I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 24 October 2023

1.00pm

Claris Conference Centre
19 Whangaparapara Road
Claris
Aotea / Great Barrier Island

 

Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Izzy Fordham

 

Deputy Chairperson

Patrick O'Shea

 

Members

Laura Caine

 

 

Chris Ollivier

 

 

Neil Sanderson

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Guia Nonoy

Democracy Advisor

 

16 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 301 0101

Email: guia.nonoy@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

6.1     Youth Advisory Panel - Taimarino Cleave                                                        5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                6

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              6

11        Environmental agency and community group reports                                             9

12        Adoption of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023                               25

13        Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                                         59

14        Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                    63

15        Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025                                                                                                                      93

16        Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)      105

17        Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan                       113

18        Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation              121

19        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board meeting schedule                                                                                                                                     135

20        Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule)                                                                         139

21        Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record of Proceedings               143

22        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

Chairperson I Fordham will open the meeting and welcome everyone in attendance.

Deputy Chairperson P O’Shea will lead the hui in a karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 September 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

6.1       Youth Advisory Panel - Taimarino Cleave

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      congratulate Taimarino Cleave on being appointed a member of Auckland Council’s Youth Advisory Panel.

 

 

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Environmental agency and community group reports

File No.: CP2023/12558

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for Aotea Great Barrier community groups and environmental agencies with an interest or role in the environment or the work of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board to have items considered as part of the board’s business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To support open and more direct interaction between the board, local groups and others, the local board has extended an invitation to either speak at the board’s business meeting via Public Forum or put items forward and have reports included in the agenda.

3.       Inclusion of items on the agenda is at the discretion of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Chairperson in discussion with the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Local Area Manager. Any items submitted will be included under a cover report which will have the recommendation that “item xyz be noted or received”.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)    note / tuhi ā-taipitopito the following reports:

i)     Aotea / Great Barrier Natural Environment Islands monthly update – September 2023 report.

ii)     Envirokiwi update on the Okupu planting project

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aotea / Great Barrier Natural Environment-Islands monthly update – September 2023

11

b

Envirokiwi update on the Okupu planting project

23

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqui Fyers - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Adoption of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023

File No.: CP2023/14596

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption every three years and use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

3.       A draft version of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period for the SCP ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

4.       The local board has considered all submissions and feedback received from the consultation period. Most submitters were in support for the plan and only minor edits for clarification are proposed.

5.       The Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023, which includes the proposed changes, is attached to this report.

6.       The key sections of the Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) are:

·    Māori outcomes

·    Climate action

·    Our people

·    Our environment

·    Our places

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      adopt the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023 as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board to approve any minor edits that may be necessary to the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023 prior to publication.

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·    adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

9.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the Local Board Plan 2023

10.     The key sections of the Local Board Plan 2023 are outlined in the table below:

Table 1: Summary of the draft Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023

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Māori outcomes:

The draft plan has an objective to support an engaged and thriving mana whenua community. Key initiatives to support Māori outcomes in our area are weaved throughout the plan, such as delivery of the Visitor Information Centre, Ahu Moana marine restoration project, Tū Mai Taonga environmental restoration, te reo courses and the installation of pou whenua.

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Climate action:

 

Climate change and resilience are big themes for islanders. Key initiatives meeting the challenge of taking climate action in our area are weaved throughout the plan, such as grant funding for wetland restoration, riparian planting, water and food resilience projects, community facility solar power upgrades, and local waste initiatives.

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Our people:

 

We see a future where mana whenua aspirations are realised and relationships are respected; where our community is resilient and cared for; a place where our community groups are empowered, sustainable and independent; where our local businesses and social enterprises retain employment; an island that is a great place to live and visit.

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Our environment:

 

We see a future where our community deals with pests collaboratively; where our food and water supply are safe and secure; a place that protects and celebrates its night sky; where we showcase zero waste and low carbon practices; an island where our streams run clean and free, and marine waters are protected and full of life.

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Our place:

 

We see a future where our wharves and airfields meet our needs; where our connectivity is fast and reliable; a place where our roads are sealed, well maintained, and shared safely; where our accessways and tracks link up to our village spaces; an island that has affordable and sustainable housing for everyone.

 

Consideration of submissions and feedback

11.     A draft version of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

12.     The Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board has considered the submissions and feedback received.

13.     Public feedback on the draft plan was generally positive. The majority of submitters were supportive of the plan, its direction and themes covered.

14.     Given the public support there were no substantive changes made to the draft plan. Feedback received has resulted in some minor edits.

15.     The key feedback points, with staff analysis and subsequent proposed edits to the outcome chapters are outlined in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Minor edits to the draft Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023

Section

Key point of feedback

Analysis

Proposed change

Māori outcomes

Most people were in support for working closer together and in general support for this section

No changes needed

Minor template change with Māori outcome initiatives listed with bullet points

Climate action

General support for projects involving plantings, protecting wetlands, alternate energy systems, electric transport and emergency/resilience

The draft plan has key initiatives and advocacy which support all these projects. No changes needed.

Minor template change with climate initiatives listed with bullet points

 

Our people

General support for this section with requests for increased focus on senior support and oversight over community groups

The draft plan provides funding for community-led welfare and health initiatives and has initiatives to support capacity building and upskilling for community groups. No changes required.

 

Specified senior support as being a priority within an existing key initiative.

Our environment

General support for this section with requests for increased focus on plantings, wetlands, dog bylaws and pig control

The draft plan provides funding to support freshwater restoration and riparian planting. All feedback relating to dog bylaws and pig control has been passed to the operational departments. No changes required.

