I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 28 September 2023

3.00pm

Wharenui Room
Hoani Waititi Marae
451 West Coast Road
Oratia

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Greg Presland

 

Deputy Chairperson

Michelle Clayton

 

Members

Mark Allen

Liz Manley

 

Sandra Coney, QSO

Linda Potauaine

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Nataly Anchicoque

Democracy Advisor

 

22 September 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 0272872403

Email: Nataly.Anchicoque@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              6

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      6

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              6

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       6

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           7

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Waitākere Ward Councillors' Update                 9

12        Funding Auckland's Storm Recovery and Resilience                                                            11

13        Biodiversity Credit System – central government discussion document                   17

14        Local board feedback on Emergency Management Bill                                                 21

15        Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park – Fisheries New Zealand discussion paper                         27

16        Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill             33

17        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule           41

18        Delegated local board feedback on the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024                                                    45

19        Chair's Report - Greg Presland                         47

20        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Programme                                                          49

21        Workshop Records                                             51

22        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

Specifically, members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

The following are declared interests of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

 

Board Member

Organisation/Position

Mark Allen

-   Community Waitākere – Executive Officer

-   Bethells Valley Fire – Life Member

-   Waitākere Licensing Trust – Trustee

-   West Auckland Trusts Services - Director

Michelle Clayton

-   Glen Eden Residents’ Association – Member

-   The Personal Advocacy and Safeguarding Adults Trust – Trustee

-   Glen Eden Returned Services Association (RSA) – Member

-   Glen Eden Railway Trust – Member

-   Te Wahi Ora Charitable Trust – Member

-   Glen Eden Community House - Member

Sandra Coney

-   Cartwright Collective – Member

-   Women’s Health Action Trust – Patron

-   New Zealand Society of Genealogists – Member

-   New Zealand Military Defence Society – Member

-   Pest Free Piha – Partner is the Coordinator

-   Piha Tennis Club – Patron and Partner is the President

-   Piha Wetland Trust – Partner is a Trustee

Greg Presland

-   Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust – Trustee

-   Glen Eden BID – Member

-   Titirangi Ratepayers and Residents Association – Member

-   Waitākere Ranges Protection Society - Member

-   Titirangi RSA - Member

Liz Manley

-   Consumer Experiences Council, Te Toka Tumai Auckland, Te Whatu Ora - Co-chair

-   Clinical Ethics Advisory Group, Te Toka Tumai Auckland, Te Whatu Ora - Member

-   Titirangi Community Arts Council Board – Member

-   Titirangi Ratepayers and Residents Association – Member

-   Laingholm District Citizens Association – Member

Linda Potauaine

-   Visionwest Community Trust – Employee

-   New Lynn Rotary – Member

-   Archtists Limited. - Director

 

            Member appointments

            Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council:

External organisation

Lead

Alternate

Glen Eden Business Improvement District (Glen Eden Business Association)

Michelle Clayton

Greg Presland

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Mark Allen

Liz Manley

Ark in the Park

Mark Allen

Liz Manley

Friends of Arataki and Waitākere Regional Parkland Incorporated

Michelle Clayton

Sandra Coney

Glen Eden Playhouse Theatre Trust

Mark Allen

Linda Potauaine

Te Uru Waitākere Contemporary Gallery

Linda Potauaine

Mark Allen

Glen Eden Community and Recreation Centre Incorporated

Michelle Clayton

Mark Allen

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 24 August 2023, the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 14 September 2023 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 21 September 2023, as true and correct.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 


 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Waitākere Ward Councillors' Update

File No.: CP2023/00283

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from Waitākere Ward Councillors’ Ken Turner and Shane Henderson.

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Waitākere Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Waitākere Ranges Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga                                      

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Waitākere Ward Councillors’ Ken Turner and Shane Henderson for their verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nataly Anchicoque - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Funding Auckland's Storm Recovery and Resilience

File No.: CP2023/13463

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local boards with an opportunity to provide input regarding the funding package that has been provisionally agreed with central government.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Seven months on from severe weather events in January and February 2023, many Aucklanders with impacted homes are still facing a challenging and uncertain future.

3.       Auckland Council has worked with central government to secure a funding package that would enable people in the region to move forward with certainty, as quickly as possible.

4.       The proposed funding package includes just under $2 billion of investment in storm recovery efforts for three key activities:

·        repairing storm damage to the transport network

·        Making Space for Water (the council’s flood mitigation programme) and other resilience projects

·        Category 3 property buyouts.

5.       If we do not accept the funding package, we will still need to fund the necessary infrastructure improvements but would not be in a position to buy out Category 3 homes.

6.       Public consultation is underway from 11-24 September.

7.       Local board feedback will be provided to the Governing Body along with public feedback ahead of its decision-making on 6 October 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that input is being sought from local boards at the same time as public consultation due to the very tight timelines involved and the need to provide certainty for impacted Aucklanders.

b)      whakarite / provide feedback on whether the local board supports Auckland Council agreeing to the funding package.

c)       whakarite / provide feedback on features of the package that you would like to comment on.

d)      whakarite / provide feedback on the design of the Category 3 buyout process.

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Severe weather events in January and February 2023 have had a devastating and lasting impact on many communities and thousands of individuals across Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland. Flooding and land slips have damaged or destroyed thousands of homes and up-ended lives and communities. Essential lifeline infrastructure and facilities have been impacted and are in urgent need of repair. This includes roads, bridges, stormwater systems and community facilities.

9.       Seven months on, many Aucklanders with impacted homes are still facing a challenging and uncertain future. We need to support these Aucklanders and improve the resilience of our infrastructure so that we are better prepared and can mitigate the impacts of severe weather events.

10.     Auckland Council has worked with central government to secure a funding package that would enable people in the region to move forward with certainty, as quickly as possible.

11.     To achieve all the outcomes of the package the government would provide just under $1.1 billion of new and reprioritised existing funding, with the council investing around $900 million. This is the same “locally-led, centrally-supported” approach that has been taken with other regions affected by the January and February storm events, just at a larger scale. It is different from the Christchurch earthquake recovery, where central government funded all the purchase of properties.

12.     As a locally-led effort, Auckland Council is expected to take the lead on the design and implementation of any package. This means we have a number of detailed decisions to make as part of our main decision whether to proceed with the co-funded package.

13.     Public consultation is taking place from 11-24 September. Details can be found at https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/recoveryfunding

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The proposed funding package includes just under $2 billion of investment in storm recovery efforts for three key activities, as outlined in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Proposed central government and Auckland Council contribution to recovery

 

Central government funding

Auckland Council funding

Total

Transport network recovery

$309 million

$81 million

$390 million

Making space for water and other resilience projects

$380 million

$440 million

$820 million

Category 3 home buy-outs

$387 million

$387 million

$774 million

Total

$1,076 million

$908 million

$1,984 million

 


 

Transport network recovery

15.     Auckland Council is projecting that $390 million will be needed to make repairs to roads and bridges that were damaged by the severe weather. This includes the Mill Flat Road bridge, access to Karekare and Piha, and a number of roads in the west, the north and on Aotea / Great Barrier Island that were significantly damaged. The funding would ensure that repairs can be undertaken with greater certainty.

Making Space for Water and other resilience projects

16.     A critical part of recovery is making sure we are better prepared for future severe weather. Improving resilience is essential to provide security for those who will continue to live in hazard-prone areas. This includes the flood risk management projects such as those that we have outlined in the Making Space for Water programme that we consulted on last month.

17.     This programme would allow us to create new ‘blue-green networks’ in areas with critical flood risks, and to rehabilitate streams so that they are more resilient to floods. We would be able to increase our stormwater maintenance and overland flow path management.

18.     This portion of the funding package could also be used for other resilience projects, such as community based geotechnical projects where risks can be mitigated. Importantly, the funding package would allow us to move more quickly with our efforts to build resilience.

