I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 October 2023

1.00pm

Waitematā Local Board Office
Ground Floor
33 Federal Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Genevieve Sage

 

Deputy Chairperson

Greg Moyle, (JP, ED)

 

Members

Alexandra Bonham

 

 

Allan Matson

 

 

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

 

 

Anahera Rawiri

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Katherine Kang

Democracy Advisor

 

12 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: katherine.kang@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Anne Morris - Nancy Steen garden signage proposal.                          5

8.2     Deputation - Jennifer Ward and Chris Bailey - 254 Ponsonby Road civic space project                                                           6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Ward Councillor's Update                                    9

12        Endorsement of the City Centre Action Plan  11

13        Waitematā Diversity in Parks Planning Report                                                                              17

14        Preliminary design - 254 Ponsonby Road civic space                                                                    23

15        Approval of concept design for the heritage restoration, seismic remediation, and modernisation of Leys Institute                        31

16        Waitematā Local Grant Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2023/2024 grant allocations                                                           43

17        Public notification to proposal to lease land at Point Erin Park and Salisbury Reserve to Watercare for public works                               53

18        Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025  61

19        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Waitematā Local Board meeting schedule                                    67

20        Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                             71

21        Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan                                        77

22        Te Ara Hauāuru - Northwest Rapid Transit     81

23        Feedback under delegation - Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation                                                           87

24        Feedback under delegation - Biodiversity Credit System                                                      93

25        Feedback under delegation - Auckland council submission to Fisheries New Zealand on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf                                              97

26        Feedback under delegation - Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee                                                99

27        Feedback under delegation - Emergency Management Bill                                               101

28        Chairperson's Report                                       103

29        Board Members' Reports                                 105

30        Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records 107

31        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                             109

32        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

Chair G Sage will welcome those present and open the meeting with a karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 19 September 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Anne Morris - Nancy Steen garden signage proposal.

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Anne Morris and Delphine Lomas on behalf of Heritage Roses Auckland will be attendance to present to the local board on the proposed signage for the Nancy Steen Rose Garden Parnell, located in Dove Myer Robinson Park, Parnell, within the Waitematā Local Board.

3.       Auckland’s Nancy Steen Garden was developed by the New Zealand Heritage Roses group and the Auckland City Council, the garden opened in 1984. Nancy Steen Garden contains a collection of heritage roses and is home to over 200 species of roses and number of shrubs and perennials.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from the Heritage Roses Auckland and thank Anne Morris and Delphine Lomas for their attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Jennifer Ward and Chris Bailey - 254 Ponsonby Road civic space project

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Jennifer Ward and Chris Bailey on behalf of the the Community-Led Design Group (CLDG) will be in attendance to speak to the board in support of the preliminary design for the 254 Ponsonby Road civic space project.

3.       The CLDG has been working on this project for many years and has also been closely involved with mana whenua and the Design Group to work through issues and considerations based on the ’Needs assessment’ that informed much of this work.

4.       In its October Business Meeting, the Waitematā board is to approve the preliminary design and enabling works for the new civic space at 254 Ponsonby Road.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation in support of the preliminary design for the 254 Ponsonby Road civic space project from the Community-Led Design Group and thank Jennifer Ward and Chris Bailey for their attendance.

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Ward Councillor's Update

File No.: CP2023/14667

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waitematā Local Board on Governing Body issues.

2.       A verbal update will be provided at the meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Waitematā Local Board’s Standing Orders clauses 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board, or on any Council business matter the Governing Body member wishes to raise with the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update from Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Endorsement of the City Centre Action Plan

File No.: CP2023/14757

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the Auckland City Centre Action Plan: our priorities for a thriving city centre (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The City Centre Action Plan is a new integrated implementation plan for the city centre. It supports the delivery of the City Centre Masterplan (CCMP) through cross-agency work programmes. 

3.       The CCMP remains the guiding document for the city centre. The Action Plan reinforces the strategic direction of the masterplan and provides a joined-up implementation pathway for its implementation.   

4.       Extensive, targeted stakeholder engagement was held over March-September 2023 to help gather insights and develop the Action Plan. These conversations have directly shaped the content of the plan. This engagement also reinforces that the plan identifies the necessary elements from a range of different sector interests.   

5.       While the output of the Action Plan is important, the process of working together as a cross-agency team is equally key to success.  The way of working together and processes underpinning this, have been refined and further developed through the Action Plan. This supports the ongoing and iterative nature of integrated implementation.  

6.       The Action Plan considers the changing context since the CCMP was refreshed in 2020. This includes the impacts on the city centre resulting from COVID-19, recent social and economic pressures and the impact of climate change. Four characteristics for the city centre are identified that will help drive its desirability over the next decade. These are evidence-based drivers, that have been informed by the CCMP, research and time spent listening to and working with city centre stakeholders and business leaders: 

· ​A city centre that offers a diverse range experiences​ 

· ​A city centre that is a leader in sustainability​ 

· ​A city centre that celebrates our unique identity​ 

· ​A city centre that is an attractive place to live 

7.   The Action Plan will assist the council group to prioritise its work in the city centre and ensure a sharper focus on those projects and initiatives that have the greatest impact from limited funds to deliver on priorities over the short and medium term. 

8.   The Action Plan is a way to organise and communicate council group activity in the city centre within a single, coherent framework. This is done through a series of integrated programmes. These cover both city-wide/system and place-based/infrastructure initiatives.

9.   The Action Plan has a 10-year timeframe.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      endorse the Auckland City Centre Action Plan, 2023 (Attachment A)

 

Horopaki

Context

10. The CCMP was introduced in 2012 and updated in 2020 to guide the Auckland Council group’s efforts to rejuvenate the city centre.

11. In November 2021, the council’s Planning Committee endorsed Eke Panuku as the lead agency for the implementation of the CCMP. Eke Panuku started in the lead agency role in July 2022 following a robust cross council discovery phase.

12. To help clarify the council group's role and approach to urban regeneration in the city centre, Eke Panuku and the city centre integrated team created the City Centre Action Plan (Action Plan).

13. The Action Plan helps define how the CCMP vision can be achieved. It also sets out a rationale for why continued investment in the city centre is required and responds to the changing context of the city centre.

14. The Action Plan builds on and is aligned with council’s strategic direction. It enables integrated implementation of the CCMP and helps implement strategies such as the Auckland Plan, Waitematā Local Board Plan, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri and Regional Land Transport Strategy within the city centre location.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15. The purpose of the Action Plan is to: 

·    Prioritise our investment by working to one plan and making the most of constrained funding while preparing for the future. 

·    Integrate our work for the city centre by working as one team, harnessing the skills and expertise from across the group and presenting a clear picture to decision makers.​

·    Inspire others to contribute to the CCMP outcomes by advocating for the city centre, listening, and speaking positively and as one voice on the most important issues, and championing the work of others in the city centre.​ 

16. The Action Plan is an important deliverable of both Eke Panuku as lead agency and the council whānau as an integrated team. It has been supported by wide-spread stakeholder engagement. 

17. The themes that have arisen from stakeholders are highly consistent, irrespective of whether the partners and stakeholders engaged with represent business, residents, community organisations or public sector agencies.  These emerging themes have helped shape the Action Plan:

·    Importance of collaboration and interdependence if we are to achieve a shared vision for the city centre.

·    Broad acceptance and support for the Masterplan outcomes and Action Plan strategic drivers. 

·    Importance of the city centre "experience" - quality of the public realm, safety, cleanliness, pedestrian friendliness and wayfinding are essential to the city's success.

·    Widespread concerns around safety especially in relation to crime, concern that this has worsened since the COVID-19 lockdown periods. Agreement that pro-social behaviours such as attracting more people into the city centre can help dissuade anti-social activity.

·    Acknowledgement of the deep cultural significance of the city centre to mana whenua.

·    Universal acknowledgement of the importance of transport and ease of movement around the city centre. 

·    High expectations around commissioning of the City Rail Link.

·    Establishment of a city centre primary school considered a "game changer" for the city centre.

·    Uncertainty over the future mix of residential and commercial uses in the city centre, acknowledging changing development dynamics and market conditions.

·    Clear appetite for further investment and transformational projects in the city centre.

·    Continuing high levels of support which provide a strong social license for the City Centre Targeted Rate.

18. The action plan's integrated work programmes (figure 1) consider action across three timeframes - immediate, next 12 months, short term, 1-3 years medium term, 4 to ten years, with more clarity on the immediate and short-term actions.

Figure 1

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19. The city centre has a very important role to play in Auckland’s climate action as it seeks to reduce emissions and prepare for the impacts of climate change.

20. The Action Plan supports implementation of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and the CCMP (Outcome 9 – Sustainable city centre).

21. The ambition is for the city centre to lead the way on sustainability and climate change resilience.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22. The Action Plan was developed with inputs and insights gathered from representatives across the whole of the group – Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Watercare alongside Eke Panuku.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23. Eke Panuku and the city centre integrated team have engaged with the local board on regular basis on the development of the Action Plan. Workshops with the local board on the action plan were held on 14 March, 9 May and 25 July 2023.

24. There is strong alignment between the draft Waitematā Local Board Plan 2023 and the city centre action plan. There are opportunities to work together on these aligned actions.

25. Extensive engagement was undertaken through the development of the Action Plan to gather the insights and priorities of partners and stakeholders whose organisations play significant roles in investment, operations and day to day activity in the city centre. 

26. Eke Panuku and the integrated city centre team have engaged with representatives of mana whenua, Heart of the City, Karangahape Road Business Association, City Centre Residents Group, City Centre Network, Thriving City Network, New Zealand Police, Ports of Auckland Ltd, developers, tertiary institutions, central government agencies and departments, City Rail Link Ltd and the Auckland City Centre Advisory Panel.

27. Key themes of feedback are included in this report in the analysis and advice section.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28. Eke Panuku and the city centre integrated team through the Eke Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum held three hui with mana whenua to strengthen the relationship and receive input about the Advance Mana Whenua Outcomes Programme identified in the Action Plan. This programme provides one way to support working together with mana whenua.

29. An engagement with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei was held, at their request, to discuss their position and interests in the city centre. We will seek shared opportunities to work with mana whenua and continuously improve our ways of working with mana whenua to reflect our treaty-based partnership.

30. Independent Māori Statutory Board officers were also briefed on the project and the mana whenua engagement process with the forum.

31. As the Action Plan is considered a living document, Eke Panuku will continue to partner with and seek input from Māori to maintain the integrity of this document and to ensure we are aligning our plans with those aspirations of Māori

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32. Beyond existing budgets, the implementation of the Action Plan will be subject to the funding available to the council group.

33. The Action Plan is a ‘living’ document and will be updated through an annual refresh and regular monitoring.

34. The Action Plan has taken a conservative approach and defines the funding status of initiatives as funded, partly funded and unfunded. The status of actions will be updated following the council’s long-term plan (LTP) and the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) decision-making through the annual refresh. 

35. There will also be further investigation of partnership opportunities with the Crown and private sector to ensure funding impact is optimized. Work is also underway to consolidate financial information to be able to present a joined-up city centre investment view. 

36. As this Action Plan has been produced at the start of the LTP process, information about funding status is subject to further work to confirm funding and resources against priorities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37. ​The Action Plan will be updated to reflect the final funding status of initiatives once this is agreed through the current LTP process.  

38. ​There are many activities and initiatives underway in the city centre at any one time. The Action Plan is not intended to be an exhaustive list of these but a summary of what are considered to be the main priorities for support.    

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39. Following local board endorsement, the Action Plan will be presented to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee for endorsement.

40. Eke Panuku and the city centre integrated team will close the loop with stakeholders.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

City Centre Action Plan, 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carlos Rahman - Principal Advisor Governance and Engagement

Simon Oddie - Priority Location Director, Eke Panuku

Authorisers

Ian Wheeler - Chief Operating Officer, Eke Panuku

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Waitematā Diversity in Parks Planning Report

File No.: CP2023/06506

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Waitematā Diversity in Parks Planning Report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitematā Local Board seeks to improve its open space network to be inclusive spaces that provide recreational amenity for a wide range of age groups, abilities, ethnicities, and genders.

3.       Waitematā parks and open spaces play a crucial role in community welfare and quality of life.  They offer opportunities for interactions between people of different social and ethnic backgrounds and play a prominent role in promoting health and wellbeing.

4.       The key objectives for the investigation into diversity provision in the Waitematā open space network include:

·    Understanding the enablers and barriers to activation and recreation in parks and reserves.

·    Capturing community feedback from the wide range of people who live and work in the local board area including different ethnicities, women and girls, the Rainbow community, older adults and the homeless.

·    Providing recommendations for future engagement with community groups, as well as activation and potential park improvements to ensure diversity and accessibility needs are well represented in future parks planning and development.

5.       The Diversity in Parks Planning Report seeks to inform and improve forward work programme planning for parks and open spaces in the local board area by ensuring that the community’s connection and access to open space is considered and well-represented.

6.       Key insights provided by the assessment have been summarised in this report with assessment recommendations being categorised under the following themes:

·    Amplify a diversity lens to parks planning and development.

·    Activate parks and open spaces.

·    Improve facilities and amenities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      adopt the Waitematā Diversity in Parks Planning Report.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Waitematā Diversity in Parks Planning is an approved activity in the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (Sharepoint ID 704 / resolution number WTM/2021/128). Staff agreed the scope and key outcomes during a workshop with elected members on 27 July 2021 workshop, and the draft report was reviewed at workshops held 2 August 2022 and 31 January 2023.

8.       Waitematā is a diverse local board area. According to 2018 census figures, the majority of non-European residents in Waitematā identify as Asian at 31.5%, and 46% of the population was born overseas. In addition to diverse ethnic communities, the local board is home to a wide range of groups including families, youth, adults, seniors, new migrants, international students, Rainbow communities and those without housing.

9.       There are more than 100 parks in the local board area, but population growth, housing intensification, infrastructure needs and changes in demographics will impact demand and access to open space. The way parks and open spaces are currently being used, and will be used in the future, is consequently changing and intensifying.

10.     Providing equitable access to parks that meet the recreational needs of diverse communities has several benefits, including improving mental and physical wellbeing by connecting people with nature and providing space to exercise, play and socialise.  Parks and open spaces also play an important part in improving social cohesion and community participation.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The focus of the research was to engage with diverse groups and capture community feedback from a broad range of people, with an emphasis on those communities who have been poorly represented through standard consultation processes. Community engagement involved a broad range of people including mana whenua, Chinese, older adults, women and girls, people with disabilities, Rainbow communities and people without housing.

