I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manurewa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 October 2023

1.30pm

Manurewa Local Board Office
7 Hill Road
Manurewa

 

Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Glenn Murphy

 

Deputy Chairperson

Matt Winiata

 

Members

Joseph Allan

 

 

Heather Andrew

 

 

Anne Candy

 

 

Angela Cunningham-Marino

 

 

Andrew Lesa

 

 

Rangi McLean

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rohin Patel

Democracy Advisor

 

13 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 021 914 618

Email: rohin.patel@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Falelalaga Cultural and Education Centre                                  5

8.2     Deputation - Te Pūtahi Māori o Manurewa                                                        6

8.3     Deputation - Swimgym and Find Your Field of Dreams                                  6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              7

11        Governing Body Members' Update                                                                              9

12        Chairperson's Update                                                                                                 11

13        Adoption of the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023                                                 13

14        Manurewa Local Grant Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2023/2024 Grants Allocations                                                                                                       19

15        Implementation of the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2023/2024                                                                                                                      35

16        Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025                                                                                                                      57

17        Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                    71

18        Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan                         97

19        Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation              113

20        Approval for a new private road name at 49 Jellicoe Road, Manurewa              127

21        Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)      135

22        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule          145

23        For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board                       149

24        Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - October 2023  157

25        Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records                                                           161

26        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 21 September 2023, as true and correct.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Manurewa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Falelalaga Cultural and Education Centre

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Penina Ifopo from Falelalaga Cultural and Education Centre will be in attendance to provide the board with an update on the work they have been doing in the community and present a proposal to the local board. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Penina Ifopo from Falelalaga Cultural and Education Centre for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Te Pūtahi Māori o Manurewa

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Pania Wilson from Te Pūtahi Māori o Manurewa will be in attendance to speak to the board regarding an objection to the process of naming of Katikati Drive in Manurewa.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Pania Wilson, Chair of Te Pūtahi Māori o Manurewa combined board of trustees, for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Swimgym and Find Your Field of Dreams

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Horst Miehe Swimgym and Rick Pickard from the Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation will be in attendance to speak to the board about the Swimgym programme. They will also highlight some challenges and opportunities that the facilities review and tender process, currently underway through Auckland Pools and Leisure, could present.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Horst Miehe from Swimgym and Rick Pickard from the Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation, for their presentation and attendance.

 

Attachments

a          19 October 2023: Manurewa Local Board - Deputation - Swimgym and Find Your Field of Dreams Presentation...................................................... 175

 


 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Governing Body Members' Update

File No.: CP2023/14313

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the ward area Governing Body members to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive verbal or written updates from Councillors Angela Dalton and Daniel Newman.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Update

File No.: CP2023/14314

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on activities since the last business meeting undertaken in their capacity as Chairperson.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson Glenn Murphy to update the local board on his activities as Chairperson since the last business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal report from the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Adoption of the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023

File No.: CP2023/14271

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption every three years and use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

3.       A draft version of the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period for the SCP ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

4.       The local board has considered all submissions and feedback received from the consultation period. Key changes and minor edits for clarification are proposed.

5.       The Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023, which includes the proposed changes, will be tabled at the meeting.

6.       The key sections of the Local Board Plan 2023 are:

·    Māori outcomes

·    Climate action

·    Our people

·    Our environment

·    Our community

·    Our places

·    Our economy.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      adopt the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023, tabled at the meeting.

b)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Manurewa Local Board to approve any minor edits that may be necessary to the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023 prior to publication.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·    adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

9.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the Local Board Plan 2023

10.     Māori outcomes – our high population of Māori residents enjoy relevant and welcoming public facilities and services. We support Māori-led services, and engagement and relationships with iwi, marae and Māori communities are ongoing.

11.     Climate action - our communities are more resilient to climate change effects. In an increasingly complex and uncertain risk landscape, we want to ensure our people are more prepared and more resilient to climate change effects.

12.     Our people - our people are resilient, connected and engaged. We take pride in Manurewa, enjoying quality of life, diversity and a sense of safety and connection.

13.     Our environment - our environment is protected, restored and enhanced. We care for our natural treasures, restored waterways and flourishing urban forest. We’re reducing our carbon footprint, greenhouse gas emissions and waste, and building community resilience to climate change effects.

14.     Our community - our communities enjoy responsive services and facilities that enable great participation. our facilities and public places are popular gathering points. They offer choices for people from different backgrounds and life-stages to take part in sports, recreation, creativity and play.

15.     Our places - our urban development attracts quality employment, community and sustainability outcomes that meet the needs of our growing population. Our transport network is accessible, affordable, offers choice and makes it easy to move around.

16.     Our economy - our local economy is strong, and our town centres are thriving. People can live, work and play close to home. Businesses want to invest here, local people can get quality local jobs, and young people are well prepared for, and engaged in, the workforce.

Consideration of submissions and feedback

17.     A draft version of the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

18.     The Manurewa Local Board has considered the submissions and feedback received.

19.     Public feedback on the draft plan was generally positive. The majority of submitters were supportive of the plan, its direction and themes covered.

20.     Analysis indicates that a significantly high percentage of submissions (35 per cent) were from young people aged under 15 years. This is largely consistent with the demographics of the Manurewa local board area, which has an under-15 population of 25.8 per cent. However, European submitters were significantly over-represented (70 per cent) compared with the proportion of the population of the area that identify with this ethnicity (29.2 per cent).

21.     The key feedback points, with staff analysis and subsequent proposed changes to the outcome chapters are outlined in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Key changes to the draft Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023

Key point of feedback

Analysis

Proposed change

Celebrating Māori and Pasifika culture

Add a focus on Māori and Pasifika creative arts to the investigation of an arts broker programme

Amend initiative as follows:

Investigate the feasibility of an arts broker programme to nurture creative expression. This resource would include a specific focus on supporting Māori and Pacific creative arts

Protection for properties affected by coastal erosion and flood risks

Add in an advocacy initiative to Governing Body to ensure that zoning in coastal and flood prone areas is of an appropriate level of intensity

Add advocacy as follows:

Advocate to Governing Body for:

Appropriate low intensity zoning in coastal areas of Manurewa where there is a risk of flooding

Keep drains free from rubbish

Add clearance of drain grates to initiative advocating for more frequent clearance of stormwater sumps

Amend initiative as follows:

Advocate to the Governing Body for a minimum of twice-yearly of stormwater sumps and more frequent clearance drain grates to be a routine and ongoing service to mitigate flood risk

Drain grates in significant transport corridors within low lying and flood prone areas will require the most frequent clearance

Auditing of drain and sump clearance needs to be increased to monitor and enforce contractor compliance with service standards

22.     The Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023, to be tabled at the meeting incorporates the proposed changes to the outcome chapters as described in Table 1 and other minor changes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     The Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023 contains a specific Climate Action section, focusing on the scope of challenges posted by climate change. It considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.


 

24.     The plan includes specific objectives and initiatives including:

·    supporting community-led education programmes that increase awareness of low carbon actions people can take to achieve energy efficient and healthy homes and lifestyles

·    delivering initiatives that strengthen community resilience to disasters and climate change effects

·    advocating to the Governing Body for a minimum of twice-yearly clearance of stormwater sumps and more frequent clearance of drain grates to be a routine and ongoing service to mitigate flood risk

·    funding initiatives that encourage reductions in illegal dumping across Manurewa

·    continuing to fund locally led food sovereignty and initiating ways to strengthen community-led food systems

·    making community facilities available for third parties and community-based energy projects to invest in electric vehicle charging, renewable energy and battery storage

·    focusing on transport options that encourage a mode shift from private car use, are easy to access and meet diverse community needs

·    investigating the feasibility of a covered Manurewa night market that prioritises local stall holders, ensures access is affordable and promotes zero waste and healthy food options.

25.     The impact on the climate of the final plans has been considered. The final publication will be an online document to minimise printing hard copies. 

26.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Manurewa Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The adoption of the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023 will inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. It will also form the basis for the development of the following three years’ work programmes.

28.     Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft and final plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the final Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023. Workshops were held on 7 September and 28 September to discuss and consider feedback and agree any changes.

30.     In developing the plan, the Manurewa Local Board considered:

·    advice from mana whenua and mataawaka

·    what is already known about our communities and what is important to them

·    submissions received via online forms, hardcopy forms, emails and post

·    feedback provided at engagement events

·    regional strategies and policies

·    staff advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     In developing the plan, the Manurewa Local Board:

·    considered views and advice expressed by mana whenua at hui with Ara Kōtui, a roopu comprising of the five southern local boards (Manurewa, Manurewa, Franklin, Māngere-Otahuhu, Ōtara-Papatoetoe) and mana whenua representatives, on 6 June and 15 August 2023

·    considered existing feedback from Māori with an interest in the local board area

·    reviewed submissions received.

32.     The Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023 promotes outcomes or issues of importance to Māori such as:

·    continuing the delivery of Te Kete Rukuruku which includes Māori naming of parks and reserves

·    increasing opportunities for the expression of Māori arts, culture, stories and identity

·    investigating community lease options to support Ngāti Tamaoho aspirations for a cultural hub at Te Pua/Keith Park

·    continuing the commitment to ensuring Māori participation is effective and meaningful

·    supporting the development of rangatahi Māori through the Tuia mentoring programme

·    advocating to ensure youth services recognise the important place of pastoral care and cultural safety in rangatahi education and employment

·    working with mana whenua and community partners to create a community emergency response plan

·    continuing implementation of the Manurewa Urban Ngahere Action Plan 2022 to grow tree canopy cover

·    working alongside Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua and Ngāti Tamaoho on regenerating the Puhinui Stream and improving its ecology

·    working to improve people’s health and wellbeing in partnership with community organisations, including Manurewa Marae

·    supporting initiatives that increase economic and business outcomes for Māori

·    advocating for an improvement to Māori outcome performance measures for greater accountability and to maintain momentum on progress including creating the ability for Māori communities to influence how funding is allocated.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plan informs this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     There are no risks identified in adopting the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Staff recommend that responsibility for approving any minor edits following adoption be delegated to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Manurewa Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarah McGhee - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Manurewa Local Grant Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2023/2024 Grants Allocations

File No.: CP2023/14662

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications for Manurewa Local Grant Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Manurewa Local Grant Round One (Attachment A) and Multi-board Grant Round One (Attachment B).

3.       The Manurewa Local Board adopted the Manurewa Local Board Grants Programme 2023/2024 (Attachment C). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Manurewa Local Board set a total community grants budget of $209,182 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

·    A total of $1,810 was refunded from application LG2310-133 due to project partially cancelled and reallocated for 2023/2024 Community Grants round.

·    A total of $2,000 was refunded from application LG2110-422 due to project cancellation and reallocated for 2023/2024 Community Grants round.

·    A total of $66,368 was reallocated from Community Grants Manurewa to undertake the new work programme activity line item ‘Full Facilities Contracts Park Bins Top-up’.

This will leave $146,624 to spend for four Local Grant Rounds and two Multi-Board Grant Rounds.

5.       For Manurewa Local Grant Round One 2023/2024 a total of thirty-two local grant applications were received, requesting a total amount of $156,285.39. For Manurewa Multi-board Grant Round One 2023/2024 a total of nine grant applications were received, requesting a total amount of $39,622.90.


 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Manurewa Local Grant Round One 2023/2024

 

Table One: Manurewa Local Grant Round One 2023/2024 applications

 

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2410-101

Weymouth Residents & Ratepayers Incorporated

Towards a contribution of Weymouth News printing cost from 1 November 2023 to 1 January 2024

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-102

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Towards facilitator fee, affiliation fee, and basketball cost to run Girls Coaching Programme in Manurewa Local Board area from 1 November 2023 to 28 June 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-105

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated

Towards cost to purchase and deliver MDI Spacers, Fridge magnets and brochures in Manurewa from 6 November 2023 to 31 January 2024

$3,800.00

Eligible

LG2410-111

Community Groups Feeding the Homeless Incorporated

Towards two-month Waka of Caring Drop-in Centre venue hire cost at 58 Mahia Road from 2 November 2023 to 2 January 2024

$6,900.00

Eligible

LG2410-112

Mobility Assistance Dogs Trust

Towards cost of worm tablets and flea tablets cost for mobility dogs from 23 November 2023 to 31 January 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-114

Siala Aumau

Towards cost for Papatoetoe U11 Red Knights team to have a one-day activity at Rainbow's End Theme Park on 16 September 2023

$1,000.00

Ineligible

LG2410-116

North Shore Budget Service

Towards operational cost to deliver Total Money Management project Auckland reginal wide from 1 November 2023 to 1 November 2024

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-117

South East Auckland Senior Citizens' Association Incorporated

Towards transportation, accommodation and meal cost for forty seniors travel to Waitangi from 5 February 2023 to 6 February 2023

$13,500.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2410-121

Auckland Seniors Support And Caring Group

Towards venue hire cost and tutor fee to deliver art and culture project in Wattle Downs area from 1 November 2023 to 31 May 2024

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-122

New Zealand Health Association Limited T/A Sanitarium Health and Wellbeing

Towards venue hire cost at Manurewa Leisure Centre to run South Auckland Sanitarium Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon event on 22 November 2023

$1,544.00

Eligible

LG2410-123

Counties Manukau Gymnastics Inc

Towards purchasing Gymnastic New Zealand Ribbons needed for competitions and club members on 1 November 2023

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-125

The ReCreators Charitable Trust

Towards operational and admin cost to deliver eleven Community DIY Upcycling Workshops in Manurewa from 1 November 2023 to 29 February 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-126

Manurewa Central School

Towards eighty-five students travel cost to Rotorua from 27 October 2023 to 25 November 2023

$4,675.00

Eligible

LG2410-127

Wattle Downs Residents & Ratepayers Association Incorporated

Towards rock climbing equipment and bouncy castle rental cost, and face painting cost for Community Picnic event on 10 December 2023

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-128

Manurewa Business Association Inc.

Towards electrician cost for Alleyway Lighting Upgrade project from 1 December 2023 to 31 December 2023

$3,135.00

Eligible

LG2410-129

Te Whakaora Tangata

Towards staff salaries to deliver Family Restoration Programme in Manurewa area from 1 November 2023 to 29 February 2024

$6,011.00

Eligible

LG2410-132

Rawiri Residents Association

Towards bin collection, toilet rolls, handwash, hand towels cost to deliver Packaging Recycling & Hygiene Project at Rawiri Residents Association from 1 November 2023 to 28 June 2024

$2,720.20

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2410-133

Te Kura Akonga o Manurewa

Towards purchasing new school uniform for Te Kura Akonga o Manurewa students from 4 September 2023 to 30 March 2024

$19,350.50

Eligible

LG2410-134

Disability Sport Auckland Incorporated

Towards purchasing a defibrillator at Disability Sport Auckland from 1 November 2023 to 31 December 2023

$2,150.00

Eligible

LG2410-135

St Anne's Catholic Church Manurewa

Towards venue hire, transport, resources, speakers, activities cost to run Health Promotion and Disease Prevention project at St Anne's Catholic Church Manurewa from 6 November 2023 to 30 March 2024

$5,000.00

Ineligible

LG2410-138

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards a contribution of annual costs to supervise and train volunteers at the Youthline House in Papatoetoe from 1 November 2023 to 30 June 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-139

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Towards Manukau Student Takehome Packs to run Life Education programme at Vector Wero Whitewater Park from 1 November 2023 to 31 March 2024

$5,100.00

Eligible

LG2410-140

Tōtara Hospice

Towards cost to translate English language clinical hospice material to Te Reo Māori from 1 November 2023 to 30 June 2024

$5,609.50

Eligible

LG2410-145

Manurewa Croquet Club Inc

Towards replacing the alarm system at Manurewa Croquet Club from 1 November 2023 to 31 January 2024

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-146

The Methodist Church Of New Zealand Te Haahi Weteriana O Aotearoa Manurewa Methodist Parish (2420)

Towards facilitator wage, corporate clean up kit and skip bin cost to run Lue Lue clean-up project at Weymouth Costal Walk on 18 November 2023

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-147

The Rising Foundation Trust

Towards operating costs for a full-time Programme Coordinator based at Manurewa High School from 7 November 2023 to 19 December 2023

$7,201.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2410-148

Clendon Library Chess Club

Towards admin, coaching, chess workbooks, certificates and badgers, chess clocks and related cost to run Te Matariki Clendon Library Chess Club from 1 November 2023 to 31 December 2023

$1,494.44

Eligible

LG2410-150

Counties Manukau Touch Association Incorporated

Towards venue hire and equipment cost to run Community Growth Programme at Gallaher Park and Mountford Park from 4 November 2023 to 3 March 2024

$15,731.66

Eligible

LG2410-151

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Towards Street Smart handbooks print cost to support high school students in Manurewa area from 29 November 2023 to 29 March 2024

$3,024.00

Eligible

LG2410-153

Action Education Incorporated

Towards operational cost to run twenty the cost to deliver twenty Spoken Word Poetry workshops at Manurewa High School and James Cook College from 15 January 2024 to 31 July 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2410-154

Rawiri Residents Association

Towards cost to establish Rawiri's Little Gardens at Rawiri Residents Association from 1 November 2023 to 30 June 2024

$3,193.00

Eligible

LG2410-155

All Seasons Community Sports Trust

Towards purchasing PA system to run All Seasons Community Sports projects from 1 November 2023 to 31 March 2024

$1,146.09

Eligible

Total

 

 

$156,285.39

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Manurewa Multi-board Grant Round One 2023/2024

 

Table Two: Manurewa Multi-board Grant Round One 2023/2024 applications

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-101

Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust

Towards uniforms for the Aotearoa Māori Rugby League inaugural tournament at Te Atatu South Park and Ngati Otara Park from  22 September 2024 to 27 October 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-122

CNSST Foundation

Towards marketing cost, tutor fee, venue hire, Programme Coordination and Educational Support, operating and admin cost to run Chinese Cultural Competency Training Programme from 15 January 2024 to 30 November 2024

$2,625.00

Eligible

MB2324-132

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated

Towards Nurse Educator Expertise cost from 4 December 2023 to 31 March 2024

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-135

Good Bitches Trust

Towards cake boxes, flyers, staff cost, operational cost, promotional cost, volunteer training and recognition to deliver Baking It Better project in Auckland from 15 December 2023 to 30 November 2024

$3,520.00

Eligible

MB2324-141

John Walker Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation

Towards swimming instructor and bus driver cost to deliver Community Swim project in five swimming facilities in Auckland from 1 February 2024 to 13 December 2024

$15,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-149

Ngapuhi Ki Tamaki

Towards event related furniture and feature cost and venue hire to deliver Ngapuhi Ki Tamaki Waiata & Hitori project on 16 December 2023

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-158

Better Men Limited

Towards start up cost to deliver Defying Depression, Cool2Care project from 1 January 2024 to 31 December 2024

$0.00

Ineligible

MB2324-163

Babylon Community Development Charitable Trust

Towards airtime cost of Voice of Mesopotamia-Access Community Radio weekly program on Planet FM104.6 from 31 August 2023 to 31 August 2024

$2,392.00

Ineligible

MB2324-164

Bravo Company Charitable Trust

Towards tramping and tenting related cost to deliver Well-being for fathers project from 4 December 2023 to 31 July 2024

$5,085.90

Eligible

Total

 

 

$39,622.90

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. The local board grants programme sets out:

·    Local board priorities

·    Exclusions

·    Grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    Any additional accountability requirements

·    The Manurewa Local Board adopted the Grants Programme for 2023/2024 (Attachment C). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

8.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

9.       The Manurewa Local Board set a total community grants budget of $209,182 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.      The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage.

13.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Manurewa Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

15.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined to increase their chances of success next time.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Ngā Mātārae department has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     This report presents applications received in Manurewa Local Grant Round One (Attachment A) and Multi-board Grant Round One (Attachment B).

18.     The Manurewa Local Board adopted the Manurewa Local Board Grants Programme 2023/2024 (Attachment C). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

19.     The Manurewa Local Board set a total community grants budget of $209,182 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

·   A total of $1,810 was refunded from application LG2310-133 due to the project partially cancelled and reallocated for 2023/2024 Community Grants round.

·   A total of $2,000 was refunded from application LG2110-422 due to project cancellation and reallocated for 2023/2024 Community Grants round.

·   A total of $66,368 was reallocated from Community Grants Manurewa to undertake the new work programme activity line item ‘Full Facilities Contracts Park Bins Top-up’

This will leave $146,624 to spend for four Local Grant Rounds and two Multi-Board Grant Rounds.

20.     For Manurewa Local Grant Round One 2023/2024 a total of thirty-two local grant applications were received, requesting a total amount of $156,285.39. For Manurewa Multi-board Grant Round One 2023/2024 a total of nine grant applications were received, requesting a total amount of $39,622.90.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Following the Manurewa Local Board allocating funding for Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Grants Round One, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2023/2024 Manurewa Local Grant Round One Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

2023/2024 Manurewa Multi-Board Round One Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

2023/2024 Manurewa Community Grant Programme

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amber Deng - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Implementation of the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/13584

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grant funding towards priority projects identified within the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan was adopted in August 2022 to provide strategic guidance on the provision of the local sporting facilities network [MR/2022/116].

3.       On 20 July 2023 Manurewa Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024 including item 3008; Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan implementation [MR/2023/126].

4.       There is $150,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget to implement the findings of the plan by way of grants to community led projects.

5.       Staff have collated data and insights following a series of site visits, kanohi ki te kanohi meetings, phone calls and emails with community groups which has supported the findings from the development of the plan resulting in the analysis herein.

6.       Following the analysis of seven medium-high projects, the recommended community led project grant is $150,000 to Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club Incorporated to support the renewal of mountain bike tracks at Tōtara Park.

7.       There is one known live project proposed for inclusion in the priority projects list:

Manurewa Squash Club – Development of a multipurpose community hub

8.       Following the resolution to formalise the grant, staff will work with the grant recipient to set in place a Funding Agreement and project plan to achieve the desired outcomes. The Funding Agreement template that will be used has been approved by council’s legal team.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve Totara Park Mountain Bike Club Incorporated $150,000 to support the renewal of mountain bike tracks at Tōtara Park.

b)      whai / adopt the amended priority projects list including the addition of the multipurpose community hub project to be led by Manurewa Squash Club Incorporated.

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

Manurewa Local Board - Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024

9.       On 20 July 2023 Manurewa Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024 including item 3008; Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan implementation [MR/2023/126].

10.     Item 3008 Activity Description: Support priority projects identified within the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan. Assess implementation options for funding and allocation of grants based on criteria in the plan.

11.     This item has $150,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget allocated for 2023/2024 with a further $150,000 approved in principle for outer years.

Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2022

12.     The Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan was adopted in August 2022 to provide strategic guidance on the provision of the local sporting facilities network [MR/2022/116].

13.     The plan outlines the current network of sport and active recreation facilities across Manurewa (irrespective of ownership) and identifies existing and future provision challenges and needs.

14.     Key outputs of the plan include:

·    consolidated inventory of sport and active recreation facilities

·    themes and trends of local facility needs and issues

·    assessment of potential impacts of demographic and infrastructure changes

·    identification of gaps in facility provision against current and future needs

·    framework for prioritising projects/potential opportunities for further analysis and assessment

·    prioritised list of projects/opportunities to provide clear direction to support advocacy, resource allocation, and leasing decisions.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Overview of findings within the plan

15.     Manurewa is well provisioned with a comprehensive and unique network of over 150 parks, open spaces, water access and bespoke sport facilities, although, there is a high inactivity rate (30 per cent).

16.     The local board area has high deprivation, is extremely diverse, with the highest Māori population in Tāmaki Makaurau, and relatively young compared to the wider Auckland region. Therefore, the right mix of facilities in terms of type, function, condition, access, and location, is critical.

17.     Optimising and activating spaces and having the flexibility to adapt to changing needs, preferences, and local communities across Manurewa is also essential.

Priority projects and general key moves

18.     The plan identifies a full range of capital developments, repair and maintenance, and spatial/master planning projects. In total, 47 projects were independently assessed and categorised by priority.

19.     Priority projects identified in the plan were assessed using four guiding principles, derived from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 and supported by a series of components from The New Zealand Sporting Facilities Framework.

20.     The project assessment criteria including principles of investment and sub-criteria weightings can be found in Attachment A as Appendix B.

21.     The priority projects list is supported by eight general key moves which may also inform specific projects for consideration.

Community grant recommendations

22.     There is $150,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget to implement the findings of the plan by way of grants to community led projects.

23.     Of the 47 projects within the plan, there was a relatively even spread of asset ownership or project lead, as categorised below:

·    10 school-based projects including a mix of secondary schools and primary schools

·    11 community projects, typically clubs or trusts

·    5 mixed in nature including community-council and mana whenua-council

·    21 council projects ranging from planning to $1M+ construction.

24.     Staff have collated data and insights following a series of site visits, kanohi ki te kanohi meetings, phone calls and emails with community groups which has supported the findings from the development of the plan resulting in the analysis herein.

25.     Eighteen projects were deemed eligible for this type of funding (six community, nine school, three mixed) of which seven medium-high priority projects were considered live projects that could feasibly utilise funding over the next 12-18 months.

26.     An analysis of grant options and the level of recommended support can be found in the table below.

Table 1: Assessment and recommended funding for live community led priority projects

Project

Analysis

Recommendation

Totara Park Mountain Bike Club

#10

Renewal of mountain bike tracks

A memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the club and council has now been formalised providing clarity of roles and responsibilities for both parties.

Although the project in the plan proposes the development of new, additional tracks there is considerable work required to bring the existing tracks up to a safe and fit for purpose standard.

There is an existing council budget for maintenance of the tracks however damage following extreme weather events over the past few years means maintenance either cannot be carried out or is not sufficient to restore tracks to an operative manner.

The club based at Tōtara Park facilitates a number of events and ongoing competitions annually as well as acting as kaitiaki of the tracks. The club has circa 280 members however this is only a small percentage (estimated 5-10 per cent) of track users with data indicating up to 2,500 rides per track per week. There is a strong track record of delivering community outcomes, club maintenance of tracks through working bees and strong relationships with key staff at council and Citycare.

Council land with MOU in place with the club.

$150,000

High

 

Disability Sport Auckland

#17

Development of indoor court

Formerly Parafed Auckland, the regional sports organisation is relocating from their existing facility which they share with the Auckland Spinal Rehab Unit, as part of the Counties Manukau DHB site in Ōtara.

The new facility will form part of the specialised rehabilitation centre at the Manukau Health Park neighbouring the existing SuperClinic site. Central government confirmed a $216 million investment in April 2022 for the replacement of the Auckland Spinal Rehab unit at Ōtara.

A detailed business case was approved by Te Whatu Ora in April 2022 alongside funding to commence the design phase. Detailed design will be completed mid-2024 at which point final construction budget and timelines will be produced for approval.

Project is on schedule to have the Specialised Rehabilitation Centre operational by 2026/2027. No further funding is required for this stage of the project and with construction costs of circa $15.5 million this local board budget line may be deemed insufficient.

Ministry of Health land.

Not recommended for funding

Medium

 

Homai Bowling Club

#21

Convert natural green to artificial

The club is currently completing internal clubroom renovation works. The artificial green conversion remains part of the strategic plan with recent seasons highlighting the need for an all-weather surface.

The club have engaged an external consultant who has provided a proposal to conduct a needs analysis and feasibility study at a cost of $10,000-12,000.

With investigation work ongoing for a new clubroom facility at the park and the development of an indoor cricket net facility this project should be considered as part of a broader vision for the park. This project may be reconsidered next funding round.

Lease expires 16 June 2031.

Not recommended for funding

Medium

 

Jellicoe Park Tennis Club

#22

Resurface courts, re-fence and install floodlighting on 2 new courts.

 

This project has multiple facets as illustrated in the plan. Courts 5-6 are considered the ‘new courts’ added in 2021 thanks to the support of the local board granting $293,000 [MR/2020/30]. Courts 1 and 2 have recently been resurfaced, completed October 2022.

Resurfacing of central courts 3-4 has been quoted at a cost of $81,580. The courts remain heavily used by members and have further playing life until the need for resurfacing.

Lighting of courts 5-6 is estimated to be $100,000. Courts 1-4 are currently floodlit allowing for night play. The two new courts are council-owned and maintained yet public access is not apparent.

Technically not eligible for funding due to the expired lease.

Lease expired 31 July 2021.

Not recommended for funding

 

Medium

 

Manurewa High School

#24

Canopy cover and lighting of outdoor turf

The school have received quotes for the lighting and covering of the existing outdoor four-court turf. Currently undergoing planning and design with an estimated project completion of May 2024.

Community access could be achieved given the location of the turf at the front of the site and the adjacent carparking.

The school has a captured market of more than 2,000 local rangatahi and is generally open to the sharing of facilities with the wider community however most sporting platforms are at capacity already.

The recent construction of the four-court canopy at the neighbouring Netball Manurewa site has significantly increased public provision.

Council investment would be contingent on community access as agreed by both parties. At the time of staff meeting with the school leadership there was no request for funding of this project.

Ministry of Education land.

Not recommended for funding

Medium

 

Manurewa High School

#25

Pool canopy and changing rooms

This project is in progress with the school opting for a shade structure rather than a fully enclosed option due to the cost. The canopy is estimated to be completed by May 2024 in line with the turf project #24.

There are also plans to develop additional changing rooms with an estimated completion date of early 2024.

The location of the pool at the rear of the site has been highlighted as a barrier to community access. The school has previously raised their desire for an accessway to be developed through the Manukau Super Clinic site with access from Browns Road between 47 and 43 Browns Road running adjacent to the school boundary.

At the time of staff meeting with the school leadership there was no request for funding of this project however contact details were exchanged with a view of forming a potential application to the regional council Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund (Investment Fund).

Ministry of Education land.

Not recommended for funding

Medium

 

Manurewa Tennis Club

#28

Construction of canopy cover

The club were successful in their application for $400,000 in the recently announced Investment Fund.

Landowner approval has been gained and building consent was granted in July 2023 conditional of receiving resource consent which was not originally planned for by the club. Council staff have made contact with the club to assist in their application for resource consent.

The total cost of construction at the time of the funding application was $761,350. The club has been working closely with another funder who has indicated their support of the project. Costs for lodging the resource consent are not yet known.

The club has overseen a number of facility projects rejuvenating courts and clubrooms over recent years. They offer a number of programmes and events catering to a large range of age and ability levels and have seen the membership grow from 88 in 2015 up to 295 in April 2023.

Given the significant contribution through the Investment Fund and the confidence of further funding support, no local board funding is recommended at this time.

Lease expires 17 June 2040.

Not recommended for funding

Medium

 

Totara Park Mountain Bike Club Incorporated

27.     Following the analysis of seven medium-high projects, the recommended community led project grant is $150,000 to Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club Incorporated to support the renewal of mountain bike tracks at Tōtara Park.

28.     Formally established in 2013 the club acts as kaitiaki of the mountain bike track network with 17 tracks and several small link tracks covering approximately 15 kilometres at present.

29.     The club have been recording ride data since July 2019 with numbers showing rides per week varying between 405-2,575 from mid-2019 to mid-2022 (noting this includes multiple COVID-19 lockdowns).

30.     There is strong community demand from the formalised club membership as well as casual riders from a local and regional catchment.

31.     The facilities plan identifies a need for tracks which are suitable for tamariki and beginner riders and an increasing trend of families riding together. Further insights highlight the need to preserve and enhance existing offerings.

32.     The club had an application to the regional council fund withdrawn in 2020 due to eligibility criteria not being met or not being formalised with clarity. Manurewa Local Board endorsed the application at the time and expressed concern over the lack of clarity [MR/2020/29].

33.     Since the failed application to the Investment Fund the club have had a freeze on landowner approval applications whilst progress was made in formalising an MOU with council. The MOU has now been signed giving effect to the 17 August 2023 business meeting resolution [MR/2023/132].

34.     Mountain bike tracks are graded, Grade 1 – Easiest to Grade 6 – Extreme, to indicate the level of difficulty to riders. 

35.     Higher graded tracks account for complexity in adverse weather conditions and generally cater for experienced riders with a high level of technical ability. Lower graded tracks present a safe and often social offering suitable as a first ride for non-cyclists.

36.     The renewal of the lower graded (easier) tracks would bring the level of difficulty back down to the appropriate grade. At present there is an increased level of difficulty for entry level tracks due to the adverse weather conditions and lack of renewal works in recent times.

Supporting renewals work will increase levels of provision back to previous rates and remains in alignment with the Tōtara Park Masterplan adopted in august 2017 [MR/2017/188].

37.     The investment would also align with the Draft Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023: “Continue partnering with community groups to deliver the Tōtara Park masterplan as funding allows”.

38.     The wider vision for the club is summarised by a quote from President Kelvin Hieatt:

“The intent of the club is to build a legacy for the park, a recreational and environmental showpiece that the board, the city, and the community can be proud of.”


 

New project for inclusion in the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

39.     The priority projects list offers an independent evaluation of prioritised local need at a single moment in time. It is acknowledged that the community sport sector is ever changing and subsequently as do facility needs.

40.     New projects can be considered for inclusion in the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan following an independent evaluation of project merits aligned to the assessment criteria found in Attachment A as Appendix B.

41.     There is one known live project proposed for inclusion in the priority projects list:

Manurewa Squash Club – Development of a multipurpose community hub.

Manurewa Squash Rackets Club Incorporated

42.     Manurewa Squash Club are leading a vision for the construction of an independent multisport, multipurpose facility on the vacant land adjacent to the existing squash club.

43.     The site, including the existing squash club, is located at 171 Weymouth Road, opposite Mountfort Park, on a 3,420 square meter section zoned for Residential – Mixed Housing Suburban Zone.

44.     The existing facility comprises five indoor squash courts, changing rooms, a kitchen, bar and lounge which serves a diverse membership of around 100 registered players young and old and is recognised as a regional tier facility in the Auckland Squash Facilities Plan 2018.

45.     On top of their traditional membership the club has facilitated opportunities for participation of school students through a racket sport programme coaching fundamental movement skills and integrating well-being and self-actualisation principles.

46.     The proposed new facility would entail multilevel indoor courts to facilitate sport, recreation, dance and wellbeing offerings as a centralised hub for local tamariki to get active and connect.

47.     The club has had several positive conversations with major funding partners and would explore a multi-agency, multi-funder project.

Table 2: Proposed priority project for inclusion

REF#

48

PROJECT

Manurewa Squash Club – Development of a multipurpose community hub

FACILITY TYPE

Indoor courts

PRIORITY LEVEL

High

RATIONALE

·      Proposing the development of a multipurpose facility in the vacant land adjacent to the existing squash club

·      Infrastructure which would accommodate multiple codes and uses beyond sport and recreation

·      Highest shortfall of indoor court space within south Auckland. Manurewa is a projected high growth area for multiple indoor court codes

·      Network need to balance participation outcomes with income generation. A more multipurpose facility would enable a diversification of income streams whilst maintaining participation rates

ACTIONS

·      Consult other codes to assess level of need and scope potential partnership opportunities

·      Ascertain project scope and undertake cost benefit and feasibility analysis

·      Partner with facility funders and seek capital investment required

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan is founded on three key elements to drive climate action, one of which is preparing Auckland for the impacts of climate change.

49.     The recommendation supports renewals of mountain bike tracks following a series of weather events over several years. One of the key goals of the project is to ensure the tracks are more resilient or prepared for the impacts of climate change into the future.

50.     The natural environment is one of eight priorities within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāhiriwi. The club is a key contributor to the annual planting programme led by the council Park Ranger, to ensure our taiao/environment remains as healthy as possible.

51.     The club works closely with the Park Ranger to plan for changes or additions to the track network and ensures a symbiotic relationship between recreational park users and te taiao.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     The land and subsequent tracks are owned by council with the ongoing management of the track network subject to a recently formalised memorandum of understanding between the club and council [MR/2023/132].

53.     The responsibilities of each party are detailed in the MOU and supporting documents which will guide implementation of this renewals work.

54.     Parks and Community Facilities are supportive of the grant recommendation and have acknowledged the need for robust maintenance to safeguard the investment.

55.     Parks and Community Facilities have a separate work programme item whereby they are exploring the maintenance schedules and developing an auditing process to ensure the tracks continue to be showcased as one of the unique attractions of Manurewa.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

56.     The project recommended for support provides significant local, sub-regional and regional participation outcomes across a broad range of ages and ability levels.

57.     The club have noted an increase in secondary school visitation of the tracks with programmes and annual visits now a regular occurrence for many.

58.     On 14 September 2023 grant recommendations were workshopped with the local board where they provided direction in support of the proposed grant.

59.     Two main topics were raised by elected members regarding the project a) that routine maintenance be upkept to ensure the investment was maximised and b) expectations are managed with the club regarding future funding.

60.     Further context regarding these points are covered in the ‘Council group impacts and views’ section and the ‘Risks and mitigations' section.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     Manurewa Local Board have the largest Māori population and the second highest percentage of population identifying as Māori, when compared to all other Auckland local board areas.

62.     The mountain bike track network is free and open to the general public and is therefore highly accessible as a local asset for the largest Māori population in Tāmaki Makaurau.

63.     Tōtara Park is not identified as an area of cultural significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     This item has $150,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget allocated for 2023/2024 as approved in the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme [MR/2023/126].

65.     The grant recommendation of $150,000 to support mountain bike track renewals does not exceed the budget available and as such there are no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

66.     The uncontestable nature of the funding coupled with the type of project recommended provides risks as outlined below.

Table 4: Risks and mitigations

Risks

Mitigations

Community groups who do not receive funding may feel aggrieved

Recommendations support a high priority project identified within the plan. The project has been independently assessed in alignment with council’s investment priorities for community sport.

Club expectations of consistent funding for this type of project

Given the mixed management model the MOU provides an avenue for either party to fund renewals work. The MOU and supporting documents clarify responsibilities and the funding agreement will reference these guiding documents as well as the one-off nature of this grant.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     Following the resolution to formalise the grant, staff will work with the grant recipient to set in place a funding agreement and project plan to achieve the desired outcomes. The funding agreement template that will be used has been approved by council’s legal team.

68.     A progress update will be provided within the process for implementation of the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan in 2024/2025.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Updated 2023/2024 Priority Project List

45

     


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kieran Nevey - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Dave Stewart - General Manager Active Communities

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025

File No.: CP2023/15278

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted on as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

3.       This report seeks the feedback of the local board on consultation on proposed changes to local fees and charges.

4.       There are proposed changes to the following local fees and charges:

·    Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·    Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

5.       The Governing Body will agree regional consultation items including proposed changes to fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

6.       Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whakarite / to seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 for the following:

i)        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review

A)      Membership Fees

1)      The alignment of legacy memberships to current rates over 3 years

2)      The introduction of a new Auckland wide membership option that allows access to all Auckland Council Pool & Leisure sites regardless of operator.

B)      Aquatic Entrance Fees

1)      The introduction of baseline aquatic entrance fees for all Auckland Council Pool and Leisure sites.

2)      An increase to the concessionary discount from 15 per cent to 40 per cent.

C)     Swim School Fees

1)      An increase to swimming lesson prices closer to market rates whilst maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders

2)      A new 30 per cent discount for Community Service Card Holders and their dependents

3)      A new 40 per cent discount for those with special needs that require private lessons.

D)     Recreation Fees

1)      An increase to holiday programme and OSCAR (before and after school care) fees

2)      To simplify recreation term programme pricing.

ii)       Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review

A)      To adjust fees in line with Hire Fee Framework July 2014.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

8.       A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 12 October 2023. This report seeks the feedback of the local board on proposed changes to fees and charges that will be included alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation.

9.       A three-year cycle of fee reviews was introduced in the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. Over the years the cost of delivering these services have increased but the fees and charges for users have not been adjusted accordingly.

10.     Local boards could choose to increase or decrease its fees and charges from the proposal. This may result in extra funding for the local board if fees are increased or a top-up may be required from the local board funding if fees are reduced from the proposal.

11.     The Governing Body will agree on consultation items including proposed fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

12.     Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

13.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This is the third year of the fee review cycle. There are changes proposed to the following local fees and charges:

·        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·        Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.


 

Active Communities

15.     There are 45 Active Communities sites (pool and leisure facilities) across the Auckland region. 25 of these are currently managed directly by Auckland Council. A Request for Proposal process is currently underway for council owned pool and leisure services. Relevant fees and charges proposed will be included as part of the contract negotiations.

16.     The review of fees and charges for Active Communities services has been split into two phases due to its size and complexity. Council managed bookable spaces were reviewed and adopted in 2023 as phase one.

17.     In this second phase, staff have reviewed the majority of the remaining fees to ensure an appropriate level of cost recovery to enable the council to provide an equitable service across the network.

Membership fees

18.     Some customers are on membership rates that we no longer offer. They include memberships may have been in place prior to amalgamation in 2010, or membership types that have since been discontinued. We are proposing to align these legacy memberships with current membership options over three years. In year one, we estimate that around 4,500 memberships (approximately 20 per cent) will increase by up to 7 per cent. The estimated increase in revenue is $260,000 in year one across the region.

19.     We are also proposing to introduce an Auckland wide membership option to allow customers to access all 45 pool and leisure sites, both council-managed and contracted. The estimated increase in revenue from this proposal is expected to be around $90,000 per year across the region.

Aquatic entrance fees

20.     The baseline aquatic entrance fees for all council managed and contracted pools and leisure sites are proposed to change. This will include fees for swimming, spa, sauna and steam room use for adults as well as spectator and supervising adult fees.

21.     Alongside this proposed fee change, we are proposing an increased discount rate for seniors (over 65 years), students (over 17), Community Services card and permanent disability card holders, from 15 per cent currently to 40 per cent. This proposal will increase revenue by an estimated $77,000 per annum across the region and will ensure equitable access for users of these services.

22.     Officers have reviewed data available and found no conclusive evidence to support a significant change to the targeted rate for Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara Papatoetoe local boards at this stage. It is recommended that the targeted rate be adjusted by the forecast council rate of inflation for 2024/2025. As of the time this report was written the forecast rate of inflation for council’s arts and recreation services was 3.5 per cent for 2024/2025. This will be used to calculate the targeted rate amount to be included in the 10-year budget consultation. The final rate amount will be set in June 2024 based on the updated inflation forecast available to the council at that point.

Swim school fees

23.     An increase in swim school fees is proposed. This will align swimming lesson pricing closer to market rates while maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders. This proposal includes a new 30 per cent discount for Community Services card holders and their dependents and a 40 per cent discount for those with special needs requiring private lessons. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $745,000 per year across the region.

Recreation fees

24.     We are also proposing to increase OSCAR before and after school care and holiday programme fees to maximise government subsidies and to ensure higher levels of cost recovery. Term programme fees have also been adjusted across the network to provide a simpler charging framework and recover costs appropriately. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $196,000 per year across the region.

25.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached (Attachment A).

Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces

26.     Venue hire and bookable spaces incorporates community halls, community centres, art centres and bookable library spaces. Fees for 252 bookable spaces at 110 venues are included in this review.

27.     A review of fees has been split into two phases. The Hire Fee Framework considers the size, condition and quality of each bookable space, the levels of staffing, the amenities available, and current patterns of utilisation of the spaces. It also addresses variations within local board and adjacent areas to bring pricing of comparable venues closer together. Phase one of this review will ensure that fees across similar venues are charged appropriately across the portfolio.

28.     Fees for around half of the venues reviewed are not proposed to change as they have been set at an appropriate level when compared to spaces nearby or with similar types of spaces or capacity.

29.     Around 40 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $2 to align them to similar or nearby venues and a further 8 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $12 for this reason. For a small number of venues, we are proposing to decrease fees to generate interest in hiring these facilities.  Overall, these proposed changes to venue hire fee are expected to the generate an increase in revenue of around $160,000.

30.     In phase two we will investigate the cost to serve and assess the balance between rates and user pays to ensure we are providing good value to the ratepayer, whilst providing accessibility to customers and communities. This review will include input from local boards.

31.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached. (Attachment A).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     The local board input into consultation on fees and charges is procedural in nature. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The fees and charges review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. There are no impacts to the Council group wider than the parent (Auckland Council).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 12 October 2023.

35.     The local board has the opportunity to input on the local fees and charges before the governing body makes a decision on consulting on changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

36.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement and adopting local fees and charges.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The council does not hold information on the ethnicity of fee payers so is not able to identify the exact impact on the proposed changes on Māori. The impact of the proposed rates and fees changes on Māori will be similar to that on other residents in Auckland.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The local board provides input to regional plans and proposals. There will be information in the council’s consultation material for each proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

39.     The table below summarises the total financial implications for all local boards:

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Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The proposed changes to rates fees and charges will allow the council to meet its cost recovery targets for the relevant activities for the 2024/2025 financial year. If these adjustments are not made the level of general rates increase may have to be higher than set out in the Mayoral proposal or further alternative budget mitigations found.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The Governing Body will adopt the consultation document and supporting information content the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 including the changes to fees and changes for 2024/2025 on 6 December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Fees and Charges

63

b

Feedback form for proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sugenthy Thomson - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/14945

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with a summary of public consultation feedback, respond to previous queries and seek formal resolutions supporting the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (AT) have adopted a Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. AT is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       A speed management plan for the Auckland region is a government requirement and will set safe and appropriate speed limits to reduce road deaths and serious injuries. Katoa, Ka Ora is the name of this plan, and it is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all.

5.       AT workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora with local boards in February and March 2023, and local boards provided formal feedback about the proposal in March and April 2023, specifically the five development approaches within the speed management plan.

6.       Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023.

7.       AT has analysed and summarised the consultation feedback received and provided responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora. This information is provided as a series of attachments to this report for local board members to review.

8.       Further, the report seeks local board support for the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes within its area.

9.       Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the summary of public consultation feedback received on the proposed Katoa, Ka Ora speed limit changes (Attachment D) 

b)      note AT’s responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora (Attachment A) 

c)      note AT’s legal obligations under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (Rule) and that the Rule requires best efforts to complete safe and appropriate speed limit setting near schools by 2027 

d)      note that since June 2020, when the programme started, road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed  

e)      support the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes identified for this local board area (Attachment C and Attachment E) 

f)       support speed limit review near schools that do not have current or proposed safe speed limits including Destiny School  

g)      support speed limit review of additional locations requested in public consultation feedback and recommended for the next future consultation in Attachment C

Horopaki

Context

10.     AT is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use. 

Alignment with Central Government policy

11.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy. The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to school.

12.     The strategy’s action plan includes the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires road controlling authorities to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

13.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications; category one and category two. Most Auckland schools are classified as category one, or schools where children may be out and about outside the school gate. To comply with the Rule, speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) are required in the area outside of the school. Category two schools are where children are more likely to be picked up or dropped off within the school grounds.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency).

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent, easy-to-understand changes that communities can understand. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

Auckland Transport’s role

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury. So, after receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board, the safe speeds programme has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland reducing speed limits on many roads.

18.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes, the programme focuses on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation. The phases can be summarised as follows:

a)   Phase One covered approximately 11 per cent of the local road network and focused on the highest risk roads.

b)   Phase Two covered approximately 8 per cent of the network and had a significant focus on safe speeds for rural roads and roads near schools.

c)   Phase Three covered approximately 19 per cent of the network and included roads around schools, rural roads, town centre roads, rural marae and roads requested by the community.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on safety around schools so AT directly surveyed all schools with proposed speed limit changes in late-2022 and early 2023. The summary results of the local schools survey was shared with each local board as part of the February/March 2023 workshop follow-up.

22.     Information about the iterative engagement process used to develop Katoa, Ka Ora was shared with local boards in two rounds of workshops held in February/March 2022 and in February/March 2023.

23.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on. Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. 7801 pieces of feedback were received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Katoa, Ka Ora has been consulted on with the public and with local boards. This report updates local boards on:

a)   The results of the public consultation conducted from 24 July to 28 August 2023 in each local board area, including AT’s responses to the changes requested by members of the public.

b)   AT’s response to the local board feedback provided in April 2023, including AT’s responses to changes requested by members of the public.

25.     This information is included in attachments to this report and AT’s overall considerations for this local board area are summarised in a two-page summary infographic (Attachment B).

26.     Additionally, the full consultation report will be published on the AT website by early November 2023.

27.     The attachments provide a clear summary of what people in this local board area said about the programme so local board members are aware of community sentiment as they consider AT’s technical advice.

Technical advice

28.     AT’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system; the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. This includes finalising a speed management plan within legal timeframes and setting safe speed limits near all schools by 2027. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by 2027, we are proposing to include a review of permanent speed limits near all remaining schools in a future consultation.

30.     Further, the impact of speed reduction on the number of DSI is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

a)   Since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.

b)   In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a 9 per cent increase in road deaths.

31.     30km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed around schools is used for the safe speed programme.

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that Katoa, Ka Ora meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. The proposed speed of 30km/h near schools is consistent with legislative requirements and is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.  

33.     Additionally, speed reductions delivered to date by the programme are already reducing DSI. It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the local board is to support the programme.

Customer research

34.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

35.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

36.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. Their experiences of high-speed vehicles, near misses, crime and ‘stranger danger’ around schools mean an increasing number of parents drive their children to and from school. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

38.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

39.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The Safe Speeds Programme was endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning committee and the current term Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     AT has visited all local boards during February and March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes.

42.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February and March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

43.     In post-workshop resolutions local boards indicated their level of support for the programme. Common themes were higher levels of support near schools, town centres and places where people are out and about.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

45.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka. Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora.

46.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

47.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at their workshops in February and March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications. Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. Comprehensive communications including the evidence and key facts have been provided to increase understanding and support of safe speeds. 

50.     Funding constraints may require the scale of the plan to be reduced or delivery to be slowed or delayed. Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback received from local boards. We will use this, along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our legal and safety obligations as a road controlling authority, to help edit and finalise Katoa, Ka Ora, a speed management plan for Auckland.

52.     We have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee in November 2023. Confirmation of a date is yet to be received.

53.     Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

A list of requests made via resolution by this local board on the proposed approach for Katoa, Ka Ora in April 2023; and AT’s response to those requests

77

b

Two-page infographic report of public feedback received on Katoa, Ka Ora – for the Local Board

81

c

List of recommended changes and requests for additional locations for the Local Board area

83

d

Summary report of public feedback on Katoa, Ka Ora consultation –for the Local Board

85

e

Map of local board proposal used in consultation, to read alongside Attachment C

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Eric van Essen, Programme Director, Strategic Programmes, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan

File No.: CP2023/14717

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031 and to provide information received from public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) is seeking feedback from local boards on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP). In particular, AT is seeking feedback on the service improvements proposed for the local board’s area.

3.       The RPTP is the main plan for public transport services in Auckland. It also includes a vision, goals, policies, and targets that relate to the planning and delivery of the public transportation system.

4.       AT will use the local board’s formal views, along with feedback received via public consultation, to finalise the plan. The AT Board is expected to adopt the final plan in November 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to Auckland Transport on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031, in line with the template provided in Attachment A.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Regional Public Transport Plan is Auckland’s main plan for public transport (PT) services. It outlines how PT will be managed and improved over the next eight years, with a detailed focus on the first three years. This includes the services that will operate during this period (and how they will change) and the goals, policies and actions that will shape PT.

6.       The purpose of the RPTP is to enable consultation with the public and PT operators on the planning of PT services. This is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act 2003.

7.       Public consultation on the draft RPTP ran from 17 July to 17 August 2023, and AT received over 3,200 responses. This compares well to the 462 responses the previous (2018) RPTP received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Public feedback was generally very supportive of the content of the draft RPTP. This includes:

·    strong support for the plan’s vision and goals

·    support for the action areas within the plan

·    support for most proposed service improvements (with the main exception of the removals of ferry services to Gulf Harbour and Northcote Point).

9.       Feedback that was not supportive of the content of the draft RPTP included:

·    wanting further improvement and/or faster delivery

·    concerns that PT is too expensive or does not provide value for money

·    comments that a greater percentage of the cost of operating PT should come from users (via fares).

10.     The RPTP includes AT’s aspirations to do more in further improvements and faster delivery if and when more funding for PT becomes available.

11.     AT has provided a breakdown of the top areas submitters from each local board commented to assist the board in providing feedback (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Public transport has a key role to play in helping to reduce emissions, as set out in Auckland Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP). The RPTP acknowledges the ambitious targets the TERP has for increased PT usage, and the actions and improvements included in the RPTP will play an important role in making progress towards those targets.

13.     One of the RPTP’s goals is ‘enhancing the environment and tackling the climate emergency’. This goal guides efforts of transition to a low-emission PT system, encouraging mode shift, and adapting infrastructure to a changing climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Auckland Council’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee endorsed the overall strategic direction for the draft RPTP in April 2023. This included the vision and goals for the plan, and a ‘balanced’ approach to service improvements.

15.     Following public consultation closing, AT also engaged with the council’s advisory panels to get specific feedback about aspects of the plan relevant to the panels’ expertise.

16.     AT has also worked with Auckland Council and Eke Panuku staff to ensure, where possible, the draft RPTP is aligned with other strategic plans and projects across the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     AT held a range of public information events across the region at libraries, community centres, bus and train stations. AT also held two on-line drop-in sessions. Across all of these events, AT had hundreds of conversations with the public which will also be used to inform changes to the plan. In addition, some members of the public called AT to ask questions and seek clarification on content in the plan.

18.     Public feedback was generally supportive of the vision and goals in the draft RPTP and requested additional service improvements (beyond what AT is currently funded to deliver).

19.     Proposed service improvements in the draft RPTP in the local board’s area were set out in a memo from AT, dated 12 July 2023.

20.     AT set out the feedback received from residents of the local board’s area in a memo and supporting material (Attachment B and Attachment C) provided for a workshop on the draft RPTP held on 7 September 2023.

21.     Workshops to date have been positive, with most local boards supporting AT’s proposals for service improvements and initiatives to reduce the cost of public transport to users (such as the proposed weekly fare cap and extended transfer window).

22.     Some local boards have also requested more information around the use of existing services and expressed an interest in exploring the potential for on-demand AT Local services to operate in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     AT has held multiple hui with mana whenua as part of the development of the RPTP and will be making changes to the draft RPTP based on their feedback.

24.     The draft RPTP includes a Māori outcomes section (part 3.7), which outlines key areas of concern to mana whenua and mataawaka and where more detail can be found in the plan.

25.     AT intends to revise part 3.7, and other relevant parts of the RPTP, to reflect feedback received from Māori (both mana whenua and mataawaka).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications of providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

27.     The RPTP is required to be a realistically fundable plan, and AT’s budget for additional services is constrained (and fully allocated to the service improvements proposed in the draft RPTP).

28.     Any feedback provided regarding service level improvements should take into account AT’s financial constraints, and the trade-offs that may be required to implement them (for example, increasing services on one route is likely to require reductions on another route).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no risks associated with providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     AT will use the feedback provided by the local board, along with feedback received from the public and other stakeholders, to finalise the draft RPTP.

31.     The AT Board will consider adopting the revised RPTP at their 29 November 2023 meeting.

32.     If adopted, the final RPTP will be publicly released in early December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

RPTP feedback template for local boards

101

b

RPTP consultation 2023 snapshot

105

c

RPTP post-consultation memo

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Luke Elliott, Principal Planner, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

File No.: CP2023/14982

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform local board members of the Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation and invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parliament’s Environment Committee has opened an Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, with submissions due on 1 November 2023.

3.       This inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met. The Ministry for the Environment has developed an Issues and Options paper to assist the Inquiry (refer Appendix A).

4.       The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

5.       Auckland Council staff are preparing a submission for the inquiry, led by the Chief Sustainability Office. However, the tight timeframe means that we are proposing a delegated sub-group of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee will approve the submission after the draft submission has been circulated to elected members for comments.

6.       Local boards are invited to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback for inclusion into Auckland Council’s submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       On 25 August 2023, the Environment Committee opened its Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. The inquiry is open for public submissions until 1 November 2023.

8.       The inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.

9.       For the purposes of its inquiry, the Environment Committee is particularly interested in:

·    The current approach to community-led retreat and adaptation funding, its strengths, risks and costs

·    Lessons learned from severe weather events and natural disasters in Aotearoa New Zealand for community-led retreat and funding climate adaptation

·    Effective mechanisms for community-led decision making

·    The role of the private sector in managing climate risk

·    Potential institutional arrangements, including roles and responsibilities of central and local government agencies, iwi and hapū

·    Māori participation, Crown obligations, and how to best give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi, and integrate matauranga Māori and te ao Māori across the adaptation system

·    Alignment and integration with existing legislation and regulatory framework, including the reformed resource management system and any changes needed to regulatory powers and potential economic or other incentives needed to support adaptation actions (both before and after extreme events)

·    Funding sources, access to them and principles and criteria for cost sharing

·    Targets or indicators for assessing progress to more resilient communities and infrastructure.

10.     The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Ministry for the Environment released a paper to inform and support submissions titled ‘Community-led retreat and adaptation funding: issues and options’

12.     A template is attached for local board feedback (refer Attachment A).

13.     The table below sets out the key timeframes for local board input on the submission:

Date

Action

2 October 2023

Briefing for local board members

5 October 2023

Report to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee (for delegation)

6 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be considered for incorporation into the submission

20 October 2023

Draft submission shared with local boards

27 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission

1 November 2023

Closing date for submissions

2 November 2023

Copy of final council submission circulated to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee members, local board members and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

 


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     One of the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan is “to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway”.

15.     Under our current emissions pathway, Auckland will continue to experience ongoing sea-level rise, coastal inundation and erosion, and more frequent and severe weather events like those Aucklanders experienced in early 2023.

16.     Globally there needs to be urgent and rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

17.     However, regardless of the global trajectory in emissions, Auckland and New Zealand need to adapt to the impacts of climate change that are already happening and are likely to continue.

18.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will likely inform the development of national legislation which will have implications for how Auckland Council undertakes adaptation.

19.     This submission contributes to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan through action B1 (Ensure our approach to planning and growth aligns with low carbon, resilient outcomes), sub-action 8 (Collaborate to ensure climate change mitigation and adaptation is a priority in national planning legislation).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The development of the proposed Climate Adaptation Bill is likely to be informed by the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. This legislation will have significant impacts across the Auckland Council group.

21.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

22.     Learnings from the 2023 severe weather events will be incorporated into the submission by the Recovery Office and Auckland Emergency Management as they are deemed relevant to climate adaptation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Local authorities will play a key role in implementation in climate adaptation, as they:

·    are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·    have a responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience,

·    enhance community resilience through public education, infrastructure provision and land use planning processes.

24.     Local board views are being sought on the Parliamentary Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, which is considering options for community-led retreat and adaptation funding and will be appended to council’s final submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     There are implications for Māori within a potential future climate adaptation system.

26.     Central government are engaging directly with Māori regarding climate adaptation.

27.     A communication on the Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation has been sent to all iwi entities and their feedback sought. IMSB secretariat staff will work with the council’s technical team throughout the development of the submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The submission will be developed within existing resources.

29.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will be considering funding sources for climate adaptation, as well as the role of local government.

30.     There are potentially significant financial implications for local government within a future climate adaptation system. Council’s submission provides an opportunity to state our position on how funding of climate adaptation should operate in the future.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Financial and legal expertise will be sought in the development of the submission to identify possible financial, legal and reputational risks to the council associated with climate change adaptation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Given the tight timeframes provided to us by the Government, we will be requesting a delegated sub-group to finally approve the council submission by 1 November 2023.

33.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

34.     Please note that due to tight timeframes this may not align with scheduled local board business meetings and any inputs from local boards may need to either be delegated or utilise the urgent decision process.

35.     Local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission is due by 6 October 2023.

36.     Local board feedback to be appended to the council’s submission is due by 27 October 2023.

37.     Once local board feedback has been formalised (either by urgent decision or delegated authority), Local Board Services staff will email this feedback to be incorporated in or appended to council’s submission.

38.     Once the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation are released in 2024, staff will provide local boards with a memo summarising the conclusions.

39.     Any queries can be directed to Petra Pearce, Petra.Pearce@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Template for submission points on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Petra Pearce - Lead Climate Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 49 Jellicoe Road, Manurewa

File No.: CP2023/14985

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Manurewa Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 49 Jellicoe Road, Manurewa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       The developer and applicant, Sukhi Group Ltd, has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 49 Jellicoe Road, Manurewa are:

·    Malwa Lane (applicant’s preference)

·    Kailay Lane (alternative)

·    Moosa Lane (alternative)

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      approve the name Malwa Lane (applicant’s preferred name) for the new private road created by way of subdivision undertaken by Sukhi Group Ltd at 49 Jellicoe Road, Manurewa, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60394155, SUB60394157 and road naming reference RDN90110446).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60394155 (subdivision reference number SUB60394157) was issued in December 2022 for the construction of 11 new residential freehold units and one commonly owned access lot (COAL).

7.       Scheme and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A and B to the agenda report.

8.       In accordance with the standards, every public road and any private way, COAL, or right of way, that serves more than five lots generally requires a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       LINZ have advised that a road name is not required and that sub-addressing is possible in this instance. However, the applicant has confirmed that they would like to proceed with naming the COAL.

10.     The COAL that will be named is highlighted in yellow in Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

12.     The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

13.     Theme: The proposed names represent a cultural link to the local area – there is a large Indian population in Manurewa.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Malwa Lane (applicant’s preference)

‘Malwa’ is a region in Punjab. The name represents inclusivity of all people and cultures from different parts of the world, and the cultural diversity / Indian population in Manurewa.

Kailay Lane

(alternative)

In Punjabi, ‘Kailay’ means strength, perseverance and bravery.

Moosa Lane

(alternative)

‘Moosa’ in Punjabi means staying connected with your roots and representing your community. This name represents the multicultural Manurewa community.

 

14.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     It should be noted that research was undertaken to verify the definitions and meanings of all the names proposed. No direct translations were available or found that supported the applicant’s description of what the two alternative names mean. Therefore, the meanings / definitions as described by the applicant were not able to be verified as accurate. For this reason, the alternative names are not recommended.

16.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

17.     Road Type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

18.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

23.     On 1st September 2023 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Tamaterā (Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

·    Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·    Ngāti Whanaunga (Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated)

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki

·    Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

24.     By the close of the consultation period, no responses, comments, or feedback were received. While acknowledging that this does not automatically signify a lack of interest in the matter, and noting that dependent on the scale of a development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications do receive comments from mana whenua, the applicant now wishes to continue to a decision from the local board.

25.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and no Te Reo Māori names are proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

27.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database.  LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Scheme Plan

131

b

Location Plan

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amy Cao - Subdivision Advisor

Authoriser

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)

File No.: CP2023/15056

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with an update on the Joint Council-controlled Organisation (CCO) Engagement Plans, CCO work programme (Jul-Sep 2023), and expected milestones in its area for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were adopted in June 2022. These plans record CCO responsibilities and local board commitments with Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare.

3.       CCOs provide local boards with the CCO work programme in their area. Each work programme item lists the engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

4.       The engagement plans expired in June 2023 and have not been updated since June 2022. Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts on CCOs delayed a review starting in the first half of 2023.

5.       A current review of the plans is not recommended due to disruptions and unknowns from:

·    Water Services Reform Programme

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer having dedicated staff to support local boards

·    Auckland Transport rolling out a new local board relationship programme

·    reviewing the CCO Accountability Policy through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

6.       This report does not include work programme updates from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited or Auckland Transport.

7.       Auckland Transport will provide their work programme updates through Forward Work Programme briefing packs coming to November 2023 local board workshops.

8.       This report provides an update on Eke Panuku and Watercare work programme items from July to September 2023 and the engagement approach and anticipated milestones for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

9.       The next CCO quarterly report will be provided in February 2024.  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the council-controlled organisation update on engagement plans, the work programme (Jul-Sep 2023) and anticipated milestones and engagement approaches for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023).

 

Horopaki

Context

What are CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans?

10.     The 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations recommended that CCOs and local boards adopt an engagement plan to:

·    help cement CCO and local board relations

·    agree on a common understanding of accountability between CCOs and local boards

·    coordinate CCO actions better at the local level.

11.     These plans record the commitment between Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Watercare and the local boards to work together.

12.     Each local board adopted their 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans in June 2022. These plans include CCO responsibilities and local board commitments.

CCO work programme items

13.     CCOs provide local boards with a work programme that lists the different CCO projects happening in the local board area.

14.     The work programme is not a full list of projects in the local board area. It includes work programme items for engagement purposes.

15.     Each work programme item records an engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

16.     The engagement approach is based on the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) standards which are provided in Table 1 below. Note that the “involve” and “empower” categories are not included in the CCO reporting as decided when the joint engagement plans were adopted.

Table 1: International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Engagement Approach Levels

CCO engagement approach

Commitment to local boards

Inform

CCOs will keep local boards informed.

Consult

CCOs will keep local boards informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and aspirations, and provide feedback on how local board input influenced the decision. CCOs will seek local board feedback on drafts and proposals.

Collaborate

CCOs will work together with local boards to formulate solutions and incorporate their advice and recommendations into the decisions to the maximum extent possible.

CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans have expired

17.     The CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans expired in June 2023. The plans have not been updated since June 2022.

18.     The plans were not updated in the first half of 2023 due to disruptions to CCOs caused from Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts.  

19.     A current review of the Joint CCO Engagement Plans is not recommended since:

·    the Water Services Reform Programme may replace Watercare with a new water entity

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer has dedicated support staff to support local board engagement and liaison following Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts

·    Auckland Transport is currently rolling out work which future engagement plans would need to consider, such as:

Forward Works Programme (full list of Auckland Transport projects in the local board area)

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

Regional Land Transport Plan

Local Board Transport Plans

·    the CCO Accountability Policy will be updated as part of the next Long-term Plan which the CCO engagement plans would need to align. 

What are the next steps?

20.     The CCO quarterly reporting will continue to provide work programme updates from Watercare and Eke Panuku.

21.     Local board staff will:

·    work with Auckland Transport on providing clarity on local transport plans and how the transport plans would either replace or integrate with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    liaise with Tātaki Auckland Unlimited on what engagement and reporting resource they are able to provide to local boards following their restructure

·    investigate what engagement requirements and role the new water entity will have with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    provide support to local boards on advocating for any changes wanted to the CCO Accountability Policy through developing the next Long-term Plan. 

22.     Auckland Transport will provide updates on their work programme through the Forward Works Programme workshops starting in November 2023. 

23.     Local boards received the last update to the CCO work programme and engagement approach in July 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     The following sections provide an update on work programme items for Eke Panuku and Watercare. 

25.     More detailed updates to the CCO work programme are provided in Attachments A-B.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Completed work programme items since June 2023

26.     There are no completed items from Eke Panuku Development Auckland’s work programme to report.

New work programme items since June 2023

27.     There are no new items in Eke Panuku Development Auckland’s work programme to report.

Changes to work programme item engagement levels since June 2023

28.     There are no changes to engagement levels in Eke Panuku Development Auckland’s work programme to report

29.     Eke Panuku’s work programme items are provided in Attachment A.

Watercare

Completed work programme items since June 2023

30.     There are no completed items from Watercare’s work programme to report.

New work programme items since June 2023

31.     There are no new items in Watercare’s work programme to report.

Changes to work programme item engagement levels since June 2023

32.     There are no changes to engagement levels in Watercare’s work programme to report.

33.     Watercare’s work programme items are provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     This report does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

35.     Each CCO must work within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework. Information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     Local boards advise CCOs of issues or projects of significance, communicate the interests and preferences of their communities and allow for flexibility in terms of engagement, recognising differing levels of interest.

37.     The work programme items are shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     This report on the CCO work programme items provides the communication of up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     This report does not have a direct impact on Māori, however the projects it refers to will.

40.     Local boards and CCOs provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to their decision-making processes. These opportunities will be worked on a project or programme basis. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     This report does not have financial impacts on local boards.

42.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     Some local boards expressed concern over the quality of CCO work programme reporting in April and July 2023, in particular with Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport is currently working on a relationship project which has objectives to deliver:

·    an enhanced process to develop transport plans that reflect local board input and priorities

·    more consistent and timely reporting, updates and analysis on local projects and issues

·    improved support for communication and engagement with local communities.

44.     Auckland Transport will be presenting Forward Work Programme briefing packs to local boards at November 2023 workshops which will address their CCO quarterly updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     The local board will receive the next CCO work programme report in February 2024 which will include an update on projects from Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023) and expected milestones for work in Quarter Three (Jan-Mar 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Eke Panuku Manurewa work programme update

141

b

Watercare Manurewa work programme update

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2023/14036

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for three meeting dates to be added to the 2023-2024 Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (the Long-Term Plan) and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 (Annual Plan) timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Manurewa Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Thursday, 17 November 2022.

3.       At that time, the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision-making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unknown. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve three meeting dates as an addition to the Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule so that the modified 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes can be met.

5.       The board resolved on 20 April 2023 to add an additional meeting on 2 November 2023 at 1.30pm to adopt the Local Board Plan. This meeting is no longer required as the Local Board Plan will be adopted on 19 October 2023. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whakaee / approve the addition of three meeting dates to the 2022-2025 Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes as follows:

i)        Thursday, 30 November 2023, 1.30pm

ii)       Thursday, 2 May 2024, 1.30pm

iii)      Thursday, 13 June 2024, 1.30pm

b)      whakakore / revoke the additional meeting previously scheduled for Thursday 2 November 2023, 1.30pm.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

7.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings. Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

8.       The Manurewa Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its Thursday, 17 November 2022 business meeting.

9.       The timeframes for local board decision-making in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

10.     The local board is being asked to make decisions in late-November 2023 and late-April and early-June 2024 to feed into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 processes. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meetings as additions to the meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meetings as extraordinary meetings.

12.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

13.     For option two, only the specific topic the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 process could be considered at this meeting.

14.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarah McGhee - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board

File No.: CP2023/14553

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board to receive reports and resolutions that have been referred from Governing Body committee meetings, Council Controlled Organisations, forums or other local boards for information.

2.       The following information was circulated to the local board:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Potential changes to the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land

19

26 September 2023

Franklin Local Board resolutions circulated to all other local boards for their information

2

Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park – Fisheries New Zealand discussion paper

15

28 September 2023

Waitākere Ranges Local Board resolutions circulated to all other local boards for their information

3

Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill

16

28 September 2023

Waitākere Ranges Local Board resolutions circulated to all other local boards for their information

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the following information from other local board and council meetings:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Potential changes to the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land

19

26 September 2023

Franklin Local Board resolutions circulated to Papakura and Manurewa Local Boards for their information

2

Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park – Fisheries New Zealand discussion paper

15

28 September 2023

Waitākere Ranges Local Board resolutions circulated to all other local boards for their information

3

Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill

16

28 September 2023

Waitākere Ranges Local Board resolutions circulated to all other local boards for their information

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board: Potential changes to the National Policy Statement for Highly Productive Land

151

b

Waitākere Ranges Local Board: Bottom Fishing Access Zones in the Hauraki Gulf Tīkapa Moana Marine Park – Fisheries New Zealand discussion paper

153

c

Waitākere Ranges Local Board: Auckland Council submission on Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana Marine Protection Bill

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - October 2023

File No.: CP2023/14315

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Manurewa Local Board the three-month Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governance Forward Work Calendar is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next three months. The Governance Forward Work Calendar for the Manurewa Local Board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

i)    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)   clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month, be included on the agenda for business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

5.       The Governance Forward Work Calendar is also shared with mana whenua iwi organisations, along with an invitation to contact the local board through Local Board Services Department in liaison with the Local Board Chair, should mana whenua representatives wish to attend a business meeting or workshop on particular subjects of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - October 2023

159

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Senior Local Board Advisor

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2023/14316

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Manurewa Local Board’s records for the workshops held on 7, 14 and 28 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1.1 the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

4.       This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Manurewa Local Board workshop records from:

i)        7 September 2023

ii)       14 September 2023

iii)      28 September 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

7 September 2023: Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

163

b

14 September 2023: Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

167

c

28 September 2023: Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

169

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Senior Local Board Advisor

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.3      Attachment a    19 October 2023: Manurewa Local Board - Deputation - Swimgym and Find Your Field of Dreams Presentation                                     Page 175


Manurewa Local Board

19 October 2023