Category 3 property buy-outs

19.     Homes in Category 3 are not safe to live in because the risk from future flooding or landslips is intolerably high. Options to reduce this risk at a property or community level are not available or affordable. Homes in these areas should not be rebuilt or remain on their current sites.

20.     Central government’s co-funding conditions for Category 3 properties are that they must be:

·        residential

·        impacted by the severe weather events of January and February 2023

·        subject to ongoing intolerable risk to life, and

·        without an economic way to mitigate the risk.

21.     The proposed funding package would provide up to $774 million to buy Category 3 homes and allow people affected by the January and February severe weather events to move on with their lives. The funding for this would be split evenly between Auckland Council and central government.

22.     The $774 million is based on current estimates of around 700 homes to be included in this category. If this maximum amount is exceeded, central government and the council have agreed to work together in good faith to decide next steps.

23.     Auckland Council would need to administer the buy-out process from start to finish, including the purchase and removal of homes, and the ongoing management of the land. We know that there would be extra costs that wouldn’t be fully co-funded through the proposed funding package, including the costs of demolishing buildings, and any costs arising from the ongoing management of the land. We will also need to consider how we best make use of the newly acquired land, for example public parks and blue-green networks.

24.     We need to make some decisions about how the buy-out process would work, including the price we pay for Category 3 houses, how this works with insurance, and any conditions (e.g. price caps or exclusions) that might need to be put in place. Given the complexity of the task, we are proposing to take an approach where we work towards decisions that are simple, fair, cost-effective, timely, and give certainty to affected Aucklanders.

Accepting the funding package

25.     If Auckland Council accepts the funding package:

·        We will receive additional government funding to accelerate our efforts to increase the resilience of our infrastructure.

·        We can get on with making improvements that would otherwise take decades to achieve.

·        We can offer a process forward for Category 3 property owners.

·        We will need to find extra revenue to meet the council funding commitment.

26.     If Auckland Council does not accept the funding package:

·        We won’t receive all the proposed funding from central government, although we could still anticipate receiving some of the transport funding in the normal way, and could apply to the National Resilience Plan for further funding without a guarantee of our applications being successful.

·        We will still need to fund the necessary infrastructure improvements and may need to take longer to do this using the available council funding methods.

·        We won’t be in a position to buy out Category 3 homes: some property owners would face severe hardship and people would remain at risk.

27.     Accepting the funding package would be a significant step in the recovery process. We acknowledge that recovery is not happening as quickly as affected communities would like. There is a difficult balance between moving quickly and moving accurately, especially with so many thousands of potentially affected homes needing individual technical assessments. It’s important that everyone can have confidence in the information and evidence available so that we can make robust, defensible and enduring decisions.

28.     We also need to balance the needs of impacted homeowners with the needs of the wider community and consider the affordability and hazard management impacts for all Aucklanders.

Methodology of Category 3 buy-outs

29.     If we go ahead with the funding package, the details of the purchase methodology for Category 3 properties would need to be determined, and would have a strong influence on how simple, fair, cost-effective and timely our process could be, and how much certainty we could offer affected homeowners.

30.     Some of the policy details we need to consider include:

·        How we define Category 3 residential properties. We need to consider whether we should make different provisions for holiday homes and rentals that are assessed as being in Category 3, compared to primary residences. We will not be purchasing non-residential properties.

·        How we set the buy-out price. If our starting point is to take a ‘fair value’ approach, we need to decide how we assess that. Using capital value (the valuation that helps us to assess rates bills) would be the quickest option but wouldn’t necessarily reflect the true market value of every individual house. Establishing market value would be a much slower option: it could delay the process and would add further administrative costs. We could adopt a hybrid approach that gets most of the money to homeowners sooner and allows the balance to be resolved through valuation. Other alternatives would be to offer a fixed sum to all Category 3 homeowners or establish a sliding scale of payment based on hardship.


 

·        The size of owner contributions. Like all investments, property ownership carries risks. Aucklanders, through Auckland Council, do not guarantee owners against loss. Auckland Council will need to consider whether to offer 100% of the value of the property, or a lesser amount, provided we can meet our objective of removing people from situations of intolerable risk. This could take the form of a cap on buy-out offers above a certain amount.

·        What we do about insurance settlements, and uninsured and underinsured properties. Government and council contributions are intended to ‘top up’ rather than replace any amounts received through private insurance or EQC (Earthquake Commission). We still need to decide how this would work in practice. We also need to determine a fair outcome both for homeowners and for the Aucklanders who will have to fund buy-outs. This will mean we need to consider if Aucklanders who had no insurance or limited insurance should receive more, less or the same as other Category 3 homeowners.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The response that is being proposed in this funding package is a one-off, made necessary by the urgent and extraordinary scale of events.

32.     As climate change increases the risk of severe weather events, Auckland Council will not be in a position to continue to buy out other flood- and slip-affected homes. We are working to improve public awareness of hazards, so that Aucklanders are better able to manage their risks. We are also reviewing our approach to the planning and development of homes in areas with natural hazards, however the impact of this is confined largely to new development, and doesn’t address the legacy of thousands of homes that are already built in higher-risk areas.

33.     We are strongly advocating to central government to establish a national scheme to support recovery from future events, and to put in place better processes for managed retreat in advance of disaster.

34.     Both the Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan advocate for greater resilience to severe storms and flood events. A key principle of the proposed Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan is ‘Opportunities to build resilience and avoid future harm are sought proactively’.

35.     The funding received from central government for Making Space for Water and other resilience projects will enable Auckland Council to implement the initiatives within these plans in a way that both builds resilience to the impacts of climate change, and has a lower carbon impact than the solutions that have historically been utilised.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The Recovery Office is working with Legal, Finance, the Chief Planning Office and the Mayoral Office to consider the approach set out by the Crown, the implications for council, and the appropriate parameters for council’s actions at each stage of the negotiations and potential implementation process. The Executive Leadership Team sub-group also spans the relevant parts of the council that are necessary to input and/or be involved in this process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     During August, local boards and local communities provided feedback on the draft Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan, which will inform how government funding for infrastructure will be allocated. Staff are currently analysing the feedback to inform the final content of the Plan.

38.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to give feedback specifically on the funding agreement that has been agreed in-principle with central government.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The Recovery Office is engaging with mana whenua representatives to discuss the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan. Meetings are underway and will continue throughout September.  These meetings also provide opportunity to discuss the government funding package.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     Auckland’s recovery from the severe weather events of early 2023 is going to require significant investment, with or without central government co-funding. The proposed package increases the total investment into Auckland, with over $1 billion in new and reprioritised central government funding.

41.     Significant funding from Auckland Council would still be required to deliver on the activities described in this package.

42.     If we agree to proceed with the funding package, we would initially use borrowing to fund Auckland’s share of the proposal, until we can make more considered funding decisions in the next long-term plan. This is due to be consulted on in early 2024.

43.     Using borrowing in the short term would mean we could get the infrastructure repairs and the Category 3 buy-out process moving quickly.

44.     Based on initial timing projections the additional council debt required is likely to peak at $650 million. This would increase the debt-to-revenue ratio by 7 – 9 per cent over the next five to seven years, remaining within current debt limits.

45.     The council has a number of options to fund the proposed package in the long-term plan, including reducing or deferring other capital spending, sale of assets, service reductions, and rates. These decisions may also be impacted by the outcomes of the government’s water reform process.

46.     If the council were to proceed with the full proposed programme and fund it using only rates, then this would require an additional rates increase equivalent to 3.1 per cent of general rates, which could be phased in over two years. Any rates increase would be on top of other significant budget pressures the council is facing. Current indications suggest overall rates increases of over 10 per cent for 2024/2025 for residential ratepayers, if cost reductions or funding sources are not found.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     Risks and mitigations with the Crown offer process are identified in Table 2.