12.     A total of 158 people were engaged in this study, and research was undertaken in four parts:

·    Interviews with leaders of diverse community organisations to understand their organisational and communities recreational need and activation barriers.

·    Research scan of existing relevant research in New Zealand and internationally.

·    Interviews with current Auckland Council officers to understand how current and future programming may meet the needs of diverse communities.

·    Online survey to develop themes on value, use, services, and barriers to activating parks.

13.     The data from the community and council officer interviews, surveys, focus groups, and literature review were collated and analysed to identify themes, insights and recommendations.

14.     Key insights from the research highlighted the following:

·    Walking, playing and picnics are the most common activities in local parks.

·    Respondents favoured community and cultural events and activities, multi-age playgrounds and more equipment.

·    For parks to feel welcoming and comfortable they need to provide clean toilets and be well-maintained with good access, lots of plants and accessible signage.

·    Feeling unsafe was a significant barrier to park access for Chinese, older adults, people with disabilities, Rainbow communities and women and girls.

·    For those with access needs, the journey to parks begins before people leave their homes.

·    Private space within parks support people to meet for quietude and exercise, especially for Rainbow communities, older adults, women and girls and Chinese communities.

·    There is a desire from Māori, Chinese, unhoused communities and older adults for opportunities to maintain and care for local parks.

·    Parks are living rooms for unhoused communities, as well as their bedrooms and bathrooms.

·    There are concerns about anti-social behaviour in parks and damage that is caused by some rough sleepers.

·    Understanding lived experiences of diverse communities will improve access to parks, help develop innovative actions, enhance safety and improve wellbeing.

15.     The report’s recommendations are informed by the survey results, interviews with community leaders and council officers and local and international literature.  These recommendations aim to provide direction and interventions that would best meet the needs of Waitematā’s diverse communities.

16.     There are three primary drivers for the report’s recommendations.  These drivers are: amplify a diversity lens to parks planning and development, activate parks and open spaces and improve facilities and amenities.

 

Recommendations – Amplify a diversity lens

Scales of justice outline

Consider applying a diversity and equity lens for funding, procurement and prioritising activations for diverse populations.

Female with solid fill

Consider incorporating gender mainstreaming into all planning, design, and implementation.

Wheelchair with solid fill

Undertake accessibility reviews and provide accessibility maps on Auckland Council’s website, and commission accredited barrier-free auditors when developing parks and undertaking renewals. 

Chat with solid fill

Consider how the local board and council engage and communicate with diverse groups. Have ongoing dialogue.

Aspiration with solid fill

Implement the findings and insights relevant to parks from Community Action on Youth and Drugs (CAYAD) Auckland Joyful Movement research for trans and gender diverse youth.

Table 1: Recommendations to amplify a diversity lens.

 

Recommendations – Activating parks

Users outline

Co-design and collaborate on initiatives, activities, activations, and amenities with diverse populations and connect via local community organisations. Consider mapping exercises (what could we do here, what do you want to do here).

Deciduous tree

Create opportunities and initiatives for diverse communities to take ownership of caring for parks, including community gardens. 

Flag outline

Honour the significance of Rainbow Pride history in Albert Park. Celebrate the first Gay Pride March led by Ngahuia Te Awekotuku in 1972.

Table 2: Recommendations to activate parks and open spaces.

 

Recommendations – Facilities and amenities

Siren outline

Consider communicating why parks are not lit and/or investigating whether some parks could benefit from being lit to enable use in the evenings. Ensure lighting connected to key park facilities such as leisure centres and commuter routes comply with council’s lighting guidelines and Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles.

Qr Code with solid fill

Ensure signage location is accessible and important information is available in Asian languages, potentially via QR codes or other digital means.

Tennis racket and ball outline

Investigate ways to promote and advocate for activations and potential partnership funding for informal recreation activity, such as dancing, yoga, tai chi, and informal games in city centre parks and open spaces.

Toilet with solid fill

Consider provision for gender neutral and accessible single-stall toilets when toilets are scheduled for renewal.

Fence outline

Consider fencing of playgrounds, where deemed appropriate (e.g., the safety of children is of primary concern).  

Elliptical outline

Facilitate gym equipment, activations and activities tailored for girls and women, away from high traffic areas.   

Asian Temple outline

Consider improved shading through planting of trees to increase use of picnic, barbecue areas and accessibility seating to accommodate groups.

Table 3: Recommendations to improve facilities and amenities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     While parks inherently provide climate and health benefits, there are opportunities to design Waitematā’s green open spaces in a way that will maximise these benefits.

18.     The recommendations in this report present opportunities to reduce carbon output by making sustainable choices in asset solutions, such as employing the urban ngahere strategy to improve shade and shelter, and providing improved accessibility with greenways connections, and more activation choices for passive and active recreation activities for the community to enjoy.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Report findings and recommendations have been socialised with council departments including Connected Communities so that future parks planning and activations reflect the community need and diversity.

20.     Further liaison with teams in Eke Panuku, Healthy Waters, Auckland Transport and other appropriate Council Controlled Organisations and key stakeholder groups is warranted and will help to inform future work progamme planning and community consultation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The diversity assessment aligns with several Auckland Council and local board strategic policies and guidelines including the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020, supporting two of the Plan’s outcomes:  

·        Outcome 2: Connected communities that are inclusive, accessible and equitable.

·        Outcome 3: High-quality urban development that has accessible, versatile and sustainable public and private spaces.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     Parks are fundamentally important to iwi, their culture and traditions.  All development of the open space network benefits from mana whenua input which is integral to leveraging our parks to provide for increased recreation and connection to nature. Driving positive outcomes for Māori will contribute to the positive social, cultural, economic, and environmental outcomes for Tāmaki Makaurau and Aotearoa.

23.     The intention for the diversity assessment is to deliver on the Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework aligned with the following mana outcomes specifically led by Customer and Community Services:

·    Mana outcome statement: Empowered whānau Māori across Tāmaki Makaurau

Mahi objective: The council group will enable whānau Māori to experience relevant and welcoming public facilities and services. It will support Māori-led services where appropriate.

24.     This means that all tamariki, rangatahi and adults in Aotearoa are physically active and engaged through diverse play, active recreation and sport opportunities and activities.

25.     Mana whenua engagement will be ongoing and as recommended within the report, will be essential at a project level to ensure the needs of iwi are met and reflected in open space development.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The recommendation for the local board to adopt the report which was funded in the 2021/2022 work programme has no further financial implications.  It is service outcome based and provides recommendations to be considered when future local board work programmes are developed during annual plan processes.

27.     As an approved activity in the Waitematā Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme, the Diversity in Parks Planning Report was allocated $20,000 LDI Opex funding (resolution number WTM/2021/128).

28.     While the findings and recommendations from the Diversity in Parks Planning Report will inform future parks Planning outcomes, no budget is currently identified and/or required to fund specific project outcomes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     The Waitematā Local Board aims to improve its open space network to provide inclusive spaces for recreational amenity for its diverse population.

30.     The adoption of the Diversity in Parks Planning Report is a meaningful step towards realising this objective and will help to inform and align strategic outcomes to deliver an open space network that caters for diverse needs.

31.     The ability to improve parks and open spaces for the benefit of diverse communities may be restricted if the report is not adopted by the local board.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Parks and Community Facilities will identify future projects and work streams incorporating diversity outcomes which in turn will improve accessibility and service outcomes for the culturally diverse Waitematā community.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Diversity in Parks Planning Assessment 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacqui Fell - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Preliminary design - 254 Ponsonby Road civic space

File No.: CP2023/15644

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the preliminary design and enabling works for the new civic space at 254 Ponsonby Road.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       254 Ponsonby Road was acquired by Auckland City Council (pre-amalgamation) in 2006 to address the need for more civic space within the Ponsonby precinct that had been strategically identified in 2000.

3.       The draft preliminary design has been presented to the Waitematā Local Board at workshops on 6 June 2023, 29 August 2023, and 3 October 2023. Direction from members has been considered in the preliminary design.

4.       The new civic space at 254 Ponsonby Road project aligns with the strategic goals of Auckland Council and the Waitematā Local Board.

5.       The preliminary design has been developed based on the concept approved in 2020, LandLAB option C, and meets the needs identified by strategic analysis.

6.       The budget for the development of this civic space is $5.58 million. Costs for the design and proposed options have been assessed by a quantity surveyor to determine what is achievable within the budget. 

7.       Indicative costs of base level works is a total of $5,265,500.  Indicative costs of the recommended optional items is a total of $315,000.

8.       There is currently a commercial lease on the site with a final expiry date of 31 January 2024.  Enabling works can be actioned from 1 February 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the preliminary design for the new civic space at 254 Ponsonby Road (Attachments A and B), and progress to detailed design

b)      whakaae / approve the optional items in the preliminary design to progress:

i)       Retain the skeleton of the building (Green discovery room)

ii)       Retain all the canopy (extra 2 bays)

iii)      Water storage and reuse system

iv)      Skylights to canopy

v)      Retain north wall

c)       whakaae / approve the enabling works to begin from 1 February 2024.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       254 Ponsonby Road was acquired by Auckland City Council pre-amalgamation in 2006 to address the need for more civic space within the Ponsonby precinct that had been strategically identified in 2000.

10.     On 20 August 2019, the Finance and Performance Committee approved the sale of 200 Victoria Street West, and approved the allocation of sale proceeds of up to $5.5 million for the development of a civic space at 254 Ponsonby Road (resolution FIN/2019/88).  The Committee also noted the remaining budget for the development at 254 Ponsonby Road will be considered as part of the One Local Initiative funding process on completion of the detailed business case.

11.     The original concept plan, LandLAB option C dated 27 November 2019, was approved by the local board in 2020 (resolution WTM/2020/20). It was for the entire site, including the civic spaces and a multi-use building.

12.     At the local board workshop on 29 August 2023, staff presented an updated concept design by LandLAB without the multi-use building, as there is no one local initiative (OLI) funding for the building now or in the forseeable future.

13.     At the local board workshop on 3 October 2023, staff presented the draft preliminary design and local board feedback have been considered and incorporated into the preliminary design being presented in this business meeting (Attachments A and the Preliminary design drawings that will be tabled).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     In 2016 there were several consultations and exhibitions to define the community’s vision for the site. The community highlighted the following items to be of importance:

·    an inclusive space that would encourage and foster social connections

·    a place to sit and relax

·    an urban green space

·    a place to hold markets and events

·    a play space

·    an area to host public art

·    a place which demonstrates sustainable design

15.     Civic spaces are a specific type of open space with a range of amenity values such as: meeting and socialising opportunities, event space, landscaping and gardens, and public artworks.

16.     Ponsonby is defined as a town centre. It will be well served by one or more small civic spaces (<1000m2) and one medium civic space (1500m2 to 2000m2).

17.     Staff had undertaken an assessment of the 254 Ponsonby Road civic space proposal against the policy which concluded that there is a shortfall of civic space in Ponsonby, and that the site and proposed community design can deliver the desired amenity values. Development of the full site (2326m2) would meet the policy provision target.

18.     This project will fulfill the needs identified by strategic assessment in 2017 for more public open space in the area. This site will be a civic space, where people can meet, socialize, enjoy events and markets. It will be a structured urban space.

19.     The preliminary design by LandLAB aligns with the policy and the community vision for the site. It includes the following:

·    development of the whole site

·    a variety of civic spaces

·    covered space for events

·    public toilet facilities

·    a safeguarded area for a future building

20.     The proposed retaining of the existing canopy will be beneficial in supporting outdoor events. The size and height of the canopy make it a unique outdoor event space in the area. It will provide shade and shelter from the weather. The canopy is 363m2 (11m x 33m) and 3.6m high.

21.     There are a variety of spaces within the site that provide for different uses and delineate the site into different character areas. Retaining the frames of the existing building gives the space a 3D vertical dimension, creating a sense of enclosure.

22.     On-going maintenance has been considered. Roof top planters, community storage kiosks, and raised planter beds have been removed from the plan.

23.     The site is zoned Open Space Community at the back (western end) and Town Centre at the eastern Ponsonby Road end. This zoning prevents building on the western area of the site.

24.     The budget for the development of this civic space is $5.58 million. Costs for the design and proposed options have been assessed by a quantity surveyor to determine what is achievable within the budget.  Costs have been seperated into base level works, and optional items.

25.     Base level works are listed in the table below:

Base level works

Indicative Costs

1

Demolition & enabling works

727,000 

2

Active civic space (Without skeleton, or kiosks)

1,091,000 

3

Relaxing civic space (With grass and paths)

737,000 

4

Public toilets

343,000 

5

Urban canopy (3 bays), without roof garden edges or skylights

1,052,000 

6

Design & operational costs

723,000 

7

Contingency (15%)

592,500 

8

Sub total

$5,265,500 

 

26.     Optional items have been presented to the local board.  Items have been assessed by staff taking into account strategic alignment to regional and local policies and plans, outcomes, costs, and effects on the project. The optional items and recommendations are listed below:

Optional items

Indicative Costs

Recommended items

1

Retain the skeleton of the building (Green discovery room)

240,000 

240,000 

2

Retain all the canopy 

(extra 2 bays)

-58,000 

-58,000 

3

Community kiosks along the northern side

431,000 

4

Work on O’Neil St

210,000 

5

Work on Ponsonby road

95,000 

6

Western raised island planters 

100,000 

7

Western hard surface instead of grass with paths

200,000 

8

Water storage and reuse system

50,000 

50,000 

9

Roof gardens to canopy 5 bays

210,000 

10

Skylights to canopy

100,000 

100,000

11

Retain north wall

-52,000

-52,000

Contingency (8%)

35,000

Sub total

$315,000 

 

27.     There is currently a commercial lease on the site with a final expiry date of 31 January 2024.  Enabling works can be actioned from 1 February 2024. The enabling works package includes:

·    securing the site

·    traffic management

·    asbestos removal

·    adaptive deconstruction of the main building

·    retaining the drive-through canopy for reuse

·    site clearance and stripping.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

29.     Sustainability and carbon reduction are prime drivers for the design. Some elements aim to be exemplars of best practice and will include an educational focus.

30.     Key elements include:

·        adaptive re-use of the existing structures on the site

·        solar PV panels on the roof to provide power to the site

·        storm water retention and soakage

·        water storage for use on the site

·        tree canopy

·        ecology.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Staff throughout the council family have contributed to the preliminary design development including Regional Services and Strategy, Connected Communities, Maori Outcomes, Parks and Places Specialist, Events, and Community Facilities: Operations.