Specific references to wetlands have been added within existing key initiatives for freshwater restoration.

Note: a specific reference within board advocacy to stop the use of Glyphosate was added following feedback received after consultation had closed.

Our places

General support for this section with a focus on affordable housing and transport projects and parking

The local board has limited decision-making over housing and transport.

No changes required to the advocacy.

No changes made to this section.

 

16.     The Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) incorporates the proposed minor edits to the outcome chapters as described in Table 2.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023 contains a specific Climate action section, focusing on the scope of challenges posted by climate change. It considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

18.     The plan includes specific objectives and initiatives including:

·    wetland restoration and riparian tree planting with eco-sourced seeds,

·    local emergency response support

·    water and food resilience projects,

·    grants for community facility solar power upgrades,

·    and local waste initiatives.

19.     The impact on the climate of the final plans has been considered. The final publication will be an online document to minimise printing hard copies. 

20.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The adoption of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023 will inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. It will also form the basis for the development of the following three years’ work programmes.

22.     Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft and final plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the final Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023. Workshops were held on 12 September and 3 October to discuss and consider feedback and agree any changes.

24.     In developing the plan, the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board considered:

·    advice from mana whenua and mataawaka

·    what is already known about our communities and what is important to them

·    submissions received via online forms, hardcopy forms, emails and post

·    feedback provided at engagement events

·    regional strategies and policies

·    staff advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     In developing the plan, the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

·    considered views and advice expressed by mana whenua at Kawa Marae hui held on 15 April 2023

·    considered existing feedback from Māori with an interest in the local board area

·    reviewed submissions received.

26.     The Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023 promotes outcomes or issues of importance to Māori with:

·    Delivery of the Visitor Information Centre,

·    Ahu Moana marine restoration projects,

·    Tū Mai Taonga environmental restoration work,

·    te reo courses

·    and the installation of pou whenua

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plan informs this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There are no risks identified in adopting the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Staff recommend that responsibility for approving any minor edits following adoption be delegated to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2023

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqui Fyers - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2023/15673

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board reduced Local Board Transport Capital Fund budget for the 2022-2025 political term and seek local board approval of the projects to be delivered.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport manages the Local Board Transport Capital Fund on behalf of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board. Auckland Transport provides quality advice to support local board decision-making. A decision relating to the allocation of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund is being sought.

3.       The confirmed budget for Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board is now $384,451 which includes the additional approved budget of $89,557 to cover current contractual commitments. This replaces the indicative budget of $450,250 discussed in the June 2023 Auckland Transport report.

4.       The reduction in the Local Board Transport Capital Fund reflects the pressure Auckland Transport and its funding partners are under due to flood recovery work following the severe weather events in early 2023, inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

5.       Of the confirmed budget, $89,557 has been approved as additional budget to cover Kawa Road and Motairehe Roads seal extension work which are under construction with contractual commitments, from the previous term.

6.       In this report, Auckland Transport recommends that projects with no contractual commitments are prioritised by Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board and the remaining budget of $294,894 is allocated to:

·        Blackwell Drive Berm Repair ($16,000)

·        Hector Sanderson Road walkway ($52,000)

·        Kawa and Motairehe Roads seal extensions ($226,894 plus any cost savings from the above two projects)

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      allocate the Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2025 of $294,894 as follows:

i)   whakaae / approve $16,000 to for Blackwell Drive berm repairs

ii)  whakaae / approve $52,000 to construct a walkway on Hector Sanderson Road

iii) whakaae / approve $226,894 plus any cost savings once the above two projects are completed, towards Kawa Road and Motairehe Road seal extensions

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that $89,557 additional budget has been approved to cover current contractual commitments for Kawa Road and Motairehe Road seal extension work.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is an Auckland Transport (AT) fund established in 2012 to allow local boards to deliver small projects in their local area that would not normally be prioritised by Auckland Transport. In 2014, the LBTCF budget was set at $20 million spread across all local boards and distributed based on Auckland Council’s Local Board Funding Policy.

8.       Since 2020, when COVID 19 lockdowns impacted on Auckland Council’s revenue the LBTCF has been reduced specifically to $15 million per annum across all local boards in the most recent Regional Land Transport Plan of which Aotea / Great Barrier’s share was $450,250.

9.       Due to further budget reductions, (as outlined above), Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board’s new allocation of LBTCF for the 2022–2025 political term is $384,451.

10.     Therefore, the local board must now review the programme of work that was planned and reduce it to match the new budget. The local board’s role is to review the work programme supported by AT’s quality advice, consider options, and then decide about re-prioritisation. This report confirms the new programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Auckland Transport held three workshops with the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board in 2023 to discuss the LBTCF and its allocation.

12.     Workshop one on 7 February: Suggestions were gathered from local board members for allocating the LBTCF in the new term as well as to progress reports on projects from the last political term.

13.     Workshop two on 16 May: AT reported back on cost estimates for the proposed new projects along with the indicative budget for the new term. This was followed up by a decision report from AT in June 2023 that established the projects that the local board wished to support.

14.     Workshop three on 3 October: AT confirmed the budget for the new term as $384,451 which was considerably less than the figure anticipated in workshop two. The reduction in budget reflects the pressures on AT and our funding partners following the devastating floods of early 2023 and the roading repair bill, the reduction in AT’s overall budget as required by Auckland Council plus inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

15.     At workshop three, AT’s advice to the local board was to continue to progress projects with contractual commitments that had been resolved in the previous term.

16.     At the third workshop AT also recommended that the local board identify which projects it wished to support with the remainder of the fund in the current term.

17.     New Projects identified for LBTCF in 2022–2025 Political Term

Project

Description

Project cost estimates

Blackwell Drive Berm Repair

Berm improvements to support parking opposite the shops

$16,000

Hector Sanderson Road Walkway

Laying of 1.2m wide JakMat to stabilise walkway by airport corner

$52,000

Kawa Road and Motairehe Road seal extensions

Continuation of seal extension work for these roads already under construction

$226,894

 

18.     The above projects will fully expend the budget allocation of the LBTCF for the Aotea Great Barrier Local Board for the 2022-2025 Political Term.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency and has developed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

20.     Auckland Transport therefore urges the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board to consider prioritisation of projects that help reduce carbon emissions.

21.     Most of the proposed projects above will encourage either safe walking or cycling and will contribute to reducing carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Any engagement required with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual-project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board discussed this programme of work at three workshops with AT in 2023.  This report reflects the views of the local board as expressed in the workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The actions being considered do not have specific impacts on Māori.  Both AT and council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about.

25.     Any Auckland Transport project that requires consultation with iwi will include that activity within its project plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     This report requires consideration of a significant financial commitment of up to $384,451 by the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board.

27.     The costs calculated are based on estimates and it is possible that costs on some projects may be under or over the estimations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There is a risk that some projects may cost more than is budgeted in this report, but equally some projects may reduce in scope after further investigation work is carried out. 

29.     As resources and budgets are constrained, delaying decision making means that there is less time for planning for the investigation, design, and subsequent delivery of the projects that the local board wishes to progress. Timely decision making will provide the best opportunity for these projects to be delivered in the current political term.

30.     Finally, future budgets are not confirmed meaning that there may be sudden changes to the programme next year after Auckland Council sets budgets through the Long-term Plan process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Auckland Transport will take note of the local board’s confirmed projects and continue to work towards public consultation and delivery.

32.     Throughout the process, AT will keep the local board updated and when a decision is required, a report will be made to a public meeting so the members can consider it and decide on next steps.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Beth Houlbrooke - Elected Member Relationship Partner - Auckland Transport

Authoriser

John Gillespie - Head of Stakeholder and Elected Member Relationships - Auckland Transport

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/14950

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with a summary of public consultation feedback, respond to previous queries and seek formal resolutions supporting the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (AT) have adopted a Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. AT is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       A speed management plan for the Auckland region is a government requirement and will set safe and appropriate speed limits to reduce road deaths and serious injuries. Katoa, Ka Ora is the name of this plan, and it is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all.

5.       AT workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora with local boards in February and March 2023, and local boards provided formal feedback about the proposal in March and April 2023, specifically the five development approaches within the speed management plan.

6.       Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023.

7.       AT has analysed and summarised the consultation feedback received and provided responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora. This information is provided as a series of attachments to this report for local board members to review.

8.       Further, the report seeks local board support for the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes within its area.

9.       Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      note the summary of public consultation feedback received on the proposed Katoa, Ka Ora speed limit changes (Attachment D)

b)      note AT’s responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora (Attachment A) 

c)      note AT’s legal obligations under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (Rule) and that the Rule requires best efforts to complete safe and appropriate speed limit setting near schools by 2027

d)      note that since June 2020, when the programme started, road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed

e)      support the updated changes proposed in this local board area, following public consultation feedback and in-person engagement with communities and the local board. (Attachment C and Attachment E).

Horopaki

Context

10.     AT is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use. 

Alignment with Central Government policy

11.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy.  The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to school.

12.     The strategy’s action plan includes the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires road controlling authorities to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

13.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications; category one and category two. Most Auckland schools are classified as category one, or schools where children may be out and about outside the school gate. To comply with the Rule, speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) are required in the area outside of the school. Category two schools are where children are more likely to be picked up or dropped off within the school grounds.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency).

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent, easy-to-understand changes that communities can understand. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

Auckland Transport’s role

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury. So, after receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board, the safe speeds programme has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland reducing speed limits on many roads.

18.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes, the programme focuses on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation. The phases can be summarised as follows:

a)   Phase One covered approximately 11 per cent of the local road network and focused on the highest risk roads.

b)   Phase Two covered approximately 8 per cent of the network and had a significant focus on safe speeds for rural roads and roads near schools.

c)   Phase Three covered approximately 19 per cent of the network and included roads around schools, rural roads, town centre roads, rural marae and roads requested by the community.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on safety around schools so AT directly surveyed all schools with proposed speed limit changes in late-2022 and early 2023. The summary results of the local schools survey was shared with each local board as part of the February/March 2023 workshop follow-up.

22.     Information about the iterative engagement process used to develop Katoa, Ka Ora was shared with local boards in two rounds of workshops held in February/March 2022 and in February/March 2023.

23.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on. Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. 7801 pieces of feedback were received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Katoa, Ka Ora has been consulted on with the public and with local boards. This report updates local boards on:

a)   The results of the public consultation conducted from 24 July to 28 August 2023 in each local board area, including AT’s responses to the changes requested by members of the public.

b)   AT’s response to the local board feedback provided in April 2023, including AT’s responses to changes requested by members of the public.

25.     This information is included in attachments to this report and AT’s overall considerations for this local board area are summarised in a two-page summary infographic (Attachment B).

26.     Additionally, the full consultation report will be published on the AT website by early November 2023.

27.     The attachments provide a clear summary of what people in this local board area said about the programme so local board members are aware of community sentiment as they consider AT’s technical advice.

Technical advice

28.     AT’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system; the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. This includes finalising a speed management plan within legal timeframes and setting safe speed limits near all schools by 2027. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by 2027, we are proposing to include a review of permanent speed limits near all remaining schools in a future consultation.

30.     Further, the impact of speed reduction on the number of DSI is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

a)   Since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.

b)   In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a 9 per cent increase in road deaths.

31.     30km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed around schools is used for the safe speed programme.

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that Katoa, Ka Ora meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. The proposed speed of 30km/h near schools is consistent with legislative requirements and is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.  

33.     Additionally, speed reductions delivered to date by the programme are already reducing DSI. It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the local board is to support the programme.

Customer research

34.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

35.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

36.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. Their experiences of high-speed vehicles, near misses, crime and ‘stranger danger’ around schools mean an increasing number of parents drive their children to and from school. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

38.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

39.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The Safe Speeds Programme was endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning committee and the current term Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     AT has visited all local boards during February and March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes.

42.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February and March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

43.     In post-workshop resolutions local boards indicated their level of support for the programme. Common themes were higher levels of support near schools, town centres and places where people are out and about.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

45.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka. Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora.

46.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

47.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at their workshops in February and March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications.  Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. Comprehensive communications including the evidence and key facts have been provided to increase understanding and support of safe speeds. 

50.     Funding constraints may require the scale of the plan to be reduced or delivery to be slowed or delayed.  Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback received from local boards. We will use this, along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our legal and safety obligations as a road controlling authority, to help edit and finalise Katoa, Ka Ora, a speed management plan for Auckland.

52.     We have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee in November 2023. Confirmation of a date is yet to be received.

53.     Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

A list of requests made via resolution by this local board on the proposed approach for Katoa, Ka Ora in April 2023; and AT’s response to those requests.

71

b

Two-page infographic report of public feedback received on Katoa, Ka Ora for the Local Board

73

c

List of recommended changes and requests for additional locations for the Local Board area - refer to map in attachment E.

75

d

Summary report of public feedback on Katoa, Ka Ora consultation for the Local Board

81

e

Map of local board proposal used in consultation - to read alongside Attachment C.

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Eric van Essen - Programme Director Strategic Programmes - Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025

File No.: CP2023/15288

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted on as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

3.       This report seeks the feedback of the local board on consultation on proposed changes to local fees and charges.

4.       There are proposed changes to the following local fees and charges:

·    Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·    Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

5.       It is noted in Attachment A that these reviews are not directly applicable to the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board area.

6.       The Governing Body will agree regional consultation items including proposed changes to fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

7.       Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 for the following:

i)        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review

A)      Membership Fees

1)      The alignment of legacy memberships to current rates over 3 years

2)      The introduction of a new Auckland wide membership option that allows access to all Auckland Council Pool & Leisure sites regardless of operator.

B)      Aquatic Entrance Fees

1)      The introduction of baseline aquatic entrance fees for all Auckland Council Pool and Leisure sites.

2)      An increase to the concessionary discount from 15 per cent to 40 per cent.

C)     Swim School Fees

1)      An increase to swimming lesson prices closer to market rates whilst maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders

2)      A new 30 per cent discount for Community Service Card Holders and their dependents

3)      A new 40 per cent discount for those with special needs that require private lessons.

D)     Recreation Fees

1)      An increase to holiday programme and OSCAR (before and after school care) fees

2)      To simplify recreation term programme pricing.

 

ii)       Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review

A)      To adjust fees in line with Hire Fee Framework July 2014.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

9.       A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 3 October 2023. This report seeks the feedback of the local board on proposed changes to fees and charges that will be included alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation.

10.     A three-year cycle of fee reviews was introduced in the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. Over the years the cost of delivering these services have increased but the fees and charges for users have not been adjusted accordingly.

11.     Local boards could choose to increase or decrease its fees and charges from the proposal. This may result in extra funding for the local board if fees are increased or a top-up may be required from the local board funding if fees are reduced from the proposal.

12.     The Governing Body will agree on consultation items including proposed fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

13.     Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

14.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     This is the third year of the fee review cycle. There are changes proposed to the following local fees and charges:

·        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·        Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

Active Communities

16.     There are 45 Active Communities sites (pool and leisure facilities) across the Auckland region. 25 of these are currently managed directly by Auckland Council. A Request for Proposal process is currently underway for council owned pool and leisure services. Relevant fees and charges proposed will be included as part of the contract negotiations.

17.     The review of fees and charges for Active Communities services has been split into two phases due to its size and complexity. Council managed bookable spaces were reviewed and adopted in 2023 as phase one.

18.     In this second phase, staff have reviewed the majority of the remaining fees to ensure an appropriate level of cost recovery to enable the council to provide an equitable service across the network.

Membership fees

19.     Some customers are on membership rates that we no longer offer. They include memberships may have been in place prior to amalgamation in 2010, or membership types that have since been discontinued. We are proposing to align these legacy memberships with current membership options over three years. In year one, we estimate that around 4,500 memberships (approximately 20 per cent) will increase by up to 7 per cent. The estimated increase in revenue is $260,000 in year one across the region.

20.     We are also proposing to introduce an Auckland wide membership option to allow customers to access all 45 pool and leisure sites, both council-managed and contracted. The estimated increase in revenue from this proposal is expected to be around $90,000 per year across the region.

Aquatic entrance fees

21.     The baseline aquatic entrance fees for all council managed and contracted pools and leisure sites are proposed to change. This will include fees for swimming, spa, sauna and steam room use for adults as well as spectator and supervising adult fees.

22.     Alongside this proposed fee change, we are proposing an increased discount rate for seniors (over 65 years), students (over 17), Community Services card and permanent disability card holders, from 15 per cent currently to 40 per cent. This proposal will increase revenue by an estimated $77,000 per annum across the region and will ensure equitable access for users of these services.

23.     Officers have reviewed data available and found no conclusive evidence to support a significant change to the targeted rate for Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara Papatoetoe local boards at this stage. It is recommended that the targeted rate be adjusted by the forecast council rate of inflation for 2024/2025. As of the time this report was written the forecast rate of inflation for council’s arts and recreation services was 3.5 per cent for 2024/2025. This will be used to calculate the targeted rate amount to be included in the 10-year budget consultation. The final rate amount will be set in June 2024 based on the updated inflation forecast available to the council at that point.

Swim school fees

24.     An increase in swim school fees is proposed. This will align swimming lesson pricing closer to market rates while maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders. This proposal includes a new 30 per cent discount for Community Services card holders and their dependents and a 40 per cent discount for those with special needs requiring private lessons. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $745,000 per year across the region.

Recreation fees

25.     We are also proposing to increase OSCAR before and after school care and holiday programme fees to maximise government subsidies and to ensure higher levels of cost recovery. Term programme fees have also been adjusted across the network to provide a simpler charging framework and recover costs appropriately. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $196,000 per year across the region.

26.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached (Attachment A). It is noted that these reviews are not directly applicable to the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board area.

Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces

27.     Venue hire and bookable spaces incorporates community halls, community centres, art centres and bookable library spaces. Fees for 252 bookable spaces at 110 venues are included in this review.

28.     A review of fees has been split into two phases. The Hire Fee Framework considers the size, condition and quality of each bookable space, the levels of staffing, the amenities available, and current patterns of utilisation of the spaces. It also addresses variations within local board and adjacent areas to bring pricing of comparable venues closer together. Phase one of this review will ensure that fees across similar venues are charged appropriately across the portfolio.

29.     Fees for around half of the venues reviewed are not proposed to change as they have been set at an appropriate level when compared to spaces nearby or with similar types of spaces or capacity.

30.     Around 40 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $2 to align them to similar or nearby venues and a further 8 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $12 for this reason. For a small number of venues, we are proposing to decrease fees to generate interest in hiring these facilities.  Overall, these proposed changes to venue hire fee are expected to the generate an increase in revenue of around $160,000.

31.     In phase two we will investigate the cost to serve and assess the balance between rates and user pays to ensure we are providing good value to the ratepayer, whilst providing accessibility to customers and communities.  This review will include input from local boards.

32.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached. (Attachment A). It is noted that these reviews are not directly applicable to the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     The local board input into consultation on fees and charges is procedural in nature. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     The fees and charges review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. There are no impacts to the Council group wider than the parent (Auckland Council).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 3 October 2023.

36.     The local board has the opportunity to input on the local fees and charges before the governing body makes a decision on consulting on changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

37.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement and adopting local fees and charges.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     The council does not hold information on the ethnicity of fee payers so is not able to identify the exact impact on the proposed changes on Māori. The impact of the proposed rates and fees changes on Māori will be similar to that on other residents in Auckland.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     The local board provides input to regional plans and proposals. There will be information in the council’s consultation material for each proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

40.     The table below summarises the total financial implications for all local boards:

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Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     The proposed changes to rates fees and charges will allow the council to meet its cost recovery targets for the relevant activities for the 2024/2025 financial year. If these adjustments are not made the level of general rates increase may have to be higher than set out in the Mayoral proposal or further alternative budget mitigations found.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     The Governing Body will adopt the consultation document and supporting information content the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 including the changes to fees and changes for 2024/2025 on 6 December 2023.


 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Full schedule of proposed changes to fees

99

b

Feedback form

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sugenthy Thomson - Lead Financial Advisor, Financial Strategy & Planning

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Manager - Local Board Financial Advisors

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)

File No.: CP2023/15236

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with an update on the Joint Council-controlled Organisation (CCO) Engagement Plans, CCO work programme (Jul-Sep 2023), and expected milestones in its area for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were adopted in June 2022. These plans record CCO responsibilities and local board commitments with Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare.

3.       CCOs provide local boards with the CCO work programme in their area. Each work programme item lists the engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

4.       Watercare does not have a work programme or engagement plan with Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board.

5.       The engagement plans expired in June 2023 and have not been updated since June 2022. Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts on CCOs delayed a review starting in the first half of 2023.

6.       A current review of the plans is not recommended due to disruptions and unknowns from:

·    Water Services Reform Programme

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer having dedicated staff to support local boards

·    Auckland Transport rolling out a new local board relationship programme

·    reviewing the CCO Accountability Policy through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

7.       This report does not include work programme updates from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Watercare or Auckland Transport.

8.       Auckland Transport will provide their work programme updates through Forward Work Programme briefing packs coming to November 2023 local board workshops.

9.       This report provides an update on Eke Panuku work programme items from July to September 2023 and the engagement approach and anticipated milestones for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

10.     The next CCO quarterly report is scheduled to be provided in February 2024.  

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the council-controlled organisation update on engagement plans, the work programme (Jul-Sep 2023) and anticipated milestones and engagement approaches for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023).

Horopaki

Context

What are CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans?

11.     The 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations recommended that CCOs and local boards adopt an engagement plan to:

·    help cement CCO and local board relations

·    agree on a common understanding of accountability between CCOs and local boards

·    coordinate CCO actions better at the local level.

12.     These plans record the commitment between Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Watercare and the local boards to work together.

13.     Each local board adopted their 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans in June 2022. These plans include CCO responsibilities and local board commitments.

14.     Watercare does not have a specific work programme or engagement plan with Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board.

CCO work programme items

15.     CCOs provide local boards with a work programme that lists the different CCO projects happening in the local board area.

16.     The work programme is not a full list of projects in the local board area. It includes work programme items for engagement purposes.

17.     Each work programme item records an engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

18.     The engagement approach is based on the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) standards which are provided in Table 1 below. Note that the “involve” and “empower” categories are not included in the CCO reporting as decided when the joint engagement plans were adopted.

Table 1: International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Engagement Approach Levels

CCO engagement approach

Commitment to local boards

Inform

CCOs will keep local boards informed.

Consult

CCOs will keep local boards informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and aspirations, and provide feedback on how local board input influenced the decision. CCOs will seek local board feedback on drafts and proposals.

Collaborate

CCOs will work together with local boards to formulate solutions and incorporate their advice and recommendations into the decisions to the maximum extent possible.

 

CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans have expired

19.     The CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans expired in June 2023. The plans have not been updated since June 2022.

20.     The plans were not updated in the first half of 2023 due to disruptions to CCOs caused from Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts.  

21.     A current review of the Joint CCO Engagement Plans is not recommended since:

·    the Water Services Reform Programme may replace Watercare with a new water entity

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer has dedicated support staff to support local board engagement and liaison following Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts

·    Auckland Transport is currently rolling out work which future engagement plans would need to consider, such as:

Forward Works Programme (full list of Auckland Transport projects in the local board area)

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

Regional Land Transport Plan

Local Board Transport Plans

·    the CCO Accountability Policy will be updated as part of the next Long-term Plan which the CCO engagement plans would need to align. 

 

What are the next steps?

22.     The CCO quarterly reporting will continue to provide work programme updates from Watercare (except for Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board) and Eke Panuku.

23.     Local board staff will:

·    work with Auckland Transport on providing clarity on local transport plans and how the transport plans would either replace or integrate with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    liaise with Tātaki Auckland Unlimited on what engagement and reporting resource they are able to provide to local boards following their restructure

·    investigate what engagement requirements and role the new water entity will have with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    provide support to local boards on advocating for any changes wanted to the CCO Accountability Policy through developing the next Long-term Plan. 

24.     Auckland Transport will provide updates on their work programme through the Forward Works Programme workshops starting in November 2023. 

25.     Local boards received the last update to the CCO work programme and engagement approach in July 2023.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

26.     All Eke Panuku work programmes are in progress. It’s noted that a 50 per cent increase in mining activity has been approved for the resource consent at the quarry for the next three years to meet Cyclone Gabrielle's infrastructure rebuild.

27.     More detailed updates to the CCO work programme are provided in Attachment A.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     This report does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

29.     Each CCO must work within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework. Information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Local boards advise CCOs of issues or projects of significance, communicate the interests and preferences of their communities and allow for flexibility in terms of engagement, recognising differing levels of interest.

31.     The work programme items are shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     This report on the CCO work programme items provides the communication of up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     This report does not have a direct impact on Māori, however the projects it refers to will.

34.     Local boards and CCOs provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to their decision-making processes. These opportunities will be worked on a project or programme basis. 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     This report does not have financial impacts on local boards.

36.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     Some local boards expressed concern over the quality of CCO work programme reporting in April and July 2023, in particular with Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport is currently working on a relationship project which has objectives to deliver:

·    an enhanced process to develop transport plans that reflect local board input and priorities

·    more consistent and timely reporting, updates and analysis on local projects and issues

·    improved support for communication and engagement with local communities.

38.     Auckland Transport will be presenting Forward Work Programme briefing packs to local boards at November 2023 workshops which will address their CCO quarterly updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     The local board will receive the next CCO work programme report in February 2024 which will include an update on projects from Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023) and expected milestones for work in Quarter Three (Jan-Mar 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Eke Panuku Aotea / Great Barrier work programme update

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Jacqui Fyers - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan

File No.: CP2023/14737

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031 and to provide information received from public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) is seeking feedback from local boards on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP). In particular, AT is seeking feedback on the service improvements proposed for the local board’s area.

3.       The RPTP is the main plan for public transport services in Auckland. It also includes a vision, goals, policies, and targets that relate to the planning and delivery of the public transportation system.

4.       AT will use the local board’s formal views, along with feedback received via public consultation, to finalise the plan. The AT Board is expected to adopt the final plan in November 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a) provide feedback to Auckland Transport on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031, in line with the template provided in Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Regional Public Transport Plan is Auckland’s main plan for public transport (PT) services. It outlines how PT will be managed and improved over the next eight years, with a detailed focus on the first three years. This includes the services that will operate during this period (and how they will change) and the goals, policies and actions that will shape PT.

6.       The purpose of the RPTP is to enable consultation with the public and PT operators on the planning of PT services. This is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act 2003.

7.       Public consultation on the draft RPTP ran from 17 July to 17 August 2023, and AT received over 3,200 responses. This compares well to the 462 responses the previous (2018) RPTP received.

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Public feedback was generally very supportive of the content of the draft RPTP. This includes:

·    strong support for the plan’s vision and goals

·    support for the action areas within the plan

·    support for most proposed service improvements (with the main exception of the removals of ferry services to Gulf Harbour and Northcote Point).

9.       Feedback that was not supportive of the content of the draft RPTP included:

·    wanting further improvement and/or faster delivery

·    concerns that PT is too expensive or does not provide value for money

·    comments that a greater percentage of the cost of operating PT should come from users (via fares).

10.     The RPTP includes AT’s aspirations to do more in further improvements and faster delivery if and when more funding for PT becomes available.

11.     AT received one submission from a person who gave their local board as Aotea / Great Barrier. This person responded via a social media link, which asked about our proposed service improvements across Auckland. They did not answer questions on other aspects of the plan.

12.     The submission said our proposals related to service improvements were ‘great as they are’ and told us to get on with delivering our plan.

13.     AT has held workshops with other local boards to take them through the feedback from their constituents and give them an overview of the contents of the wider RPTP. AT did not schedule a workshop with the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Public transport has a key role to play in helping to reduce emissions, as set out in Auckland Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP). The RPTP acknowledges the ambitious targets the TERP has for increased PT usage, and the actions and improvements included in the RPTP will play an important role in making progress towards those targets.

15.     One of the RPTP’s goals is ‘enhancing the environment and tackling the climate emergency’. This goal guides efforts of transition to a low-emission PT system, encouraging mode shift, and adapting infrastructure to a changing climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Auckland Council’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee endorsed the overall strategic direction for the draft RPTP in April 2023. This included the vision and goals for the plan, and a ‘balanced’ approach to service improvements.

17.     Following public consultation closing, AT also engaged with the council’s advisory panels to get specific feedback about aspects of the plan relevant to the panels’ expertise.

18.     AT has also worked with Auckland Council and Eke Panuku staff to ensure, where possible, the draft RPTP is aligned with other strategic plans and projects across the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     AT held a range of public information events across the region at libraries, community centres, bus and train stations. AT also held two on-line drop-in sessions. Across all of these events, AT had hundreds of conversations with the public which will also be used to inform changes to the plan. In addition, some members of the public called AT to ask questions and seek clarification on content in the plan.

20.     Public feedback was generally supportive of the vision and goals in the draft RPTP and requested additional service improvements (beyond what AT is currently funded to deliver).

21.     Proposed service improvements in the draft RPTP in the local board’s area were set out in a memo from AT, dated 12 July 2023.

22.     AT received one submission from a person who gave their local board as Aotea / Great Barrier. The submission said our proposals related to service improvements were ‘great as they are’, and told us to get on with delivering our plan.

23.     Workshops to date have been positive, with most local boards supporting AT’s proposals for service improvements and initiatives to reduce the cost of public transport to users (such as the proposed weekly fare cap and extended transfer window).

24.     Some local boards have also requested more information around the use of existing services and expressed an interest in exploring the potential for on-demand AT Local services to operate in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     AT has held multiple hui with mana whenua as part of the development of the RPTP and will be making changes to the draft RPTP based on their feedback.

26.     The draft RPTP includes a Māori outcomes section (part 3.7), which outlines key areas of concern to mana whenua and mataawaka and where more detail can be found in the plan.

27.     AT intends to revise part 3.7, and other relevant parts of the RPTP, to reflect feedback received from Māori (both mana whenua and mataawaka).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     There are no financial implications of providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

29.     The RPTP is required to be a realistically fundable plan, and AT’s budget for additional services is constrained (and fully allocated to the service improvements proposed in the draft RPTP).

30.     Any feedback provided regarding service level improvements should take into account AT’s financial constraints, and the trade-offs that may be required to implement them (for example, increasing services on one route is likely to require reductions on another route).

 

 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are no risks associated with providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     AT will use the feedback provided by the local board, along with feedback received from the public and other stakeholders, to finalise the draft RPTP.

33.     The AT Board will consider adopting the revised RPTP at their 29 November 2023 meeting.

34.     If adopted, the final RPTP will be publicly released in early December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

RPTP feedback template for local boards

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Luke Elliot - Principal Planner - Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

File No.: CP2023/14731

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform local board members of the Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation and invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parliament’s Environment Committee has opened an Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, with submissions due on 1 November 2023.

3.       This inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.  The Ministry for the Environment has developed an Issues and Options paper to assist the Inquiry (link ‘Community-led retreat and adaptation funding: issues and options’).

4.       The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

5.       Auckland Council staff are preparing a submission for the inquiry, led by the Chief Sustainability Office.  However, the tight timeframe means that we are proposing a delegated sub-group of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee will approve the submission after the draft submission has been circulated to elected members for comments.

6.       Local boards are invited to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback for inclusion into Auckland Council’s submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       On 25 August 2023, the Environment Committee opened its Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. The inquiry is open for public submissions until 1 November 2023.

8.       The inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.

9.       For the purposes of its inquiry, the Environment Committee is particularly interested in:

·    The current approach to community-led retreat and adaptation funding, its strengths, risks and costs

·    Lessons learned from severe weather events and natural disasters in Aotearoa New Zealand for community-led retreat and funding climate adaptation

·    Effective mechanisms for community-led decision making

·    The role of the private sector in managing climate risk

·    Potential institutional arrangements, including roles and responsibilities of central and local government agencies, iwi and hapū

·    Māori participation, Crown obligations, and how to best give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi, and integrate matauranga Māori and te ao Māori across the adaptation system

·    Alignment and integration with existing legislation and regulatory framework, including the reformed resource management system and any changes needed to regulatory powers and potential economic or other incentives needed to support adaptation actions (both before and after extreme events)

·    Funding sources, access to them and principles and criteria for cost sharing

·    Targets or indicators for assessing progress to more resilient communities and infrastructure.

10.     The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Ministry for the Environment released a paper to inform and support submissions titled ‘Community-led retreat and adaptation funding: issues and options’

12.     A template is attached for local board feedback (refer Attachment A).

13.     The table below sets out the key timeframes for local board input on the submission:

Date

Action

2 October 2023

Briefing for local board members

5 October 2023

Report to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee (for delegation)

6 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be considered for incorporation into the submission

20 October 2023

Draft submission shared with local boards

27 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission

1 November 2023

Closing date for submissions

2 November 2023

Copy of final council submission circulated to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee members, local board members and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     One of the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan is “to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway”.

15.     Under our current emissions pathway, Auckland will continue to experience ongoing sea-level rise, coastal inundation and erosion, and more frequent and severe weather events like those Aucklanders experienced in early 2023.

16.     Globally there needs to be urgent and rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

17.     However, regardless of the global trajectory in emissions, Auckland and New Zealand need to adapt to the impacts of climate change that are already happening and are likely to continue.

18.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will likely inform the development of national legislation which will have implications for how Auckland Council undertakes adaptation.

19.     This submission contributes to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan through action B1 (Ensure our approach to planning and growth aligns with low carbon, resilient outcomes), sub-action 8 (Collaborate to ensure climate change mitigation and adaptation is a priority in national planning legislation).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The development of the proposed Climate Adaptation Bill is likely to be informed by the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. This legislation will have significant impacts across the Auckland Council group.

21.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

22.     Learnings from the 2023 severe weather events will be incorporated into the submission by the Recovery Office and Auckland Emergency Management as they are deemed relevant to climate adaptation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Local authorities will play a key role in implementation in climate adaptation, as they:

·    are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·    have a responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience,

·    enhance community resilience through public education, infrastructure provision and land use planning processes.

24.     Local board views are being sought on the Parliamentary Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, which is considering options for community-led retreat and adaptation funding and will be appended to council’s final submission.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     There are implications for Māori within a potential future climate adaptation system.

26.     Central government are engaging directly with Māori regarding climate adaptation.

27.     A communication on the Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation has been sent to all iwi entities and their feedback sought. IMSB secretariat staff will work with the council’s technical team throughout the development of the submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The submission will be developed within existing resources.

29.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will be considering funding sources for climate adaptation, as well as the role of local government.

30.     There are potentially significant financial implications for local government within a future climate adaptation system. Council’s submission provides an opportunity to state our position on how funding of climate adaptation should operate in the future.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Financial and legal expertise will be sought in the development of the submission to identify possible financial, legal and reputational risks to the council associated with climate change adaptation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Given the tight timeframes provided to us by the Government, we will be requesting a delegated sub-group to finally approve the council submission by 1 November 2023.

33.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

34.     Please note that due to tight timeframes this may not align with scheduled local board business meetings and any inputs from local boards may need to either be delegated or utilise the urgent decision process.

35.     Local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission is due by 6 October 2023.

36.     Local board feedback to be appended to the council’s submission is due by 27 October 2023.

37.     Once local board feedback has been formalised (either by urgent decision or delegated authority), Local Board Services staff will email this feedback to be incorporated in or appended to council’s submission.

38.     Once the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation are released in 2024, staff will provide local boards with a memo summarising the conclusions.

39.     Any queries can be directed to Petra Pearce, Petra.Pearce@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Template for submission points on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

127

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Petra Oearce - Lead Climate Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Lauren Simpson - Chief Sustainability Officer

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2023/13843

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for two meeting dates to be added to the 2023-2024 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (the Long-Term Plan) and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 (Annual Plan) timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Tuesday, 6 December 2022.

3.       At that time, the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision-making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unknown. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve two meeting dates as an addition to the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board meeting schedule so that the modified 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes can be met.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      approve the addition of two meeting dates to the 2022-2025 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes as follows:

i)        Tuesday, 30 April 2024, 10am

ii)       Tuesday, 11 June 2024, 10am.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its Tuesday, 6 December 2022 business meeting.

8.       The timeframes for local board decision-making in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

9.       The local board is being asked to make decisions in late-November 2023 and late-April and early-June 2024 to feed into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 processes. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meetings as additions to the meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meetings as extraordinary meetings.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 process could be considered at this meeting.

13.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqui Fyers - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule)

File No.: CP2023/12553

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule) was formerly called the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar 2019 – 2022, and appended to the report as Attachment A. The policy schedule is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff for reference and information only.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendars aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule) for the political term 2022-2025 as at October 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

October 2023 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule)

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqui Fyers - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record of Proceedings

File No.: CP2023/12551

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion. No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held on Tuesday 19 September, Tuesday 26 September, Tuesday 3 October and Tuesday 10 October are appended to the report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)   note / tuhi ā-taipitopito the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on the following dates:

i)    Tuesday 19 September 2023

ii)   Tuesday 26 September 2023

iii)   Tuesday 3 October 2023 and

iv)  Tuesday 10 October 2023

 


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20230919 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record

145

b

20230926 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record

147

c

20231003 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record

149

d

20231010 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record

151

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacqui Fyers - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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