I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday 24 October 2023

10:00am

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board office
2 Glen Road
Browns Bay

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

Members

Jake Law

Victoria Short

 

Sam Mills

Gregg Walden

 

Alexis Poppelbaum, JP

Leanne Willis

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Louise Healy

Democracy Advisor

 

19 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 021 419 205

Email: louise.healy@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Friends of Okura Bush                                                                  5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              6

11        Proposed new community lease to the Hibiscus Coast Boating Club Incorporated at 162 Brightside Road, Stanmore Bay Park, Stanmore Bay                                        7

12        Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                    19

13        Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan                         47

14        Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                                         63

15        Adoption of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023                                   69

16        Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)        75

17        Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025                                                                                                                      85

18        Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation                99

19        Local board feedback on council’s submission to the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making                                                     113

20        Hibiscus and Bays Local and Multi-board Grants Round One, and Transitional Rates Grants 2023/2024 grant allocations                                                              117

21        Adoption of a business meeting schedule for 2024                                              127

22        Members' Reports                                                                                                      129

23        Hōtaka Kaupapa - Policy Schedule October 2023                                                 133

24        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records                                              137

25        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of

            Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The chairperson opened the meeting and welcomed those in attendance.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday 26 September 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Friends of Okura Bush

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Chris Bettany and Dale Connelly from Friends of Okura Bush have requested a deputation to update the local board on a new project. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Chris Bettany and Dale Connelly for their presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Proposed new community lease to the Hibiscus Coast Boating Club Incorporated at 162 Brightside Road, Stanmore Bay Park, Stanmore Bay

File No.: CP2023/14841

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community ground lease to the Hibiscus Coast Boating Club Incorporated for its facilities located at 162 Brightside Road, Stanmore Bay Park, Stanmore Bay.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hibiscus Coast Boating Club seeks a new community ground lease to continue occupation and operation from their group-owned building at 162 Brightside Road, Stanmore Bay.

3.       The Hibiscus Coast Boating Club currently holds a community ground lease which has reached final expiry on 30 April 2023. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated, or a new lease is granted.

4.       A new lease to Hibiscus Coast Boating Club was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2022/2023 at their 23 June 2022 local board meeting (resolution number HB/2022/80).

5.       The club aims to promote, protect and advance the interests of recreational boating and the sport of fishing. These activities align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 1: A connected community, and Outcome 4: Open spaces to enjoy.

6.       The Hibiscus Coast Boating Club has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. They have all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

7.       The Hibiscus Coast Boating Club has asked to increase their leased area to maintain the grass between their building and the Hibiscus Sea Rescue Trust. Council staff and the Hibiscus Sea Rescue Trust are supportive of the group’s lease area request.

8.       Staff from Park Specialists, Area Operations, Active Recreation, Resilient Land and Coasts, and Connected Communities have been consulted with no concerns raised regarding a new lease, including the new lease area to the group.

9.       As the Hibiscus Coast Boating Club is contemplated in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan 2022, public notification and iwi engagement was not required for the progression of this new lease.

10.     This report recommends that a new community ground lease be granted to the Hibiscus Coast Boating Club for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 November 2023 with one 10-year right of renewal.

11.     If the local board decides to grant the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakaae / grant under Section 54(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community ground lease to the Hibiscus Coast Boating Club Incorporated for 1884 square meters (more or less) located at 162 Brightside Road, Stanmore Bay on the land legally described as Lot 12 Deposited Plan 64710 (as per Attachment A to the agenda report – Site Map), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – 10 years, commencing 1 November 2023, with one 10-year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B to the agenda report – Community Outcomes Plan).

b)      whakaae / approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated July 2023).

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

13.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2022/2023 at their 23 June 2022 local board meeting (resolution number HB/2022/80).

14.     A new lease to the Hibiscus Coast Boating Club (the club) at 162 Brightside Road, Stanmore Bay was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved through the work programme.

Land, building and lease

15.     The land occupied by the club is legally described as LOT 12 DP 64710, held by Auckland Council as a recreation reserve, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

16.     The club holds a community ground lease for their group-owned building which commenced on 1 May 2004 and reached final expiry on 30 April 2023. The lease will continue to hold over on a month-by-month basis on existing terms and conditions until the lease is terminated or a new lease is granted to the club.

17.     As a group-owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee.  These costs are covered by the club’s membership fees, donations, raffles and bar sales.

18.     The building is primarily used for club activities, marine safety training and storage for the club’s tractor.

19.     The club is willing to share its facilities with the community. Its facilities are available for hire and used regularly for coastguard meetings.