Table 2. Risks and mitigations with the Crown offer process

            Risk

Mitigations

More than 700 properties are identified as category 3.

Good faith commitment with the Crown to develop a joint response if this situation arises.

Eligibility criteria for the National Resilience Plan have not yet been defined, meaning there is a risk to accessing the pre-committed funding for resilience

Address within terms of the agreement

Significant additional funding required from Auckland Council

An existing risk that will need to be addressed in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, regardless of the Crown offer.

Terms of the Crown offer do not adequately provide for the complexity of the council processes needed to undertake buy outs.

Policy and legal analysis is underway to consider the implications of the terms of the agreement, to be reported to the Governing Body.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Technical assessment of affected homes and remediation of damaged infrastructure will continue throughout the decision-making process.

49.     Public consultation is underway from 11-24 September.

50.     The Governing Body will meet on 6 October to consider input from local boards and feedback from public consultation and will decide whether to agree to the proposed funding package.

51.     If the package is agreed, the council will begin conversations with confirmed Category 3 home-owners at the end of October.

52.     From November, voluntary buy-outs for Category 3 properties will begin, as technical assessments are confirmed.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Megan Howell - Recovery Specialist

Authorisers

Mat Tucker - Group Recovery Manager

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Biodiversity Credit System – central government discussion document

File No.: CP2023/13564

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of central government’s discussion document entitled ‘Helping nature and people thrive – Exploring a biodiversity credit system for Aotearoa New Zealand’, and its potential implications for Auckland Council should such a system be advanced.

2.       To provide an opportunity for Local Boards to offer any feedback to council staff to help inform the preparation of a council submission on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Central government (Ministry for the Environment, Department of Conservation) published a discussion document on 7 July 2023 (weblink: Biodiversity Credit System) which is exploring the potential for a ‘biodiversity credit system’ that could be developed for Aotearoa New Zealand. Central government is seeking feedback on the need for and possible design of a biodiversity credit system, and the potential roles of government and Māori in implementing it.

4.       Staff from Natural Environment Strategy (NES) are coordinating the development of a proposed Auckland Council submission. Staff are inviting feedback from local boards, mana whenua and the Rural Advisory Panel, to help shape the proposed Auckland Council submission which will be considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023.

5.       NES staff provided a webinar to overview the discussion document with approximately 40 local board members on 21 August 2023. Local board feedback to NES staff is due no later than 29 September 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide any feedback to council staff to help inform a council submission on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System by 29 September 2023.

Horopaki

Context

6.       The development of a national biodiversity credit system is intended to be used to increase funding opportunities from the private sector towards restoration efforts. This could be a catalyst to, or supplement, council activities, such as the regulatory implementation of the National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity (NPSIB) and the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM).


 

7.       The government’s discussion document is very much an initial consultation to start the national conversation about a potential biodiversity credit system that could be developed for Aotearoa New Zealand. Consequently, the government’s discussion document is very exploratory in nature and does not set out a specific proposed system with clear scope, roles and implementation mechanisms to provide feedback on, rather it discusses a number of different approaches that could be taken to different aspects of designing and implementing such a system.

Main points covered in discussion document

8.       The discussion document explains:

a)      what biodiversity credits and a biodiversity credit system are with some international examples that are emerging

b)      what the benefits could be in the Aotearoa New Zealand context

c)      different approaches that could be taken to the scope and design of a system, and

d)      the distinct roles that government could play.

9.       The discussion document includes consultation questions that seek views on the different approaches and roles for a biodiversity credit system.

10.     Biodiversity credits are a way of attracting funding from the private sector, to invest in efforts by landowners to protect, maintain and enhance indigenous vegetation and habitats, including shrublands, grasslands, wetlands and natural and regenerating native forests. The credits are intended to recognise, in a transparent and consistent way, landholder projects or activities that protect, maintain and enhance indigenous biodiversity, or positive outcomes, e.g., a 1 % increase (or avoided decrease) in the indigenous biodiversity of a hectare.

11.     By purchasing credits, people and organisations can finance and claim credit for their contribution to ‘nature-positive’ actions and outcomes. This is an emerging approach that is gaining considerable interest internationally. In Aotearoa New Zealand, credits could relate to protecting, restoring, and enhancing nature on public and private land, including whenua Māori (Māori land).

12.     A biodiversity credit system could recognise efforts to protect, enhance and restore indigenous biodiversity in any habitat (on land, in freshwater, and / or coastal and marine environments) or only in some. Biodiversity credits could represent work on whole ecosystems or catchments or focus on endangered or taonga species or remnant habitats.

13.     The discussion document suggests seven principles that could apply to the design of a government supported biodiversity credit system. The principles would let people know what they can expect when they participate in a biodiversity credit system and what is expected of them. For example, the system should have clear rules for the claims investors can make to avoid ‘greenwashing,’ should reward nature-positive activities additional to business as usual, and the system should maximise positive impact on biodiversity (including uplifting mauri and mana of biodiversity).

14.     The discussion document also explains the components of a fully functioning system, including measurement, verification and reporting, legal recognition, potential ways credits can be traded and the roles of industry experts. It notes that regional and district councils could potentially play a role in providing expertise to landowners for biodiversity credit activities and / or projects.

15.     The Government is exploring the possible roles it could play to support the establishment of a biodiversity credit system for Aotearoa New Zealand that would operate with both integrity and impact. It suggests the following two roles but notes that a blend of these options may be appropriate, which could evolve over time:


 

a)      market enablement: where it provides policies and guidance for the development and uptake of voluntary schemes in Aotearoa New Zealand, and potentially funding for system development as the market is established. An enablement role seeks to influence the outcomes and operation of the market, using non-regulatory tools such as good practice guidance and optional standards.

b)      market administration: where it establishes and manages a voluntary biodiversity scheme and is active in the ongoing management and administration. A market administration role includes setting a regulatory framework, with tools to direct the outcomes and the operation of the market.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Potential implications for Auckland Council

16.     Given the nature of the government’s discussion document, it is difficult to be certain about the potential implications of a biodiversity credit system for Auckland Council as no clear proposals have been made about its scope, design and implementation or different roles central government and councils will have within the system.

17.     There are potential benefits that a biodiversity credit system could have for funding protection, restoration, and enhancement of indigenous biodiversity on public and private land in the Auckland region. Depending on the scope and design of a biodiversity credit system (which will be developed following feedback on this initial consultation being undertaken by central government), it could be of relevance to initiatives undertaken locally seeking to achieve positive biodiversity and freshwater outcomes as they complement regulatory requirements (e.g., tree planting, stream restoration etc). However, as discussed in paragraph 13 above, one of the suggested principles for a biodiversity credit system is ‘it should reward nature-positive activities additional to business as usual’. For example, this suggests that funding derived from a credit should not serve to substitute funding provided to existing council programmes.

18.     As the discussion document is at an early, exploratory stage, it is not clear yet what role councils should play or how the council group including local boards might benefit. MfE stated in a recent presentation to the Te Uru Kahika Resource Managers Group on 31 August that it is very open to hearing suggestions from councils.

19.     Our feedback is likely to include a number of our own questions and different views from the council group about the system scope, design and implementation. In some instances, we may also be able to suggest different options for consideration by central government, e.g., in relation to the role councils could play:

a)      little or no involvement by council?

b)      some partnership with central government to help identify focus areas for achieving the best biodiversity outcomes?

c)      council acts as a translator / navigator providing advice to landowners in the region about use of biodiversity credits and where to focus efforts?

20.     There are 23 questions asked in the discussion document. NES staff have identified the key questions that are more about the system design and overall approaches that could be taken, which we thought local boards may want to focus any feedback on. These can be found in Attachment A of the agenda report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Feedback from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board is due no later than 29 September, to help inform the proposed council submission that will be presented to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023.

