letter of representation

·    draft proposed audit opinion, including commentary on the key audit matters

·    status of the annual reports.

7.       All matters raised by the Audit and Risk Committee in relation to the annual report content have been resolved.

8.       At the time of writing this report, there was one outstanding audit matter relating to the audit of Auckland Council’s flooded floors performance measure. Management is working with Audit New Zealand to bring their audit of this performance measure to closure. Apart from this, there were no significant outstanding audit or process issues relating to the annual reports.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the confirmation by the Audit and Risk Committee that the audit process, in respect of the draft Auckland Council Annual Report 2022/2023 and the draft Auckland Council Summary Annual Report 2022/2023, has been completed satisfactorily and recommended them for adoption by the Governing Body

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the draft Auckland Council Annual Report 2022/2023 and the draft Auckland Council Summary Annual Report 2022/2023 will be discussed in the confidential section of this meeting.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Section 98 of the Local Government Act 2002 requires the council to prepare, adopt and publish an annual report and a summary annual report within four months following the financial year end.

10.     As an issuer of debt on the NZX, the council is subject to the NZX listing rules. This requires the release of unaudited group primary financial statements and commentary on changes from the prior year, within 60 days of the financial year end. In addition, the NZX listing rules require the audited annual report to be released no later than three months from the financial year end.

Annual report contents

11.     The annual reports detail the activities and performance of the Auckland Council Group. They include performance results for the group against planned levels of performance set in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (Recovery Budget) and the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The summary annual report discloses the most significant matters dealt with in the annual report.

12.     The annual reports cover all activities of the council, council-controlled organisations (CCOs), subsidiaries, joint ventures and associated entities.

13.     The annual reports consist of four separate volumes and a summary:

·        Volume 1: an overview and a summary of service performance against year one of the Recovery Budget, material issues facing the council, service and summarised financial performance of each group of activity

·        Volume 2: a summary of local board achievements and their financial performance against the Recovery Budget

·        Volume 3: detailed consolidated statutory financial statements for the group and the council, the group’s consolidated funding impact statement with financial commentary against the Annual Plan 2022/2023 and groups of activity funding impact statements with financial commentary against the Recovery Budget.

·        Volume 4: a summary of the group’s integration of climate change risks and opportunities into its governance mechanisms, strategy, risk management, and the metrics and target the group uses to measure progress towards climate targets.

·        Summary annual report: a financial and non-financial performance overview, summary financial statements, material issues, an introduction to the groups of activities.

 


 

 

14.     The annual reports, except Volume 4, have been audited by Audit New Zealand on behalf of the Auditor-General. Volume 4 was reviewed by Audit New Zealand, but no opinion has been expressed on it. It becomes mandatory to prepare this volume from 2023/2024 and in 2024/2025 we expect Audit New Zealand to provide a limited assurance engagement over Scope 1 and 2 Greenhouse gas emissions that are included in Volume 4.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The unaudited Auckland Council Group 2022/2023 primary financial statements and commentary were released via the NZX on 29 August 2023 (preliminary NZX release) following recommendations and approvals by the Audit and Risk Committee, the chief executive and the mayor.

16.     The annual reports and the audit were completed following the preliminary NZX release.

17.     On 15 September 2023, the Audit and Risk Committee reviewed the annual reports, as well as the council’s process and controls undertaken to prepare them. The committee received feedback on the audit from Audit New Zealand and the Deputy Auditor-General and made a recommendation for adoption of the annual reports (Attachment A) subject to the finalisation of disclosure items, clearance of all performance measures, final management review and receipt of the Independent Auditor’s Report.

18.     Since the Audit and Risk Committee meeting, the annual reports have undergone final editing and review by council staff and Audit New Zealand. The group financial controller will update the Governing Body at this meeting on the finalisation of the audit work on Auckland Council’s Auckland Council’s flooded floors performance measure.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.      This committee paper relates to financial and non-financial statutory reporting. No decision is sought in this paper that has a direct impact on the group’s greenhouse gas emissions nor the group’s approach to preparing for climate change.

20.     However, it is acknowledged that the activities undertaken by the group and reported on within the annual report have the potential to be impacted by climate change and can also reinforce or weaken our climate action response.

21.     Climate risk disclosures included in Volume 4 play a key role in how external organisations direct capital flow towards climate positive solutions and investments. Reporting of the group’s response to climate change risk holds the group publicly accountable, and ensures the business maintains their focus on addressing climate change risk at all levels across the group.

22.     Volume 4 was prepared using the Aotearoa New Zealand Climate Standards and provides an example for other local government entities seeking to disclose their approach to managing climate risk.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The annual reports reflect the results of the group for the year ended 30 June 2023. The CCOs and Port of Auckland Limited are involved in the preparation of this information and have reviewed any content relating to them.

 


 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Volume 2 includes a section featuring the achievements in each local board area. Local boards were engaged to collect and review this information and each local board chair has prepared a message which is included in their respective annual reports and has approved the content.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     The annual reports cover all aspects of the group’s governance and public accountability. They include commentary on the group’s contribution to outcomes for Māori, the role of the Independent Māori Statutory Board and the council’s Ngā Mātārae - Māori Outcomes department.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications directly arising from the information contained in the report as no financial decision is sought.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The following risks and mitigations have been identified:

 

Risk

Mitigation

Breach of confidentiality

The information contained within the annual reports may be released to the public prior to its release to the NZX.

 

All Auckland Council, CCO and Port of Auckland Limited (POAL) employees who are involved in the preparation and review of the annual reports have been briefed on confidentiality requirements.

A cover memo was attached to the draft annual reports provided to Governing Body members reminding the Governing Body of NZX confidentiality obligations.

 

Events subsequent to balance date may not be disclosed

Significant events may occur between the balance date and approval date and might not be known to the preparers of the annual report, thus go undisclosed.

The group financial controller has formally requested council management, CCOs and POAL confirm whether there are any events subsequent to balance date which might require disclosure.

 

CCO draft/ issued statutory financial statements and POAL statutory financial statements have been reviewed for disclosure of subsequent events.

 

Delay in issue of audit report

There may be a delay in issuing of the audit report due to unresolved audit matters.

At the time of writing this report there is one outstanding process issue relating to the audit of Auckland Council’s flooded floors performance measure. We expect to have this matter resolved before the annual reports are approved at this meeting.

The council’s Financial Control and Group Performance units have been working proactively with the Audit New Zealand to finalise the audit of the flooded floors performance measure and the related disclosures.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     The Governing Body will discuss the annual reports in confidence with staff, the Deputy Auditor-General and Audit New Zealand, after which it will adopt the annual reports.

29.     The Deputy Auditor-General will issue the audit opinion at the time of the adoption of the annual reports by the Governing Body.

30.     The annual reports will then be released to the NZX and published on our website. Printed copies will be made available at libraries and service centres.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolution from the Audit and Risk Committee meeting on 15 September 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracy Gers - Group Accounting & Reporting Manager

Francis Caetano - Group Financial Controller

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath – Acting Group Treasurer

Peter Gudsell - Group Chief Financial Officer

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Acting Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer Update

File No.: CP2023/13127

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a monthly update to the Governing Body on key matters from the Auckland Council Interim Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer as at 31 August 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Interim Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer’s Update

2.       Phil Wilson, Interim Chief Executive and Peter Gudsell, Group Chief Financial Officer (GCFO) will provide a summary of highlights and key activities and updates for the following:

·    Service improvements and savings

·    Affordable waters reform

·    Resource Management (RM) Reform

·    Cost sharing arrangement with central government for weather events

·    Long-term Plan process (LTP)

·    Auckland International Airport Limited partial share sale

·    Domestic green bond issuance

·    Financial performance for Auckland Council and the Auckland Council Group

·    Economic/ market update.

Affordable water reforms

3.       In August 2023, the Water Services Entities Amendment Bill, Water Services Legislation Bill and the Water Services Economic Efficiency and Consumer Protection Bill received royal assent.

Resource management (RM) reform

4.       The Natural and Built Environment Act and the Spatial Planning Act received royal assent in August 2023.

5.       An pre-notification draft of the transitional National Planning Framework has been released. It is intended to support the development of the first regional spatial strategies. Staff have begun work on feedback on the draft which closes on 13 December 2023.  

6.       The Parliamentary inquiry into community-led retreat and adaptation funding has opened and a Council submission on the issues and options paper is under development.  The findings of this inquiry will support the development of the Climate Adaptation Bill (which represents the third part of the RM reforms).

7.       A new national policy statement on natural hazard decision-making (NPS-NHD) is being developed. It is an interim tool (under the RMA) to guide plan changes and resource consent decision making for new developments.  The NPS-NHD and inquiry into community-led retreat and adaptation funding will shape and feed into a comprehensive national direction framework for natural hazards for the new RM system.

Cost sharing arrangement with central government for weather events

8.       Auckland Council and the central government have reached an in-principle agreement, subject to public consultation, to co-fund a one-off funding package to help Auckland recover from the severe weather events of Auckland Anniversary weekend and Cyclone Gabrielle.

9.       To achieve all of the outcomes of the proposed package the government would provide just under $1.1 billion of new and reprioritised existing funding, with Auckland Council investing around $900 million.

10.     Funding will go to three main areas:

·    restoring the transport network

·    Making Space for Water and other resilience projects

·    the buyout of Category 3 homes (where the risk from future flooding or landslides is intolerably high)

11.     More information on this matter, including the public consultation process, is covered in the report on this agenda titled ‘Recovery Office Update’.

Long-term Plan process 2024 - 2034

12.     The Long-Term Plan 2024-2034 is on track, although taking a different approach to support political direction and decision-making, as well as rigorous audit processes, means there is added pressure across the group to meet constrained timelines.