New lease area

20.     The club have asked for an increase of their leased area under their lease to maintain the grassed area between their building and the Hibiscus Sea Rescue Trust (Attachment A - Site Map).

21.     The club have asked for this change to:

a)      use the additional outdoor area to host various club activities

b)      maintain the grassed area between their building and The Hibiscus Sea Rescue Trust.

22.     The club have advised they will share the cost of maintenance for the new additional leased area with the Hibiscus Sea Rescue Trust. The Hibiscus Sea Rescue Trust have agreed to the club’s lease area change request.

23.     Staff from Park Specialists, Area Operations, Active Recreation and Connected Communities have considered the requested change and have no concerns regarding this request.

The Hibiscus Coast Boating Club Incorporated

24.     The Hibiscus Coast Boating Club was registered as an incorporated society in August 1985, with the following objectives:

·        to promote, protect and advance the interests of recreational boating and the sport of fishing

·        continuous development of members' knowledge of seamanship, safety at sea, NZ marine and fishing regulations.

 

25.     The club consists of approximately 520 members, with its operation being supported by four paid staff members (one full-time and three part-time) and eight part-time volunteers. The club is open most evenings for its various programmes and social events.

26.     The club has held a presence at Stanmore Bay Park for more than 30 years and is open to supporting the local community. They recently took part in cleaning the Stanmore Bay Park area after the Auckland Anniversary flooding event.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

27.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The club is exercising this right by applying for a new lease. The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

Public notification and engagement 

28.     As the club is contemplated on the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan 2022, public notification or iwi engagement is not required for granting a new lease to the club.

Assessment of the application

29.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver marine recreation services.

30.     The club has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

31.     The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

32.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and its facility was found to be well managed and maintained. The club building has been improved over time with the club recently adding a covered deck as an extension to the building.

33.     The club provides a valuable service to the local community by supporting marine recreation and marine safety, while making its facilities available for hire to help support initiatives within the local community.

34.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement and is attached to the report as Attachment B.

35.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and the community outcomes plan will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.

36.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to club for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 November 2023 with one 10-year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

38.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

39.     Climate change has some potential to impact the lease, as the leased area is in a flood prone area and coastal inundation zone.

40.     As a group-owned building, the club are expected to mitigate against or prepare for any climate change impacts for protecting their assets at this location.

41.     Based on further advice from the Resilient Land and Coasts team, it was noted the site is subject to a five-year return period coastal inundation event but not subject to coastal erosion hazard for the short term. The team have considered the climate impact change at this location and have considered it feasible on progressing a new lease to the club for the proposed term of the lease.

42.     The team have advised that under the Whangaparaoa Shoreline Adaptation Plan, the site is subject to a ‘limited intervention’ management strategy for the next 20 years, moving to a ‘managed retreat’ strategy for the medium to long term.

43.     The club have been notified regarding the climate impact risks at this location.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate impact exposure at 162 Brightside Road, Stanmore Bay

Map indicative keys

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     Council staff from Area Operations, Active Recreation, Resilient Land and Coasts, Connected Communities and Park Specialists were consulted regarding the proposed lease. There have been no concerns raised on the proposed lease to the club.

45.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote health and wellbeing for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

47.     The assessment of this application was provided as a memo to the local board on 8 August 2023. The local board indicated its in principle support of the lease proposal, including the lease area change for the club.

48.     The delivered activities align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 1: A connected community

·        Hibiscus and Bays communities are supported, connected and vibrant

Outcome 4: Open spaces to enjoy

·        protect, maintain, and improve access and amenities for activities on our coastlines, parks and reserves

·        provide a range of play and active recreation opportunities for all ages and abilities in our parks, reserves, and coastal environment.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     Iwi engagement was not required in consideration of this lease application, as per paragraph 28.

50.     The lessee has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori outcomes that reflect their local community as per Attachment B of this report. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community by supporting education and awareness of Māori culture and values. The club shows they can deliver on Māori outcomes by hosting events like Matariki evenings and are connected with the local marae to support hui which contribute towards achieving Māori outcomes.

51.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

52.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

53.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

54.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     On 8 June 2023 the Annual Budget was approved by the Governing Body which included changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines of the rent fee for a community ground lease from $1.00 per annum to $1300.00 plus GST per annum taking effect from 1 July 2023.

56.     A new lease to the group was due prior to the Annual Budget changes on 1 July 2023, but due to unforeseen circumstances there were delays on receipt of the club’s lease application. Taking this into consideration, staff recommend that rent remain at $1.00 per annum until the next lease renewal date for this club.