22.     As part of preparing the council submission, staff will consider and present the potential impacts on climate, Māori and local board views as well as the financial implications, risks and mitigations in the report to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee. Due to this being an initial consultation to start the national conversation about a potential biodiversity credit system, central government’s discussion document is very exploratory in nature and does not set out a specific proposed system with clear scope, roles and implementation mechanisms to provide feedback on. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the potential impacts and implications at this stage, and this may become more evident in subsequent central government consultations when a more defined approach to the design and implementation of a biodiversity credit system has been developed and proposed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key consultation questions

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Taran Livingston - Lead Analyst NES

Authorisers

Dave Allen - Manager Natural Environment Strategy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on Emergency Management Bill

File No.: CP2023/12947

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request local board input into the development of the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Emergency Management Bill (the Bill) intended to replace the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (CDEM Act) is open for submissions until 3 November 2023. The Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee will make a submission to the Bill.

3.       Further to the Memo to Governing Body, local board members and Independent Māori Statutory Board dated 17 August, this report invites local boards to provide input into the development of the Committee’s submission. A high-level overview of the Bill is provided, and a more detailed summary of the Bill’s more significant changes is attached.

4.       Decisions on the Bill, submissions to it and subsequent progress will be made by the government formed after the general election in October 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide input to the development of Auckland Council’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Emergency Management Bill to replace the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (CDEM Act) is open for submission until 3 November 2023 and can be accessed via legislation.govt.nz

6.       The Bill is a part of the programme of policy work known as the Trifecta Work programme that arose out of the government’s response to the 2017 report of the Technical Advisory Group on Better Reponses to Natural Disasters and other Emergencies.

7.       Comment is sought on the Bill as currently presented. Please note that decision-making on the progress of the Bill will be made by the government formed after the general election in October 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Emergency Management Bill

8.       The Emergency Management Bill updates the emergency management system to improve performance, modernise the current legislative and regulatory framework, and acknowledge the importance of community resilience and preparedness. The Bill builds on the CDEM Act and:

·        restructures the Bill to a more modern approach

·        includes current provisions with minor amendment

·        introduces new language and terminology, as a consequence of the shift from ‘Civil Defence Emergency Management’ to ‘Emergency Management’

·        introduces more significant change consistent with the Technical Advisory Group’s recommendations and the government’s response.

A more modern Bill

9.       The Bill is structured with parts and sub-parts (some accompanied with outlines of their contents) and makes extensive use of headings. Some sections of the CDEM Act are moved to the Schedules of the Emergency Management Bill.

Current provisions minorly amended

10.     Much of the current CDEM Act is carried over with minor amendment. The placement of these clauses within the Bill’s structure means provisions carried over may be placed in a different order than they appeared in the CDEM Act.

Language and terminology

11.     Changes to language and terminology appear throughout the Bill including:

New terminology

Outgoing terminology

Emergency Management

Civil Defence Emergency Management

Emergency Management Committee

Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee

Emergency Management Committee Plan

Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee Group Plan

Coordinating Executive

Coordinating Executive Group

Area Controller

Group Controller

Area Recovery Manager

Group Recovery Manager

emergency designation

a state of emergency or a transition period

 

More significant changes

12.     The more significant changes introduced by the Bill are summarised briefly below, and in more detail in Attachment A.

Greater recognition of the role of Māori and enhancing Māori participation

13.     The role of iwi and Māori has been increasingly recognised in the practice of emergency management since the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes. The Bill recognises the role of iwi and Māori in emergency management at all levels, through representation, requiring each committee to improve its capability and capacity to engage with iwi and Māori, and making involvement consistent nationally.

Changes to the requirements regarding the Emergency Management Committee Plan (currently the Group Plan)

14.     Emergency Management Committees will need to engage with representatives of disproportionately impacted communities (such as seniors and the disabled), iwi and Māori, and other people or groups as appropriate, before it approves a Plan. This is to encourage more proactive engagement with communities as a part of Plan development.

Critical infrastructure

15.     New requirements are introduced in addition to changing the terminology from ‘lifeline utilities’ to ‘critical infrastructure’ entities/sector. The requirement to share information is made explicit for the purpose of the Bill. A new requirement to develop and publish the planned level of service during emergencies is introduced.

16.     The provisions in the Bill are part of a wider policy development programme to develop a more resilient model led by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, that recognises a broader range:

·        of infrastructure (i.e. banks)

·        of potential threats (i.e. cyberattack)

·        and their dependencies and interdependencies.

The role of Emergency Management Committees compared to the functions and duties of local authority members of Emergency Management Committees

17.     The Bill clarifies the different roles of Emergency Management Committees and local authorities. Some new requirements are added, and business continuity is provided for separately. The provisions are expressed in similar terms although the function and duties of local authorities are more oriented towards action.

Changes regarding emergency designation - State of Emergency and Notice of Transition Period

18.     The term ‘emergency designation’ is introduced, meaning either a state of emergency or notice of transition. The Bill also requires the appointment of people able to declare a state of emergency or give a notice of transition period from the representatives on the Emergency Management Committee.

Regulations and Director’s rule-making powers

19.     The Bill expands the range of matters regulations can be made for, including operational matters, infringement offences and breaches of rules. A new power is granted to the Director of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) to make rules regarding roles and responsibilities in specific situations, technical standards, training, qualifications and other matters.

Infringements

20.     The Bill sets up a framework for issuing, serving and payment of infringement notices for offences made under the regulation making powers of the Bill, for the purposes of the Bill.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The definition of emergencies in the CDEM Act and the Bill includes naturally occurring emergencies such as severe weather and drought. It is widely anticipated that these types of emergencies will become more frequent and severe as a consequence of Climate Change.

22.     The Bill updates the regulatory framework under the CDEM Act. Under the framework emergency management comprises the four R’s - Reduction, Readiness, Response and Recovery. Emergency management practice seeks to:

·        reduce the risk from emergencies

·        raise awareness of and preparedness for emergencies

·        provide a platform for effective response to and recovery from emergencies.

23.     The changes signalled by the Bill will be complemented by the review of the National Emergency Management Plan, the roadmap for the implementation of the National Disaster Resilience Strategy and the wider policy work related to infrastructure.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The Bill and proposed changes to the framework for emergency management has implications across the Auckland Council group, due to our obligations as:

·    managers of critical infrastructure

·    providers of key information during emergencies

·    potential staff to be redirected to support response and recovery activities.

25.     Auckland Emergency Management is working with various parts of Auckland Council and CCO’s including Auckland Plan Strategy and Research, Healthy Waters, Local Board Services, Ngā Matarae, Auckland Transport and Watercare on the development of the submission to the Bill.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report requests input from local boards into the development of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee’s submission on the Bill.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     There is a high level of interest amongst iwi and Māori. NEMA has held several national hui. Similarly, engagement with marae and related discussions indicate an awareness and interest.

28.     We have written to iwi and Māori to encourage them to both make their own submission on the Bill and provide comment or feedback that can be reflected in the development of Auckland Council’s submission. If there is interest, a hui on this topic may be held.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The changes signalled in the Bill will require amended or additional processes and practices and introduce additional cost across the emergency management system, it is uncertain when they will arise.

30.     It is also unclear how such costs will fall between participating Emergency Management Committees, local authorities, ratepayers, critical infrastructure entities and sectors, their shareholders and consumers. There may also be implications for capacity amongst participants across the emergency management system, critical infrastructure entities and sectors.