32.     Subject to agreement with Oo Media, Auckland Transport have provided indicative support of the proposal to relocate the bus shelter. 

33.     Works on O’Neill Street and Ponsonby Road are listed as optional items.  Auckland Transport are supportive of these items however do not have budget available to progress these. The local board is able to consider these items as part of its Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

34.     Eke Panuku manage the commercial lease on the site. The tenant is aware that the final expiry of the lease is 31 January 2024. Any enabling works can occur from 1 February 2024.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     The existing site is in poor condition. The buildings are lacking in maintenance and there are asbestos containing materials on the premises. The structure has been assessed at 45 per cent of the national building standard. The front part of the existing building has been vacant for some time and concerns have been raised of anti-social behaviour occurring at the back car park area.

36.     A project governance plan has been established as follows:

·    Project Control Steering Group (PCSG) - Local board liaison representative and Auckland Council project team. Meets monthly or at completion of design stages.

·    Design group – The project manager, project sponsor, two members of the CLDG, designer and quantity surveyor

·    Community Led Design Group (CLDG) - Meetings as required, liaison with community groups and the community through the website.

37.     The need for more civic space has been consistently confirmed as a high priority through extensive local community consultations. It has also been represented through the local community’s sustained passion, involvement, and interest in the delivery of the project through the community-led design group.

38.     The local community, represented by the community led design group, is eager to see the site developed into a civic space, as per the approved concept plan (resolution WTM/2020/20)

39.     Local board views have been expressed through three workshops and staff have responded to queries and requests.

40.     The Ponsonby Business Association felt that the site was too long for a civic space and suggested that the back area is developed as medium density residential, and that the front area has commercial or community use buildings on two sides to activate the space.

41.     Neither of these views are able to be addressed during this stage of the project for the following reasons:

·    The strategic assessment and needs analysis did not identify a need to develop residential or commercial outcomes through this project.

·    Developing the back area of the site as medium density residential would require a review of the Governing Body decision.

·    The zoning for the back area of the site under the Auckland Unitary Plan does not support residential development. 

·    There is no funding currently allocated to progress the multi-use building element of the project, however a safeguarded area for a future building has been included in the preliminary design. 

42.     Developing a civic space on the full site will not prevent these suggestions to be considered in the future.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     Staff have engaged with mana whenua representatives from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua.

44.     There is a lack of physical recognition of Māori history and narratives in the Ponsonby area.
This project is seen by iwi as an important opportunity to improve outcomes and representation for Māori in the area.

45.     The Ponsonby Road Masterplan - Māori Heritage report by Ngarimu Blair (2013), provided an historical summary of Māori activity in the area and a Māori vision for this site.

46.     The designer, LandLAB, working in collaboration with mana whenua representatives, has provided a range of design opportunities for recognition of cultural narratives, to align with the Blair report vision and input from mana whenua representatives. These include:

·        a vertical marker

·        naming of the site

·        bilingual naming of the facilities

·        detailed patterning

·        tree canopy – urban ngahere

·        wananga – education space

·        ecology – rimu trees, gardens.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     $5.58 million was allocated to the Ponsonby Park project from the sale of an endowment property at 200 Victoria Street West.

48.     The site has been transferred from Eke Panuku to Auckland Council to become a service asset. The tenant has been notified that their lease ends on 31 January 2024.

49.     The project can be delivered within the $5.58 million funding, by focusing on the base level elements and adding optional items, subject to costing.

50.     The funding is allocated in financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025, with completion set for November 2024.

51.     Staff have developed a preliminary annual OPEX (Operating Expenditure) budget of $70,000.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     The following risks and mitigations have been identified.

Risk Description

Mitigation

Date Identified

Owner

Project runs over time.

 

·    Ensure a project schedule is regularly updated.

·    Ensure project documentation and correspondence is recorded.

Sept 2023

Project Manager

Lack of support from key stakeholders and community groups.

 

·    Establish a communications plan.

·    Communicate regularly with stakeholders and community groups.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

Project scope creep occurs.

 

·    Review the design development to identify scope creep.

·    Focus on the basic scope and add optional items subject to costing

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

The design moves away from the core strategic needs and council standards.

·    Set up a PCSG (Project Control Steering Group) as an officer and subject matter advice group.

·    Review the design against the needs assessment.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

 

Potential negative public / media reaction for the project, particularly if the communication is ineffective.

·    Ensure communication is clear and well timed with the project.

·    Communicate effectively via the established communications plan.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

Delayed delivery of the project due to project politics and council processes.

·    Ensure communication is clear and well timed with the project.

·    Provide adequate time for processes, reporting, and reviews.

·    Ensure project team communicates and meets project milestones.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

The project runs over budget.

 

·    Engage a Quantity Surveyor to ensure project element budgets are accurate.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

Quantity Surveyor

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     Staff will instruct the designer, LandLAB, to continue with detailed design and bring the final design to a workshop in December for local board feedback.

54.     Staff will instruct the designer to complete documentation for the enabling works package and staff will carry out procurement to start on site in February 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Preliminary design presentation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Bill Jackson – Senior Project Manager, Parks and Community Facilities

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Martin Wong - Manager Area Operations

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Approval of concept design for the heritage restoration, seismic remediation, and modernisation of Leys Institute

File No.: CP2023/15040

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the concept design options for the heritage restoration, seismic remediation, and modernisation of Leys Institute for approval to progress to detailed design and consenting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Leys Institute library and gymnasium were determined as being earthquake-prone following the completion of a detailed seismic assessment in 2019, with a rating of 5% of the New Building Standard. The facility was closed in December 2019 due to the risk to staff and members of the public.

3.       The seismic strengthening project was combined with a restoration and modernisation project underway at the time to make the Leys Library fit-for-purpose and to improve service provision.

4.       Two concepts were developed in partnership with a Project Advisory Group consisting of local stakeholders including the Leys family, library staff and local community groups.

5.       These concepts are captured in:

·    Option 1: Full (seismic strengthening work and a new atrium between the library and gymnasium building, extension of gymnasium, installation of a new lift to provide full accessible access to all 3 levels, and heritage restoration of parts of the library building)

·    Option 2: Reduced (seismic strengthening work and improvements in the layout of the library basement, redesign of the library ground level, and refurbishment of the gymnasium extension).

6.       The preliminary cost estimates for Option 1: Full is $20.1 million, and Option 2: Reduced is $14.8 million.

7.       Option 1: Full will likely require the introduction of a targeted rate to cover a budget shortfall of between $3 million to $6 million in addition to the proposed sale of four properties.  A targeted rate will need to be considered through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 consultation and decision-making process and will have a longer project delivery timeline.

8.       A quadruple bottom line analysis identified Option 2: Reduced as the preferred option. This option will also likely require the sale of a third property in addition to the two which have already been proposed for sale to raise funds for this project. This will be sought through property optimisation.

9.       Staff recommend that the preferred option, as recommended in the detailed business case, Option 2: Reduced, be approved as the way to proceed.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the recommendation of the Leys Institute Restoration and Seismic Strengthening Detailed Business Case to progress with Option 2: Reduced involving seismic strengthening work and improvements in the layout of the library basement, redesign of the library ground level, and refurbishment of the gymnasium extension.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The iconic Leys Institute was opened in 1905 (library) and 1906 (gymnasium). The facility was gifted to the legacy Auckland City Council in 1968.

11.     In 2018, an investigation (as documented in the West Waitematā Current State Analysis report) identified an ongoing need for local library services and that the poor condition of Leys Library building constrained delivery of these services.  

12.     In August 2019, the local board approved the development of an indicative business case to understand service and facility investment options for the restoration of Leys Institute (WTM/2019/168).

13.     Due to the buildings being earthquake-prone and the subsequent risk to public and staff, the Leys Institute was closed in December 2019. Library services have since been delivered from a small (150m2) temporary library space in Jervois Road called Little Leys. Venue for hire customers have been directed to other nearby facilities. 

14.     In September 2020, staff reported the outcomes of the indicative business case to the local board (WTM/2020/204). High-level findings included:

·    Auckland Council has obligations under the Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Act 2016 to ensure that the Leys Institute is not earthquake prone.

·    The council has obligations under the Resource Management Act (1991) and the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 for the Leys Institute to be protected from destruction (partial or total), demolition, or relocation beyond the site.

·    The council has obligations under the 1904 Deed of Agreement to operate the Leys Institute as a library in perpetuity.

·    Change is required for continuation of library service provision in the Ponsonby area.

15.     Upon receiving the above information, the local board directed the development of a detailed business case for the restoration, modernisation, and seismic remediation of the Leys Institute. The purpose of a detailed business case was to:

·    determine strategic, economic, financial, and commercial feasibility

·    consider design options and provide cost benefit analysis

·    provide assurance that the preferred option identified is the right approach to deliver the desired outcomes, and is an effective and sustainable long-term solution

·    confirm the case for change and investment to enable delivery.

Two concept design options

16.     A Project Advisory Group was established to determine a design brief and drive the development of concept designs with a contracted architect. Membership of the advisory group included representatives from:

·    the Leys family

·    community groups

Friends of Leys Institute

Herne Bay Residents Association

St Marys Bay Association

Freemans Bay Residents Association

·    Ponsonby Community Centre

·    Te Poari ā-Rohe o Waitematā

·    NZ Historic Places Trust

·    subject-matter specialists from council.

17.     Over a series of hui from December 2021 to June 2022, the Project Advisory Group learned about the history of the site and heritage value of the buildings. They also discovered the current drivers and trends that shape the future of library and community services. All of these contributed to the development of project options.

18.     Two concept options were identified in partnership with the Project Advisory Group.
Option 1: Full – includes:

·    seismic strengthening work

·    a new atrium between the library and gymnasium building

·    extension of gymnasium

·    installation of a new lift to provide full accessible access to all 3 levels

·    and heritage restoration of parts of the library building.

Option 2: Reduced – includes:

·    seismic strengthening work

·    improvements in the layout of the library basement

·    redesign of the library ground level

·    refurbishment of the gymnasium extension.

19.     These concept designs were detailed by Matthews and Matthews Architects at a high level.

20.     Mana whenua groups were consulted and Ngāti Te Ata and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei inputted separately to the engagement rōpū. 

21.     Public consultation was held in October and November 2022, where 83 per cent of respondents preferred Option 1: Full, and 17 per cent preferred Option 2: Reduced.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.     Two concept designs have been developed as part of the preparation of the detailed business case for the seismic strengthening and restoration of the Leys Institute. These concept designs are outlined and compared below.

 

Option 1: Full

23.     Option 1 connects the library and gymnasium buildings with a three-level annex. This will integrate the buildings to the courtyard and outside environment. This design increases the effective library area by 636m2, providing additional service spaces, as well as creating a strong link to the whenua/land. The current Leys library facility provides 500m2 of library space.

24.     Option 1 has a central entry/exit pathway from Saint Marys Road through to Dedwood Terrace. This links the library and gymnasium and provides a clear line-of-sight from the front of the facility to the back. This design aspect is considered a good crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) outcome, and an important feature that links the building to the streetscape. 

25.     The provision of a lift in this concept design makes all levels accessible. New bathrooms are provided on all levels, including accessible facilities. This means that there will be one accessible bathroom on each floor. 

26.     In providing a large extension and building footprint, concept design 1 enables new spaces for full library and community service delivery now and into the future. This includes:

·    a parent room

·    flexible use gymnasium space

·    a community kitchen

·    library workspace

·    storage facilities

·    a first-floor breakout space containing a kitchen

·    bathroom facilities

·    a business hub for local groups to meet or work remotely.

Option 2: Reduced

27.     Option 2 provides a smaller building renewal component than the Full option. It redesigns spaces within the existing building footprint to provide an effective increase of 171m2 of library area. The library and gymnasium are kept as two separate buildings with individual access entry/exit points. The current Leys library facility provides 500m2 of library space. 

28.     The primary feature of Option 2 is that the 1938 Lending Library Room and library basement is replaced with a new two-level design. The addition extends the library service space which has an internal staircase providing access to the lower level and a platform lift to provide accessibility access between the ground floor and basement level.

29.     There is no change to the upper floor of the original library space. It retains the main lecture hall, smaller supper room, toilets, and lift. The gymnasium space remains generally unchanged. Provision has however been made for a new accessible bathroom on the main ground level.

30.     Table 1 outlines the main features and differences between Option 1: Full and Option 2: Reduced.

 


 

Table 1: Summary of details and differences between Option 1: Full and Option 2: Reduced

Features

Option 1

Full Option

Option 2

Reduced Option

Seismic strengthening to 67% NBS

Yes

Yes

Fire and accessibility upgrades to code compliance

Yes

Yes

Critical renewals and building maintenance

Yes

Yes

Covered connection between existing buildings

Yes

No

New library space

Yes – 636m2 increase from basement level and ground floor extensions including new atrium and 1st storey extension

Yes – 171m2 provided predominantly at the basement level under lending and children’s library

New lift

Yes – access to basement, ground and 1st storey

No - existing lift provides access to ground and 1st storey

Internal heritage restoration

Yes – 1st storey library layout reverted to original room design

No

Large atrium entrance

Yes

No

Shared working space

Yes – Basement of gym building gym extension

No

New workspaces

Yes – Ground level of gym extension

No

New toilets

Yes – 3 new toilets. Basement and ground level of gym extension, and 1st storey single water closet

Yes – existing toilet in gym building redesigned

More storage

Yes – basement level under lending library and gym extension ground level

Yes – basement level under lending library

A new breakout area

Yes – 1st storey

No

Landscaping

Yes

Yes

New staff room and lockers

Yes – basement level of gym extension

No

New terraced seating space

Yes

No

Cost estimate

$20.1 million

$14.8 million

 

Option 2: Reduced (increased scope)

31.     With the sale of a fourth property, an increased project scope for Option 2: Reduced can be explored in the design phase.

32.     Items which could be requested in an increased scope version of Option 2: Reduced, are: -

·    the inclusion of a covered level crossing between the library and gymnasium building

·    heritage restoration of the first storey of the library building

·    increased landscaping and outdoor area development around the buildings

·    Re-sitting of the Michael Joseph Savage Memorial fountain within the grounds of Leys Institute

·    upgrade of the library staff room spaces

·    inclusion of preparatory works for Option 1: Full. These would include widening the area of geotechnical assessment and ground improvement works, and the design and construction of building foundations required for Option 1: Full.

