I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 18 October 2023

10.00am

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant, JP

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Erica Hannam

 

 

Melanie Kenrick

 

 

Tim Spring

 

 

Dr Janet Tupou

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda Gweshe

Democracy Advisor

 

12 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: Jacinda.Gweshe@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      6

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              6

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       6

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           6

8.1     North Shore Baseball Club                        6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Approval of Northcote community hub services and integration into Cadness Reserve                                                                                9

12        Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)                                 19

13        Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                             29

14        Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan                                        53

15        Local board feedback on Emergency Management Bill                                                 69

16        Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation                                     79

17        Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on central government submission on Aotearoa New Zealand’s new resource management system: Developing the transitional National Planning Framework                                                         187

18        Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making                                               189

19        Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill   191

20        Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on Proposed options for bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf                         195

21        Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on Biodiversity Credit Scheme - central government discussion document                                       199

22        Urgent Decision: Kaipātiki Local Board Feedback on Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024                                        205

23        Amendment of the Kaipātiki Local Board Community Forum meeting date for November 2023                                                                    293

24        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report 295

25        Members' Reports                                            297

26        Governing Body and Independent Māori Statutory Board Members' Update                 299

27        Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule               301

28        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - September 2023                                                307

29        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The meeting will be opened with a karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

i)            A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

ii)          A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 20 September 2023, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       North Shore Baseball Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding North Shore Baseball Club.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       David Fegan, President, North Shore Baseball Club and Camryn Brown, Vice President, North Shore City Baseball Club, will be in attendance to address the board on this item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from North Shore Baseball Club and thank David Fegan and Camryn Brown for their attendance and presentation.

Attachments

a          18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - North Shore Baseball Club..................................... 321

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Approval of Northcote community hub services and integration into Cadness Reserve

File No.: CP2023/15124

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board for the services and spaces to be included in the design of the new, integrated, multi-purpose Northcote community hub within a footprint of approximately 1,500 square metres.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Independent community needs assessment research resulted in recommendations for services and spaces to be included in the new community hub (the hub). The hub will be an integrated, multi-purpose community facility which will meet the current and future needs of Northcote residents. 

3.       Under Eke Panuku’s Northcote town centre masterplan (endorsed by the local board in 2019 resolution number KT/2019/41 and approved by Eke Panuku Board) the Norman King Building located at 65 Pearn Crescent, Northcote will be demolished.  This building currently houses the service providers of NorthArt Incorporated and Hearts and Minds NZ Incorporated.  

4.       As approved by the local board in October 2021 (resolution number KT/2021/170), the hub will be a refurbishment of, and extension to, the existing library building and annex located at 5 Ernie Mays Street, Northcote adjacent to Cadness Reserve. 

5.       The library building currently houses the Northcote Library, and the annex houses the Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote and Northcote Plunket. 

6.       Service provider organisations currently housed in the Norman King Building and the library building annex have been offered operating space in the hub.

7.       The hub has funding of $17.3 million allocated within Eke Panuku’s capital budget. This budget supports the construction of a building approximately 1,500 square metres in size.

8.       A design brief working group was established to determine the design requirements of the hub. The working group included all members of the Kaipātiki Local Board, relevant staff of council and Eke Panuku, and the service providers offered operating space in the hub. 

9.       Through the design brief working group, and one-on-one sessions with each service provider, the spatial operational requirements of each provider have been identified.

10.     The proportion of space proposed in the hub for council services (e.g. library and public-use spaces) in relation to service provider space (e.g. dedicated art exhibition and provider operating space) is represented in the pie chart of Figure 1 below. 

Figure 1: Pie chart showing the proportion of spaces in the hub building

11.     Staff are confident that the indicative size of approximately 1,500 squares metres, can provide services that meet current and future needs of the Northcote community. The footprint will also meet the requirements of service providers operating from the hub.

12.     The project budget of $17.3 million is considered sufficient for the development and build of a new, integrated, multi-purpose community hub for Northcote. 

13.     Approving the services and the spatial requirements, as outlined in this report, will confirm the design brief. Thereafter it will enable the development of concept/preliminary designs (to be approved by the local board) to progress within the current project timeframe.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the following services and spaces to be included in the design of the new, integrated, multi-purpose Northcote community hub, within the approximately 1,500 square metre footprint:

i)       library services and public-use spaces of approximately 815m2

ii)       one dedicated gallery/operating space of approximately 200m2 for NorthArt (that can be modified to community-use space if required in the future)

iii)      dedicated operating space of approximately 110m2 -150m2 in total for the following service providers (that can be modified to accommodate future community services if required):

A)      Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote

B)      Northcote Plunket

C)      Hearts and Minds New Zealand Incorporated.

b)      approve staff developing individual agreements for shared hub operations with the following community service providers:

A)      Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote

B)      Northcote Plunket

C)      Hearts and Minds New Zealand Incorporated

D)      NorthArt Incorporated.

c)       approve the new multi-purpose community hub being complimentary to, and integrated with, the outdoor space in Cadness Reserve.

d)      note that the local board has delegated authority to approve the hub concept and detailed designs, as the next decision points for this project.

Horopaki

Context

14.     Northcote represents a major urban renewal opportunity for Auckland and residents have a long-held desire to see the town centre revitalised.

The Northcote town centre masterplan was approved by the local board in 2019

15.     Eke Panuku developed the Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan (the masterplan) in 2019. The Kaipātiki Local Board endorsed the masterplan by resolution KT/2019/41, at its 20 March 2019 business meeting.

16.     The development of a multi-purpose community hub building is identified as one of the ten criteria for success in the town centre masterplan.

17.     The masterplan enables Eke Panuku to acquire buildings within the Northcote town centre under the Public Works Act, for the purposes of urban renewal. The criteria and principles of the masterplan must be realised to satisfy obligations under the Public Works Act. 

18.     As part of the masterplan, the Norman King Building (65 Pearn Crescent, Northcote) will be demolished to enable redevelopment outcomes and improvements to the town centre.

Independent research makes recommendations for services and spaces in hub

19.     In 2020/2021, a community needs assessment was undertaken by an independent research contractor. The purpose was to understand the current and future community service provision needs of the Northcote community.

20.     Findings from the community needs assessment were presented in a report to the local board on 15 September 2021. The findings also included recommendations for optimal council provision of improved future community services in Northcote.

Local board resolutions regarding the community needs assessment

21.     Several resolutions were passed at the 15 September 2021 business meeting (resolution number KT/2021/149) regarding the community needs assessment findings and resulting recommendations. The resolutions of relevance are:

The Kaipātiki Local Board:

d)      do not support Recommendation C as some current operators require their own space, particularly when dealing with private customer matters:

i)     Recommendation C: Current information and community social service providers share operating space and align for innovative, comprehensive and ‘non-asset-based’ customer service delivery.

j)       support the following third-party groups being accommodated in the community hub building with dedicated fixed-asset-based space, if deemed by the local board to be needed to accommodated:

i)     Hearts and Minds NZ Inc

ii)    The Fono North Shore

iii)    Northcote Plunket Clinic

iv)   Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote

v)    Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust

          …

k)      require NorthArt Society Incorporated to be accommodated with adequate dedicated gallery space in the community hub building.

22.     At the time of submitting the community needs assessment findings, the provision of a dedicated gallery space was not recommended for inclusion in the hub. This was based on public feedback which identified ‘a visual arts exhibition space’ as low priority. 

Community hub location approval and concern of hub impact on Cadness Reserve

23.     The local board approved the location of the hub as adjacent to Cadness Reserve in a business meeting on 20 October 2021. The creation of the hub would involve the refurbishment of, and extension to, the existing library building and annex (5 Ernie Mays Street, Northcote) which currently house the Northcote Library, Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote and Northcote Plunket. 

24.     Resolution 15(f) from that business meeting (KT/2021/170) stated:

The Kaipātiki Local Board:

f)       require that the location of the community hub building extension has minimal impact on Cadness Reserve, while creating a viewshaft connection between the town centre and the reserve.

Design brief working group includes full local board and service providers

25.     A design brief working group was established to determine design requirements of the hub.  This included all Kaipātiki Local Board members, relevant staff from council and Eke Panuku, and representatives of the current service providers in council’s Northcote facilities including:

·        NorthArt Incorporated

·        Hearts and Minds New Zealand Incorporated

·        The Fono North Shore

·        Northcote Plunket

·        Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote

·        Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust.

26.     The first design brief working group hui was held on 12 December 2022.  At this hui, the architectural design team presented opportunities for an integrated community hub. Each service provider was asked to express their expectation of what the hub would provide to the community, and their role and spatial requirements within that. 

27.     The architectural design team subsequently conducted one-on-one sessions with representatives from each service provider over the months of January and February 2023 to confirm their spatial requirements.

28.     During February 2023, Eke Panuku commissioned a cost plan from a Quantity Surveyor to establish an appropriate size for the new facility against the confirmed budget of $17.3 million. Advice received was that a building of 1,500 square metres total (including refurbished and new areas) would be an appropriate figure to utilise at this stage of the project.