31.     The full financial and resource implications may not be known until the Bill is enacted, the National Emergency Management Plan reviewed, the roadmap for the implementation of the National Disaster Resilience Strategy completed and critical infrastructure policy confirmed. These programmes will be subject to the decision-making of the government to be formed after the General Election in October 2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The general direction of policy on which the Bill is based has been signalled for some time. The submission process is the most effective means of managing risk of unfavourable change.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     A workshop of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee to consider the recommendations of the draft submission is scheduled for 18 October 2023. Materials will be circulated to Committee members in preparation for the workshop.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of the Emergency Management Bill's more significant changes

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Wayne Brown - Principal Recovery Advisor

Authorisers

Paul Amaral - General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park – Fisheries New Zealand discussion paper

File No.: CP2023/13690

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of central government’s discussion document entitled ‘Proposed options for bottom fishing access zones in the Hauraki Gulf’.

2.       To offer an opportunity for local boards to input into an Auckland Council submission to Fisheries New Zealand.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Fisheries New Zealand released a discussion paper consulting on options for establishing Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana on 30 August 2023. The proposals follow the June 2021 publication of Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf: Government action on the Sea Change Plan.

4.       The Fisheries New Zealand proposal presents four options for Bottom Fishing Access Zones (BFAZ) that vary in closing 74.1 per cent to 87.3 per cent of the Gulf to Danish seining and 77.1 per cent to 89.2 per cent of the Gulf to bottom trawl fishing. Current closures protect on average 35 per cent of predicted suitable habitat.

5.       Staff from Natural Environment Strategy (NES) are coordinating an Auckland Council submission and inviting input from local boards and mana whenua. The submission will be considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023.

6.       Council staff appreciate the many demands on local boards and note there is no obligation to provide feedback on this fisheries management proposal. NES staff have considerable in-depth background of the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana discussions over the last decade and experience on the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan Advisory Group.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on any of the Fisheries New Zealand consultation questions, to help inform the proposed council submission that will be presented to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023.

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

Background

7.       Auckland Council initiated the Sea Change marine spatial planning process a decade ago in cooperation with Waikato Regional Council. Natural Environment Strategy staff played a significant role in resourcing a stakeholder-led process through to the publication of the stakeholder plan in April 2017.

8.       Central government developed Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf: Government action on the Sea Change Plan (June 2021) in response to marine protection (Department of Conservation) and fisheries management (Fisheries New Zealand) proposals in the Sea Change plan. Revitalising the Hauraki Gulf addresses the respective DOC and Fisheries New Zealand responsibilities and how the relevant Sea Change plan proposals could be advanced.

9.       An approved Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan was announced on 9 August 2023 setting out a management objective to protect marine benthic (i.e. ocean floor) habitats from any adverse effects of fishing and exclude bottom trawling and Danish seining in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana except within defined areas.

10.     A key technical document (published by Fisheries New Zealand in March 2023) outlines the use of a spatial decision support tool to aid the development of options for the Bottom Fishing Access Zones (BFAZ) proposal.

11.     On 30 August 2023, Fisheries New Zealand released a discussion paper (Attachment B) consulting on options for establishing Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana.

12.     The proposals encompassed by the Bottom Fishing Access Zones discussion paper are quite separate from the marine protection proposals outlined in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill in that they are being advanced through existing fisheries legislation. However, both Fisheries New Zealand and DOC have worked closely in the concurrent release of the respective proposals under fisheries and conservation legislation respectively.

13.     The marine protection proposals encompassed by the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill are not further discussed in the context of this report which focuses on the proposals to create Bottom Fishing Access Zones. A separate report will be provided to local boards to provide input on an Auckland Council submission to the Environment Select Committee on the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This report sets out the analysis and advice for local board consideration on the Fisheries New Zealand discussion document. Staff advice to be presented to the Planning Environment and Parks (PEP) Committee will also evaluate and address implications for Māori, considerations of climate impacts, and organisational risks in accordance with formal council reporting expectations.

Bottom trawl and Danish seine fishing methods

15.     Bottom trawling is when a fishing net is towed along the seafloor. Danish seining uses a net that is set out using long ropes in a diamond shape on the seabed. While Danish seine fishing does not tow the fishing gear over the seabed in the same manner as bottom trawling, there are impacts to the benthic habitat inside the diamond area as the ropes are drawn in and the net is retrieved.


 

16.     Estimates of the historical footprint indicate the vast majority of available and suitable seafloor in the Gulf has been fished by bottom contact fishing methods at some point in time, with varying levels of intensity. There has been a noticeable reduction in overall trawl fishing effort within the Gulf since 2018, with some fishers who previously operated in the Gulf making the choice to fish elsewhere.

17.     Bottom contact fishing can affect seafloor habitats and communities by damaging or removing structure forming species, reducing habitat complexity and altering the seafloor structure. The functioning of these communities can be affected as a result. There have been relatively few assessments of the impacts of Danish seine fishing to benthic habitat and communities. Danish seine fishing does not use ‘trawl doors’, and the ground gear is lighter.

Fisheries economics in the Gulf

18.     About half of all fish caught commercially in the Gulf is sold in Auckland restaurants fish shops and take-away shops. Trawling- and Danish seine-caught fish make up part of this market, but accurate information is not immediately available. The top ten inshore species caught account for 95 per cent of total catch landed by Danish seine and bottom trawl fishing in the Gulf. The top five species account for 90 per cent of the total commercial catch from the Gulf. These include, in descending order, snapper, trevally, john dory, gurnard, terakihi, gemfish, jack mackerel, leatherjacket, school shark and mirror dory.

19.     Of the 222 entities owning the primarily affected quota shares (which can be fished in the Gulf), 21 entities own quota shares allocated to Māori by virtue of Treaty Settlement legislation. This accounts for 12 per cent of the total quota shares for these fish stocks. There are 28 Danish seine or trawl operators (fishing permit holders) that have fished the areas proposed for BFAZ over the last five years, operating 22 trawl vessels and 11 Danish seine vessels. Current revenue generated from these two fishing methods from the Gulf amounts to $7.2 million based on port price, or $10.5 million based on export prices.

Legislative context

20.     The proposed implementation of BFAZs is one part of an overall management approach being taken to improve the health and mauri of the Gulf. Other initiatives have been identified at both a national and regional level that complement the BFAZ proposals. Increasing the health of the Gulf will also be dependent on improved land management activities administered by councils.

21.     Fisheries New Zealand are responsible for administering the Fisheries Act 1996 and its supporting regulations. The Act gives commercial, recreational, and customary Māori fishers access to resources while ensuring fisheries are managed sustainably and that the effects on the aquatic environment are managed. People making decisions under the Act are to ensure that they do so in a manner that is consistent with the Treaty of Waitangi (Fisheries Claims) Settlement Act 1992.

Engagement prior to formal proposals

22.     Engagement by Fisheries New Zealand and the Department of Conservation with tangata whenua and iwi representatives (from adjacent areas as well as from within the Gulf) has indicated that the majority of iwi primarily support the removal of some or all mobile bottom contact fishing methods from the Gulf. Consultation is ongoing with tangata whenua throughout the region and with iwi fisheries forums in areas that could receive displaced fishing efforts resulting from the proposed changes.


 

23.     Public submissions preceding the approval (August 2023) of the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan supported the removal of bottom trawling and Danish seining from the Gulf, or the establishment of BFAZs. Commercial interests noted that the sector was working towards reducing the impact of bottom trawling through innovative methods and gear trials, and that fishers trawl over soft seabed sediment forms, as opposed to reefs which are associated with high biodiversity. Commercial interests were concerned about the impacts of restricting bottom fishing and Danish seining on fishing operations and the potential displacement of effort that could occur.

Using a spatial planning approach to determine options for public engagement

24.     A Fisheries New Zealand science project (ZBD2020-06) was contracted to NIWA in 2020 to collate spatial information on habitat forming species, to develop models predicting the distribution of biogenic habitats, and to test a spatial planning approach. Current closures protect on average 35 per cent of predicted suitable habitat for the 20 biogenic habitat groups, although this ranged from 10 to 94 per cent for the nine most vulnerable biogenic habitat groups.