33.     If multiple additional items are requested, an indication of priority would be needed.

34.     Cost estimates for requested increased scope items and their impact on the project timeline and consenting requirements will be able to be provided at the conclusion of the first design phase (There are 3 design phases in total). A further decision will be sought at this stage on whether the additional scope item/s requested are to be retained.

35.     If this Option 2: Reduced (increased scope) is selected, the local board will need to:

·    support progressing the sale of a fourth property to fund the project

·    agree on the scope item/s to be added, and their priority if there are multiple project scope additions requested.

Quadruple Bottom Line analysis of options

36.     A Quadruple Bottom Line (QBL) analysis identified Option 2: Reduced as the highest-ranking option. The QBL was collectively completed by six council staff, from the Project Specialisation Office, Connected Communities and the Service and Asset Planning teams.

37.     The QBL analysis ranked Option 2: Reduced, as the best option with a score of 0.63. The second-best option is Option 1: Full, which scored slightly lower at 0.58. The Reduced option also scored significantly higher from a value for money aspect.

38.     While both the Full and Reduced options scored the same in the Environmental aspect, the Full option scored higher in the environmentally friendly building practices. The Full option also scored the highest in restoring the mauri of the whenua metrics. The Reduced option scored higher in construction waste minimisation, as less demolition would be required.

39.     While both the Full and Reduced options scored the same in the social aspect, the Full option scored higher in community service provision. The Reduced option has a lower reputation risk for council, due to higher certainty of progressing and reopening on schedule.

40.     The Full option scored higher in the Cultural aspect. This is due to the increased project scope and the introduction of new spaces, providing more opportunities for mana whenua to influence the delivery process. It also allows for more significant changes to be introduced to the facility’s sense of place and cultural identify.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     Adaptive reuse is the technique of preserving the building’s heritage character while accommodating changes in demand, technology and uses. Reuse is increasingly seen as an alternative to building new. This is due to the closer alignment to sustainability, a circular economy, and sustainable urban environments.

42.     Rehabilitation of a heritage facility reduces council’s impact on climate. This is achieved through the reuse of materials and reduced transportation (as materials are already produced and were transported onto site over 100 years ago).

43.     The location of the Leys Institute enables the use of active and public transport. The building is located along key bus routes and adjacent to a town centre.

44.     The sustainability of the restoration has been considered in the development of the concept designs, and will be further refined in the detailed design / business case. As the Leys Institute functions as a library, it offers a great opportunity to teach the importance of sustainability through its design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.     Staff throughout the council family have contributed to the concept design and detailed business case development including:

·    Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·    Connected Communities

·    Finance and Business Performance

·    Heritage

·    Regional Services and Strategy

·    Parks and Community Facilities. 

46.     The allocation of decision-making on investment in local community facilities has transferred to local boards (GB/2021/137 and GB2022/53). Local board decisions will adhere to the budget and minimum service level parameters set by the Governing Body. Decisions will be implemented through local board plans and the long-term plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     Community support for restoring and reopening the Leys Institute was expressed through the council’s emergency budget consultation process carried out in June 2020. Friends of Leys Institute and members of the Leys family have also expressed support for this direction. The aforementioned worked as integral members of the Project Advisory Group to develop the concept designs. 

48.     The local board have previously indicated support for the restoration of the Leys Institute at their September 2020 business meeting, where they directed the development of a detailed business case (WTM/2020/204).

49.     Progress on the development of a detailed business case, including the two concept designs, was presented to the Waitematā Local Board at a workshop on 9 August 2022. The local board indicated support for the concept designs to proceed to public consultation.

50.     The public consultation held October to November 2022 showed 83% to be in support of progressing with Option 1: Full, and 57% in support of introducing a targeted rate to deliver Option 1: Full.

51.     In August 2023, the development of the detailed business case was completed and recommended progressing with Option 2: Reduced. The reason for the recommendation of Option 2: Reduce was largely due to the lower risks of the option relating to obtaining funding for the project to progress, and the higher certainty relating to the timeline, to complete the design and construction project phases, and to reopen the Leys Institute to the public.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.     The Māori population in the Leys Institute catchment area is seven per cent of the Ponsonby population. It is expected to be stable at seven per cent until 2038.

53.     Two per cent of the Leys Institute Library’s active members are Māori, compared to 13 per cent of Auckland Māori visiting libraries in the Auckland region each month.

54.     The restoration of the Leys Institute provides an opportunity to celebrate mana whenua significance. Acknowledging the Leys Institute’s place on Te Rimutahi ridgeline and history as a traditional transport route from Maungawhau to Te Too. 

55.     The two concept designs were developed with significant input from mana whenua. 

56.     A mana whenua rōpū of Ngāti Te Ata and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei representatives provided key advice to the concept design process, including that: 

·    a name is required for the whare that joins the past to the future, and shows us moving forward together

·    we use landscape architecture and ‘view shafts’ to recognise traditional cultural stories that are hugely significant to Māori

·    that the whare must be whanau-centric

·    hauora is most important and must inform the renovation design. The four pillars of hauora (te whare tapa whā) are important to bring Te Ao Māori to the space, and that colour can be used to create links between the pillars and between cultural stories.

57.     Māori will benefit from the opportunity to increase Te Ao Māori at the Leys Institute. Mana whenua will continue to be engaged throughout the design and build processes, in alignment with the outcomes sought by Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.     The impact of COVID-19, and the resulting economic slow-down, has had a significant impact on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity. 

59.     The local board requested certain financial parameters be considered in the development of a detailed business case. These are: 

·    that costs remain within the range outlined in the indicative business case of $15.3 million to $21.2 million

·    the consideration of property sales to fund the project

·    a ring-fence of council funds as a source of funding up to $7.4 million

·    that alternative sources of funding be investigated (such as community fundraising, philanthropic donations, and targeted rates).

60.     Kwanto Quantity Surveyors produced preliminary cost estimates in August 2022 for the delivery of the two concept designs. The cost estimates are based on the concept designs prepared by Matthews and Matthews Architects as shown in Table 2

Table 2: Preliminary cost estimates for design options

Option

Preliminary costs

Option 1: Full

$20.1M

Option 2: Reduced

$14.8M

61.     Currently, two funding sources have been confirmed:

·    $9.2 million from council’s regional seismic budget, from financial years 2024/2025 and 2025/2026, has been committed to the project to cover the seismic remediation costs of the Leys Institute.

·    Sale proceeds from 3 Ponsonby Road and 19 Jervois Road have been approved, by Te Poari ā-Rohe o Waitematā, as funding sources. 19 Jervois Road has an unconditional agreement signed and proceeds of $3 million are expected for the project. 3 Ponsonby Road is currently being processed for sale. Approval will be sought through a confidential report by Eke Panuku for the further proposed sale of property to fund this project.

62.     The status of the four properties considered for service property optimisation and ring-fenced council funding include:

·    19 Jervois Road, St Marys Bay (local board service property) - unconditional contract signed, settlement in January 2024

·    3 Ponsonby Road, Grey Lynn (local board endowment property) - approved for sale

·    10 Fremlin Place, Avondale (Leys Institute Trust property) – seeking LB approval for sale

·    24 St Marys Road, St Marys Bay (Leys Institute Trust property) – for consideration

63.     Option 1: Full, will likely need four properties to be sold and the introduction of a targeted rate.

64.     Option 2: Reduced, will likely need three properties to be sold, but can progress without a targeted rate.

65.     Due to the early stage of the project, and high complexity of the project (Heritage structure, uncertain ground conditions, complex seismic strengthening work required), the current delivery timeframes and estimated project costs could increase in subsequent project delivery stages.

66.     Option 1 would require additional consequential opex to maintain and service, greater than the option 2 proposal. The additional consequential opex would be required to be funded from existing local ABS budgets.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.     Table 3 outlines the main risks and mitigations associated with the recommendation in this report[1].

Table 3: Project risks and mitigations

Type of risk 

Risk 

Risk level 

Mitigation 

Reputational 

If communication is not clear and regular, then the community may feel isolated and lose trust in the council. 

Medium 

Establish clear lines of communication. 

Develop and implement an agreed communication and engagement strategy. 

Ensure all project status information is accurate and up to date. 

Reputational  

If the project is not delivered or delivered late then there may be a negative impact on council’s reputation.

Medium 

Ensure stakeholders are given updates regularly and make efforts to deliver the project collaboratively with project stakeholders.

Financial 

If there is significant movement in pricing due to the current buoyant construction market, then higher costs can be expected.

Medium 

Obtaining interim or periodic cost estimate updates from a quantity surveyor at key project stages.

Financial 

If potential contributions from proposed funding sources are less than anticipated, then alternative funding may be needed. 

Low 

Gain an early understanding of the revenue that could be generated from the proposed funding sources. 

Consult with the public to understand support for alternative funding.  

Financial 

If construction work reveals additional building issues, then higher costs can be expected.

Medium  

Support and enable the design team to fully investigate the building during the design phase.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

68.     Based on the decision from this report, staff will procure a project design team to develop the option approved by the local board.

69.     Progress the proposed sale of properties which have been earmarked for this project.

70.     The overall timeframe for reopening the Leys Institute will depend on a range of factors including:

·    procurement of a suitable design team

·    building and site investigations, and resolving technical, architectural, or structural queries

·    obtaining resource and building consent

·    procurement of a suitable building contractor.

71.     Next steps and estimated timeframes are summarised in Table 4.

Table 4: Next steps and estimated timeframes  

Timeframe 

Action 

October 2023 to July 2024 

Procure design team, developed and detailed design, and consents

August 2024 to July 2025

Tender for construction and complete physical works

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

John Cheah – Project Manager Sesimic Project Specialisation, Parks and Community Facilities  

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Waitematā Local Grant Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2023/2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2023/09841

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Waitematā Local Grant round one and Multi-board Grant round one 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Waitematā Local Grant round one (Attachment A), and Multi-board Grant round one 2023/2024 (Attachment B).

3.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted the Waitematā Community Grant Programme 2023/2024 on the 18 July 2023. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants (Attachment C).

4.       The Waitematā Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $148,991.00 for the 2023/2024 financial year, with two Local Grant rounds, two Quick Response rounds and one Multi-board round.

5.       Eighteen applications have been received for the Local Grant round one 2023/2024 requesting a total of $128,927.35 and eleven applications have been received for Multi-board Grant round one 2023/2024, requesting a total from the Waitematā Local Board of $335,806.00 and an overall total of $655,360.00.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received for the Waitematā Local Grant round one, listed in the following table

Table One: Waitematā Local Grant round one 2023/2024 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2420-132

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of 20 spoken word workshops

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-105

Auckland Indian Sports Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of 96 cricket balls for the Auckland Indian Sports Club

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-107

Auckland Seniors Support And Caring Group Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of facilitator fees, venue hire, guest speakers and trainer fees, refreshments, project Coordinator wages, a translator, printing and stationary costs, and travel allowances

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-125

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of producing and printing of 1026 Street Smart Handbooks

$3,591.00

Eligible

LG2420-108

Charlotte Museum Trust

Community

Towards the cost of monthly utility and sundries, microphone speaker system, 25 chairs and two tables

$4,924.00

Eligible

LG2420-117

Community Groups Feeding the Homeless Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of a new fridge

$3,046.35

Eligible

LG2420-127

Grey Lynn Business Association

Community

Towards the cost of a rainbow seat

$9,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-106

Kelmarna Community Farm Trust

Environment

Towards the cost of a chicken training course, three chicken coordinator wages, weekend wages, fencing and chicken feed

$9,176.00

Eligible

LG2420-121

Mobility Assistance Dogs Trust

Community

Towards client applicant coordinator wages

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-131

Nightsong

Community

Towards facilitation and artist fees for the Seven Wonders project

$8,850.00

Eligible

LG2420-122

Auckland Pride Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of project contingency

$16,840.00

Ineligible

LG2420-103

Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Community

Towards subsidised and free classes of Community Upcycling DIY Workshops in community spaces, Libraries and Community Centers

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-111

The Actors Program

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of the consultancy services of the Board of The Actors Program

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG2420-123

Roskill Together Trust

Environment

Towards the cost of the Waitemata Local Eco Festival

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-114

The Mother Trust

Events

Towards the cost of stage production including technical labor costs and travel costs

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-120

The North Shore Budget Service Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of wages for a financial mentor

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-126

Wingspan Trust

Community

Towards the cost of 80 one hour Wingspan counselling sessions

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2420-128

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of clinical supervision and support, and volunteer training services

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$128,927.35

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received for the Waitematā Multi-board Grant round one, listed in the following table.

Table Two: Waitematā Multi-board grant round one 2023/2024 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-159

Anxiety NZ Trust

Community

Towards wages to employ part time specialist community educator to work across Auckland (December 2023 - November 2024)

$52,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-143

Big Brothers Big Sisters Auckland

Community

Towards mentor development program in The Parenting Place (December 2023 - May 2024)

$15,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-145

Charlotte Harland

Arts and culture

Towards the writing process and research for the television series "Dabble" in Auckland (April 2023 - August 2024)

$1,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-112

English Language Partners New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards stationery costs

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-135

Good Bitches Trust

Community

Towards cake boxes, flyers, staff cost, operational cost, promotional cost, volunteer training and recognition to deliver Baking It Better project in Auckland from 15 December 2023 to 30 November 2024

$22,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-158

Better Men Limited

Community

Towards start up cost to deliver Defying Depression, Cool2Care project from 1 January 2024 to 31 December 2024

$250,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-146

Rainbow Youth Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of venue hire, marketing and promotion costs, food from countdown, tote bags, art supplies, koha for facilitators, Orange Sky annual subscription, and catering costs of meetings

$22,280.00

Eligible

MB2324-127

Seed 2 Harvest Trust

Community

Towards lease of 96 Swanson Road in Henderson (December 2023 - July 2023)

$50,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-139

Shine School of Confidence

Arts and culture

Towards speech and drama lessons including tuition fees, venue hire, and teaching resources at various community centers or local schools (January 2024 - December 2024)

$110,080.00

Eligible

MB2324-101

Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards uniforms for the Aotearoa Māori Rugby League inaugural tournament at Te Atatu South Park and Ngati Otara Park

$56,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-151

Yoga Limited T/A Hot Yoga Works

Sport and recreation

Towards support due to hardship during COVID and Auckland rains (Auckland CBD August 2023 - December 2023)

$75,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$655,360.00

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grant programme

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     higher priorities

·     lower priorities

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted the Community Grant Programme for 2023/2024 on 18 July 2023 and will operate two Quick Response and two Local Grant rounds and one Multi-board round for this financial year.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

12.     In addition to the eligibility criteria outlined in the Community Grants Policy, the Waitematā Local Board have indicated in the Local Board Grants Programme that they will not fund groups who request funding over the maximum amount set.