29.     The second design brief working group hui was held on 2 March 2023.  At this hui, the design team informed the group that the spatial requirements requested from providers intending to operate from the hub, were difficult to achieve within the established project parameters (e.g. budget of $17.3 million and 1,500 square metre footprint). 

30.     Service providers were asked to reconfirm their individual spatial requirements and to consider integrating with council services and public-use spaces of the hub design. 

31.     Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust indicated that they do not wish to operate from the hub. 

32.     Subsequent to a local board workshop on 26 July 2023, staff and the design team met with library staff.  August and September 2023 saw meetings held with each service provider to clarify their spatial requirements for operating from the hub.

33.     Details on the spatial requirements are outlined in the table below. 

Table 1: Service provider requirements that have been agreed for the hub

library / public-use space of approximately 815m2  

−      a broad range of flexible and interconnected spaces housing the library collection and supporting library programming

−      an open entry area with comfortable seating that encourages informal social interactions, along with a small publicly accessible kitchen 

−      a computer services/technology space

−      meeting rooms to accommodate activities including a large seminar room

−      spaces/rooms that support messy and maker-type group learning opportunities

−      a casual drop-in social activity space (specifically to cater to older people in the mornings and early afternoons and for youth after school hours)

−      outdoor covered space extending from the hub building for large events and activities 

dedicated art exhibition space of approximately 200m2  

NorthArt Incorporated

−      dedicated gallery and operating space (NorthArt to decide how much of that is gallery space and how much is operating / office space)

−     gallery can be integrated with the rest of the hub but to be standalone / secure so it can operate independently (i.e. not dependent on the library being open)

−     provision of storage space for specialised equipment used occasionally (such as ladders and light fixtures)

service provider operating space of approximately 110m2 - 150m2

Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote

−      office / operating space similar to what they currently have

−      confidential client meeting room    

−      shared space would be beneficial for waiting areas and the display of information

Northcote Plunket

−      one clinic room with a bench and sink

−      future-proofing so that an additional clinic space could be provided if necessary

−      additional office workspace for a nurse that could be shared amongst other work areas

Hearts and Minds New Zealand Incorporated

−      provision of desk space for up to ten staff

−      a closed office for the chief executive 

−      a confidential client meeting room

−      access to a large meeting / seminar room

 

34.     The Fono have a sublease with Hearts and Minds New Zealand Incorporated and have delegated their representation to them.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

35.     The proportion of space proposed in the hub for council services (e.g. library and public-use) in relation to service provider space (e.g. dedicated art exhibition and provider operating space) is represented in the pie chart below of Figure 2. 

Figure 2: Pie chart showing the proportion of spaces in the hub building

36.     Note that 25 to 35 per cent of the total space in a public building for back-of-house amenities and auxiliary spaces is an industry standard. 

Requirements, project budget and footprint

37.     The purpose of council’s provision of a community hub facility is to provide public-use spaces that enhance opportunities for people to interact, learn and partake in activities together. This increases social cohesion and community wellbeing.

38.     The location of the hub building extension should have minimal impact on Cadness Reserve, while creating a viewshaft connection between the town centre and the reserve.

39.     Integrating the hub with Cadness Reserve allows for indoor-outdoor flow between the building and the open green space, increasing greater opportunities for community use.  

40.     The new, integrated, multi-purpose community hub has funding of $17.3 million allocated within Eke Panuku’s capital budget, which supports the construction of a building approximately 1,500 square metres.

41.     Note that an upgrade of Cadness Reserve is part of the Northcote town centre development project with its own budget.

42.     Staff are confident that a hub size of approximately 1,500 square metres can provide services to meet the needs of the Northcote community and the spatial requirements of service providers operating from the hub.

43.     Therefore, the project budget of $17.3 million is considered sufficient for the development and build of a new, integrated, multi-purpose community hub facility for Northcote, with minimal impact on Cadness Reserve. 

44.     Note that the local board’s resolutions from October 2021 have been considered and alongside further design work and hui with community service providers, the advice and recommendations for the design brief have been developed and the local board approval of these is sought through this report.

Service provider agreements 

45.     It is important that the service providers accommodated in the hub have input on decisions regarding facility operations.

46.     To give the service providers confidence and long-term planning certainty, an agreement will be established with each service provider accommodated in the hub.

47.     If desired, each agreement can be approved by the Chairperson of the local board or by his/her authorised delegate.   

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     Construction of the community hub will add to greenhouse gas emissions, as will the demolition of the Norman King Building. However, in the long-term, operational greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the hub will be minimised through design decisions for the new build.

49.     Greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the adaptive re-use of the Northcote Library building and site, will be minimal and consequently have a positive sustainability impact.

50.     The redesign of Ernie Mays Street to have a bus stop outside the hub will enhance the public transport network and contribute to a reduction in transport emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.     The community hub project team includes subject matter experts from across the council family including Eke Panuku; Regional Services and Strategy; Connected Communities; Parks and Community Facilities; Heritage; Financial and Business Performance; and Local Board Services.

52.     Approving the services and spatial requirements of the hub will confirm the design brief and enable the consultant design team to progress to the concept/preliminary design stage.

53.     If recommendations of this report are not approved, this will result in a significant delay for the development of a fit-for-purpose community hub in Northcote. 

54.     This delay will impact the construction timeframe of building the hub expected to commence in May 2025.  The hub is the first tangible product of an improved town centre for the community and is a key success factor for the overall Northcote town centre redevelopment project.   

55.     The wider town centre redevelopment project will continue to progress regardless of delays in the community hub project. This includes the construction of an extended Ernie Mays Street, which requires the removal of the Norman King Building. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Impacted lessees in the current Norman King and David Mitchell Buildings    

56.     The Norman King Building will be demolished as part of the masterplan. The current library building and annex will be reconfigured for the hub. This means that the following service providers who are current lessees of these buildings will be displaced:

·        Hearts and Minds New Zealand Incorporated

·        NorthArt Incorporated

·        Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote

·        Northcote Plunket.

57.     Operating space will be made available in the new, integrated, multi-purpose community hub for each of the four current lessees/service providers.

Ensuring continued community services

58.     Council and Eke Panuku will continue to work with lessees/service providers (as well as library staff) who are displaced during construction of the new town centre, to ensure there is continued community services provision for Northcote residents until relocation within the hub. 

59.     The hall on the corner of College Road and Ernie Mays Street was acquired in June 2023 to provide temporary accommodation for the displaced service providers.  Once the services are permanently located in the hub, the hall site will be redeveloped along with other council properties (as per the masterplan and intended urban renewal public work). 

Local board updates and views 

60.     Eke Panuku have provided the Kaipātiki Local Board with updates on the community hub project through bi-monthly workshops since 2020. Additional workshops and business meetings were also held when the local board’s direction and/or decision was sought for this project.

61.     The local board visited Te Paataka Koorero o Takaanini and Te Manawa to get an understanding of how community hubs operate.  

62.     The local board’s views regarding recommendations in this report are referenced in the Horopaki / Context section.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.     Eke Panuku has worked closely with mana whenua from the outset of the Northcote town centre redevelopment project. The principles underpinning the masterplan comprise the celebration of Māori communities. Te Aranga values and principles have been embedded within the design process of the hub.

64.     The design team and staff have attended the Eke Panuku mana whenua forum on the following dates: 7 November 2022, 5 December 2022, 27 February 2023, 13 March 2023, 20 March 2023, 3 July 2023 and 10 July 2023.

65.     A site hikoi was held in March 2023 at the commencement of the design brief stage with the forum and the architectural design team in attendance. 

66.     In July 2023, a sub-committee of Eke Panuku’s mana whenua forum was established for this project including representatives of mana whenua from Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki and Te Patukirikiri. The sub-committee meet monthly with the architectural design team, to guide the design development and ensure alignment with the Take Mauri Take Hono framework. 

67.     Eke Panuku and council will continue to work with mana whenua throughout the delivery of the community hub. In working together, Eke Panuku seeks to ensure that the project can produce outcomes that better reflect Māori in Auckland, and the Māori cultural narrative that exists for Northcote.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     The community hub has funding of $17.3 million allocated within Eke Panuku’s capital budget. This supports the construction of a building approximately 1,500 square metres.

69.     The design brief working group process initially identified a ‘wish list’ of spatial requirements from each service provider. To realise the wish list from each provider, as well as the provision of council library services and public-use spaces would require a building of approximately 2,800 square metres and additional funding.

70.     The sourcing of additional funding through Auckland Council processes would delay the construction of the hub by at least one year. Construction of the community hub is currently expected to commence in May 2025.

71.     A delay in approving the recommendations in this report has a risk of increasing the overall cost of the hub due to the continual rise in cost of construction materials. This could have significant impact on the overall size of facility that could be provided within the project budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     Identified risks and mitigations associated with the recommendations in this report are provided in table two below.

Table 2: Risks and mitigations associated with this report’s recommendations

Risk

Mitigation

The needs of the community are not met through the new hub, because all the recommended services and spaces resulting from the community needs assessment research are not provided in the hub 

Continuation of council staff from Connected Communities and Regional Services and Strategy departments as part of Eke Panuku’s project control group who meet regularly with the architectural design team  

Additional spatial requirements from a service provider not included in Table 1 of this report   

Consideration of additional requirements by the chief architect and staff if can be included in the design.  If not, the service provider can choose not to operate from the hub 

The dedicated art gallery space reduces the amount of community-use space for the general public

Design the art gallery space so that it can be modified into community-use space at minimal cost if required

Hub spaces are difficult to adapt to meet the flexible and/or future needs of the community due to exclusive operating spaces provided to community service providers 

Verification by the chief architect that the service provider operating area of the hub can be future-proofed and modified to community-use space at minimal cost if required

The heritage status of the library constrains design options

Continued and ongoing collaboration and communication with council’s Heritage team to achieve satisfactory solutions, especially during the design stage

Delays in the approval process of design development significantly extends the hub construction timeframe resulting in an increase of build costs beyond the project budget  

Continue with regular updates to the local board by the project team. Establish clear decision point timeframes with the consequences of delayed decision-making clearly identified 

Service delivery in Northcote is disrupted during redevelopment of town centre

Service transition strategy developed and implemented to facilitate interim relocation during redevelopment

Challenges in logistical and design integration with other public realm projects such as, Ernie Mays Street extension, Te Ara Awataha and Cadness Reserve enhancement

Effective management within Unlock Northcote programme design and delivery

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     The spatial planning and architectural development of the hub and site on which it sits, is driven by the building functions and required adjacencies associated with the Northcote town centre development and timeframes. 

74.     Confirming the spatial requirements of service providers intending to operate from the hub through this report, is an essential step in the design process.

75.     Upon approval of the recommendations in this report, the concept / preliminary design stage of the hub can start in earnest.

76.     The anticipated timeframes and proposed next steps for this project are identified in the figure below.


 

Figure 3:  Anticipated timeframes and next steps for the community hub project

77.     Note that it is undecided at the time of writing the report whether formal public consultation on the concept / preliminary designs of the hub is required.  If formal public consultation takes place, it would add a minimum of six months to the project timeframe prior to construction commencing.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kimberly Rees - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Kate Cumberpatch - Priority Location Director

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services & Strategy

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)

File No.: CP2023/15038

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with an update on the Joint Council-controlled Organisation (CCO) Engagement Plans, CCO work programme (Jul-Sep 2023), and expected milestones in its area for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were adopted in June 2022. These plans record CCO responsibilities and local board commitments with Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare.

3.       CCOs provide local boards with the CCO work programme in their area. Each work programme item lists the engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

4.       The engagement plans expired in June 2023 and have not been updated since June 2022. Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts on CCOs delayed a review starting in the first half of 2023.

5.       A current review of the plans is not recommended due to disruptions and unknowns from:

·        Water Services Reform Programme

·        Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer having dedicated staff to support local boards

·        Auckland Transport rolling out a new local board relationship programme

·        reviewing the CCO Accountability Policy through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

6.       This report does not include work programme updates from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited or Auckland Transport.

7.       Auckland Transport will provide their work programme updates through Forward Work Programme briefing packs coming to November 2023 local board workshops.

8.       This report provides an update on Eke Panuku and Watercare work programme items from July to September 2023 and the engagement approach and anticipated milestones for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

9.       The next CCO quarterly report will be provided in February 2024.  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the council-controlled organisation update on engagement plans, the work programme (Jul-Sep 2023) and anticipated milestones and engagement approaches for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023).

 

Horopaki

Context

What are CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans?

10.     The 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations recommended that CCOs and local boards adopt an engagement plan to:

·        help cement CCO and local board relations

·        agree on a common understanding of accountability between CCOs and local boards

·        coordinate CCO actions better at the local level.

11.     These plans record the commitment between Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Watercare and the local boards to work together.

12.     Each local board adopted their 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans in June 2022. These plans include CCO responsibilities and local board commitments.

CCO work programme items

13.     CCOs provide local boards with a work programme that lists the different CCO projects happening in the local board area.

14.     The work programme is not a full list of projects in the local board area. It includes work programme items for engagement purposes.

15.     Each work programme item records an engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

16.     The engagement approach is based on the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) standards which are provided in Table 1 below. Note that the “involve” and “empower” categories are not included in the CCO reporting as decided when the joint engagement plans were adopted.

Table 1: International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Engagement Approach Levels

CCO engagement approach

Commitment to local boards

Inform

CCOs will keep local boards informed.

Consult

CCOs will keep local boards informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and aspirations, and provide feedback on how local board input influenced the decision. CCOs will seek local board feedback on drafts and proposals.

Collaborate

CCOs will work together with local boards to formulate solutions and incorporate their advice and recommendations into the decisions to the maximum extent possible.

 

CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans have expired

17.     The CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans expired in June 2023. The plans have not been updated since June 2022.

18.     The plans were not updated in the first half of 2023 due to disruptions to CCOs caused from Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts.  

19.     A current review of the Joint CCO Engagement Plans is not recommended since:

·        the Water Services Reform Programme may replace Watercare with a new water entity

·        Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer has dedicated support staff to support local board engagement and liaison following Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts

·        Auckland Transport is currently rolling out work which future engagement plans would need to consider, such as:

o   Forward Works Programme (full list of Auckland Transport projects in the local board area)

o   Local Board Transport Capital Fund

o   Regional Land Transport Plan

o   Local Board Transport Plans

·        the CCO Accountability Policy will be updated as part of the next Long-term Plan which the CCO engagement plans would need to align to. 

What are the next steps?

20.     The CCO quarterly reporting will continue to provide work programme updates from Watercare and Eke Panuku.

21.     Local board staff will:

·        work with Auckland Transport on providing clarity on local transport plans and how the transport plans would either replace or integrate with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·        liaise with Tātaki Auckland Unlimited on what engagement and reporting resource they are able to provide to local boards following their restructure

·        investigate what engagement requirements and role the new water entity will have with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·        provide support to local boards on advocating for any changes wanted to the CCO Accountability Policy through developing the next Long-term Plan. 

22.     Auckland Transport will provide updates on their work programme through the Forward Works Programme workshops starting in November 2023. 

23.     Local boards received the last update to the CCO work programme and engagement approach in July 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     The following sections provide an update on work programme items for Eke Panuku and Watercare. 

25.     More detailed updates to the CCO work programme are provided in Attachments A-B.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

26.     Key highlights from the Eke Panuku Development Auckland work programme in quarter one 2023/24 include:

·        Haumaru Northcote – Kainga Ora has commenced the request for proposal (RFP) process with selected construction companies for the 52 unit development.

·        Northcote community hub and Cadness Reserve upgrade – Updated concept plans / spatial diagram presented to the local board in a workshop and their feedback received.

·        Para Kore / Zero Waste – The Zero Waste Hub has been closed to enable a shift to a new more community focused model to spread the zero waste message more widely.

·        Te Ara Awataha greenway wayfinding signage – New reserve names have been received and final designs are being finalised.

·        Upgrade of Lake Road, College Road and Kilham Avenue and extension of Ernie Mays Street         Concept design being completed along with initial SW modelling.

27.     Eke Panuku’s full work programme items are provided in Attachment A.

Watercare

28.     Key highlights from the Watercare work programme in quarter one 2023/24 include:

·        Lake Northcote wastewater pumpstation renewal – The project is in the planning stages and aiming for work to begin in March 2024.

·        North Shore 1 and 2 water main remediation – Complete.

·        Kahika Pumpstation upgrades and extension – 64 per cent of the pipeline installation is complete as is 50 per cent of the road reinstatement. Works are being coordinated with Auckland Transport and Auckland Council flood repair works to Kaipātiki Road.

·        Chelsea wastewater upgrades – Investigations are still underway with a workshop planned with the local board in October 2023.

29.     Watercare’s full work programme items are provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     This report does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

31.     Each CCO must work within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework. Information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Local boards advise CCOs of issues or projects of significance, communicate the interests and preferences of their communities and allow for flexibility in terms of engagement, recognising differing levels of interest.

33.     The work programme items are shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     This report on the CCO work programme items provides the communication of up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     This report does not have a direct impact on Māori, however the projects it refers to will.

36.     Local boards and CCOs provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to their decision-making processes. These opportunities will be worked on a project or programme basis. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     This report does not have financial impacts on local boards.

38.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Some local boards expressed concern over the quality of CCO work programme reporting in April and July 2023, in particular with Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport is currently working on a relationship project which has objectives to deliver:

·        an enhanced process to develop transport plans that reflect local board input and priorities

·        more consistent and timely reporting, updates and analysis on local projects and issues

·        improved support for communication and engagement with local communities.