25.     A Hauraki Gulf Benthic Spatial Planning Advisory Group (HGBSPAG) was formed in 2022 to facilitate collaboration on the process of collating spatial information on, modelling the distribution of and testing spatial planning approaches for managing habitat forming species. A spatial decision-support tool, Zonation, was used to identify priority areas for particular objectives (i.e. those areas with high fisheries importance and low importance for biogenic habitats).

26.     The findings of the science project (ZBD2020-06) were presented to the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan Advisory Group (HGFPAG) in August 2022. These inputs were further refined by Fisheries New Zealand and Department of Conservation, prior to a final opportunity for review by the HGPFAG. The proposals were subsequently finalised and endorsed by Cabinet for public engagement.

Discussion paper proposed options

27.     There are four BFAZ options proposed which vary in degrees of protection to biodiversity and impact to bottom trawl and Danish seine fisheries. The status quo or a complete ban are not proposed options. Ordered in increasing impact to bottom trawl and Danish seine fisheries the options are:

Option 1

Close 74.1 per cent of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 77.1 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish six BFAZ.

Option 2

Close 79.4 per cent of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 82.4 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish five BFAZ.

Option 3

Close 86.6 per cent of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 88.5 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish four BFAZ.

Option 4

Close 87.3 per cent of the Gulf shallower than 200m to Danish seine and 89.2 per cent to trawl fishing methods and establish four BFAZ.

 


 

28.     Fisheries New Zealand considers that each of the four proposed options addresses the problem of adverse impacts of bottom contact fishing on benthic habitats in the Gulf. They each address the Crown’s obligations under section five (Treaty of Waitangi), section eight (the Purpose of the Fisheries Act), section nine (environmental principles) and section 10 (information principles) of the Act by allowing for continued sustainable utilisation. Each option provides for different levels of fishing utilisation and has different potential resulting impacts depending on the scale of reduced access. There remains uncertainty around expected changes to landings and revenue, displacement of fishing effort to other areas not affected by the closures and the substitution of fishing methods other than Danish seine and trawl.

29.     Specific assessment of each proposed option is outlined in the discussion paper with reasonable detail, with an emphasis on envisaged biodiversity outcomes and economic outcomes. Economic impacts may fall disproportionately on a small number of permit holders. This manifests itself as impacts on landings and revenue (based on port prices received), export revenue, reduced incomes for Licenced Fish Receivers (including wholesalers and/or processors) and retailers.

Key consultation questions

30.     There are 13 questions asked in the discussion paper (reproduced in Attachment A), and NES staff have highlighted the following key consultation questions of anticipated interest to local boards to support the feedback process:

·        Which option do you support for proposed Bottom Fishing Access Zones? Why?

·        If you do not support any of the options listed, what alternative(s) should be considered? Why?

·        Do you have any ideas or alternative approaches to the management of bottom fishing impacts, apart from the proposed Bottom Fishing Access Zones?

·        Do you think the proposed options adequately provide for social, economic and cultural wellbeing?

·        Do you think the criteria outlined in section five (of the discussion paper) will provide a suitable basis to assess the options and their impacts?

·        Do you think the proposed options appropriately consider the effects on the benthic environment?

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Council staff will be taking an agenda report and proposed draft submission to the Planning Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023. In addition to an assessment of the proposals as they further the council’s obligations to biodiversity management in the coastal marine area (cf. fisheries management), the themes of the internal input will be summarised in the agenda report and incorporated into the proposed submission as appropriate.

32.     Local board feedback received by 29 September will be considered by NES staff in shaping the proposed council submission. While that early input is encouraged where possible, all local board feedback received by 16 October 2023 will be appended to the committee report. NES staff will make relevant observations to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee about the local board input received as that informs the proposed council submission.

33.     A separate report will be provided to local boards to provide input on an Auckland Council submission to the Environment Select Committee on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park: Questions for submitters

 

b

Discussion paper - Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dave Allen - Manager Natural Environment Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill

File No.: CP2023/13912

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill and offer an opportunity for local boards to input into the shaping of an Auckland Council submission from the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee to Parliament’s Environment Select Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parliament’s Environment Select Committee of Parliament released the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill on 4 September 2023 for public consultation. The draft legislation follows a Department of Conservation (DOC) consultation on proposed areas for marine protection that closed on 28 October 2022.

3.       The Bill proposes two new marine reserves immediately adjacent to existing marine reserves (i.e. extensions), and subject to the same rules and provisions as the existing marine reserves. The Bill also proposes five seafloor protection areas, and twelve high protection areas in the Hauraki Gulf. For these types of marine protection areas, protected customary rights will not be affected.

4.       Input on Auckland Council’s submission has been invited from local boards, and mana whenua. Given the decision-making responsibilities of the governing body on statutory matters, a draft council submission will be presented to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee at its meeting on 2 November 2023.

5.       Local board feedback received by 29 September 2023 will be considered for incorporation into the council submission and noted in the agenda report. Feedback received by 16 October 2023 will be appended to the committee report and considered for incorporation into the proposed submission prior to the submission being finalised. The committee’s direction on themes or issues that need to be strengthened or alternatively de-emphasised will enable staff to finalise the submission to clearly articulate the council committee’s position around key points.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide input to help shape the Auckland Council submission to Parliament’s Environment Select Committee.

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Council initiated the Sea Change marine spatial planning process a decade ago in cooperation with Waikato Regional Council. Natural Environment Strategy staff played a significant role in resourcing a stakeholder-led process through to the publication of the stakeholder plan in April 2017.

7.       Subsequently, central government developed Revitalising the Gulf – Government Action on the Sea Change Plan (June 2021) in response to marine protection (Department of Conservation) and fisheries management (Fisheries New Zealand) proposals in the Sea Change plan. Revitalising the Gulf addresses how the relevant Sea Change plan proposals could be advanced, including potential new marine protection areas in the Gulf.

8.       The Department of Conservation (DOC) released a discussion document on marine protection proposals in the Hauraki Gulf with consultation closing on 28 October 2022. The proposed areas included two marine reserves, twelve High Protection Areas, and five Seafloor Protection Areas.

9.       DOC received strong support for these protection measures and for the overall aim of Revitalising the Gulf. However, some recreational and commercial fishing interests were affected, and refinements were sought. Auckland Council submitted a technical staff submission supporting the proposals in principle. In the case of Auckland Council, staff queried through their submission the potential impacts around council group operational activities undertaken, some of which were the subject of consenting processes (e.g. maintenance of infrastructure on or under the seabed).

10.     The Hauraki Gulf Marine Protection Bill coincides with the release of a discussion paper by Fisheries New Zealand on Bottom Fishing Access Zones (BFAZ) in the Hauraki Gulf to fulfil direction from the Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan (as announced on 9 August 2023). The Fisheries Plan includes management objectives to protect marine benthic (i.e. ocean floor) habitats from any adverse effects of fishing and exclude bottom trawling and Danish seining in the Hauraki Gulf except within defined areas. Fisheries New Zealand and DOC have worked closely on the concurrent release of the proposals under fisheries and conservation legislation respectively.

11.     The BFAZs are not addressed further in this information memo. A separate report to local boards provides an opportunity to input on a separate submission being prepared for the Planning, Environment and Parks (PEP) Committee on behalf of Auckland Council on the Fisheries NZ proposals.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Overview of the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill

12.     The Bill seeks to address the continued degradation of the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana (the Gulf) by establishing two new marine reserves (effectively as extensions to existing marine reserves), twelve high protection areas (HPAs), and five seafloor protection areas (SPAs). Together, these areas could increase the protected areas of the Gulf nearly threefold from 6.7 per cent to just over 18 per cent of the Gulf (including the Cable Protection Zones).