13.     Grant application LG2420-122 from Auckland Pride Incorporated, has been marked as being Ineligible as the group are requesting for more than the maximum amount of funds you can apply for, in the Waitematā Local Grant rounds.

14.     Grant application MB2324-145 from Charlotte Harland, has been marked as Ineligible, due to the applicant applying to two Local Boards, when the minimum is three Local Boards.

15.     Grant application MB2324-158 from Better Men Limited, has been marked as Ineligible as the application missing the required information.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement 

16.     The Local Board Community Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way.

17.     Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; decreasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

19.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waitematā Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

21.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

22.     A summary of each application received through Waitematā Local Grant round one and Multi-board Grant round one 2023/2024 is provided (refer Attachment A and B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

24.     Eleven applicants applying to the Waitematā Local Grant round one have indicated that their project targets Māori or contribute to Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

26.     The Waitematā Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $148,991.00 for the 2023/2024 financial year, with two Local Grant rounds, two Quick Response rounds and one Multi-board round.

27.     Eighteen applications have been received for the Local Grant round one 2023/2024 requesting a total of $128,927.35 and eleven applications have been received for Multi-board Grant round one 2023/2024, requesting a total from the Waitematā Local Board of $335,806.00 and an overall total of $655,360.00.

28.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified that a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Following the Waitematā Local Board allocation of funding for the Local Grant round one and Multi-board Grant round one, staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Grant round one - application summary

 

b

Waitematā Multi-board Grant round one - application summary

 

c

Waitematā Community Grant Programme 2023/2024

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Arna Casey - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Public notification to proposal to lease land at Point Erin Park and Salisbury Reserve to Watercare for public works


File No.: CP2023/14918

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support to publicly notify Watercare Services Limited (Watercare) proposal for lease agreements under section 17 Public Works Act 1982 (PWA) for temporary occupation of Point Erin Park, Ponsonby and Salisbury Reserve, Herne Bay for public works.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Point Erin Park is located at 94 Shelley Beach Road, Ponsonby and Salisbury Reserve located at 19 Salisbury Street, Herne Bay (the parks) are respectively held by Auckland Council in fee simple subject to the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA).

3.       Watercare seeks the use of part of the parks to enable construction of the Central Interceptor and Herne Bay Sewer Upgrade projects (the projects).

4.       Watercare has served council draft notices under section 18 of the PWA (section 18 PWA Notice) of its intention to lease parts of the parks for essential public works associated with the projects (the proposal).

5.       Auckland Council is required under the LGA to publicly notify the proposal for the grant of lease to Watercare.

6.       Staff recommend that the Waitematā Local Board supports the public notification of the proposal to enter into a section 17 PWA agreement with Watercare to lease land within Point Erin Park and Salisbury Reserve for essential public works.

7.       Staff recommend that the local board delegates authority to the chairperson to appoint a hearings panel to hear any objections received under the public notification process and make a decision in that regard.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the public notification pursuant to section 138 Local Government Act 2002 of Auckland Council’s intention to enter into an agreement under section 17 of the Public Works Act 1982 to grant Watercare Services Limited a lease of parts of the land at Point Erin Park and Salisbury Reserve for public works purposes.

b)      tuku mana / delegate authority to the chairperson to appoint a hearings panel, if required, to hear any objections received as a result of the public notification process and make a decision in that regard.

c)       tuhi / note that the terms of the proposal to grant a lease to Watercare Services Limited as follows:

Point Erin Park

·    term - 36 months commencing between 10 January 2024 and 1 June 2024 (to be confirmed)

·    area – two locations totaling approximately 6000m2  as shown on the land requirement plan in figure 1

·    public work/use - construction area for the Central Interceptor project

·    compensation - current market value as assessed by an independent registered valuer

·    reinstatement - full reinstatement and above ground infrastructure to be incorporated into the park.

Salisbury Reserve

·    term - 24 months commencing May 2024 (to be confirmed)

·    area - approximately 3500m2 as shown on the plan in figure 2

·    public work/use – laydown area and site office for the Herne Bay Sewer Upgrade 

·    compensation - current market value as assessed by an independent registered valuer

·    reinstatement full reinstatement.

d)      pōhiri / request that council staff report back to the local board following public notification for a decision on the proposal.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Watercare requires temporary occupation of the land at Point Erin Park at 94 Shelley Beach Road, Ponsonby and Salisbury Reserve at 19 Salisbury Street, Herne Bay for public work purposes associated with the Central Interceptor and Herne Bay Trunk Sewer Upgrade projects.

9.       The Central Interceptor (CI) is a major public work designed to provide for future wastewater needs of Auckland due to population growth and existing combined water and sewerage systems.

10.     Point Erin Park has identified by Watercare as the most suitable location for the CI terminal shaft. The proposed occupation of approximately 6000m2 of land at Point Erin is anticipated for approximately 36 months commencing in the first half of 2024 (date to be confirmed).

11.     Watercare is also working on the Western Isthmus Water Quality Improvement Programme (WIWQIP) to improve infrastructure and reduce wastewater overflows and improve water quality at local beaches.

12.     The proposed Herne Bay trunk sewer upgrade forms part of the WIWQIP which will, on completion, connect to the CI tunnel terminating at Point Erin Park.

13.     The proposed occupation of approximately 3500m2  of land at Salisbury Reserve is anticipated for approximately 24 months from May 2024.

14.     Further details of the proposal are contained in the memorandum to the local board dated     29 September 2023 - attachment A.

15.     Public consultation for the proposal is required in accordance with the LGA before a decision is made to grant a lease of the land.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Proposed temporary occupation of Point Erin Park and Salisbury Reserve

16.     Watercare’s section 18 PWA Notice in respect of Point Erin Park proposes the following terms:

a)   term - 36 months commencing between 10 January 2024 and 1 June 2024 (to be confirmed)

b)   area - approximately 6000 m2 , as shown on the plan in figure 1 (below)

c)   public work/use - construction area for the Central Interceptor Point Erin Park project

d)   compensation - current market value

e)   reinstatement – to incorporate above ground infrastructure into the park.

17.     Watercare’s section 18 PWA Notice in respect of Salisbury Reserve proposes the following terms:

a)   term - 24 months commencing May 2024 (to be confirmed)

b)   area - approximately 3500m2 , as shown on the plan in figure 2 (below)

c)   public work/use – laydown area and site office for the Herne Bay Sewer Upgrade

d)   compensation - current market value

e)   reinstatement – full reinstatement including replacement planting.

 

Figure 1. Point Erin Park - land requirement plan

Two locations required by Watercare for temporary occupation:

·       a main construction area (approximately 3,150 m2) and access (approximately 600m2) associated with construction of the terminal shaft shown in orange on the plan

·       a secondary construction area associated with the control chamber (approximately 1,650 m2) shown in yellow and on the south-west corner of the plan.

Figure 2. Salisbury Reserve – land requirement plan

·             Area (approximately 3500m2) is required by Watercare for temporary occupation outlined red shaded grey.

Land Status – Local Government Act 2002

18.     Point Erin Park situated at 94 Shelley Beach Road, Ponsonby is legally described as part Allotment 9-10 Section 8 Suburbs of Auckland, Part Deposited Plan 501 and Lot 3 DP 48893 comprising an area of 4.2896 hectares, more or less, contained in record of title NA26B/385.

19.     Point Erin Park is held by Auckland Council in fee simple subject to the LGA. 

20.     Salisbury Reserve at 19 Salisbury Street, Herne Bay comprises a total area of approximately 1.2840 hectares and is held by Auckland Council in fee simple subject to the LGA.

21.     The relevant part of Salisbury Reserve (as required by Watercare) is legally described as Lots 3 and 4 DP 22075, comprising of 918 square metres and 3870 square metres respectively, contained in Record of Titles NA522/170 and NA522/168.  This part of the park is accessed from Argyle Street.

Public Notification and Engagement

 

22.     Under section 138 of the LGA, Auckland Council must publicly notify a proposal to grant a lease of land held under the LGA as a park if the term is longer than six-months in duration and has the effect of excluding or substantially interfering with the public’s access to the park.  Iwi consultation is also appropriate in accordance with section 81 of the LGA.

23.     During the public notification process, interested parties will be invited to make submissions (whether in support or to object) on the lease proposal on the parks. Submitters will be provided with one calendar month in which to make their submissions.

24.     If the council receives any objections during the public notification process, in which the submitter has stated that they wish to have their objection heard, then a hearings process will need to be undertaken.

25.     Subject to the outcome of the consultation and deliberations, the council is able enter into an agreement and grant a lease of land held under the LGA, in this case, under section 17 of the PWA.

26.     The cost of public notification will be met by Watercare.

 

Occupation of land held under the LGA under the PWA

27.     The PWA provides far reaching powers to enable essential public works to be undertaken on third party land.

28.     The section 18 PWA Notices Watercare served council on May 2023 and 4 September 2023 respectively were issued on the basis that it requires a lease of the land held by council under the LGA for essential public works.

29.     Where a section 18 PWA notice is issued, the landowner can object to the taking of the land for a lease under the PWA by opposing the proposal in the Environment Court under section 24 PWA.

30.     If council does not support the taking of the land under the PWA, section 23 PWA would apply and Watercare may serve a section 23 PWA notice of intention to compulsory ‘take’ a lease of the land and, unless Council chooses to object under section 24 of the PWA, a lease is effectively ‘taken’ under the PWA. Watercare can request the Land Information New Zealand to issue a proclamation taking the land in the NZ Gazette.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     Public notification does not trigger any climate change impacts or introduce any new source of greenhouse gas emissions. Public notification is only an administrative action required under the LGA.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Land Advisory Services staff consider that the appropriate statutory process for the grant of a lease of high-profile park land for public work purposes that are inconsistent with the recreational use of the land is for Watercare to serve a section 18 PWA Notice.

33.     Parks and Community Facilities and Council Legal Services staff recommend public notification of the proposal as required under the LGA.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The Waitematā Local Board is aware of Watercare’s Central Interceptor and Herne Bay sewer upgrade projects.

35.     Since February 2023 council and Watercare staff have consulted with the local board over the proposed temporary occupation of these parks and have responded to queries.

36.     Land Advisory Services provided the details of the proposal and advised the local board of the statutory process by way of a memorandum dated 29 September 2023 (attachment A).  This report is the first step of the statutory process.

37.     The public consultation process will allow members of the public to make submissions on the proposal to inform local board decision making.

38.     Staff will report back to the local board on the outcome of the public consultation for considering whether to grant a lease to Watercare for temporary occupation of the parks.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     In accordance with section 81 of the LGA, staff are required to engage with mana whenua on the proposal to lease the land to Watercare.

40.     Watercare has commenced mana whenua engagement as detailed in paragraphs 69 to 73 of the memorandum to the local board dated 29 September 2023 in attachment A.

41.     Staff will report back to the local board on the outcome of iwi engagement.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     All costs relating to the advertisement and Land Advisory Services staff time involved in the public notification of the proposal to grant the proposed lease will be borne by Watercare. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     The public consultation process will provide the public the opportunity to submit their views and concerns on the proposal.  This will mitigate potential reputational risk to council in granting a lease to Watercare for occupation of the parks.

44.     Should the council receive any objections during the public notification process, in which the submitter has stated that they wish to have their objection heard, then a hearings process would need to be undertaken.

45.     Should the public notification process become contentious, so that an agreement to grant a lease under section 17 of the PWA with Watercare cannot be reached by negotiation, Watercare may then decide to serve a notice under section 23 of the PWA of it’s intention to compulsory ‘take’ a lease of the land and, unless Council chooses to object under section 24 of the PWA, a lease is effectively ‘taken’ under the PWA. Watercare can then request Land Information New Zealand to issue a proclamation taking the land in the NZ Gazette. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Staff will arrange publication of public notice of the proposal and, subject to public feedback, determine whether a hearing is required.

47.     Watercare will continue to engage with mana whenua in relation to the proposal.

48.     Subject to the outcome of public consultation and iwi engagement, staff will report back to the local board to seek approval to enter into a section 17 PWA agreement with Watercare granting a lease for the temporary occupation of the parks for essential public works.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memorandum to Local Board dated 29 September 2023- Watercare proposed temporary occupation of Point Erin Park and Salisbury Reserve

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katerina Marinkovich - Principal Property Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025

File No.: CP2023/15326

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted on as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

3.       This report seeks the feedback of the local board on consultation on proposed changes to local fees and charges.

4.       There are proposed changes to the following local fees and charges:

·    Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·    Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

5.       The Governing Body will agree regional consultation items including proposed changes to fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

6.       Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      whakarite / to seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 for the following:

i)       Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review

A)      Membership Fees

1)      The alignment of legacy memberships to current rates over 3 years

2)      The introduction of a new Auckland wide membership option that allows access to all Auckland Council Pool & Leisure sites regardless of operator.

B)      Aquatic Entrance Fees

1)      The introduction of baseline aquatic entrance fees for all Auckland Council Pool and Leisure sites.

2)      An increase to the concessionary discount from 15 per cent to 40 per cent.

C)      Swim School Fees

1)      An increase to swimming lesson prices closer to market rates whilst maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders

2)      A new 30 per cent discount for Community Service Card Holders and their dependents

3)      A new 40 per cent discount for those with special needs that require private lessons.

D)      Recreation Fees

1)      An increase to holiday programme and OSCAR (before and after school care) fees

2)      To simplify recreation term programme pricing.

ii)       Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review

A)      To adjust fees in line with Hire Fee Framework July 2014.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

8.       A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on the 3rd October 2023. This report seeks the feedback of the local board on proposed changes to fees and charges that will be included alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation.

9.       A three-year cycle of fee reviews was introduced in the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. Over the years the cost of delivering these services have increased but the fees and charges for users have not been adjusted accordingly.

10.     Local boards could choose to increase or decrease its fees and charges from the proposal. This may result in extra funding for the local board if fees are increased or a top-up may be required from the local board funding if fees are reduced from the proposal.

11.     The Governing Body will agree on consultation items including proposed fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

12.     Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

13.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This is the third year of the fee review cycle. There are changes proposed to the following local fees and charges:

·        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·        Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

Active Communities

15.     There are 45 Active Communities sites (pool and leisure facilities) across the Auckland region. 25 of these are currently managed directly by Auckland Council. A Request for Proposal process is currently underway for council owned pool and leisure services. Relevant fees and charges proposed will be included as part of the contract negotiations.