40.     Auckland Transport will be presenting Forward Work Programme briefing packs to local boards at November 2023 workshops which will address their CCO quarterly updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The local board will receive the next CCO work programme report in February 2024 which will include an update on projects from Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023) and expected milestones for work in Quarter Three (Jan-Mar 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Eke Panuku Development Auckland work programme update Q1 23/24

27

b

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting  - Watercare work programme update Q1 23/24

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/14941

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with a summary of public consultation feedback, respond to previous queries and seek formal resolutions supporting the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (AT) have adopted a Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. AT is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       A speed management plan for the Auckland region is a government requirement and will set safe and appropriate speed limits to reduce road deaths and serious injuries. Katoa, Ka Ora is the name of this plan, and it is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all.

5.       AT workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora with local boards in February and March 2023, and local boards provided formal feedback about the proposal in March and April 2023, specifically the five development approaches within the speed management plan.

6.       Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023.

7.       AT has analysed and summarised the consultation feedback received and provided responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora. This information is provided as a series of attachments to this report for local board members to review.

8.       Further, the report seeks local board support for the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes within its area.

9.       Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the summary of public consultation feedback received on the proposed Katoa, Ka Ora speed limit changes (refer to Attachment D of the agenda report).

b)      note AT’s responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

c)       note AT’s legal obligations under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (Rule) and that the Rule requires best efforts to complete safe and appropriate speed limit setting near schools by 2027.

d)      note that since June 2020, when the programme started, road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed. 

e)      support the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes identified for this local board area (refer to Attachment C and Attachment E of the agenda report). 

f)       support speed limit review near schools that do not have current or proposed safe speed limits including Glenfield College, Ako Space, Beach Haven School, Chelsea School, Northcote School (Auckland) and St Mary's School (Northcote).  

g)      support speed limit review of additional locations requested in public consultation feedback and recommended for the next future consultation in Attachment C of the agenda report. 

Horopaki

Context

10.     AT is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use. 

Alignment with Central Government policy

11.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy. The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to school.

12.     The strategy’s action plan includes the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires road controlling authorities to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

13.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications; category one and category two. Most Auckland schools are classified as category one, or schools where children may be out and about outside the school gate. To comply with the Rule, speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) are required in the area outside of the school. Category two schools are where children are more likely to be picked up or dropped off within the school grounds.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency).

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent, easy-to-understand changes that communities can understand. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

Auckland Transport’s role

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury. So, after receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board, the safe speeds programme has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland reducing speed limits on many roads.

18.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes, the programme focuses on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation. The phases can be summarised as follows:

a)      Phase One covered approximately 11 per cent of the local road network and focused on the highest risk roads.

b)      Phase Two covered approximately 8 per cent of the network and had a significant focus on safe speeds for rural roads and roads near schools.

c)      Phase Three covered approximately 19 per cent of the network and included roads around schools, rural roads, town centre roads, rural marae and roads requested by the community.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on safety around schools so AT directly surveyed all schools with proposed speed limit changes in late-2022 and early 2023. The summary results of the local schools survey was shared with each local board as part of the February/March 2023 workshop follow-up.

22.     Information about the iterative engagement process used to develop Katoa, Ka Ora was shared with local boards in two rounds of workshops held in February/March 2022 and in February/March 2023.

23.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on. Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. 7801 pieces of feedback were received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Katoa, Ka Ora has been consulted on with the public and with local boards. This report updates local boards on:

a)      The results of the public consultation conducted from 24 July to 28 August 2023 in each local board area, including AT’s responses to the changes requested by members of the public.

b)      AT’s response to the local board feedback provided in April 2023, including AT’s responses to changes requested by members of the public.

25.     This information is included in attachments to this report and AT’s overall considerations for this local board area are summarised in a two-page summary infographic (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report).

26.     Additionally, the full consultation report will be published on the AT website by early November 2023.

27.     The attachments provide a clear summary of what people in this local board area said about the programme so local board members are aware of community sentiment as they consider AT’s technical advice.

Technical advice

28.     AT’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system, the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. This includes finalising a speed management plan within legal timeframes and setting safe speed limits near all schools by 2027. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by 2027, we are proposing to include a review of permanent speed limits near all remaining schools in a future consultation.

30.     Further, the impact of speed reduction on the number of DSI is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

a)      Since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.

b)      In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a 9 per cent increase in road deaths.

31.     30km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed around schools is used for the safe speed programme.

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that Katoa, Ka Ora meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. The proposed speed of 30km/h near schools is consistent with legislative requirements and is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.  

33.     Additionally, speed reductions delivered to date by the programme are already reducing DSI. It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the local board is to support the programme.

Customer research

34.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

35.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

36.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. Their experiences of high-speed vehicles, near misses, crime and ‘stranger danger’ around schools mean an increasing number of parents drive their children to and from school. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

38.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

39.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The Safe Speeds Programme was endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning committee and the current term Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     AT has visited all local boards during February and March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes.

42.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February and March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

43.     In post-workshop resolutions local boards indicated their level of support for the programme. Common themes were higher levels of support near schools, town centres and places where people are out and about.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

45.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka. Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora.

46.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

47.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at their workshops in February and March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications.  Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. Comprehensive communications including the evidence and key facts have been provided to increase understanding and support of safe speeds. 

50.     Funding constraints may require the scale of the plan to be reduced or delivery to be slowed or delayed.  Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback received from local boards. We will use this, along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our legal and safety obligations as a road controlling authority, to help edit and finalise Katoa, Ka Ora, a speed management plan for Auckland.

52.     We have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee in November 2023. Confirmation of a date is yet to be received.

53.     Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board Response to Resolutions

37

b

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Infographic

39

c

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Safe Speeds - Responses to public feedback

41

d

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Safe Speeds - LB feedback summary

43

e

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Katoa Ka Ora Map Kaipātiki

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Eric van Essen, Programme Director, Strategic Programmes, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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18 October 2023

 

 

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18 October 2023

 

 

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18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan

File No.: CP2023/14701

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031 and to provide information received from public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) is seeking feedback from local boards on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP). In particular, AT is seeking feedback on the service improvements proposed for the local board’s area.

3.       The RPTP is the main plan for public transport services in Auckland. It also includes a vision, goals, policies, and targets that relate to the planning and delivery of the public transportation system.

4.       AT will use the local board’s formal views, along with feedback received via public consultation, to finalise the plan. The AT Board is expected to adopt the final plan in November 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to Auckland Transport on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031, in line with the template provided in Attachment A of the agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Regional Public Transport Plan is Auckland’s main plan for public transport (PT) services. It outlines how PT will be managed and improved over the next eight years, with a detailed focus on the first three years. This includes the services that will operate during this period (and how they will change) and the goals, policies and actions that will shape PT.

6.       The purpose of the RPTP is to enable consultation with the public and PT operators on the planning of PT services. This is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act 2003.

7.       Public consultation on the draft RPTP ran from 17 July to 17 August 2023, and AT received over 3,200 responses. This compares well to the 462 responses the previous (2018) RPTP received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Public feedback was generally very supportive of the content of the draft RPTP. This includes:

·        strong support for the plan’s vision and goals

·        support for the action areas within the plan

·        support for most proposed service improvements (with the main exception of the removals of ferry services to Gulf Harbour and Northcote Point).

9.       Feedback that was not supportive of the content of the draft RPTP included:

·        wanting further improvement and/or faster delivery

·        concerns that PT is too expensive or does not provide value for money

·        comments that a greater percentage of the cost of operating PT should come from users (via fares).

10.     The RPTP includes AT’s aspirations to do more in further improvements and faster delivery if and when more funding for PT becomes available.

11.     AT has provided a breakdown of the top areas submitters from each local board commented on to assist the board in providing feedback (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Public transport has a key role to play in helping to reduce emissions, as set out in Auckland Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP). The RPTP acknowledges the ambitious targets the TERP has for increased PT usage, and the actions and improvements included in the RPTP will play an important role in making progress towards those targets.

13.     One of the RPTP’s goals is ‘enhancing the environment and tackling the climate emergency’. This goal guides efforts of transition to a low-emission PT system, encouraging mode shift, and adapting infrastructure to a changing climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Auckland Council’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee endorsed the overall strategic direction for the draft RPTP in April 2023. This included the vision and goals for the plan, and a ‘balanced’ approach to service improvements.

15.     Following public consultation closing, AT also engaged with the council’s advisory panels to get specific feedback about aspects of the plan relevant to the panels’ expertise.

16.     AT has also worked with Auckland Council and Eke Panuku staff to ensure, where possible, the draft RPTP is aligned with other strategic plans and projects across the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     AT held a range of public information events across the region at libraries, community centres, bus and train stations. AT also held two on-line drop-in sessions. Across all of these events, AT had hundreds of conversations with the public which will also be used to inform changes to the plan. In addition, some members of the public called AT to ask questions and seek clarification on content in the plan.

18.     Public feedback was generally supportive of the vision and goals in the draft RPTP and requested additional service improvements (beyond what AT is currently funded to deliver).

19.     Proposed service improvements in the draft RPTP in the local board’s area were set out in a memo from AT, dated 12 July 2023.

20.     AT set out the feedback received from residents of the local board’s area in a memo and supporting material (refer to Attachment B and Attachment C of the agenda report) provided for a workshop on the draft RPTP held on Wednesday 1 November 2023. 

21.     Workshops to date have been positive, with most local boards supporting AT’s proposals for service improvements and initiatives to reduce the cost of public transport to users (such as the proposed weekly fare cap and extended transfer window).

22.     Some local boards have also requested more information around the use of existing services and expressed an interest in exploring the potential for on-demand AT Local services to operate in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     AT has held multiple hui with mana whenua as part of the development of the RPTP and will be making changes to the draft RPTP based on their feedback.

24.     The draft RPTP includes a Māori outcomes section (part 3.7), which outlines key areas of concern to mana whenua and mataawaka and where more detail can be found in the plan.

25.     AT intends to revise part 3.7, and other relevant parts of the RPTP, to reflect feedback received from Māori (both mana whenua and mataawaka).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications of providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

27.     The RPTP is required to be a realistically fundable plan, and AT’s budget for additional services is constrained (and fully allocated to the service improvements proposed in the draft RPTP).

28.     Any feedback provided regarding service level improvements should take into account AT’s financial constraints, and the trade-offs that may be required to implement them (for example, increasing services on one route is likely to require reductions on another route).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no risks associated with providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     AT will use the feedback provided by the local board, along with feedback received from the public and other stakeholders, to finalise the draft RPTP.

31.     The AT Board will consider adopting the revised RPTP at their 29 November 2023 meeting.

32.     If adopted, the final RPTP will be publicly released in early December 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - RPTP feedback template for local boards

59

b

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - RPTP 2023: Kaipātiki Local Board area snapshot

63

c

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Memo - Kaipātiki - Auckland’s Draft Regional Public Transport Plan 2023 – 2031

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Luke Elliott, Principal Planner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on Emergency Management Bill

File No.: CP2023/15529

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request local board input into the development of the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Emergency Management Bill (the Bill) intended to replace the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (CDEM Act) is open for submissions until 3 November 2023. The Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee will make a submission to the Bill.

3.       Further to the memo to Governing Body, local board members and Independent Māori Statutory Board dated 17 August, this report invites local boards to provide input into the development of the Committee’s submission. A high-level overview of the Bill is provided, and a more detailed summary of the Bill’s more significant changes is attached.

4.       Decisions on the Bill, submissions to it and subsequent progress will be made by the government formed after the general election in October 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide input to the development of Auckland Council’s submission on the Emergency Management Bill.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Emergency Management Bill to replace the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (CDEM Act) is open for submission until 3 November 2023 and can be accessed via legislation.govt.nz

6.       The Bill is a part of the programme of policy work known as the Trifecta Work programme that arose out of the government’s response to the 2017 report of the Technical Advisory Group on Better Reponses to Natural Disasters and other Emergencies.

7.       Comment is sought on the Bill as currently presented. Please note that decision-making on the progress of the Bill will be made by the government formed after the general election in October 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Emergency Management Bill

8.       The Emergency Management Bill updates the emergency management system to improve performance, modernise the current legislative and regulatory framework, and acknowledge the importance of community resilience and preparedness. The Bill builds on the CDEM Act and:

·        restructures the Bill to a more modern approach

·        includes current provisions with minor amendment

·        introduces new language and terminology, as a consequence of the shift from ‘Civil Defence Emergency Management’ to ‘Emergency Management’

·        introduces more significant change consistent with the Technical Advisory Group’s recommendations and the government’s response.

A more modern Bill

9.       The Bill is structured with parts and sub-parts (some accompanied with outlines of their contents) and makes extensive use of headings. Some sections of the CDEM Act are moved to the Schedules of the Emergency Management Bill.

Current provisions minorly amended

10.     Much of the current CDEM Act is carried over with minor amendment. The placement of these clauses within the Bill’s structure means provisions carried over may be placed in a different order than they appeared in the CDEM Act.

Language and terminology

11.     Changes to language and terminology appear throughout the Bill including:

New terminology

Outgoing terminology

Emergency Management

Civil Defence Emergency Management

Emergency Management Committee

Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee

Emergency Management Committee Plan

Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee Group Plan

Coordinating Executive

Coordinating Executive Group

Area Controller

Group Controller

Area Recovery Manager

Group Recovery Manager

Emergency designation

a state of emergency or a transition period

 

More significant changes

12.     The more significant changes introduced by the Bill are summarised briefly below, and in more detail in Attachment A of the agenda report.

Greater recognition of the role of Māori and enhancing Māori participation

13.     The role of iwi and Māori has been increasingly recognised in the practice of emergency management since the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes. The Bill recognises the role of iwi and Māori in emergency management at all levels, through representation, requiring each committee to improve its capability and capacity to engage with iwi and Māori, and making involvement consistent nationally.

Changes to the requirements regarding the Emergency Management Committee Plan (currently the Group Plan)

14.     Emergency Management Committees will need to engage with representatives of disproportionately impacted communities (such as seniors and the disabled), iwi and Māori, and other people or groups as appropriate, before it approves a Plan. This is to encourage more proactive engagement with communities as a part of Plan development.


 

Critical infrastructure

15.     New requirements are introduced in addition to changing the terminology from ‘lifeline utilities’ to ‘critical infrastructure’ entities/sector. The requirement to share information is made explicit for the purpose of the Bill. A new requirement to develop and publish the planned level of service during emergencies is introduced.

16.     The provisions in the Bill are part of a wider policy development programme to develop a more resilient model led by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, that recognises a broader range:

·        of infrastructure (i.e. banks)

·        of potential threats (i.e. cyberattack)

·        and their dependencies and interdependencies.

The role of Emergency Management Committees compared to the functions and duties of local authority members of Emergency Management Committees

17.     The Bill clarifies the different roles of Emergency Management Committees and local authorities. Some new requirements are added, and business continuity is provided for separately. The provisions are expressed in similar terms although the function and duties of local authorities are more oriented towards action.

Changes regarding emergency designation - State of Emergency and Notice of Transition Period

18.     The term ‘emergency designation’ is introduced, meaning either a state of emergency or notice of transition. The Bill also requires the appointment of people able to declare a state of emergency or give a notice of transition period from the representatives on the Emergency Management Committee.

Regulations and Director’s rule-making powers

19.     The Bill expands the range of matters regulations can be made for, including operational matters, infringement offences and breaches of rules. A new power is granted to the Director of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) to make rules regarding roles and responsibilities in specific situations, technical standards, training, qualifications and other matters.

Infringements

20.     The Bill sets up a framework for issuing, serving and payment of infringement notices for offences made under the regulation making powers of the Bill, for the purposes of the Bill.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The definition of emergencies in the CDEM Act and the Bill includes naturally occurring emergencies such as severe weather and drought. It is widely anticipated that these types of emergencies will become more frequent and severe as a consequence of Climate Change.

22.     The Bill updates the regulatory framework under the CDEM Act. Under the framework emergency management comprises the four R’s - Reduction, Readiness, Response and Recovery. Emergency management practice seeks to:

·        reduce the risk from emergencies

·        raise awareness of and preparedness for emergencies

·        provide a platform for effective response to and recovery from emergencies.

23.     The changes signalled by the Bill will be complemented by the review of the National Emergency Management Plan, the roadmap for the implementation of the National Disaster Resilience Strategy and the wider policy work related to infrastructure.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The Bill and proposed changes to the framework for emergency management has implications across the Auckland Council group, due to our obligations as:

·        managers of critical infrastructure

·        providers of key information during emergencies

·        potential staff to be redirected to support response and recovery activities.

25.     Auckland Emergency Management is working with various parts of Auckland Council and CCO’s including Auckland Plan Strategy and Research, Healthy Waters, Local Board Services, Ngā Matarae, Auckland Transport and Watercare on the development of the submission to the Bill.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report requests input from local boards into the development of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee’s submission on the Bill.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     There is a high level of interest amongst iwi and Māori. NEMA has held several national hui. Similarly, engagement with marae and related discussions indicate an awareness and interest.

28.     We have written to iwi and Māori to encourage them to both make their own submission on the Bill and provide comment or feedback that can be reflected in the development of Auckland Council’s submission. If there is interest, a hui on this topic may be held.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The changes signalled in the Bill will require amended or additional processes and practices and introduce additional cost across the emergency management system, it is uncertain when they will arise.

30.     It is also unclear how such costs will fall between participating Emergency Management Committees, local authorities, ratepayers, critical infrastructure entities and sectors, their shareholders and consumers. There may also be implications for capacity amongst participants across the emergency management system, critical infrastructure entities and sectors.

31.     The full financial and resource implications may not be known until the Bill is enacted, the National Emergency Management Plan reviewed, the roadmap for the implementation of the National Disaster Resilience Strategy completed and critical infrastructure policy confirmed. These programmes will be subject to the decision-making of the government to be formed after the General Election in October 2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The general direction of policy on which the Bill is based has been signalled for some time. The submission process is the most effective means of managing risk of unfavourable change.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     A workshop of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee to consider the recommendations of the draft submission is scheduled for 18 October 2023. Materials will be circulated to Committee members in preparation for the workshop.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Summary of the Emergency Management Bill's more significant changes

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Wayne Brown - Principal Recovery Advisor

Authorisers

Paul Amaral - General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

File No.: CP2023/14663

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform local board members of the Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation and invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parliament’s Environment Committee has opened an Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, with submissions due on 1 November 2023.

3.       This inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.  The Ministry for the Environment has developed an Issues and Options paper to assist the Inquiry (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report).

4.       The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

5.       Auckland Council staff are preparing a submission for the inquiry, led by the Chief Sustainability Office.  However, the tight timeframe means that we are proposing a delegated sub-group of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee will approve the submission after the draft submission has been circulated to elected members for comments.

6.       Local boards are invited to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation.

Horopaki

Context

7.       On 25 August 2023, the Environment Committee opened its Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. The inquiry is open for public submissions until 1 November 2023.

8.       The inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.

9.       For the purposes of its inquiry, the Environment Committee is particularly interested in:

·        The current approach to community-led retreat and adaptation funding, its strengths, risks and costs

·        Lessons learned from severe weather events and natural disasters in Aotearoa New Zealand for community-led retreat and funding climate adaptation

·        Effective mechanisms for community-led decision making

·        The role of the private sector in managing climate risk

·        Potential institutional arrangements, including roles and responsibilities of central and local government agencies, iwi and hapū

·        Māori participation, Crown obligations, and how to best give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi, and integrate matauranga Māori and te ao Māori across the adaptation system

·        Alignment and integration with existing legislation and regulatory framework, including the reformed resource management system and any changes needed to regulatory powers and potential economic or other incentives needed to support adaptation actions (both before and after extreme events)

·        Funding sources, access to them and principles and criteria for cost sharing

·        Targets or indicators for assessing progress to more resilient communities and infrastructure.

10.     The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Ministry for the Environment released a paper to inform and support submissions titled ‘Community-led retreat and adaptation funding: issues and options’

12.     A template is attached for local board feedback (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

13.     The table below sets out the key timeframes for local board input on the submission:

Date

Action

2 October 2023

Briefing for local board members

5 October 2023

Report to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee (for delegation)

6 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be considered for incorporation into the submission

20 October 2023

Draft submission shared with local boards

27 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission

1 November 2023

Closing date for submissions

2 November 2023

Copy of final council submission circulated to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee members, local board members and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     One of the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan is “to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway”.

15.     Under our current emissions pathway, Auckland will continue to experience ongoing sea-level rise, coastal inundation and erosion, and more frequent and severe weather events like those Aucklanders experienced in early 2023.

16.     Globally there needs to be urgent and rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

17.     However, regardless of the global trajectory in emissions, Auckland and New Zealand need to adapt to the impacts of climate change that are already happening and are likely to continue.

18.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will likely inform the development of national legislation which will have implications for how Auckland Council undertakes adaptation.

19.     This submission contributes to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan through action B1 (Ensure our approach to planning and growth aligns with low carbon, resilient outcomes), sub-action 8 (Collaborate to ensure climate change mitigation and adaptation is a priority in national planning legislation).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The development of the proposed Climate Adaptation Bill is likely to be informed by the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. This legislation will have significant impacts across the Auckland Council group.

21.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

22.     Learnings from the 2023 severe weather events will be incorporated into the submission by the Recovery Office and Auckland Emergency Management as they are deemed relevant to climate adaptation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Local authorities will play a key role in implementation in climate adaptation, as they:

·        are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·        have a responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience,

·        enhance community resilience through public education, infrastructure provision and land use planning processes.

24.     Local board views are being sought on the Parliamentary Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, which is considering options for community-led retreat and adaptation funding and will be appended to council’s final submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     There are implications for Māori within a potential future climate adaptation system.

26.     Central government are engaging directly with Māori regarding climate adaptation.

27.     A communication on the Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation has been sent to all iwi entities and their feedback sought. IMSB secretariat staff will work with the council’s technical team throughout the development of the submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The submission will be developed within existing resources.

29.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will be considering funding sources for climate adaptation, as well as the role of local government.

30.     There are potentially significant financial implications for local government within a future climate adaptation system. Council’s submission provides an opportunity to state our position on how funding of climate adaptation should operate in the future.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Financial and legal expertise will be sought in the development of the submission to identify possible financial, legal and reputational risks to the council associated with climate change adaptation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Given the tight timeframes provided to us by the Government, we will be requesting a delegated sub-group to finally approve the council submission by 1 November 2023.

33.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

34.     Please note that due to tight timeframes this may not align with scheduled local board business meetings and any inputs from local boards may need to either be delegated or utilise the urgent decision process.

35.     Local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission was due by 6 October 2023.

36.     Local board feedback to be appended to the council’s submission is due by 27 October 2023.

37.     Once local board feedback has been formalised (either by urgent decision or delegated authority), Local Board Services staff will email this feedback to be incorporated in or appended to council’s submission.

38.     Once the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation are released in 2024, staff will provide local boards with a memo summarising the conclusions.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Attachment A - Template for submission points on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

87

b

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Attachment B - Community-led retreat and adaptation funding: Issues and options

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Petra Pearce - Lead Climate Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on central government submission on Aotearoa New Zealand’s new resource management system: Developing the transitional National Planning Framework

File No.: CP2023/14931

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Kaipātiki Local Board’s feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on Aotearoa New Zealand’s new resource management system: Developing the transitional National Planning Framework.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Over the past several years, the Government has been on a journey to reform Aotearoa New Zealand’s resource management system. The Natural and Built Environment Act 2023 (NBA) and the Spatial Planning Act 2023 (SPA) were passed on 23 August 2023, introducing a new environmental management system in Aotearoa.

3.       The NBA set out how the environment will be protected and used, and the SPA mandates that each region will develop long-term spatial strategies that provide strategic direction. The Acts provide important mechanisms for meeting the Government’s objectives of reform – namely, to:

·        better protect the environment

·        enable development

·        give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi)

·        respond to climate change

·        improve system efficiency.

4.       The Government is now moving to implement the new resource management legislation. The NBA introduces the National Planning Framework (NPF), which will bring together central government direction for the planning system into a single integrated document. The NPF will provide direction on matters of national significance, environmental limits and targets, and help resolve conflict among outcomes where practicable. The Ministry for the Environment are preparing the NPF in stages. The first stage – and an early requirement of the NBA – is to develop a transitional NPF proposal, intended to come into effect in 2025. The transitional NPF proposal provides national direction on how decision-makers in the new system must manage the natural and built environment.

5.       The NPF will evolve over the next seven to ten years, as the new resource management system is embedded.

6.       The transitional NPF aims to make substantial progress towards a single, integrated framework for national direction. As a transitional instrument, it focuses on carrying across the policy intent of the substantial body of existing national direction (made under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA)) and integrating this into the new legislative framework. This is important to ensure that we build on the good work and momentum of recent years, such as the ongoing implementation of the National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management (NPS-FM).

7.       The transitional NPF proposal also includes some new direction to support the development of regional spatial strategies (RSS), which will be the initial focus of regional planning committees (RPCs). New requirements also include a first set of attributes for which environmental limits and targets must be set.

8.       The proposal also provides direction on:

·        good planning outcomes that reduce the risks of natural hazards and the effects of climate change

·        protection of outstanding natural landscapes and outstanding natural features

·        protection of cultural heritage

·        providing for infrastructure.

9.       The full content of the framework can be found at https://environment.govt.nz/publications/aotearoa-new-zealands-new-resource-management-system-developing-the-transitional-national-planning-framework/

10.     Auckland Council has been given the opportunity to provide feedback on the Government’s Aotearoa New Zealand’s new resource management system: Developing the transitional National Planning Framework.

11.     The timeframe for member feedback and approval process for the submission is below:

·        Wednesday 8 November 2023 - feedback will be incorporated into council’s submission.

·        Friday 8 December 2023 – feedback will be appended to council’s submission. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide input into the development of Auckland Council’s submission on Aotearoa New Zealand’s new resource management system: Developing the transitional National Planning Framework.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making

File No.: CP2023/15009

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Kaipātiki Local Board’s feedback to be appended to Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Government is seeking feedback on a proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making. This is a first step from central government to provide additional support for local government to manage risks to people and property from natural hazards such as floods, landslides and coastal inundation. 

3.       The proposed NPS-NHD would direct decision-makers to take a risk-based approach to natural hazards when making planning decisions relating to new development. The proposed NPS-NHD will identify three natural hazard risk categories (high, moderate and low). It will direct decision-makers to address the level of risk based on the likelihood and consequence of a natural hazard event, and then assess the tolerance to a natural hazard event in relation to the proposed new development.

4.       Tolerance is based on many factors, including the willingness and capability of those affected by the risk (eg, the community, Māori or the Crown) to bear the direct and indirect risks and costs of the natural hazard.

5.       Based on a decision-maker’s assessment of natural hazard risk and the tolerance to the risk, the proposed NPS-NHD will direct the decision-maker to:

·        in high natural hazard risk areas, avoid new development unless the level of risk can be reduced to at least a tolerable level

·        in moderate natural hazard risk areas, reduce risk to as low as reasonably practicable

·        in low natural hazard risk areas, enable new development.