13.     The Bill proposes two new marine reserves adjacent to existing marine reserves: Cape Rodney–Okakari Point Marine Reserve and the Whanganui A Hei (Cathedral Cove) Marine Reserve. The two marine reserves will be subject to the same rules and provisions set out in the Marine Reserves Act 1971, prohibiting all fishing and extraction activities (i.e. no-take zones) and will act as extensions to the existing marine reserves.


 

14.     High Protection Areas (HPAs) are a newly proposed tool to protect, restore, and enhance biodiversity within the HPA. HPAs prohibit commercial and recreational fishing, large-scale removal of non-living materials (e.g. sand), and the dumping / discharge of waste that will adversely affect aquatic life, while allowing for customary activities within the HPA. The Bill proposes twelve new HPAs:

·        Te Hauturu-o-Toi / Little Barrier Island (Auckland region coastal marine area)

·        Slipper Island / Whakahau

·        Motukawao Islands

·        Rotoroa Island (Auckland region coastal marine area)

·        Rangitoto and Motutapu (Auckland region coastal marine area)

·        Cape Colville

·        Mokohīnau Islands (Auckland region coastal marine area)

·        Aldermen Islands / Te Ruamāhua (north)

·        Aldermen Islands / Te Ruamāhua (south)

·        Kawau Bay (Auckland region coastal marine area)

·        Tiritiri Matangi (Auckland region coastal marine area)

·        Ōtata / Noises Island (Auckland region coastal marine area).

15.     Seafloor Protection Areas (SPAs) are a tool proposed to maintain and restore benthic habitats. SPAs therefore prohibit activities that adversely impact the seafloor and associated aquatic life, including bottom-contact fishing methods, dumping, depositing, or discharging waste, and sand extraction, mining and aquaculture activities. Activities like short term boat anchoring is not prohibited, along with actions taken under enactments such as the Biosecurity Act 1993 or the Resource Management (Marine Pollution) Regulations 1998, training activities undertaken by the New Zealand Defence Force, emergencies, and transit shipping. One proposed SPA (Mokohīnau Islands) proposes additional prohibitions regarding fishing activities (i.e. setnetting, potting, and bottom longlining in a specified part of the SPA). The Bill proposes five new SPAs:

·        Craddock Channel (Auckland region coastal marine area)

·        Cape Colville

·        Mokohīnau Islands (Auckland region coastal marine area)

·        Kawau Bay (Auckland region coastal marine area)

·        Tiritiri Matangi (Auckland region coastal marine area).

16.     The Bill accounts for customary rights in the new protection areas. Under the Bill, customary fishing will be allowed to continue in proposed HPAs in accordance with the following:

·        section 186 of the Fisheries Act 1996

·        regulations made under section 297 of the Fisheries Act 1996 for the purpose of section 10 of the Treaty of Waitangi (Fisheries Claims) Settlement Act 1992, or

·        subpart 5 of Part 2 of the Fisheries (Amateur Fishing) Regulations 2013.

17.     However, customary fishing activities using prohibited methods in SPAs will not be allowed to occur (i.e. bottom trawling, Danish seining, or dredging).


 

18.     The Bill, in section 27, sets out a process for obtaining permits to undertake prohibited or regulated activities in the new protection areas, including the appropriate undertaking of mātauranga Māori activities, scientific study, active restoration, or maintenance of existing infrastructure. As proposed, these permits would be additional to any resource consents required under the Auckland Unitary Plan, if such consents are able to be issued.

Impacts for Auckland Council

19.     Staff support in principle further marine protection across the area encompassed by the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park. This reflects the council’s facilitation of outcomes through initiation and support to the Sea Change marine planning initiative (2013-2017), and subsequent input into the Revitalising the Gulf central government response. Nevertheless, the proposed Bill does raise some questions on the best approaches to achieve marine protection outcomes.

20.     The nature of our advice to the governing body will consider the following themes or issues:

·        Marine reserves – council staff initially see no issues with effectively extending the two marine reserves as proposed using the existing marine reserves legislation, one of which (‘Cape Rodney-Okakari Point Extension Marine Reserve’) is in the coastal marine area (CMA) administered by Auckland Council.

·        High Protection Areas (HPA) – seven of twelve proposals occur within the Auckland CMA

Generic issues

i)          The Bill potentially sets up a dual authorisation regime (also for SPAs). Councils maintain consenting responsibilities under the Resource Management Act (RMA) for some activities that would be ‘prohibited’ under the Bill. As a point of difference, a consent application cannot be lodged for a ‘prohibited activity’ under the RMA. The Bill provides powers to regulate some activities within HPAs to give effect to upholding biodiversity objectives (including how and when such activities could occur through a permitting process). Staff have suggested to DOC staff in early 2023 that this creates inefficiencies. Alternatively, DOC staff were advised that an alternative approach might look to set biodiversity objectives by way of regulation through the new Bill, and require councils (i.e., Auckland Council, and Waikato Regional Council) to adhere to these higher standards in HPAs. This would relieve DOC from needing to upskill itself on the intersect between resource management and biodiversity outcomes and would place considerations of consenting / authorisation with council staff in Auckland and Waikato with specialist regulatory and ecological knowledge.

ii)         In making regulations that provide for the setting of biodiversity objectives, the Minister of Conservation needs to be satisfied that consultation on the additional management actions has taken place with the Minister responsible for the Fisheries Act 1996, and whānau, hapū and iwi that exercise kaitiakitanga in the HPA. The mechanism for satisfying that test remains unclear at the level of whānau, and hapū, depending on how those parties are recognised. Further, there may be value in similarly ensuring that consultation has occurred with the relevant chief executive of Auckland Council and Waikato Regional Council (or their delegates within the regulatory services function) to enhance the robustness of proposed interventions and consider the most effective alternative options to restrict adverse activities where relevant to resource management legislation.


 

iii)        Some of the biodiversity outcomes sought can be successfully achieved by applying the Fisheries Act 1996, where resource management effects have not been apparent or the primary pressure. Past examples include the Spirits Bay – Tom Bowling Bay fisheries restrictions, where trawling and scallop dredging were prohibited in 1999 to protect rare sponge communities. Accordingly, there is a question about whether introducing fisheries restrictions under the Fisheries Act by themselves would largely address the main pressures giving rise to threats to biodiversity outcomes in some areas. Resource management pressures could be further addressed for the specific locations if the relevant council (Auckland or Waikato Regional Council) enhanced its biodiversity policies and rules in the specific area in question.

Specific location issues – within Auckland Coastal Marine Area

iv)        Some HPAs within the Auckland Coastal Marine Area (CMA) may require specific staff consideration as part of submission preparation given the range of activities undertaken under the Resource Management Act within that area (e.g. specified infrastructure etc), including Kawau Bay, Tiritiri Matangi, and Rotorua Island. An SPA may be sufficient for achieving biodiversity outcomes around specified parts of Kawau Bay and Tiritiri Matangi.

v)         Rotoroa Island should be renamed as Pakatoa Island HPA given the proposed boundary surrounds the latter island to the north of Rotoroa Island, but otherwise this HPA is now well placed following ecological assessment.

vi)        The geographical area proposed for the Ōtata / Noises Island HPA may be larger than needed to achieve biodiversity outcomes associated with reef areas, at the expense of reasonable fishing activities (e.g. recreational line fishing) on the sandy flats that would be displaced to nearby coastal areas. An alternative approach could be to create a SPA buffer around a HPA area concentrated around the marine habitats adjoining the islands. Staff will evaluate the likelihood of biodiversity outcomes still being achieved, taking account of the movement and vulnerability of some species to specific fishing methods beyond an area considered for an HPA. Staff will consider prior DOC and other technical assessments in doing so which indicated that the larger area was appropriate.