13.     As of mid-September, there have been four well-attended budget committee briefings and two workshops, including two briefing sessions for local board members. These have covered the overall LTP process, legal and audit requirements, financial context, climate reporting, performance measures framework, infrastructure strategy, asset management, rating matters and the proposed engagement approach.

14.     There have also been online sessions and follow-up meetings provided to staff across the group to support the preparation of information and advice, including the preparation of service profiles to provide further insight to support decision making.

15.     There has been ongoing engagement with the Mayor’s office and support provided for political working groups so they can feed into the process, as well as regular communication with Audit New Zealand.

Auckland International Airport Limited partial share sale

16.     As signaled in its Annual Budget 2023/2024, Auckland Council sold 101.3 million shares in Auckland International Airport Limited (AIAL) on 31 August 2023.

17.     The council achieved a weighted average sale price of $8.11 per share, compared to the NZX market closing share price of $7.81 on the date of sale. The sales proceeds were $833 million with the sales proceeds being used to pay down debt maturing over September and October 2023.

Domestic green bond issuance

18.     In September 2023 the council raised a NZ$300 million, five-year, retail green bond. This was the council’s first NZ$ retail bond since 2021 and had good engagement across retail, asset managers and banks as well as some offshore investor participation. The proceeds will be allocated to finance eligible green assets in accordance with Council’s updated Sustainable Finance Framework.

Financial performance for Auckland Council and the Auckland Council Group

19.     The monthly financial dashboard for Auckland Council and the Auckland Council Group was not available at the time the agenda was due for release and will be made available prior to the meeting. A summary of the key highlights and results will be provided by the Group Chief Financial Officer at the meeting.

Economic/ market update

20.     Key economic/ market activity and updates are:

·        Annual inflation rate – Consumer Price Index was 6 per cent at end of June 2023 (updated quarterly, next due 17 October 2023).

·        Unemployment rate – 3.6 per cent to the end of June 2023, an increase of 0.2 per cent on the previous quarter (updated quarterly, next due 1 November 2023).

·        Gross Domestic Product increased by 0.9 per cent in the June 2023 quarter, bringing annual growth to 3.2 per cent (next update is 14 December 2023)

·        Auckland new dwellings consented numbers – 18,743 for the year ended July 2023 (14 per cent lower than the year ended July 2022).

·        The Official Cash Rate (OCR) rate remained at 5.5 per cent on 16 August 2023 (next update is 4 October 2023)

·        International migration (national level) – net gain of 96,200 people for the 12 months to July 2023, comprising 208,400 arrivals and 112,200 departures (provisional estimates, subject to revision).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whiwhi / receive the information provided in this report, in the monthly financial dashboard circulated prior to the meeting and the verbal updates by the Interim Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Karuna Dahya - Manager Group Performance Reporting

Tracy Gers - Group Accounting & Reporting Manager

Authorisers

Peter Gudsell - Group Chief Financial Officer

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

28 September 2023

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Governing Body

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

10        Budget reallocation for the new community facility in Avondale, Te Hono - Attachment a - Confidential report to Whau Local Board seeking direction on reallocation

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains detail that may prejudice future negotiations of the local board..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains detail that may prejudice future negotiations of the local board..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Downtown Carpark strategic transport outcomes and funding

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, matters to be discussed in relation to this item include commercial aspects of the council's carparking operations.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


 

 

 

C2       CONFIDENTIAL:  Consideration of potential land acquisition (Covering report)

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains infromation which could prejuicide negotiations.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 

C3       CONFIDENTIAL: Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council Quarterly Performance Report for the twelve months ending June 2023

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains information that may not be released to the public until it is released to the NZX on 29 September 2023.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 

C4       CONFIDENTIAL: Adoption of the Auckland Council Annual Report 2022/2023 and the Summary Annual Report 2022/2023

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains financial information that can only be made public following the release of the annual report to the NZX on 29 September 2023.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


 

 

C5       CONFIDENTIAL:  Office of the Auditor-General and Audit New Zealand briefing

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report from the Office of the Auditor-General and Audit New Zealand contains information regarding the financial results of the Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council for 30 June 2023 which cannot be made public until released to the NZX.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] According to the Reserve Bank’s consumer price index (CPI) for housing.

[2] Source: Reserve Bank of NZ, CPI Inflation Calculator, CPI (housing) growth from Q3 2017- Q1 2023 was 39.8 per cent.

[3] The study area for this project includes six Statistical Area 2 (SA2) suburbs with a combined population at the 2018 NZ census of 20,064 residents: Avondale Central, Avondale North, Avondale South, Avondale West, Rosebank Peninsula, and Avondale Rosebank.

[4] HMI data is an estimate of the number of visits based on counting GPS signals from mobile devices that use selected applications. HMI data also includes the Statistical Area 2 where the device spends the night, which allows us to see which neighbourhoods the visits come from.

 

[5] Tafaroji, R., Ball, M., Waugh, N. (2022). Integrated Facilities: Understanding community asset and service integration. Internal Auckland Council report: unpublished.