6.       The NPS-NHD would have an immediate effect, because decision-makers would need to have regard to the NPS-NHD when making decisions on resource consents or designations and give effect to the NPS-NHD for any private plan change decisions on and from the commencement date of the NPS-NHD. Local authorities would also need to give effect to the NPS-NHD through updating their planning instruments as soon as reasonably practicable. Until a plan change has been made, decisions will rely on existing plans, including the plan’s rules to trigger the need for a consent. As part of a plan change, local authorities may choose to remap natural hazard risk areas and reclassify the level of natural hazard risk accordingly, but the NPS-NHD will not require them to do so.

7.       Remaining Māori land is disproportionately exposed to natural hazard risk, and developing Māori land can be challenging. The proposed NPS-NHD seeks to acknowledge and deliver on the Treaty of Waitangi principles of active protection and tino rangatiratanga by requiring decision-makers. It will do this by requiring decision-makers to engage early and involve tangata whenua (through existing resource management processes) when making decisions on new developments on specified Māori land where a high or moderate risk exists.

8.       The full content of the proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making can be found at: https://consult.environment.govt.nz/environment/proposed-nps-for-natural-hazard-decision-making/

9.       Auckland Council has been given the opportunity to provide feedback on the proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making.

10.     The timeframe for member feedback and approval process for the submission is below:

·        Wednesday 6 October 2023 - feedback will be incorporated into council’s submission.

·        Friday 10 November 2023 – feedback will be appended to council’s submission. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to be appended to Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill

File No.: CP2023/14677

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Kaipātiki Local Board’s feedback on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill seeks to contribute to the restoration of the health and mauri of the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana. It proposes to do this by establishing two marine reserves, five seafloor protection areas, and 12 high protection areas in the Hauraki Gulf, and acknowledging customary rights within seafloor protection areas and high protection areas.

3.       This bill seeks to address the ongoing environmental decline of the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana (the Gulf) due to human activities, as described in consecutive “State of our Gulf” reports. Pressures from harvesting and utilization activities, land-based activities (such as pollution and sedimentation), and climate change have contributed to a decline in coastal and marine biodiversity. Those issues are manifesting in the increasing prevalence of ecosystem changes such as kina barrens, habitat loss, and localized fisheries depletion. New Zealand and international experts consider area-based marine protection to be one of the most effective methods for protecting marine life.

4.       Feedback from local boards was required by Friday 29 September to be incorporated into council’s submission and feedback received by Monday 16 October will be appended to council’s submission.

5.       At its business meeting on 20 September 2023, the Kaipātiki Local Board received a report on the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill.  At this meeting Member Adrian Tyler and Member Erica Hannam were delegated authority for preparing local board feedback on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill (resolution number KT/2023/171), noting that:

i)          feedback is required by Friday 29 September to be incorporated into council’s submission and feedback received by Monday 16 October will be appended to council’s submission;

ii)         proposed board feedback will be circulated to all members via email for comment and indicative approval prior to it being submitted; and

iii)        finalised board feedback will be placed on the next available business meeting agenda for noting purposes.

6.       The feedback submitted on behalf of the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the feedback on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill as provided in Attachment A to this agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Feedback from Kaipātiki Local Board on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill

195

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on Proposed options for bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf

File No.: CP2023/14684

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Kaipātiki Local Board’s feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Fisheries New Zealand released a discussion paper consulting on options for establishing bottom fishing access zones, also known as trawl corridors, in the Hauraki Gulf (Tīkapa Moana / Te Moananui-ā-Toi) on 30 August 2023. The proposals follow the June 2021 publication of Revitalising the Gulf.

3.       The Fisheries New Zealand proposal presents four options for bottom fishing access zones (BFAZ) that vary in closing 74.1 per cent to 87.3 per cent of the Gulf to Danish seining and 77.1 per cent to 89.2 per cent of the Gulf to bottom trawl fishing. Current closures protect on average 35 per cent of predicted suitable habitat. The proposals seek to protect key seafloor habitats by excluding bottom trawling and Danish seining from the Hauraki Gulf, except within defined areas.

4.       Feedback from local boards was required by Friday 29 September to be incorporated into council’s submission and feedback received by Monday 16 October was to be appended to council’s submission.

5.       At its business meeting on 20 September 2023, the Kaipātiki Local Board received a report on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf. At this meeting Member Adrian Tyler and Member Erica Hannam were delegated authority for preparing local board feedback on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf (resolution number KT/2023/172), noting that:

i)          feedback is required by Friday 29 September to be incorporated into council’s submission and feedback received by Monday 16 October will be appended to council’s submission;

ii)         proposed board feedback will be circulated to all members via email for comment and indicative approval prior to it being submitted; and

iii)        finalised board feedback will be placed on the next available business meeting agenda for noting purposes.

6.       The feedback submitted on behalf of the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the feedback on bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf as provided in Attachment A to this agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Feedback from Kaipātiki Local Board: Proposed options for bottom fishing access zones (trawl corridors) in the Hauraki Gulf

199

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on Biodiversity Credit Scheme - central government discussion document

File No.: CP2023/14689

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Kaipātiki Local Board’s feedback on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government (Ministry for the Environment, Department of Conservation) published a discussion document on 7 July 2023 (weblink: Biodiversity Credit System) which explored the potential for a ‘biodiversity credit system’ that could be developed for Aotearoa New Zealand. Central government was seeking feedback on the need for and possible design of a biodiversity credit system, and the potential roles of government and Māori in implementing it.

3.       Staff from Natural Environment Strategy (NES) were coordinating the development of a proposed Auckland Council submission. Staff invited feedback from local boards, mana whenua and the Rural Advisory Panel, to help shape the proposed Auckland Council submission which was considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023.

4.       Feedback from local boards was required by Friday 29 September.

5.       At its business meeting on 20 September 2023, the Kaipātiki Local Board received a report on the Biodiversity Credit System.  At this meeting Member Adrian Tyler and Member Erica Hannam were delegated authority for preparing local board feedback on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System (resolution number KT/2023/170), noting that:

i)          feedback is required by Friday 29 September

ii)         proposed board feedback will be circulated to all members via email for comment and indicative approval prior to it being submitted; and

iii)        finalised board feedback will be placed on the next available business meeting agenda for noting purposes.

6.       The feedback submitted on behalf of the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the feedback on the proposed Biodiversity Credit System as provided in Attachment A to this agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Feedback from Kaipātiki Local Board: Biodiversity Credit Scheme

203

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Urgent Decision: Kaipātiki Local Board Feedback on Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024

File No.: CP2023/12889

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the decision made using the local board’s urgent decision-making process (resolution number KT/2022/227) to provide feedback on the proposed direction of the 2024 draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2023/2024-2033/2034 (draft GPS 2024).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry of Transport has released the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2023/24-2033/34 (draft GPS 2024) for public consultation.

3.       The draft GPS 2024 sets out the priorities for a 10-year period to 2034 and is updated every three years.  It outlines what the government wants to achieve in land transport, and how it expects to see funding allocated between types of activities across the land transport system.

4.       The draft GPS 2024 identifies six strategic priorities that the government wants its investment programme to achieve:

a)      Maintaining and Operating the System: Focuses on efficiently maintaining the condition of the existing transport system to meet the current and future needs of users.

b)      Increasing Resilience: Aims to enhance the transport system's ability to withstand natural and human-made hazards.

c)      Reducing Emissions: Aims for a transition to a lower carbon transport system to address climate change.

d)      Safety: Aims to significantly improve safety across all modes of transportation.

e)      Sustainable Urban and Regional Development: Aims to provide accessible and reliable transport options to support social, cultural, and economic opportunities. Also emphasizes developing low-emission transport and reducing congestion.

f)       Integrated Freight System: Focuses on designing and operating efficient, resilient, and low-carbon transport corridors and hubs to support economic activities.

5.       The draft GPS proposes an increase in National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) revenue from $15.5 billion in 2021/22-2023/24 to $20.8 billion in 2024/25- 2026/27, an increase of $5.3 billion (34 per cent). 

6.       Local boards were given the opportunity to provide feedback on the proposed direction of the 2024 draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2023/24-2033/34 (draft GPS 2024). Formal feedback from local boards needs to be received by close of business on 14 September 2023. Therefore, the opportunity for the local board to formalise its feedback by resolution fell outside of the scheduled business meeting times.

7.       The next Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting was scheduled for 20 September 2023; therefore, the urgent decision process was used to formalise the local board’s feedback.

8.       Submissions were due on Friday 15 September 2023, which is after Parliament rises for the 2023 General Elections. Submissions will therefore be received by the incoming government, and it is likely that changes will be made to the GPS 2024 as a result.

9.       A copy of the final Kaipātiki Local Board feedback approved under urgent decision can be found in Attachment A of this report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision made on 14 September 2023 as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report, providing local board feedback on the proposed direction of the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024.