·        Seafloor Protection Areas (SPA) – four of the five proposals occur within the Auckland CMA

i)         The Kawau Bay and Tiritiri Matangi SPAs within the Auckland CMA may require future specific staff assessment for council submission preparation given the range of activities undertaken under the Resource Management Act within that area (e.g. specified infrastructure etc).

·        Other live marine reserve application

i)         Council staff note an existing proposal, publicly notified in January 2022, for the Hakaimango-Matiatia (Northwest Waiheke Island) Marine Reserve by ‘Friends of the Gulf Incorporated’ northwest of Waiheke Island will still need to be resolved. The proposed area encompasses 2,350 hectares which extends north towards Rakino Island and the Ōtata / Noises Islands. Following a ‘response to objections’ report by ‘Friends of the Gulf Incorporated’ to the Director-General of Conversation in April 2022, DOC advised that they were continuing to engage with tangata whenua on the application, prior to expected advice to the Minister of Conservation in 2023 on whether to uphold the objections received. No announcements have been forthcoming preceding the release of the current Bill.


 

·        Waikato Regional Council Regional Coastal Plan

i)         The Waikato Regional Council have recently notified their Regional Coastal Plan, with public submissions open between 18 August and 14 November 2023. A Hearings Committee will be formed between mid and late 2024. This will be at about the same time that the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill will have been made law, as refined. Council staff will informally engage with Waikato staff during September - October to determine if the Regional Coastal Plan proposals have any bearing on the specific proposals contained in the Bill.

·        Ongoing Resource Management reforms

i)          Resource Management reforms remain underway by central government and where relevant council staff will consider the reforms in advice to committee and the proposed submission.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     There are no identified questions for submitters to specifically provide feedback on.

22.     Staff will evaluate the matters discussed above, as well as the interrelationship with other statutory drivers, the desire to improve biodiversity outcomes through use of the right tool in the right place (e.g. the relative merits of SPA and HPA options or a combination of them in some areas).

23.     Staff will similarly consider input from mana whenua, local boards, and liaise with technical staff from Waikato Regional Council.

24.     A local board members’ briefing on Monday, 18 September 2023 provided a high-level overview of the proposals being made and an opportunity for local board members to ask questions of staff.

25.     Local board feedback received by 29 September 2023 will be considered by NES staff in shaping the proposed council submission. While early input is encouraged where possible, feedback received by 16 October 2023 will be appended to the committee report and be considered for inclusion in the final council submission at the direction of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

26.     NES staff will make relevant observations to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee (2 November 2023) about the local board input received as that informs the proposed council submission. The intent is to ensure that there is one clear position from Auckland Council being articulated to Parliament’s Environment Select Committee.

27.     Timeframes are tight for staff to evaluate these central government proposals and provide specialist advice to committee. Staff need to focus on the legislative framing of the Bill and how it could be improved in relation to other legislation and council functions (e.g. Resource Management Act), as well as the specifics of the tools offering various forms of protection, and how they are proposed to be applied in each location.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dave Allen - Manager Natural Environment Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2023/13751

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for three extraordinary meeting dates to be added to the 2023-2024 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (the Long-Term Plan) and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 (Annual Plan) timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Thursday, 8 December 2022 (WTK/2022/139).

3.       At that time, the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision-making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unknown. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve three extraordinary meeting dates as an addition to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule so that the modified 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes can be met.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the addition of three extraordinary meeting dates to the 2022-2025 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes as follows:

i)       Thursday, 30 November 2023, 10.00am

ii)       Thursday, 2 May 2024, 10.00am

iii)      Thursday, 13 June 2024, 10.00am.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its Thursday, 8 December 2022 business meeting (WTK/2022/139).

8.       The timeframes for local board decision-making in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

9.       The local board is being asked to make decisions in late-November 2023 and late-April and early-June 2024 to feed into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 processes. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meetings as additions to the meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meetings as extraordinary meetings.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 process could be considered at this meeting.

13.     Staff recommend option 2 – approving these meetings as extraordinary meetings, as there are ample meetings to manage usual business in the schedule. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     If the local board decides not to add this business meetings to their schedule this would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nataly Anchicoque - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Delegated local board feedback on the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024

File No.: CP2023/12826

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Waitākere Ranges Local Board of its feedback on the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Timelines for central government consultation processes do not typically align with local board meeting timeframes to allow for matters to be reported to the local board. 

3.       To ensure there is the opportunity to provide input on matters of interest, at the 8 December 2022 business meeting the Waitākere Ranges Local Board resolved to delegate to the Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions.

 

 

Resolution number WTK/2022/1

MOVED by Member L Potauaine, seconded by Member L Manley: 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      tautapa / delegate authority to the Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that the local board can continue to use its urgent decision process to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, if the Chair chooses not to exercise the delegation sought in recommendation (a).

c)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that this delegation will only be exercised where the timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting.

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note all local input approved and submitted for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission is to be included on the next local board meeting agenda for the public record.

CARRIED

 

4.       The Ministry of Transport has released the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2023/2024-2033/2034 (draft GPS 2024) for public consultation.

5.       The draft GPS 2024 sets out the priorities for a 10-year period to 2034 and is updated every three years.  It outlines what the government wants to achieve in land transport, and how it expects to see funding allocated between types of activities across the land transport system.

6.       The draft GPS 2024 identifies six strategic priorities that the government wants its investment programme to achieve:

·    Maintaining and Operating the System: Focuses on efficiently maintaining the condition of the existing transport system to meet the current and future needs of users.

·    Increasing Resilience: Aims to enhance the transport system's ability to withstand natural and human-made hazards.

·    Reducing Emissions: Aims for a transition to a lower carbon transport system to address climate change.

·    Safety: Aims to significantly improve safety across all modes of transportation.

·    Sustainable Urban and Regional Development: Aims to provide accessible and reliable transport options to support social, cultural, and economic opportunities. Also emphasizes developing low-emission transport and reducing congestion.

·    Integrated Freight System: Focuses on designing and operating efficient, resilient, and low-carbon transport corridors and hubs to support economic activities.

7.       The draft GPS proposes an increase in National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) revenue from $15.5 billion in 2021/22-2023/24 to $20.8 billion in 2024/25- 2026/27, an increase of $5.3 billion (34 per cent). 

8.       The deadline for local board feedback to be included in the council's submission was 14 September 2023.

9.       On 14 September 2023 the Chair and Deputy Chair signed off under delegation feedback from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024.

10.     This feedback is appended as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the decision made under delegation on 14 September 2023 providing feedback from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024 - Waitākere Ranges Local Board feedback, 14 September 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nataly Anchicoque - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Chair's Report - Greg Presland

 

File No.: CP2023/00272

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings, and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive Chair Greg Presland’s September 2023 report as tabled.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Nataly Anchicoque - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2023/02696

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly and reported to business meetings.

3.       The calendar is part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Programme for September 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar - September 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nataly Anchicoque - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

28 September 2023

 

 

Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2023/02591

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops held by the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       A workshop record providing a brief summary of the general nature of the discussion is reported to the next business meeting, along with, where considered appropriate under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, related supporting material.

3.       Waitākere Ranges Local Board workshops are open to the public. This means that public and/or media may be in attendance and workshop materials including presentations and supporting documents will be made publicly available unless deemed confidential.

4.       The workshop records of the local board workshops are appended to the report.

5.       Workshop records and supporting documents are publicly available at this link: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waitakere-ranges-local-board/Pages/waitakere-ranges-local-board-workshops.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the workshop records for 3, 10 and 17 August 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Workshop Record 3 August 2023

 

b

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Workshop Record 10 August 2023

 

c

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Workshop Record 17 August 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Nataly Anchicoque - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager