I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 October 2023

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Komiti mō ngā Tūnuku me ngā Rawa Tūāhanga  /  Transport and Infrastructure Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr John Watson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

Members

Cr Andrew Baker

Cr Mike Lee

 

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Kerrin Leoni

 

Mayor Wayne Brown

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

IMSB Member Pongarauhine Renata

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Julie Fairey

Deputy Mayor Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Lotu Fuli

Cr Ken Turner

 

Cr Shane Henderson

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Richard Hills

Cr Maurice Williamson

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Lata Smith

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua /

Senior Governance Advisor

 

16 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: +64 272 020 586

Email: lata.smith@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

19 October 2023

A close up of a logo

Description automatically generated

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5  

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input                 5

5.1     Public Input - First Union - Update on bus drivers, their collective agreement and health and safety priorities                        5

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input                                                            6

6.1     Local Board Input:  Hibiscus and Bays Local Board - Funding Transport              6

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     6

8          Waikato Regional Council Update                      7

9          Acquisition of land in Mount Roskill for stormwater management purposes                   9

10        Auckland Transport Update - October 2023    17

11        Public Transport Growth Programme              19

12        30 Year Rail Investment Programme for Auckland's Rail Network                                    25

13        Summary of Transport and Infrastructure Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 19 October 2023 33

14        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

 

 

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

 

 

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

            Click the meeting date below to access the minutes.

 

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 21 September 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

 

 

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input

 

5.1       Public Input - First Union - Update on bus drivers, their collective agreement and health and safety priorities

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Committee on bus drivers and their experiences, their collective agreement, and health and safety priorities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       First Union President, Robert Reid will address the Committee.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the public input from First Union; and whakamihi / thank First Union representative(s) for attending the meeting.

 

 

 


 

 

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input

 

6.1       Local Board Input:  Hibiscus and Bays Local Board - Funding Transport

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To address the Committee regarding sufficient transport funding to undertake long standing key projects that are time critical.

Whakarāpopototanga matua,

Executive summary

2.       Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Chairperson, Gary Brown will address the Committee.

3.       The Local Board input relates to bringing forward funding for the Whangaparāoa Bus Interchange; continued funding for Gulf Harbour Ferry services; and the Vaughans Road / Glenvar Road upgrades.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive Hibiscus and Bays Local Board input regarding funding for Whangaparāoa Bus Interchange, the Gulf Harbour Ferry services, and the Vaughans Road / Glenvar Road upgrades.

b)      whakamihi / thank the local board for their attendance.

 

 

 

 

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

19 October 2023

 

Waikato Regional Council Update

File No.: CP2023/14891

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive an update from the Waikato Regional Council in regards to joint transport activities and aspirations.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Transport and Infrastructure Committee has responsibility for the oversight of major transport and infrastructure matters that affect the region.

3.       The Waikato Regional Council shares our southern border and has responsibilities, like Auckland Council, for functions that are best delivered at a regional scale. These include regional transport planning and passenger services.

4.       Elected Members and staff from the Waikato Regional Council would like to present to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee on shared transport aspirations including:

·        The topics covered in the recent Waikato Regional Transport Committee submission to Auckland’s Regional Public Transport Plan (Attachment A).

·        A high-level update on existing inter-regional services – bus and rail – being delivered by Waikato Regional Council.

·        Recent changes to legislation and work underway with Regional Land Transport Plans, outlining some opportunities to integrate and enhance public transport services (bus and rail) that maximise the benefits to both regions – such as Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) and emissions reduction, access to employment, and education and recreational opportunities.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the presentation from Waikato Regional Council on shared transport related matters

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waikato Regional Transport Committee Submission to Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan

 

b

Waikato Regional Council - Presentation

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mara Bebich - Executive Officer

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

19 October 2023

 

Acquisition of land in Mount Roskill for stormwater management purposes

File No.: CP2023/14360

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the acquisition of approximately 2,455m2 of land for stormwater and open space management purposes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kāinga Ora’s housing redevelopment project in the brownfield area surrounding Molley Green Reserve in Mount Roskill aims to accommodate over 200 new houses while addressing stormwater management needs.

3.       The project includes the expansion of Molley Green Reserve, daylighting and restoration of a further section of Te Auaunga / Oakley Creek, and the creation of a stormwater attenuation pond on land which has been proposed to be acquired from Kāinga Ora. The stormwater works will align with the draft Stormwater Management Plan for Te Auaunga / Oakley Creek.

4.       In addition to increasing stormwater capacity and flood mitigation, the project includes enhancements to public amenities within Molley Green Reserve and the surrounding area. The project also provides stormwater capacity for future development, beyond that which is proposed by Kāinga Ora.

5.       All of the identified stormwater and open space upgrades will be paid for by Kāinga Ora.

6.       It is proposed that approximately 2,455m2 be acquired by the council from Kāinga Ora for the nominal sum of $10.

7.       The options available to the council are to acquire or not acquire the land. Acquiring the land will enable stormwater and open space works to be undertaken to cater to the Kāinga Ora development and provide capacity for future development in the area.

8.       The ongoing maintenance costs for the stormwater infrastructure and open space will be approximately $9,000 per year.

9.       The development has been planned in coordination with Healthy Waters, Customer and Community Services, Auckland Transport and Kāinga Ora to provide a holistic solution for stormwater management in the Waikōwhai neighbourhood, along with enhanced open space amenities.

10.     Staff recommend approval of the acquisition of the 2,454m2 from Kāinga Ora for stormwater and open space management purposes. If these works are not done by Kāinga Ora, they will likely need to be done by the council at a later date and higher cost to provide adequate stormwater capacity for the area.

11.     As part of this project, Auckland Transport will also vest 1,857m2 of land to Auckland Council. Acceptance of the transfer of land from Auckland Transport to Auckland Council will be made under delegated authority following the council’s internal asset transfer policy and through the process of road stopping.

12.     If the committee approves the proposed acquisition of land in Mount Roskill, staff will proceed with an agreement with Kāinga Ora for the acquisition of land. Pending approval, works are proposed to begin in late October 2023 with the park estimated to re-open in December 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whakaae / approve the acquisition of approximately 2,455m2 (139.30m2 + 2,315.37m2) of land for stormwater and open space management purposes from Kāinga Ora

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that the land referred to in a) will be acquired as a condition of subdivision consent and vested to Auckland Council through a Sale and Purchase Agreement for $10

c)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the transfer of approximately 1,857m2 (1,337.55m2 + 519.26m2) of land from Auckland Transport to Auckland Council through the process of road stopping

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that the land referred to in clause c) above shall be transferred from Auckland Transport to Auckland Council under the Auckland Council internal asset transfer policy

e)      tautapa / delegate the Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services to sign any applications, agreements or other documents required to give effect to clauses a) to d) above.

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     Kāinga Ora is redeveloping the brownfield area surrounding Molley Green Reserve in Mount Roskill. This development will include over 200 new houses. Kāinga Ora will also develop the reserve to provide additional amenity to cater for the intensification in the area, and to satisfy the stormwater management requirements of the development.

14.     A cross-council team including staff from Auckland Transport has worked through the effects of the development with Kāinga Ora staff to establish a catchment-wide solution to stormwater management within the Waikōwhai neighbourhood and provide additional open space amenity and stormwater capacity.

15.     The proposed works are required to ensure the public stormwater network meet the requirements of the recently drafted Stormwater Management Plan and the projected housing intensification in the Molley Green Reserve area. The upgrades will increase the area’s flood storage capacity by a projected 1,414m3 and benefit the overall catchment area as shown in Figure 1 below. The area recommended to be acquired for stormwater purposes is the hatched area in Figure 1.

 

A map of a neighborhood

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Figure 1. Diagram showing location for Albrecht Basin (purple arrow) and the area of catchment (in green) benefitting from the proposed upgrades

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The stormwater and open space measures to be undertaken by Kāinga Ora will provide for the planned housing development and intensification in Mount Roskill. The project will result in an improved stormwater management system by building resilience from flooding, greater recreational outcomes and green spaces. It will provide essential stormwater upgrades for Kāinga Ora’s proposed 200 new homes, as well as supporting up to 800 projected new homes in the area. All project works will be funded by Kāinga Ora.

17.     The transfer of land from Auckland Transport (road to be stopped) and acquisition (vesting at negligible cost) of land from Kāinga Ora are required to give effect to the proposal.

18.     To enable the transport, stormwater and parks works required to cater to increased development in the area, Kāinga Ora, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council staff have proposed a series of land transfers, outlined below and shown in Figure 2.

·        Kāinga Ora to vest land to:

Parks and Community Facilities to become part of the existing Molley Green Reserve

Auckland Council Healthy Waters for stormwater retention (3 Molley Green Place, 1/5 to 3/5 Molley Green Place and 45 Albrecht Avenue).

 

·    Auckland Transport to vest land to:

Parks and Community Facilities to become part of the existing Molley Green Reserve

Auckland Council Healthy Waters for stormwater retention.

19.     The Kāinga Ora land for parks and stormwater management is proposed to be sold to Auckland Council for $10. The development of the open space involves stopping the land held as road reserve (changing its status to no longer have legal title as a road).

A map of a neighborhood

Description automatically generated

Figure 2. Diagram showing the land transfers between Kāinga Ora, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council

Stormwater works proposed by Kāinga Ora

20.     To increase the capacity of the local stormwater network during high intensity storm events, staff have identified the following work be carried out on the land that is proposed to be transferred to Healthy Waters for stormwater management:

·        a new stormwater detention basin (known as Albrecht Basin)

·        daylighting piped sections of tributary to Te Auaunga Stream / Oakley Creek

·        naturalising a 70-metre section of the stream that presently has a concrete lined channel.

·        recontouring Molley Green Reserve to increase flood detention capacity.

 

 

21.     These infrastructure works are consistent with the draft Stormwater Management Plan for the Molley Green Reserve area, which is currently being reviewed by Healthy Waters, and will facilitate the planned intensification of housing in Waikōwhai. The proposed works also respond to concerns raised by mana whenua around flooding and poor drainage in this area.

22.     Creation of a new stormwater detention basin will substantially increase flood storage capacity for the surrounding area by approximately 1,414m3, as shown in Figure 1.

23.     Two piped sections of a tributary of the Te Auaunga Stream / Oakley Creek will be replaced and daylighted upstream and downstream of an existing section of the stream that has already been daylighted and restored by Auckland Council. This will involve removing the stream from its existing pipes and re-creating a more natural course, which will increase capacity during flood events and the overall amenity values of the reserve. A further section will be naturalised, and the existing concrete channel removed. Daylighting and naturalisation works will also include riparian planting, which will help to prevent erosion and filter pollution before it reaches the streams.

Open space works proposed by Kāinga Ora

24.     In addition to the above stormwater and flood mitigation works, the project will also provide improved public amenity facilities, to be vested with council, within the recontoured Molley Green Reserve. These will include:

·        new playground equipment

·        BBQ area

·        hard surface play area

·        toilet facilities

·        walking tracks.

25.     The project will also include comprehensive landscaping of Molley Green Reserve and the new detention basin at Albrecht Avenue, including native riparian planting within the margins of the daylighted stream. All of these works will be funded by Kāinga Ora.

26.     These improvements will be presented to the Puketāpapa Local Board for approval separately by Parks and Community Facilities.

Staff recommend that the council acquire the land

27.     The options available relating to the land proposed to be sold by Kāinga Ora are for council to acquire the land for the nominal amount of $10, or for council to not acuire the land (see Table 1).

28.     Acceptance of the transfer of 1,857m2 of land from Auckland Transport to Auckland Council will be made under delegated authority under the council’s internal asset transfer policy.

Table 1. Analysis of options available relating to the acquisition of the Kāinga Ora land

 

Acquire 2,455m2 land from Kāinga Ora (recommended option)

Do not acquire land from Kāinga Ora

Sufficient stormwater capacity for the Kāinga Ora development

High

üüü

Low

û

Lower flood risk for the surrounding area

High

üü

Low

û

Alignment with draft stormwater management plan for Te Auaunga Stream / Oakley Creek

High

üü

Low

û

Sufficient open space and community facilities for the Kāinga Ora development

High

üü

Low

û

Ongoing maintenance costs

Some ongoing costs

ü

No ongoing costs

üü

Future stormwater needs met for the area

Met

üüü

Not met, future works by council likely required

û

 

29.     Staff recommend acquisition of the land from Kāinga Ora for the nominal amount of $10.

30.     This will enable Kāinga Ora to carry out upgrades that are required to provide sufficient stormwater capacity for their development of over 200 houses. It will also lower flooding risk for the surrounding area, respond to mana whenua concerns around flooding and align with the proposed stormwater management plan for Te Auaunga Stream / Oakley Creek.

31.     If these works are not done by Kāinga Ora, they will likely need to be done by the council at a later date and higher cost to provide adequate stormwater capacity for the area.

32.     The project will also result in greatly improved public amenity facilities within the recontoured Molley Green Reserve, including playground equipment, BBQ areas, hard surface play areas and walking tracks.

33.     The ongoing maintenance costs for the stormwater infrastructure and open space will be approximately $9,000 per year and funded through existing regional budgets.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     The transfer of land has been considered with climate change in mind. The proposed land acquisition together with the proposed stormwater infrastructure will enable effective adaptation to climate change and provide for greater resilience and protection of people, environment, commercial and residential activities in the surrounding area by significantly increasing the flood retention capability of the reserve.

35.     The works have been designed to enable the proposed daylighted sections to become ecological refuges for several macroinvertebrates and eel species, which will contribute to the overall health and capabilities of the ecosystem.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The proposal has been developed with Kāinga Ora and a cross-council collaboration. Staff from Auckland Transport, Parks and Community Facilities and Healthy Waters have worked together to ensure that transport, infrastructure and open space needs are met.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local impacts

37.     The transfer and subsequent projects will increase the community’s access to park and open space land and to the new amenities at the upgraded Molley Green Reserve. Extensive consultation has been carried out by Kāinga Ora with mana whenua, as well as local residents, groups and other stakeholders.

38.     Engagement and received across numerous workshops indicated support for the upgrade of the reserve. The main issue raised was the request for increased stormwater resilience due to regular flooding of the reserve. The stormwater works aim to greatly reduce flooding in the local area and enable further development while providing more green spaces for people to enjoy.

Local board views

39.     Staff from Healthy Waters and Parks and Community Facilities presented the project to the Puketāpapa Local Board on 5 October 2023.

40.     The Puketāpapa Local Board indicated strong support for this project. The public amenities including community facilities, playground and park improvements will be presented to the Puketāpapa Local Board for approval separately by Parks and Community Facilities, as per the allocation of decision making for local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     As part of the initial plan changes to the Waikōwhai neighbourhood Kāinga Ora engaged extensively mana whenua.

42.     Through this engagement, mana whenua raised concerns around flooding and poor drainage and whether increased development would exacerbate these issues.

43.     A stormwater report was drafted by Kāinga Ora in conjunction with mana whenua which identified the proposed actions in this report land acquisitions as the best way to reduce flooding risks that may be increased by the development.

44.     Mana whenua also acknowledged and promoted creating more green spaces through the proposed land acquisitions while addressing the drainage issues.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     The proposed projects at Molley Green Reserve are to be delivered and funded by Kāinga Ora.

46.     Kāinga Ora is already working in the Waikōwhai neighbourhood and has undertaken a wider neighbourhood design for water, wastewater, transport and stormwater to integrate the works between asset types and minimise the exposure to rework and digging twice. This approach provides for the long term build out of the catchment and aligns appropriately with the proposed draft Stormwater Management Plan for Te Auaunga Stream / Oakley Creek. A piecemeal approach would likely lose the opportunity for a catchment-wide solution and any secondary amenity benefits.

47.     If a solution for only Kāinga Ora was constructed, it would need to be replaced in the long term with a catchment wide solution and an estimated $5 million of Kāinga Ora investment would be lost.

48.     Future maintenance costs are expected to be an annual increase of $9,000. These costs will be accounted for and budgeted into the current costs for maintaining Molley Green Reserve.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Risks and mitigations associated with this decision are outlined in Table 2.

Table 2. Potential risks associated with the proposed works.

Risks

Likelihood and Consequence

Mitigations

Maintenance costs / ongoing management of land – If there are any increase in ongoing costs for managing and maintaining the land.

Likelihood: Medium

Consequence: Low

Parks and Community Facilities already manage the reserve land and therefore provisions have been made for additional cost, which will be marginal.

Stormwater management – If the council does not acquire the land, there is a risk that no viable options for ongoing and effective management of stormwater assets are identified.

Likelihood: Low

Consequence: Medium

Through the acquisition of this land, any possible issues relating to stormwater will be mitigated as provided for in the proposed works.

Infrastructure to be vested to council – If the stormwater infrastructure built by Kāinga Ora is not fit for purpose and does not align with the stormwater code of compliance.

Likelihood: Low

Consequence: Medium

Kāinga Ora have worked closely with Healthy Waters and other infrastructure providers to ensure proposed works are fit for purpose and align to the council’s standards.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     If the committee approves the proposed acquisition of land in Mount Roskill, staff will proceed with an agreement with Kāinga Ora for the acquisition of land.

51.     Staff will also proceed with a road stopping application to Auckland Transport enabling the commencement of the road stopping process and ultimately the transfer of road land to Auckland Council.

52.     Pending approval, works are proposed to begin in late October 2023 with the park estimated to re-open in December 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Shaun McAuley – Commercial and Property Team Manager, Healthy Waters

Thomas Parsons – Intermediate Healthy Waters Specialist, Healthy Waters

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

19 October 2023

 

Auckland Transport Update - October 2023

File No.: CP2023/14752

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive the October 2023 update from the Chief Executive of Auckland Transport on the performance of the organisation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Transport and Infrastructure Committee has responsibility for the oversight of major transport and infrastructure matters that affect the Auckland region.

3.       Auckland Transport is a Controlled Organisation of Auckland Council. Auckland Transport designs, build and maintains Auckland’s roads, ferry wharves, cycleways and walkways, coordinates road safety and community transport initiatives such as school travel, and plans and funds bus, train, and ferry services across Auckland.

4.       An update (attached) will be provided by the Chief Executive on strategic issues, operational updates and key performance metrics for the most recent reporting period.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the update from Auckland Transport’s Chief Executive on the performance of the organisation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport Update - October 2023 - Presentation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mara Bebich - Executive Officer

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

19 October 2023

 

Public Transport Growth Programme

File No.: CP2023/15500

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To ohia / endorse the joint Auckland Council (AC) and Auckland Transport (AT) Public Transport Growth Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       There is a business-critical need for both AT and AC to increase public transport (PT) revenue and patronage. The AT Board had challenged the business to address and remove barriers to using PT by leveraging learnings from other jurisdictions and industries.

3.       AT established a cross functional working group in June 2022 to focus on PT recovery and develop a strategy to accelerate revenue and patronage growth. This team identified, prioritised, and implemented several initiatives that have contributed to current patronage levels.

4.       The goal was to accelerate patronage recovery to achieve 85M trips to meet Auckland Council’s 2021-31 Long-term Plan (LTP) obligations. At the time, AT had forecast to achieve 59M trips and finished the financial year achieving 72M trips despite ongoing disruptions caused by the bus driver shortage, rail network rebuild and severe weather events.

5.       On 23 May 2023 Mayor Brown, on behalf of Auckland Council, announced the establishment of a Public Transport Turnaround Plan as a key focus of the investment in the Auckland Integrated Transport Plan being prepared by the Mayor and the Minister of Transport Hon. Michael Wood.

6.       AT’s recovery strategy and the proposed recovery plan have been merged with AT and council working closely together on development of a comprehensive Public Transport Growth Programme.

7.       The draft Auckland Public Transport Growth Programme is attached to this report as Attachment A. A more detailed PT Growth Programme workplan which outlines the steps AT will take to deliver on the programme is also attached as Attachment B.

8.       The PT growth programme brings together the practical actions AT will take to provide reliable services and customer experiences that accelerate patronage growth under three main objectives and actions:

·        win back customers who have not returned to public transport,

·        acquire new customers who don’t yet use public transport, and

·        make it easier for people to use public transport more often in their daily lives.

9.       The plan details initiatives within the PT Growth programme which are funded and will be delivered within AT’s committed FY24 budget. Initiatives which are currently unfunded will need to have budget reprioritised for delivery in FY25. A visible programme will support governance decisions in funding prioritisation to support programme outcomes.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      ohia / endorse the Public Transport Growth Programme and the initiatives being included in the programme for delivery during the 2024-2025 financial year.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that initiatives with funding allocated within the 2024-2025 financial year budget will remain prioritised for delivery.

c)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that some initiatives are unfunded and additional funding will need to be requested or prioritised from existing budgets.

Horopaki

Context

10.     PT patronage in Auckland has stabilised at ~82% of pre-COVID-19 pandemic patronage levels. This level of patronage recovery is comparable to many cities around the world. Most cities appear to be relatively flat in their patronage recovery, which indicates that travel patterns have settled following the pandemic.

11.     The Public Transport Growth Programme will consolidate projects across several focus areas and sets out a practical and achievable programme for the 2023/24 and 2024/25 financial years to continue to grow Auckland’s PT patronage. The programme draws from and delivers key elements of our various statutory plans, such as the Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP).

12.     AT’s aim is to increase patronage by 25% so that we achieve a month on month run rate of 100M annual boardings by mid-2024.

13.     With the bus driver shortage resolved and the bus network returning to normal reliability, it has provided an opportunity to assess current PT utilisation and customer travel behaviour.

14.     Analysis shows that we have more Aucklanders using PT (compared to June 2019). However, changing travel patterns driven by hybrid working (work from home) opportunities offered by many employers has seen the average number of trips per customer fall by 36% in the regular commuter segment (11-20 days per month). Monthly patronage is down by more than a million (-1.2m) trips from June 2019 to June 2023 in the regular commuter segment.

15.     The change in trip frequency for PT commuters is reinforced by the city centre mode share change, which has seen a 37% decline in overall trips across all modes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     A Public Transport Growth Programme (Attachment A) has been developed to bring together the practical actions we will take to provide reliable services and customer experiences that accelerate patronage growth.

17.     Given the changes in travel behaviour and the fundamental shift in our patronage base, the programme seeks to grow patronage through the following objectives:

a)   Win-back customers who have not returned to PT by:

i)          Improving reliability and minimising the impact of disruptions for everyone;

ii)         Telling customers what has changed so they will try PT again; and

iii)        Making rapid, multiple and network wide changes that collectively aim to make PT trips faster, safer and more reliable.

 

 

b)   Acquire new customers who do not yet use PT by:

i)          Promoting PT more visibly to communities across the city;

ii)         Delivering competitive journeys - improving certainty of journey time, making our services easier to find and pay for; and

iii)        Making it easy for everyone, including visitors, to take their first trip on PT.

c)   Make it easier for people to use PT more often in their daily lives by:

i)          Raising awareness of the benefits of the connected PT network and how to use it to get around;

ii)         Targeted pricing strategies; and

iii)        Partnering with businesses and employers to encourage their staff to use PT.

18.     This Public Transport Growth Programme 2023/24 draws from and delivers key elements of our various statutory plans, such as the Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP). It aims to get back to basics, and then drive growth. To do this, the programme identifies actions in six key focus areas for the next two financial years and a number of initiatives to deliver on them. These are outlined below and further detailed in Attachment A.

1)           Boosting and valuing the workforce

2)           Providing faster, more reliable travel

3)           Help customers navigate disruptions, and build network resilience

4)           Modernising fares

5)           Supporting the customer journey

6)           Marketing great public transport journeys

19.     To support the effective delivery of the programme a monitoring reporting framework has been committed to and a more detailed work plan has been developed (Attachment B)

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     This programme of work seeks to support the reduction of greenhouse emissions by increasing PT usage, through specific initiatives that encourage existing users to utilise PT more frequently and adoption by Aucklanders who are currently not utilising it.

21.     Initiatives targeted at accelerating bus priority, fares and service improvements are aligned with the Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP) and Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     The project team have worked closely with Auckland Council’s Transport Strategy, Infrastructure and Environmental Services and Transport Office of the Mayor, as well as their appointed consultants (Pollock Consulting Ltd) to compile this programme of work.

23.     Drop-in sessions were facilitated on 9 October 2023 with Transport and Infrastructure Committee members for feedback and input into the approach and initiatives within the programme.


 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been engaged in workshops prior to seeking endorsement of the Public Transport Growth Programme.

25.     Due to timing constraints formal feedback from local boards has not been sought.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     AT exceeded its target (97.2 per cent against a target of 80 per cent) of delivering bi-lingual audio announcements on the passenger transport network. Te reo translations have also been completed for the AT website, wayfinding signage, and at bus stops and shared pathways.

27.     Several initiatives within the work programme aim to provide greater accessibility to Māori communities through targeted community engagement and promotion of PT services in areas with good connectivity and low utilisation.

28.     Whilst Community Connect, and the addition of free and half price fares for youth, have provided for a more equitable PT network. The programme contains additional fare specific initiatives which seek to further build on this through an independent review of the fare structure, fare capping, extension of free PT to Under 15s and enabling employer fare subsidisation.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     This cross functional programme of work will be delivered within AT’s committed FY24 budget for specific initiatives that have budget allocation.

30.     Additional funding will need to be secured for prioritised initiatives that are currently unfunded, either through the reallocation of funding within the existing budget, where possible, or additional funding will need to be provided by AC.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Key risk

Mitigation

Budget constraints have led to many initiatives in the programme remaining unfunded.

AT will need to reallocate existing budget, where possible, for high impact initiatives or seek additional funding.

Additional revenue will need to be raised through the Annual Fare Review in February 2024.

Timely delivery of PT growth projects in a resource constrained environment, due to budget cuts and AT restructuring.

Establishment of an internal evaluation panel to drive prioritisation and funding of initiatives within the organisation, to achieve delivery of initiatives within the necessary timeframes.

The General Election result may lead to policy changes which will increase the current cost of PT for certain user groups and potentially slow patronage growth. For example, the National Party has indicated that it would cut free and half-price fares for young people if elected.

Accelerate implementation of other fare initiatives, such as a universal weekly fare cap (inner harbour ferry, bus and rail services), in order to reduce the impact of a significant price increase for PT users.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Following on from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee’s consideration the AT Board will consider approval of the programme at its 31 October 2023 meeting.

32.     Implementation will be ongoing including prioritisation and delivery of initiatives based on funding, complexity, and patronage impact through the 23/24 and 24/25 financial years.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Public Transport Growth Programme

 

b

Public Transport Growth Plan Detailed Workplan

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Stephenson - Public Transport Growth Lead

Richard Harrison – Manager, Metro Optimisation

Stacey van der Putten - Executive General Manager Public Transport Services

Authorisers

Dean Kimpton – Chief Executive

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

19 October 2023

 

30 Year Rail Investment Programme for Auckland's Rail Network

File No.: CP2023/15504

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive an update on the development of the 30-year investment programme for rail in Auckland developed through the Auckland Rail Programme Business Case.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) and KiwiRail have jointly developed a 30-year investment programme for Auckland’s Metro rail network.

3.       KiwiRail and AT have identified that the 30-year investment programme is the recognised programme for the existing Auckland Metro rail network to optimise outcomes for passenger and freight.

4.       The programme provides capacity for growth in passengers and freight demand (regionally and nationally) as well as for mode shift and emission reduction while enabling the capacity of the investment in the City Rail Link (CRL) to be realised. Accordingly, investment in the programme would contribute to the economic growth of New Zealand.

5.       A key pillar of an effective and efficient rail system in the long-term is to maximise the segregation of freight and passenger trains (or all-stop vs non-stop services) on the network.

6.       The programme aims, by 2051, to provide efficiencies and capacity for more than tripling of both (pre-COVID-19 pandemic) annual passenger trips to over 76 million trips per year and freight tonnes to 17m per year. The programme will also provide for the opportunity of 30 per cent further capacity post 2051 by providing for nine car passengers trains. Likewise, the longer freight trains enabled from around 2042 can provide similar ongoing capacity uplift for freight.

7.       The forecast in passenger growth in peak periods would be equivalent to providing an additional three lanes of motorway capacity in each direction across the isthmus.

8.       The level of capital investment required to deliver on the Auckland Rail Programme is $21b over the next three decades accompanied by a tripling of operational investment (over today) and predicted passenger revenue streams.

9.       Funding to deliver rail improvements will come from a mixture of sources including KiwiRail, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) and AT.

10.     It is acknowledged that a significant funding gap exists across the transport portfolios in Auckland and an integrated prioritised process is required. This is currently being progressed through the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Plan, Rail Network Investment Programme (RNIP) and the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP).

11.     There are affordability challenges within the current funding models: National Land Transport Fund (NLTF), RNIP and the RLTP. Accordingly, consideration of alternative funding mechanisms is required.  The size and scale of this programme is similar to the proposed Auckland mega projects (Light Rail, Waitematā Harbour Connection and indeed the CRL). However, this programme provides benefits to the national freight supply chain and economy and, importantly, investment in the existing rail system is required to support and or enable some of the Auckland mega projects.

12.     Investment decisions made for rail in Auckland has material consequences beyond Auckland. In that context it is imperative that decision making and funding decisions fully account for the national consequences of investment in Auckland’s rail system.

13.     Staff from AT and KiwiRail will provide a presentation on the 30-year Rail Investment Programme and next steps as per Attachment A to this report.

14.     Consideration of this programme does not commit AC or AT to funding any aspects. Any financial implications, including the identification of funding sources will need to be considered by the relevant process of each organisation.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the progress update on the 30-year Rail Investment Programme and the next steps.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that future rail investment proposals are being incorporated and confirmed through the Rail Network Investment Programme, Auckland Transport Alignment Project and Regional Land Transport Plan processes.

c)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the need for KiwiRail and Auckland Transport to consider alternate funding for the 30-year programme as there are affordability challenges with the current mechanisms.

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that the initiatives for this programme are yet to be fully scoped or costed, and that any financial implications, including identification of funding sources, will need to be approved through the relevant appropriate processes of each organisation, such as the Long-term Plan for Auckland Council.

Horopaki

Context

15.     The rail network in Auckland is a key component of the land transport network. It is mixed mode which carries approximately 13 million passengers[1] and over five million tonnes of freight annually supporting the national supply chain.

16.     The Auckland Rail Programme has been developed jointly between AT and KiwiRail with Auckland Council and Waka Kotahi as key partners. It identifies the baseline investment plan for the existing Auckland heavy rail system and designated future corridors to 2051.

17.     The objectives of the programme are to increase the utilisation of the existing rail network for both freight and passengers (including investment required to realize the capacity and benefits of investment being made in the CRL), contribute to the reduction of Auckland and national net transport emissions, enable a denser urban form within the metro station catchments and ensure the network and services are resilient and reliable for the future.

18.     These objectives align with Auckland Council’s strategy to deliver sustainable travel options in response to future growth, land use and intensification around the Rapid Transit Network (RTN). Rail also plays a key part in the Auckland Plan transport outcomes of developing and delivering a sustainable transport network and in the delivery of local and national emission reduction goals.

19.     Auckland’s rail forms a critical part of both the RTN and national infrastructure, so investment is required to ensure continued movement of people and goods in, out and through Auckland’s urban limits and ensuring it does not become a bottleneck for the country. 

 

20.     This mixed-mode network predominantly consists of shared tracks for all services. As well as needing to accommodate metro passengers, it must also fit in freight and inter-regional passenger services such as Northern Explorer (Auckland-Wellington) and Te Huia (Auckland-Hamilton) services. It is expected that demand for inter-regional services will grow in the long-term. A recent parliamentary enquiry recommended that the scope for additional inter-regional services should be explored.

21.     Investment for rail has been signalled in the prior Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP) which has led to the delivery of investments for decade 1 projects that are currently underway.

22.     Projects currently being delivered to open in mid-2020s will increase the capacity and attractiveness of rail for customers including:

·    Significant rebuild of around 30 per cent of existing track to modern metro standard, able to handle the increased services expected post-CRL opening.

·    New third main line between Wiri and Westfield junctions to separate freight and passenger trains and increase system reliability in that sector.

·    City Rail Link and stations creating a connecting route through the city centre.

·    Electrification of the Southern Line to Pukekohe and construction of additional stations to serve new population growth areas in the South.

·    Additional passenger trains to increase existing capacity by over 30 per cent.

23.     Importantly the CRL will provide a meaningful increase in service levels for metro passengers. However, like any system it will only reach its full potential if other constraints in the network are unlocked over time. This programme provides the pipeline of investment to keep the system in balance in a manner that is resilient to a range of likely demand scenarios.

24.     Future investment in Auckland’s rail will be identified in the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Plan, RNIP and RLTP which will be adopted in 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Constraints in the rail network by early 2030s

25.     The existing investment in rail and opening of CRL will provide a significant uplift in capacity. Constraints across the network will hinder future growth by the early 2030s if additional investment is not planned and progressed. Examples of this include:

·      Significant population growth and economic development from the South and West (building on the Future Development Strategy) creates overcrowding on the southern line with limited ability to increase express and stopping services.

·      Increasing activity at Northport, Port of Tauranga and Ports of Auckland will continue to drive increased demand for use of the rail network for freight services.  If that capacity is not available at the times freight customers need it, then very significant numbers of additional heavy trucks would be forced onto the road network – which also may not have the capacity to enable this.

·      Demand for inter-regional passenger travel is also expected to continue to grow, and in the long term, may expand to new destinations.

26.     By the early 2030s land use and transport forecasts for passenger and freight growth are forecast to reach 42-47 million trips per year and 9 million tonnes of freight moved, which is more than the existing network can handle, even with technology improvements.


 

 

The 30-year rail investment programme

27.     Without significant additional track capacity and fleet, safety improvements such as signalling upgrades and level crossing removals, the use of the rail network will effectively be capped. This will erode the levels of services provided to customers, both passenger and commercial, as reliability and ease of use are reduced.

28.     New capacity, especially track capacity, is long run infrastructure and will be challenging to deliver in line with demand.  Any delay to the programme is therefore expected to constrain demand until capacity can be delivered.

29.     By 2051 forecast modelling has shown that annual passenger demands will be in excess of 76 million passenger trips a year and freight tonnes moved over 17 million.[2]

30.     The 30-year investment programme has identified six proposed investment areas required to delivered over the 30-years being:

·    Maintenance and renewals - including equipment upgrades.

·    Signalling and power feed upgrades.

·    New fleet, depots and stabling.

·    Segregating freight and passenger services by additional track on the Southern line (~38km of 4 tracking) and a new cross-town corridor - the Avondale-Southdown connection (~12km new track).

·    Level crossing removal by closure or grade separation across the network (encompassing 42 crossing locations).

·    Station improvements (encompassing 42 stations for increased patronage, safety and staged extensions to accommodate 9 car trains).

31.     It should be noted that the Avondale-Southdown corridor has been owned and designated by KiwiRail since the 1940s and 1950s and has remained in long term planning.  The most recent redesignation commenced in 2011/12 (concluded 2018) and the need for the corridor as part of the rail network has been reconfirmed in the Auckland Rail Development Plan of 2015, ATAP 2018, 2021 and now as a near-term strategic requirement within the 30-year investment programme.

32.     The base case programme has the construction of Avondale-Southdown planned for decade 3 (2042 onwards). Construction timing would become more urgent in the event of any closure or partial closure of Ports of Auckland. The programme has underscored the strategic importance of this corridor for heavy rail in the long-term and the priority in the short term of confirming its alignment, to provide greater certainty to the community[3]. The corridor would operate as a passenger and freight corridor (bypassing the inner network) and open up new RTN possibilities from Owairaka to Onehunga and connect Avondale to Glen Innes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     Modelling shows that to meet expected targets under the Governments Emission Reduction Plan (ERP), the network would need to quadruple the number of 2019 boardings to 86m per annum by 2035 and up to five times 2019 numbers to circa 120m per annum by 2030 to achieve Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP).

34.     While the recommended investment provides for significant improvements in levels of service, reliability, and frequencies to make rail an attractive choice, the plan also acknowledges that meeting ERP and TERP targets will require more than just infrastructure investments which sit outside of the scope of this programme, including broader policy and behaviour change needed to encourage patronage mode-shift onto rail.

35.     To reach national emission target by 2035 would require the 30-year investment programme plus additional fleet (to make 9 car trains and longer freight trains) by the 2030s.

36.     The investment programme will see approximately 2.1 million tonnes of carbon dioxide avoided over the 30-year timeframe (principally in the area of freight) with reductions reducing over time as vehicle fleet electrifies.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     Auckland Council officers have been a key stakeholder in the development of the 30-year investment programme at both a working and project governance level to ensure alignment between the programme and wider Council objectives such as the Auckland Plan and TERP.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The investment programme has been presented to all the local boards. Feedback from the local boards has in general been very supportive in the development of a forward investment plan for rail.

39.     Extensions of rail services beyond the current western and southern boundaries and to the airport were of interest. The current plan is aligned with the current RTN strategy which has other modes identified for these priorities. Should that strategy change, rail service extensions are not precluded but would require new cost benefit analysis.

40.     A key concern was raised by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board who did not support the development of the crosstown Avondale-Southdown corridor.

41.     These and other specifics that each local board have identified that impact their board area which will be progressed and further investigated as individual projects such as level crossing removals, new track proposals are progressed through business cases.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     The 30-year investment programme has been presented to mana whenua through the AT hui for Central, North/West and South.

43.     Engagement with mana whenua will continue through the programme business case process and into the development and delivery of future investigations and business cases.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The funding for the delivery of the programme business case has not been confirmed but key elements have been identified in previous RLTPs, RNIPs and ATAP.

45.     Funding to deliver rail improvements will come from a mixture of sources including KiwiRail, Waka Kotahi and AT. Future funding will be required to build the upgraded infrastructure but also to operate and maintain the services and assets.

46.     The 30-year investments incorporate $21 billion of capital costs split 2/3 KiwiRail 1/3 AT and requiring up to $22 billion of operational and renewal investment (compared to approximately $14 billion for a do minimum scenario).

47.     The programme funding requirements are significant and would represent a significant large proportion, if not the complete existing National Land Transport Fund allocations (on which there are other competing demands).

48.     For AT, the investment in rail competes with other public transport demands within the RLTP and is unlikely to be fully funded. Therefore, alternative funding for this plan needs to be considered, including funding as a single investment programme similar to Auckland mega projects.

49.     At this stage the level of funding identified in the LTP bids to Council for the constrained and balanced approaches do not provide sufficient funding to deliver on the timeframes recommended in the investment programme.  This will be further integrated and progressed over the coming months.

50.     In the meantime, the required funding is being signalled through the existing funding processes encompassing: NLTF, RNIP and the RLTP. The value of the rail programme to Auckland and the national freight and regional passenger context makes this programme bigger than business as usual. It is more complex and on a scale of other mega projects (such as the Waitematā Harbour Crossing or Light Rail) being proposed for Auckland.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     The 30-year investment programme will require a significant level of investment and an increase in the amount of work delivered on the rail network over the 30-year period. This will require both alternative and additional funding and delivery methods to be developed by KiwiRail and AT.

52.     It is important that the integrity of the programme is maintained in order to ensure benefits can be realised and interdependencies between KiwiRail and AT delivery processes aligned. Without a single programme there is the risk that projects will be progressed without alignment. KiwiRail and AT are jointly progressing the programme development to ensure interdependencies are maintained.

53.     Despite being a 30-year programme, there is a high level of urgency to deliver on the infrastructure recommended within the programme due to the long lead in times to infrastructure delivery.  Planning and design for significant infrastructure can take more than 10 years to complete with similar delivery timeframes, leading to a situation where it will be challenging to deliver in line with demand. A focus on clear levels of service and scope and minimising time to construction will need to be maintained throughout. Initial programme development is being undertaken through the existing funding mechanisms to progress the initial planning and business case required.

54.     The programme involves changes and will improve how communities will use and can access the rail network. This will particularly be noticed by the community where level crossings are changed or closed, stations upgraded and enlarged, where additional land is required to widen the rail corridor and where new rail lines are proposed through communities without good access to rail today.

55.     KiwiRail and AT are committed to working with communities through the next stages of investigations and business casing to confirm solutions, mitigations and seek funding for the projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     The 30-year investment programme is progressing through approval process of the KiwiRail Board, AT Board and Waka Kotahi Board.

57.     On adoption, funding to progress the rail programme initiatives will be sought through the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Plan, RLTP and RNIP. This will identify the next stages of work will provide more detail on the elements of the programme that will be taken forward.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

30 Year Rail Investment Programme - Presentation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gwyneth MacLeod – KiwiRail, Head of Network Strategy and Investment

Matthew Rednall – Auckland Transport, Strategic Projects Manager

Authorisers

Dean Kimpton – Auckland Transport, Chief Executive

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

19 October 2023

 

Summary of Transport and Infrastructure Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 19 October 2023

File No.: CP2023/14367

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To whiwhi / receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda or briefing papers that may have been distributed to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility and openness and transparency of information circulated to Transport and Infrastructure Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following were items distributed.

Date

Subject

19/9/2023

Auckland Council submission on the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024

3/10/2023

Drop-in Sessons - Public Transport Growth Plan

3/10/2023

City Centre Targeted Rate Annual Report 2022/2023

 

5.       The following workshops/briefings/drop-in sessions have taken place for the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

Date

Subject

9/10/2023

Drop-in Sessions - Public Transport Growth Plan

6.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Transport and Infrastructure Committee. members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      whiwhi / receive the Summary of Transport and Infrastructure Committee information memoranda and briefings – 19 October 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Transport and Infrastructure Forward Work Programme

 

b

Auckland Council submission on the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Memo:  Public Transport Growth Programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

City Centre Targeted Rate Annual Report 2022-23 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lata Smith - Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 



[1] 22 million passengers in 2019 (pre-COVID 19 pandemic).

[2] Note: to carry that volume of freight by road would require around 1.8 million additional semi-trailer trucks on our national road network.

[3] The need for Avondale Southdown is not contingent on Ports of Auckland closing, nor Light Rail. A planned closure of Ports of Auckland would accelerate the timing requirement for Avondale Southdown. If Light Rail proceeds, design and some civils would need to be accelerated, so that heavy rail is not precluded.