Context

10.     The draft GPS 2024 outlines what the government wants to achieve in land transport, and how it expects to see funding allocated between types of activities (for example, roading, public transport and road safety) across the land transport system. The GPS 2024 sets out the priorities for a 10-year period to 2034 and is updated every three years. Auckland Council made a submission on the GPS 2021 in May 2020.

Discussion

Summary of strategic priorities

11.     The draft GPS 2024 identifies six strategic priorities that the government wants its investment programme to achieve (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report):

·        Maintaining and operating the system – the condition of the existing transport system is efficiently maintained at a level that meets the current and future needs of users.

·        Increasing resilience – the transport system is better able to cope with natural and anthropogenic hazards.

·        Reducing emissions – transitioning to a lower carbon transport system.

·        Safety – transport is made substantially safer for all.

·        Sustainable urban and regional development – people can readily and reliably access social, cultural, and economic opportunities through a variety of transport options. Sustainable urban and regional development is focused on developing resilient and productive towns and cities that have a range of low-emission transport options and low congestion.

·        Integrated freight system – well-designed and operated transport corridors and hubs that provide efficient, reliable, resilient, multi-modal, and low carbon connections to support productive economic activity.

Discussion of strategic priorities

12.     The government’s priorities for GPS 2021 are safety; better travel options; improving freight connections; and climate change. An overview of the draft GPS and related documents can be found here

13.     The draft GPS 2024 removes the specific priority around travel options with this largely, although less explicitly, being incorporated into the urban development strategic priority.

14.     Sustainable urban and regional development is a new strategic priority in the draft GPS 2024. Previously, economic and development objectives were less explicit and were spread across the freight and travel options priorities.

15.     Maintaining and operating the system is also a new priority. In contrast to GPS 2021 which emphasises transformation (as opposed to “business as usual”), the draft GPS 2024 seeks to boost funding for maintenance to address what it sees as significant under-investment. 

16.     The climate change priority in GPS 2021 has been separated into two components, reflecting the need to both mitigate (reducing emissions) and adapt to climate change and other events (increasing resilience).

17.     The priorities guide investment decisions by Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) and the crown.

Summary of GPS funding

18.     The draft GPS proposes an increase in NLTF revenue from $15.5 billion in 2021/22-2023/24 to $20.8 billion in 2024/25- 2026/27, an increase of $5.3 billion (34 per cent).

19.     This requires a funding package of $7.7 billion, because revenue over 2021/22-2023/24 was augmented by a $2 billion Crown loan.

20.     The proposed between $7-8 billion funding package is made up of:

·        Increases in fuel taxes over three years ($1.4 billion)

·        Crown grants of $2.9 billion, including $500 million from the Climate Emergency Recovery Fund (CERF), which would be added to the walking and cycling activity class

·        Hypothecating traffic infringement fee revenue to the NLTF to increase the safety activity class

·        A $3.1 billion Crown loan.

21.     Key changes in activity class allocations include:

·        The public transport services activity class increases by 50 per cent

·        The local road maintenance and renewals activity class increases by 35 per cent

·        The safety activity class decreases by 37 per cent.  Note that this is due to the reallocation of funding for safety related infrastructure improvements to the State Highway and Local Road Maintenance activity classes. The government expects this will enable safety improvements to be delivered as part of a wider improvement programme.     

Strategic Investment Programme

22.     The draft GPS 2024 also sets out a series of projects that the government considers strategically important for the development of New Zealand’s transport system in the coming decades. Projects identified in the Auckland region are:

· Warkworth to Whangārei – State Highway 1

· Auckland Northwest Rapid Transit

· Auckland rail third and fourth Mains Expansion

· Avondale to Onehunga rail link

· Level Crossing Upgrade and Removal Programme.

23.     The Waka Kotahi Board approves projects funded from the NLTF, but by highlighting these projects, the government expects that their strategic importance will be given particular consideration during the development of the National Land Transport Plan.

Auckland Council submission process

24.     The Ministry of Transport has provided four weeks for consultation on the draft GPS 2024, with submissions closing on Friday, 15 September 2023.

25.     Auckland Council staff will draft the submission, with input from AT.  Because submissions close before the next Transport & Infrastructure Committee meeting on 21 September, staff will propose that members of the Governing Body and representatives of the AT Board and IMSB, be given delegation to approve the submission. 

26.     A report summarising the draft GPS 2024 and proposing approval delegations to a sub-committee will be presented to the Governing Body at its next meeting on 24 August 2023. 

Government consideration of feedback

27.     The delay in publication of the draft GPS 2024 means that the consultation period overlaps with Parliament rising on 31 August 2023, in the lead-up to the 14 October 2023 General Election. This means that feedback will be received by the next government.

28.     The Green, National and Act parties have all identified different transport priorities to those outlined in the draft GPS 2024. Changes, potentially of a substantial nature, could be made by the incoming government.  It is not clear whether an additional round of consultation will be held should substantive changes be made.  Accordingly, staff advise proceeding on the assumption that this may be the only formal opportunity for council to provide feedback to the government on GPS priorities, issues and opportunities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Council’s submission was lodged on 15 September 2023.

30.     The final Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024 will be released by July 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20 September 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - GPS on land transport 2024 Kaipātiki Local Board Feedback

211

b

20 September 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Attachment B - Draft Government Policy Statement on land transport 2024

215

c

20 September 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Attachment C - GPS 2024 memo for elected members and IMSB members 220823

291

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacob van der Poel - Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Amendment of the Kaipātiki Local Board Community Forum meeting date for November 2023

File No.: CP2023/15152

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve an amendment to the Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting schedule for the 2022-2025 electoral term, specifically regarding the date of the November 2023 Community Forum meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules. Clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings requires the Chief Executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings. Sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of LGOIMA require that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting, and that local board meetings are open to the public.

3.       Adopting a meeting schedule helps with meeting these requirements and allows for a planned approach to workloads, ensuring that local board members have clarity about their commitments.

4.       The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Wednesday 7 December 2022 (resolution number KT/2022/241).

5.       The Community Forum meetings in 2023 have been scheduled in Birkdale, Northcote and Birkenhead. However, due to member availability on Wednesday 22 November 2023, staff recommend moving the Community Forum to 6.00pm on Wednesday 29 November 2023, to be held at Rawene Centre, 33-35 Rawene Road, Birkenhead.

6.       The board will have opportunity to consider the community forum schedule for the remainder of the 2022-2025 political term in February 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the following amendment to the 2022-2025 Kaipātiki Local Board meeting schedule:

i)       change the November 2023 Community Forum meeting date, currently scheduled on Wednesday, 22 November 2023 at 6.00pm, to Wednesday, 29 November 2023 at 6.00pm, to be held at Rawene Centre, 33-35 Rawene Road, Birkenhead.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2023/00041

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to update members on recent activities, projects and issues since the last meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2023/00051

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note any verbal reports of members.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Governing Body and Independent Māori Statutory Board Members' Update

File No.: CP2023/00064

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for Governing Body and Independent Māori Statutory Board members to update the board on Governing Body or Independent Māori Statutory Board issues, or issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Governing Body and Independent Māori Statutory Board members’ verbal updates.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule

File No.: CP2023/13832

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the Board for 2023 and an overview of workshops scheduled for the month ahead.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule (previously named Governance Forward Work Calendar) was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local board’s governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The October – November 2023 Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       The October - December 2023 workshop forward work programme for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B to the agenda report. Scheduled items may change at short notice depending on the urgency of matters presented to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Kaipātiki Local Board October - November 2023 Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule and October – December 2023 workshop forward work programme.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Hōtaka Kaupapa

305

b

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - October-December 2023 workshop forward work programme.

307

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Paul Edwards - Senior Local Board Advisor

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - September 2023

File No.: CP2023/13835

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 6 September 2023, Wednesday 13 September 2023 and Wednesday 20 September 2023, 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 6 September, the workshop session was on:

·        Parks and Community Facilities

-     Full Facilities Contract Performance.

·        Annual Report

·        Local board workshop – SCP feedback

·        Connected Communities

-     Community houses and centres presentations

-     Matariki debrief

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 13 September 2023, the workshop session was on:

·        Local Board engagement on ECE outsourcing – PUBLIC EXCLUDED

·        Customer and Community Services – Active Communities

-     Pools and Leisure update

·        Customer and Community Services – Connected Communities

-     Civil Defence and Community Resilience

-     Kaipātiki Local Board Crime Prevention Fund Proposal.

·        Draft 2023 Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP)

·        Local Board Plan – possible changes based on feedback.

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 20 September 2023, the workshop session was on:

·        Northcote Community Hub

·        Local Board Annual Planning workshop 1 – LTP intro.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the record for the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 6 September 2023, Wednesday 13 September 2023 and Wednesday 20 September 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 6 September 2023 workshop record

311

b

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 13 September 2023 workshop record

313

c

18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 20 September 2023 workshop record

315

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Paul Edwards - Senior Local Board Advisor

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

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18 October 2023

 

 

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18 October 2023

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    18 October 2023 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - North Shore Baseball Club     Page 319


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 October 2023