16.     The review of fees and charges for Active Communities services has been split into two phases due to its size and complexity. Council managed bookable spaces were reviewed and adopted in 2023 as phase one.

17.     In this second phase, staff have reviewed the majority of the remaining fees to ensure an appropriate level of cost recovery to enable the council to provide an equitable service across the network.

Membership fees

18.     Some customers are on membership rates that we no longer offer. They include memberships may have been in place prior to amalgamation in 2010, or membership types that have since been discontinued. We are proposing to align these legacy memberships with current membership options over three years. In year one, we estimate that around 4,500 memberships (approximately 20 per cent) will increase by up to 7 per cent. The estimated increase in revenue is $260,000 in year one across the region.

19.     We are also proposing to introduce an Auckland wide membership option to allow customers to access all 45 pool and leisure sites, both council-managed and contracted. The estimated increase in revenue from this proposal is expected to be around $90,000 per year across the region.

Aquatic entrance fees

20.     The baseline aquatic entrance fees for all council managed and contracted pools and leisure sites are proposed to change. This will include fees for swimming, spa, sauna and steam room use for adults as well as spectator and supervising adult fees.

21.     Alongside this proposed fee change, we are proposing an increased discount rate for seniors (over 65 years), students (over 17), Community Services card and permanent disability card holders, from 15 per cent currently to 40 per cent. This proposal will increase revenue by an estimated $77,000 per annum across the region and will ensure equitable access for users of these services.

22.     Officers have reviewed data available and found no conclusive evidence to support a significant change to the targeted rate for Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara Papatoetoe local boards at this stage. It is recommended that the targeted rate be adjusted by the forecast council rate of inflation for 2024/2025. As of the time this report was written the forecast rate of inflation for council’s arts and recreation services was 3.5 per cent for 2024/2025. This will be used to calculate the targeted rate amount to be included in the 10-year budget consultation. The final rate amount will be set in June 2024 based on the updated inflation forecast available to the council at that point.

Swim school fees

23.     An increase in swim school fees is proposed. This will align swimming lesson pricing closer to market rates while maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders. This proposal includes a new 30 per cent discount for Community Services card holders and their dependents and a 40 per cent discount for those with special needs requiring private lessons. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $745,000 per year across the region.

Recreation fees

24.     We are also proposing to increase OSCAR before and after school care and holiday programme fees to maximise government subsidies and to ensure higher levels of cost recovery. Term programme fees have also been adjusted across the network to provide a simpler charging framework and recover costs appropriately. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $196,000 per year across the region.

25.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached (Attachment A).

Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces

26.     Venue hire and bookable spaces incorporates community halls, community centres, art centres and bookable library spaces. Fees for 252 bookable spaces at 110 venues are included in this review.

27.     A review of fees has been split into two phases. The Hire Fee Framework considers the size, condition and quality of each bookable space, the levels of staffing, the amenities available, and current patterns of utilisation of the spaces. It also addresses variations within local board and adjacent areas to bring pricing of comparable venues closer together. Phase one of this review will ensure that fees across similar venues are charged appropriately across the portfolio.

28.     Fees for around half of the venues reviewed are not proposed to change as they have been set at an appropriate level when compared to spaces nearby or with similar types of spaces or capacity.

29.     Around 40 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $2 to align them to similar or nearby venues and a further 8 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $12 for this reason. For a small number of venues, we are proposing to decrease fees to generate interest in hiring these facilities.  Overall, these proposed changes to venue hire fee are expected to the generate an increase in revenue of around $160,000.

30.     In phase two we will investigate the cost to serve and assess the balance between rates and user pays to ensure we are providing good value to the ratepayer, whilst providing accessibility to customers and communities.  This review will include input from local boards.

31.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached. (Attachment A).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     The local board input into consultation on fees and charges is procedural in nature. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The fees and charges review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. There are no impacts to the Council group wider than the parent (Auckland Council).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on the 3rd October 2023.

35.     The local board has the opportunity to input on the local fees and charges before the governing body makes a decision on consulting on changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

36.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement and adopting local fees and charges.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The council does not hold information on the ethnicity of fee payers so is not able to identify the exact impact on the proposed changes on Māori. The impact of the proposed rates and fees changes on Māori will be similar to that on other residents in Auckland.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The local board provides input to regional plans and proposals. There will be information in the council’s consultation material for each proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

39.     The table below summarises the total financial implications for all local boards:

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The proposed changes to rates fees and charges will allow the council to meet its cost recovery targets for the relevant activities for the 2024/2025 financial year. If these adjustments are not made the level of general rates increase may have to be higher than set out in the Mayoral proposal or further alternative budget mitigations found.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The Governing Body will adopt the consultation document and supporting information content the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 including the changes to fees and changes for 2024/2025 on 6 December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Waitematā Local Board Fees and Charges 20242025

 

b

Attachment B - Feedback form for proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content Business Area Category Proposals Local board feedback

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sugenthy Thomson - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Waitematā Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2023/13750

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for three meeting dates to be added to the 2023-2024 Waitematā Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (the Long-Term Plan) and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 (Annual Plan) timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Tuesday, 22 November 2022 (WTM/2022/201).

3.       At that time, the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision-making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unknown. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve three meeting dates as an addition to the Waitematā Local Board meeting schedule so that the modified 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes can be met.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the addition of three extraordinary meeting dates to the 2022-2025 Waitematā Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes as follows:

i)       30 November 2023, 9.30am

ii)       Tuesday, 30 April 2024, 4.00pm

iii)      Tuesday, 11 June 2024, 4.00pm.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its Tuesday, 22 November 2023 business meeting (WTM/2022/201).

8.       The timeframes for local board decision-making in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

9.       The local board is being asked to make decisions in late-November 2023 and late-April and early-June 2024 to feed into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 processes. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meetings as additions to the meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meetings as extraordinary meetings.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 process could be considered at this meeting.

13.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/14972

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with a summary of public consultation feedback, respond to previous queries and seek formal resolutions supporting the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (AT) have adopted a Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. AT is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       A speed management plan for the Auckland region is a government requirement and will set safe and appropriate speed limits to reduce road deaths and serious injuries. Katoa, Ka Ora is the name of this plan, and it is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all.

5.       AT workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora with local boards in February and March 2023, and the Waitematā Local Board provided formal feedback about the proposal at its’ 18 April 2023 business meeting (Attachment F), specifically the five development approaches within the speed management plan.

6.       Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. https://haveyoursay.at.govt.nz/kko

7.       AT has analysed and summarised the consultation feedback received and provided responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora. This information is provided as a series of attachments to this report for local board members to review.

8.       Further, the report seeks local board support for the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes within its area.

9.       Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the summary of public consultation feedback received on the proposed Katoa, Ka Ora speed limit changes (Attachment D).

b)      note AT’s responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora (Attachment A). 

c)       note AT’s legal obligations under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (Rule) and that the Rule requires best efforts to complete safe and appropriate speed limit setting near schools by 2027,

d)      note that since June 2020, when the programme started, road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.

e)      support the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes identified for this local board area (Attachment E) 

f)       provide their views on any other locations listed in Attachment C where local board views are specifically sought. 

Horopaki

Context

10.     AT is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use. 

Alignment with Central Government policy

11.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy.  The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to school.

12.     The strategy’s action plan includes the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires road controlling authorities to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

13.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications; category one and category two. Most Auckland schools are classified as category one, or schools where children may be out and about outside the school gate. To comply with the Rule, speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) are required in the area outside of the school. Category two schools are where children are more likely to be picked up or dropped off within the school grounds.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency).

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent, easy-to-understand changes that communities can understand. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

Auckland Transport’s role

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury. So, after receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board, the safe speeds programme has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland reducing speed limits on many roads.

18.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes, the programme focuses on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation. The phases can be summarised as follows:

a)   Phase One covered approximately 11 per cent of the local road network and focused on the highest risk roads.

b)   Phase Two covered approximately 8 per cent of the network and had a significant focus on safe speeds for rural roads and roads near schools.

c)   Phase Three covered approximately 19 per cent of the network and included roads around schools, rural roads, town centre roads, rural marae and roads requested by the community.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on safety around schools so AT directly surveyed all schools with proposed speed limit changes in late-2022 and early 2023. The summary results of the local schools survey was shared with each local board as part of the February/March 2023 workshop follow-up.

22.     Information about the iterative engagement process used to develop Katoa, Ka Ora was shared with local boards in two rounds of workshops held in February/March 2022 and in February/March 2023.

23.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on. Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. 7801 pieces of feedback were received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Katoa, Ka Ora has been consulted on with the public and with local boards. This report updates local boards on:

a)   The results of the public consultation conducted from 24 July to 28 August 2023 in each local board area, including AT’s responses to the changes requested by members of the public.

b)   AT’s response to the local board feedback provided in April 2023, including AT’s responses to changes requested by members of the public.

25.     This information is included in attachments to this report and AT’s overall considerations for this local board area are summarised in a two-page summary infographic (Attachment B).

26.     Additionally, the full consultation report will be published on the AT website by early November 2023.

27.     The attachments provide a clear summary of what people in this local board area said about the programme so local board members are aware of community sentiment as they consider AT’s technical advice.

Technical advice

28.     AT’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system; the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. This includes finalising a speed management plan within legal timeframes and setting safe speed limits near all schools by 2027. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by 2027, we are proposing to include a review of permanent speed limits near all remaining schools in a future consultation.

30.     Further, the impact of speed reduction on the number of DSI is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

a)   Since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.

b)   In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a 9 per cent increase in road deaths.

31.     30km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed around schools is used for the safe speed programme.

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that Katoa, Ka Ora meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. The proposed speed of 30km/h near schools is consistent with legislative requirements and is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.  

33.     Additionally, speed reductions delivered to date by the programme are already reducing DSI. It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the local board is to support the programme.

Customer research

34.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

35.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

36.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. Their experiences of high-speed vehicles, near misses, crime and ‘stranger danger’ around schools mean an increasing number of parents drive their children to and from school. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

38.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

39.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The Safe Speeds Programme was endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning committee and the current term Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     AT has visited all local boards during February and March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes.

42.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February and March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

43.     In post-workshop resolutions local boards indicated their level of support for the programme. Common themes were higher levels of support near schools, town centres and places where people are out and about.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

45.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka. Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora.

46.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

47.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at their workshops in February and March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications.  Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. Comprehensive communications including the evidence and key facts have been provided to increase understanding and support of safe speeds. 

50.     Funding constraints may require the scale of the plan to be reduced or delivery to be slowed or delayed.  Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback received from local boards. We will use this, along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our legal and safety obligations as a road controlling authority, to help edit and finalise Katoa, Ka Ora, a speed management plan for Auckland.

52.     We have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee in November 2023. Confirmation of a date is yet to be received.

53.     Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Waitematā Local Board - Response to Resolutions

 

b

Attachmnt B - Waitematā Safe Speeds - Infographic

 

c

Attachment C - Waitematā Safe Speeds - Responses to public feedback

 

d

Attachment D - Waitematā Safe Speeds - LB Feedback Summary

 

e

Attachment E - Katoa Ka Ora Map Waitematā

 

f

Attachment F -18 April 2023 Waitematā Local Board Auckland Katoa Ka Ora Speed Management report minute

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan

File No.: CP2023/14702

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031 and to provide information received from public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) is seeking feedback from local boards on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP). In particular, AT is seeking feedback on the service improvements proposed for the local board’s area.

3.       The RPTP is the main plan for public transport services in Auckland. It also includes a vision, goals, policies, and targets that relate to the planning and delivery of the public transportation system.

4.       AT will use the local board’s formal views, along with feedback received via public consultation, to finalise the plan. The AT Board is expected to adopt the final plan in November 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to Auckland Transport on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031, in line with the template provided in Attachment A.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Regional Public Transport Plan is Auckland’s main plan for public transport (PT) services. It outlines how PT will be managed and improved over the next eight years, with a detailed focus on the first three years. This includes the services that will operate during this period (and how they will change) and the goals, policies and actions that will shape PT.

6.       The purpose of the RPTP is to enable consultation with the public and PT operators on the planning of PT services. This is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act 2003.

7.       Public consultation on the draft RPTP ran from 17 July to 17 August 2023, and AT received over 3,200 responses. This compares well to the 462 responses the previous (2018) RPTP received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Public feedback was generally very supportive of the content of the draft RPTP. This includes:

·    strong support for the plan’s vision and goals

·    support for the action areas within the plan

·    support for most proposed service improvements (with the main exception of the removals of ferry services to Gulf Harbour and Northcote Point).

9.       Feedback that was not supportive of the content of the draft RPTP included:

·    wanting further improvement and/or faster delivery

·    concerns that PT is too expensive or does not provide value for money

·    comments that a greater percentage of the cost of operating PT should come from users (via fares).

10.     The RPTP includes AT’s aspirations to do more in further improvements and faster delivery if and when more funding for PT becomes available.

11.     AT has provided a breakdown of the top areas submitters from each local board commented to assist the board in providing feedback (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Public transport has a key role to play in helping to reduce emissions, as set out in Auckland Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP). The RPTP acknowledges the ambitious targets the TERP has for increased PT usage, and the actions and improvements included in the RPTP will play an important role in making progress towards those targets.

13.     One of the RPTP’s goals is ‘enhancing the environment and tackling the climate emergency’. This goal guides efforts of transition to a low-emission PT system, encouraging mode shift, and adapting infrastructure to a changing climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Auckland Council’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee endorsed the overall strategic direction for the draft RPTP in April 2023. This included the vision and goals for the plan, and a ‘balanced’ approach to service improvements.

15.     Following public consultation closing, AT also engaged with the council’s advisory panels to get specific feedback about aspects of the plan relevant to the panels’ expertise.

16.     AT has also worked with Auckland Council and Eke Panuku staff to ensure, where possible, the draft RPTP is aligned with other strategic plans and projects across the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     AT held a range of public information events across the region at libraries, community centres, bus and train stations. AT also held two on-line drop-in sessions. Across all of these events, AT had hundreds of conversations with the public which will also be used to inform changes to the plan. In addition, some members of the public called AT to ask questions and seek clarification on content in the plan.

18.     Public feedback was generally supportive of the vision and goals in the draft RPTP and requested additional service improvements (beyond what AT is currently funded to deliver).

19.     Proposed service improvements in the draft RPTP in the local board’s area were set out in a memo from AT, dated 12 July 2023.

20.     AT set out the feedback received from residents of the local board’s area in a memo and supporting material (Attachment B and Attachment C) provided for a workshop on the draft RPTP held on the 3rd October 2023.

21.     Workshops to date have been positive, with most local boards supporting AT’s proposals for service improvements and initiatives to reduce the cost of public transport to users (such as the proposed weekly fare cap and extended transfer window).

22.     Some local boards have also requested more information around the use of existing services and expressed an interest in exploring the potential for on-demand AT Local services to operate in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     AT has held multiple hui with mana whenua as part of the development of the RPTP and will be making changes to the draft RPTP based on their feedback.

24.     The draft RPTP includes a Māori outcomes section (part 3.7), which outlines key areas of concern to mana whenua and mataawaka and where more detail can be found in the plan.

25.     AT intends to revise part 3.7, and other relevant parts of the RPTP, to reflect feedback received from Māori (both mana whenua and mataawaka).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications of providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

27.     The RPTP is required to be a realistically fundable plan, and AT’s budget for additional services is constrained (and fully allocated to the service improvements proposed in the draft RPTP).

28.     Any feedback provided regarding service level improvements should take into account AT’s financial constraints, and the trade-offs that may be required to implement them (for example, increasing services on one route is likely to require reductions on another route).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no risks associated with providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     AT will use the feedback provided by the local board, along with feedback received from the public and other stakeholders, to finalise the draft RPTP.

31.     The AT Board will consider adopting the revised RPTP at their 29 November 2023 meeting.

32.     If adopted, the final RPTP will be publicly released in early December 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

RPTP feedback template for local boards

 

b

Waitematā Local Board area snapshot

 

c

Waitematā Memo

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Te Ara Hauāuru - Northwest Rapid Transit

File No.: CP2023/14812

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek views into rapid transit corridor investigations from Brigham Creek to the city centre alongside the Northwestern Motorway, State Highway 16.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and partners have re-commenced work on Northwest Rapid Transit (NWRT) with a Detailed Business Case (DBC).

3.       The purpose of the Northwest Rapid Transit project is to provide a fast, frequent and efficient rapid transport option to the northwest of Auckland, from Brigham Creek to the City Centre, alongside State Highway 16 (SH16).

a.  Note, Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth has developed a long-term Strategic Plan for the Northwest which includes a rapid transit corridor from Kumeū to a new interchange at Brigham Creek on SH16 which would connect to the Northwest Rapid Transit project.

4.       This mahi is being led by Waka Kotahi in partnership with Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua and other iwi partners, and in close collaboration with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport who, along with iwi representatives, have members on the project steering committee.

 

5.       The project area covers from Brigham Creek to the city centre along SH16 and includes providing:

a.   Rapid transit on a dedicated corridor – investigations will determine the best mode (bus or rail) and location for the corridor which could be along, or either side of, SH16.

b.   Station locations, and facilities – such as seating, passenger information displays, CCTV, lighting and bike racks.

c.   Access and connections to local bus services – we’re working with Auckland Transport to look at improvements to the supporting transport network (including feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling).

6.       The DBC process will confirm a recommended way forward for the project. The DBC will:

a.   confirm recommended mode and route for the NWRT, for an integrated rail, or independent bus solution

b.   confirm staging (and any triggers) of recommended options

c.   ensure affordable and stageable solutions are at the heart of what we are doing

d.   provide clarity on how this corridor interfaces with the wider rapid transit network and urban aspirations for the region

e.   provide a compelling investment case for the recommended option. 

7.       It’s important that we undertake a robust analysis of all the potential bus and rail rapid transit options in order to deliver the best outcome for the Northwest.

8.       We have made progress on establishing and assessing a long list of potential rapid transit modes and alignments along the Northwestern Motorway (State Highway 16).

9.       We are currently carrying out more detailed investigations as we work to confirm an emerging short list of options. 

10.     We look forward to discussing the potential rapid transit options with you at local board workshops in the coming months, prior to the second phase of engagement early next year which will involve public consultation on the shortlisted options.

11.     The second phase of public engagement was initially planned to be in November-December this year. However, more time is needed to further our detailed investigations. Therefore, the second phase of engagement has been moved to early 2024, which will put us in a better position to have more informed discussions with stakeholders and communities.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on their position for the need for rapid transit in the Northwest

b)      provide feedback on what Waka Kotahi and partners should consider as part of our investigations, including views on:

i)       access and connections on locals roads – i.e. feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling connections

ii)       issues on local roads that you feel need to be addressed for rapid transit on SH16 to work well

iii)      facilities or design features you would like to see at rapid transit stations (the ones along the motorway).

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     This project will be an important part of Auckland’s public transport infrastructure to facilitate growth in the Northwest, provide attractive and equitable transport choice, and encourage mode shift. This project will help to reduce reliance on private vehicles, thus helping to build more resilience in the network while contributing to a healthier transport system that protects the climate.

13.     The investment objectives of the project are:

a.   providing an attractive, equitable rapid transit service that improves access to social, cultural and economic opportunities and is well integrated with the current and future transport system

b.   a transport intervention that reduces Auckland’s carbon footprint

c.   supporting a compact urban form and enabling quality integrated communities.

14.     Te Kawerau ā Maki have gifted the name ‘Te Ara Hauāuru’ to the project. This name references the wind that blows from the west, a powerful force and story for the iwi. The west wind carries the voice and vision of the community of the west, and the path of connection between these communities and Tāmaki Makaurau.   

15.     Waka Kotahi is incredibly grateful to Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua and other iwi partners for sharing their knowledge (mātauranga) of the land, waters and its peoples. We acknowledge their role as kaitiaki (guardians) with responsibility for the protection of te taiao (environment) and taonga tuku iho (heritage).

Why improvements are needed

16.     The Northwest is growing with more houses, more jobs, and more people needing to travel. It’s anticipated that by 2051, the Northwest will have more than:

a.    100,000 extra people living in the Northwest

b.    40,000 new households

c.    increased congestion

d.    increased pressure on our public transport network.

17.     People living in the Northwest currently have limited public transport options and many rely heavily on their car:

a.    over 60 per cent of people living in the Northwest commute out of the area

b.    more travel to work by car than in any other region in Auckland.

Improving transport equity and wellbeing

18.     Improving transport equity in the Northwest is a key focus for this project.

19.     The Northwest is an area that’s long lacked viable public transport options. This has resulted in people relying on their cars – causing increasing congestion and carbon emissions. For many people, the lack of public transport choice has stopped them from accessing key essential services and participating in everyday activities.

20.     Providing a faster and more reliable public transport choices will transform the daily lives of many people in the Northwest for generations to come and help provide for a more vibrant and better-connected community.

More sustainable transport choice

21.     More transport choice and reducing reliance on private vehicles can help build more resilience in our networks, contribute towards a healthier, safer transport system and reliably get everyone where they need to go in a way that also helps to protect the climate.

22.     The contributions we make today towards a more sustainable future will add up to help form a healthier and safer future for us all.

23.     Better transport options will also help the Government and Aotearoa New Zealand’s commitment to reaching net zero emissions by 2050.

24.     This project will align with the Government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP), which describes how we are going to meet emissions budgets and make progress towards meeting the 2050 target. This includes reduced carbon emissions, reduced embodied carbon emissions and ways to build resilience in the transport network.

Scope

Mode and route 

25.     Confirmation of the final mode (bus or rail) is required for the Detailed Business Case, and this must consider any potential future development and potential mode switch as continued growth occurs along the corridor. Transport demand for various scenarios of the wider rapid transit network will also be assessed, including a NWRT-only scenario.

26.     It’s important that we undertake a robust analysis of all the potential bus and rail rapid transit options in order to deliver the best outcome for the Northwest.

27.     A previous investigation, as part of the Indicative Business Case, looked at the Westgate to Newton Road section of the Northwestern Motorway and recommended bus as the preferred mode.

28.     However, those investigations didn’t include the city centre components of the journey, from Newton Road to downtown, where the most critical constraints are. Previous work was also undertaken five years ago, so it is important to reflect any changes that have occurred since then such as further development of other rapid transit projects in Auckland as well as more recent city centre planning by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

29.     This means we need to undertake some further technical work to confirm the best mode for the corridor, as part of developing a Detailed Business Case for the project.

30.     The recommended mode will be determined based on a number of factors, including consideration of:

a.   demand

b.   capacity

c.   journey times

d.   how long the solution will continue to operate effectively, and potential for it to be upgraded

e.   engineering factors

f.    cost and value for money

g.   land acquisition

h.   integration and staging the delivery of the wider rapid transit network

i.    as well as other detailed analysis (e.g. environmental impacts).

 

31.     The overall route alignment and station placements along the NWRT corridor will be assessed with consideration to respective urban hubs and business developments, as well as key local feeder bus routes that will need to be established to support the project outcomes. 

32.     We will share the outcomes of our investigations into mode and route as the Detailed Business Case progresses.

Integration with the local network

33.     The success of a rapid transit solution along SH16 will be dependent on reliable walking, cycling and bus journeys on local roads connecting to stations along the motorway.

34.     The scope of this project includes access and connections to local bus services – we’re working with Auckland Transport to look at improvements to the supporting transport network (including feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling).

Integration with the wider rapid transit network

35.     This project will provide connections to the growing rapid transit network and make Tāmaki Makaurau a better place to live, while at the same time moving us towards a healthier transport network.

36.     As part of this project, we’re taking a whole of network approach and working closely with the Wāitemata Harbour Connections, Auckland Light Rail and Te Tupu Ngātahi – Supporting Growth.

37.     Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth has developed a long-term Strategic Plan for the Northwest which includes a rapid transit corridor from Kumeū to a new interchange at Brigham Creek on SH16 which would connect to the Northwest Rapid Transit project.

38.     Further planning work on NWRT will integrate wider strategic planning including the Auckland Plan 2050 and the Auckland Rapid Transit Plan.

Community engagement

39.     The first phase of community engagement ran from 24 August to 24 September 2023 and nearly 4000 people completed our engagement survey.

40.     We are currently analysing what we’ve heard from communities. When a report is ready, we will send you a high-level summary of the community feedback with some local board specific findings.  We are aiming to share this with you in November 2023.

41.     The aim of the first phase was to let people know about the project and ask some high-level questions about their experiences and what they think we should consider as part of our investigations.

42.     The second phase of community engagement is scheduled for early 2024 (March TBC) and will involve consultation on the emerging shortlist.

43.     The first phase of engagement involved workshops with 11 local boards (presentation available Attachment B). We are very grateful for your time and inputs, some of the key things we heard in workshops with you included:

a.   support of the need for rapid transit to the Northwest and better public transport options to support urban growth

b.   the importance of improvements to local roads feeding into rapid transit stations on the motorway, and making it easy for people to transfer between services

c.   integration with the rapid transit network

d.   support for active modes and the ability to take bikes/scooters on public transport

e.   the importance of consulting widely and selling the vision for the project and its benefits

f.    the need for better public transport options further north to Kumeu and Huapai

g.   the need for better public transport connections to the North Shore along SH18

h.   the need to find ways to speed up delivery timeframes and consideration of staging options

i.    the ability to retrofit a bus solution to light-rail in the future

j.    park and ride facilities at Brigham Creek.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     We have made progress on establishing and assessing a long list of potential rapid transit modes and alignments along the Northwestern Motorway (State Highway 16).

45.     We are currently carrying out more detailed investigations as we work to confirm an emerging short list of options. 

46.     Any feedback you provide now will feed into the investigation work currently underway. Your formal submission will be considered alongside the stakeholder and community views heard through the first phase of engagement which saw nearly 4000 people complete our survey.

47.     We intend to publish a public feedback report (which will include local board feedback) before the end of the year.

48.     We look forward to discussing the potential rapid transit options with you at local board workshops in the coming months, prior to the second phase of engagement early next year which will involve public consultation on the shortlisted options.

49.     The second phase of public engagement was initially planned to be in November-December this year. However, more time is needed to further our detailed investigations. Therefore, the second phase of engagement has been moved to early 2024, which will put us in a better position to have more informed discussions with stakeholders and communities.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo to local boards 26 July 2023

 

b

Local board presentation material

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Feedback under delegation - Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

File No.: CP2023/14566

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note Waitematā Local Board feedback (Attachment B) given under delegation into Auckland council submission on the Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parliament’s Environment Committee has opened an Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, with submissions due on 1 November 2023.

3.       This inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.  The Ministry for the Environment has developed an Issues and Options paper to assist the Inquiry.

4.       The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

5.       Auckland Council staff are preparing a submission for the inquiry, led by the Chief Sustainability Office. However, the tight timeframe means that we are proposing a delegated sub-group of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee will approve the submission after the draft submission has been circulated to elected members for comments.

6.       Local boards were invited to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission. Local board feedback was due no later than 6 October to be incorporation into the submission as well as being appended.

7.       Given the feedback date was before the next scheduled business meeting, the approved urgent decision delegation was utilised and this report is to note the feedback provided.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the local board feedback in Attachment B provided through approved urgent decision delegation into Auckland Council’s submission on the inquiry into Climate Adaptation.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       On 25 August 2023, the Environment Committee opened its Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. The inquiry is open for public submissions until 1 November 2023.

9.       The inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.

10.     For the purposes of its inquiry, the Environment Committee is particularly interested in:

·    The current approach to community-led retreat and adaptation funding, its strengths, risks and costs

·    Lessons learned from severe weather events and natural disasters in Aotearoa New Zealand for community-led retreat and funding climate adaptation

·    Effective mechanisms for community-led decision making

·    The role of the private sector in managing climate risk

·    Potential institutional arrangements, including roles and responsibilities of central and local government agencies, iwi and hapū

·    Māori participation, Crown obligations, and how to best give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi, and integrate matauranga Māori and te ao Māori across the adaptation system

·    Alignment and integration with existing legislation and regulatory framework, including the reformed resource management system and any changes needed to regulatory powers and potential economic or other incentives needed to support adaptation actions (both before and after extreme events)

·    Funding sources, access to them and principles and criteria for cost sharing

·    Targets or indicators for assessing progress to more resilient communities and infrastructure.

11.     The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The Ministry for the Environment released a paper to inform and support submissions titled ‘Community-led retreat and adaptation funding: issues and options’

13.     A template is attached for local board feedback (refer Attachment A).

14.     The table below sets out the key timeframes for local board input on the submission:

Date

Action

2 October 2023

Briefing for local board members

5 October 2023

Report to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee (for delegation)

6 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be considered for incorporation into the submission

20 October 2023

Draft submission shared with local boards

27 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission

1 November 2023

Closing date for submissions

2 November 2023

Copy of final council submission circulated to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee members, local board members and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     One of the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan is “to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway”.

16.     Under our current emissions pathway, Auckland will continue to experience ongoing sea-level rise, coastal inundation and erosion, and more frequent and severe weather events like those Aucklanders experienced in early 2023.

17.     Globally there needs to be urgent and rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

18.     However, regardless of the global trajectory in emissions, Auckland and New Zealand need to adapt to the impacts of climate change that are already happening and are likely to continue.

19.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will likely inform the development of national legislation which will have implications for how Auckland Council undertakes adaptation.

20.     This submission contributes to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan through action B1 (Ensure our approach to planning and growth aligns with low carbon, resilient outcomes), sub-action 8 (Collaborate to ensure climate change mitigation and adaptation is a priority in national planning legislation).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The development of the proposed Climate Adaptation Bill is likely to be informed by the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. This legislation will have significant impacts across the Auckland Council group.

22.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

23.     Learnings from the 2023 severe weather events will be incorporated into the submission by the Recovery Office and Auckland Emergency Management as they are deemed relevant to climate adaptation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Local authorities will play a key role in implementation in climate adaptation, as they:

·    are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·    have a responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience,

·    enhance community resilience through public education, infrastructure provision and land use planning processes.

25.     Local board views are being sought on the Parliamentary Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, which is considering options for community-led retreat and adaptation funding and will be appended to council’s final submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     There are implications for Māori within a potential future climate adaptation system.

27.     Central government are engaging directly with Māori regarding climate adaptation.

28.     A communication on the Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation has been sent to all iwi entities and their feedback sought. IMSB secretariat staff will work with the council’s technical team throughout the development of the submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The submission will be developed within existing resources.

30.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will be considering funding sources for climate adaptation, as well as the role of local government.

31.     There are potentially significant financial implications for local government within a future climate adaptation system. Council’s submission provides an opportunity to state our position on how funding of climate adaptation should operate in the future.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Financial and legal expertise will be sought in the development of the submission to identify possible financial, legal and reputational risks to the council associated with climate change adaptation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Given the tight timeframes provided to us by the Government, we will be requesting a delegated sub-group to finally approve the council submission by 1 November 2023.

34.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

35.     Please note that due to tight timeframes this may not align with scheduled local board business meetings and any inputs from local boards may need to either be delegated or utilise the urgent decision process.

36.     Local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission is due by 6 October 2023.

37.     Local board feedback to be appended to the council’s submission is due by 27 October 2023.

38.     Once local board feedback has been formalised (either by urgent decision or delegated authority), Local Board Services staff will email this feedback to be incorporated in or appended to council’s submission.

39.     Once the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation are released in 2024, staff will provide local boards with a memo summarising the conclusions.

40.     Any queries can be directed to Petra Pearce, Petra.Pearce@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Template for submission points on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

 

b

Attachment B - Waitematā Local Board feedback into Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Petra Pearce - Lead Climate Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Feedback under delegation - Biodiversity Credit System

File No.: CP2023/14916

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waitematā Local Board feedback given under urgent decision (WTM/2022/200) delegation (Attachment B) into the council submission on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government (Ministry for the Environment, Department of Conservation) published a discussion document on 7 July 2023 (weblink: Biodiversity Credit System) which is exploring the potential for a ‘biodiversity credit system’ that could be developed for Aotearoa New Zealand. Central government is seeking feedback on the need for and possible design of a biodiversity credit system, and the potential roles of government and Māori in implementing it.

3.       Staff from Natural Environment Strategy (NES) are coordinating the development of a proposed Auckland Council submission. Staff are inviting feedback from local boards, mana whenua and the Rural Advisory Panel, to help shape the proposed Auckland Council submission which was to be considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023.

4.       NES staff provided a webinar to overview the discussion document (Attachment A) with approximately 40 local board members on 21 August 2023. Local board feedback to NES staff was due no later than 29 September 2023.

5.       Given the feedback date was before the next scheduled business meeting, the approved urgent decision delegation was utilised and this report is to note the feedback provided

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the local board feedback in Attachment B provided through approved urgent decision delegation into the council submission on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The development of a national biodiversity credit system is intended to be used to increase funding opportunities from the private sector towards restoration efforts. This could be a catalyst to, or supplement, council activities, such as the regulatory implementation of the National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity (NPSIB) and the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM).

7.       The government’s discussion document is very much an initial consultation to start the national conversation about a potential biodiversity credit system that could be developed for Aotearoa New Zealand. Consequently, the government’s discussion document is very exploratory in nature and does not set out a specific proposed system with clear scope, roles and implementation mechanisms to provide feedback on, rather it discusses a number of different approaches that could be taken to different aspects of designing and implementing such a system.

Main points covered in discussion document

8.       The discussion document explains:

a)   what biodiversity credits and a biodiversity credit system are with some international examples that are emerging

b)   what the benefits could be in the Aotearoa New Zealand context

c)   different approaches that could be taken to the scope and design of a system, and

d)   the distinct roles that government could play.

9.       The discussion document includes consultation questions that seek views on the different approaches and roles for a biodiversity credit system.

10.     Biodiversity credits are a way of attracting funding from the private sector, to invest in efforts by landowners to protect, maintain and enhance indigenous vegetation and habitats, including shrublands, grasslands, wetlands and natural and regenerating native forests. The credits are intended to recognise, in a transparent and consistent way, landholder projects or activities that protect, maintain and enhance indigenous biodiversity, or positive outcomes, e.g., a 1 % increase (or avoided decrease) in the indigenous biodiversity of a hectare.

11.     By purchasing credits, people and organisations can finance and claim credit for their contribution to ‘nature-positive’ actions and outcomes. This is an emerging approach that is gaining considerable interest internationally. In Aotearoa New Zealand, credits could relate to protecting, restoring, and enhancing nature on public and private land, including whenua Māori (Māori land).

12.     A biodiversity credit system could recognise efforts to protect, enhance and restore indigenous biodiversity in any habitat (on land, in freshwater, and / or coastal and marine environments) or only in some. Biodiversity credits could represent work on whole ecosystems or catchments or focus on endangered or taonga species or remnant habitats.

13.     The discussion document suggests seven principles that could apply to the design of a government supported biodiversity credit system. The principles would let people know what they can expect when they participate in a biodiversity credit system and what is expected of them. For example, the system should have clear rules for the claims investors can make to avoid ‘greenwashing,’ should reward nature-positive activities additional to business as usual, and the system should maximise positive impact on biodiversity (including uplifting mauri and mana of biodiversity).

14.     The discussion document also explains the components of a fully functioning system, including measurement, verification and reporting, legal recognition, potential ways credits can be traded and the roles of industry experts. It notes that regional and district councils could potentially play a role in providing expertise to landowners for biodiversity credit activities and / or projects.

15.     The Government is exploring the possible roles it could play to support the establishment of a biodiversity credit system for Aotearoa New Zealand that would operate with both integrity and impact. It suggests the following two roles but notes that a blend of these options may be appropriate, which could evolve over time:

a)   market enablement: where it provides policies and guidance for the development and uptake of voluntary schemes in Aotearoa New Zealand, and potentially funding for system development as the market is established. An enablement role seeks to influence the outcomes and operation of the market, using non-regulatory tools such as good practice guidance and optional standards.

b)   market administration: where it establishes and manages a voluntary biodiversity scheme and is active in the ongoing management and administration. A market administration role includes setting a regulatory framework, with tools to direct the outcomes and the operation of the market.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     This is a noting of feedback report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     As part of preparing the council submission, staff will consider and present the potential impacts on climate, Māori and local board views as well as the financial implications, risks and mitigations in the report to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee. Due to this being an initial consultation to start the national conversation about a potential biodiversity credit system, central government’s discussion document is very exploratory in nature and does not set out a specific proposed system with clear scope, roles and implementation mechanisms to provide feedback on. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the potential impacts and implications at this stage, and this may become more evident in subsequent central government consultations when a more defined approach to the design and implementation of a biodiversity credit system has been developed and proposed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Biodiversity Credit System central government discussion document

 

b

Waitematā Local Board feedback on Biodiversity Credit System

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Feedback under delegation - Auckland council submission to Fisheries New Zealand on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf

File No.: CP2023/15057

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waitematā Local Board feedback given under delegation into Auckland council submission to Fisheries New Zealand on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Fisheries New Zealand is seeking views on proposed bottom fishing restrictions in the Hauraki Gulf (Tīkapa Moana / Te Moananui-ā-Toi).

3.       The consultation is looking at four options for establishing bottom fishing access zones, also known as trawl corridors.

4.       Currently, bottom-trawling and Danish seining are banned in just over a quarter of the Hauraki Gulf’s waters. This consultation is looking at options that would increase this area. The trawling ban relates to the creation of 19 new marine protection areas in the Hauraki Gulf and also the new Hauraki Gulf Fisheries Plan.

5.       The proposals seek to protect key seafloor habitats by excluding bottom trawling and Danish seining from the Hauraki Gulf, except within defined areas. 

6.       The consultation opened on 30 August and closes at 5pm on 6 November 2023.

7.       The council will be providing a submission to Fisheries New Zealand on this matter and the local board has an opportunity to provide their input into this submission.

8.       The Waitematā Local Board delegated to Member A Bonham, with majority support from members, to provide the local board input into the council submission to Fisheries New Zealand on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf by 29 September 2023 (WTM/2023/1).

9.       The Waitematā Local Board feedback provided under delegation into the council submission to Fisheries New Zealand on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf is in Attachment A.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the local board feedback in Attachment A provided under delegation into the council submission to Fisheries New Zealand on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board feedback under delegation into the council submission to Fisheries New Zealand on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf.

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Feedback under delegation - Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee

File No.: CP2023/15068

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waitematā Local Board feedback given under delegation into Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Environment Select Committee is seeking views on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill. https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/sc/make-a-submission/document/53SCEN_SCF_78FF85F3-7991-4963-60B2-08DBA2A4022F/hauraki-gulf-t%C4%ABkapa-moana-marine-protection-bill

3.       The purpose of the Bill is to seek to address environmental decline in the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana due to human activities.

4.       This Bill also seeks to contribute to the restoration of the health and mauri of the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana. It proposes to do this by establishing two marine reserves, five seafloor protection areas, and 12 high protection areas in the Hauraki Gulf, and acknowledging customary rights within seafloor protection areas and high protection areas.

5.       The council will be providing a submission to the Environment Select Committee on this matter and the local board has an opportunity to provide their feedback into this submission.

6.       Local Board feedback received by 29 September 2023 will be incorporated into the council submission. Feedback received after this and before 16 October 2023 will only be appended to the submission. The consultation closes 1 November 2023

7.       The Waitematā Local Board delegated to Member A Bonham, with majority support from members, to provide any further feedback into the council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee (WTM/2023/1).

8.       The Waitematā Local Board feedback provided under delegation into the Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the local board feedback in Attachment A provided under delegation into Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Waitematā Local Board feedback under delegation into the council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill to the Environment Select Committee

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Feedback under delegation - Emergency Management Bill

File No.: CP2023/14716

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waitematā Local Board feedback given under delegation into the Auckland Council’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Emergency Management Bill (the Bill) intended to replace the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (CDEM Act) is open for submissions until 3 November 2023. The Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee will make a submission to the Bill.

3.       Further to the Memo to Governing Body, local board members and Independent Māori Statutory Board dated 17 August, this report invites local boards to provide input into the development of the Committee’s submission. A high-level overview of the Bill is provided, and a more detailed summary of the Bill’s more significant changes is attached.

4.       Decisions on the Bill, submissions to it and subsequent progress will be made by the government formed after the general election in October 2023.

5.       The report seeking feedback on the Emergency Management Bill was on the 19 September 2023 business meeting agenda.

6.       The Waitematā Local Board delegated to Member A Bonham, with majority support from members, to provide the local board input to the development to Auckland Council’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill by 29 September 2023 (WTM/2023/1).

7.       The Waitematā Local Board feedback provided under delegation on the Emergency Management Bill is in Attachment A.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the local board feedback in Attachment A provided under delegation into the Auckland Council’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board feedback under delegation on Emergency Management Bill

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2023/15051

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for the Waitematā local board Chair to provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board Chair to update the local board on activities she has been involved in since the last regular meeting.

3.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the Chair may, by way of report, bring any matter to the attention of a meeting of the local board or its committees that is within their role or function to consider.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Waitematā Local Board Chairperson’s Report for October 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair G Sage Report October 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2023/15097

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For local board members to update the public and other local board members of the events attended and activities undertaken throughout the month as a local board member. To inform members, the public, and staff of any relevant news or updates regarding any specific responsibilities that members may have on behalf of the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At each business meeting local board members have the opportunity to provide a written report to inform their colleagues and constituents about the work they have undertaken and the results they have achieved since the previous meeting as a local board member.

3.       This report will be on the published agenda and available to the public. Producing a board member report is optional, not a requirement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written reports from Member A Bonham and Member R Northey for October 2023 and any verbal reports.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Member A Bonham Report October 2023

 

b

Attachment B - Member R Northey Report October 2023

 

c

Attachment C - Member R Northey Report October 2023 - presentation summary

 

d

Attachment D - Member R Northey Report October 2023 - Peace Heritage Walk map

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2023/15294

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board to receive the records of its recent workshop held following the previous local board business meeting. Attached is a copy of the proceeding record taken from the workshop held on:

•     3 October 2023

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance to Standing Order 12.1.4, a record of the proceedings of every Waitematā Local Board workshop held over the past month, including the names of the members attending and the general nature of the matters discussed during the workshop, shall be circulated to the members of the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Waitematā Local Board workshop records for the workshops held on 3 October 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Workshop Record 3 October 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 October 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2023/15306

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitematā Local Board with the updated Hōtaka Kaupapa/governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the Hōtaka Kaupapa, a schedule of items that will come before the Waitematā Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

4.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities;

·    clarifying what advice is required and when;

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

5.       The schedule will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the October 2023 governance forward work calendar as attached.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Goverance Forward Work Calendar

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 



[1] Auckland Council (2023) The Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium Restoration and Seismic Strengthening Detailed Business Case