57.     If the local board chooses to retain the level of rent at $1.00, there will be no requirement for the local board to top up the community lease revenue budget. However, the local board will not have the benefit of the additional revenue of $1300.00 per annum over the initial term of the lease from the club. The level of rent can be reviewed on the lease renewal date and at expiry of the initial term of the lease.

58.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. There are no other cost implications for the local board approving the lease.

59.     By the club taking over the proposed new leased area will result in an estimated maintenance saving of $800.00 per year. The club will continue to take responsibility for ongoing maintenance of their building, improvements and grounds within their leased area at this location.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     Should the local board resolve to not grant the proposed community lease the club at 162 Brightside Road, Stanmore Bay, the club’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcomes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     If the local board resolves to grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the club to finalise the lease agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Map - 162 Brightside Road, Stanmore Bay

15

b

Community Outcomes Plan for Hibiscus Coast Boating Club Incorporated

17

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chan Park - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/14952

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with a summary of public consultation feedback, respond to previous queries and seek formal resolutions supporting the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted a Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce deaths and serious injuries. Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       A speed management plan for the Auckland region is a government requirement and will set safe and appropriate speed limits to reduce road deaths and serious injuries. Katoa, Ka Ora is the name of this plan, and it is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all.

5.       Auckland Transport workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora with local boards in February and March 2023, and local boards provided formal feedback about the proposal in March and April 2023, specifically the five development approaches within the speed management plan.

6.       Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023.

7.       Auckland Transport has analysed and summarised the consultation feedback received and provided responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora. This information is provided as a series of attachments to this report for local board members to review.

8.       Furthermore , the report seeks local board support for the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes within its area.

9.       Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the summary of public consultation feedback received on the proposed Katoa, Ka Ora speed limit changes (Attachment D to the agenda report) 

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note Auckland Transport responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora (Attachment A to the agenda report) 

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note Auckland Transport’s legal obligations under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (Rule) and that the Rule requires best efforts to complete safe and appropriate speed limit setting near schools by 2027 

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that since June 2020, when the programme started, road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed  

e)      tautoko / support the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes identified for this local board area (Attachments C and E to the agenda report) 

f)       tautoko / support speed limit review near schools that do not have current or proposed safe speed limits including Ōrewa College, Kings Way School, Wentworth College, Wentworth Primary, Red Beach School, Ōrewa Primary School, St John's School (Mairangi Bay), Whangaparāoa School (Auckland), Stella Maris Primary School, Whangaparāoa College and Gulf Harbour School

g)      tautoko / support speed limit review of additional locations requested in public consultation feedback and recommended for the next future consultation in Attachment C.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use. 

Alignment with Central Government policy

11.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy. The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to school.

12.     The strategy’s action plan includes the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires road controlling authorities to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

13.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications; category one and category two. Most Auckland schools are classified as category one, or schools where children may be out and about outside the school gate. To comply with the Rule, speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) are required in the area outside of the school. Category two schools are where children are more likely to be picked up or dropped off within the school grounds.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency).

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent, easy-to-understand changes that communities can understand. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

Auckland Transport’s role

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury (DSI). So, after receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board, the safe speeds programme has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland reducing speed limits on many roads.

18.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes, the programme focuses on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation. The phases can be summarised as follows:

a)      Phase One covered approximately 11 per cent of the local road network and focused on the highest risk roads

b)      Phase Two covered approximately eight per cent of the network and had a significant focus on safe speeds for rural roads and roads near schools

c)      Phase Three covered approximately 19 per cent of the network and included roads around schools, rural roads, town centre roads, rural marae and roads requested by the community.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on safety around schools so AT directly surveyed all schools with proposed speed limit changes in late-2022 and early 2023. The summary results of the local schools survey was shared with each local board as part of the February/March 2023 workshop follow-up.

22.     Information about the iterative engagement process used to develop Katoa, Ka Ora was shared with local boards in two rounds of workshops held in February/March 2022 and February/March 2023.

23.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on. Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. 7801 pieces of feedback were received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Katoa, Ka Ora has been consulted on with the public and with local boards. This report updates local boards on:

a)      the results of the public consultation conducted from 24 July to 28 August 2023 in each local board area, including AT’s responses to the changes requested by members of the public

b)      Auckland Transport’s response to the local board feedback provided in April 2023, including AT’s responses to changes requested by members of the public.

25.     This information is included in attachments to this report and AT’s overall considerations for this local board area are summarised in a two-page summary infographic (Attachment B to the agenda report).

26.     Additionally, the full consultation report will be published on the AT website by early November 2023.

27.     The attachments provide a clear summary of what people in this local board area said about the programme so local board members are aware of community sentiment as they consider AT’s technical advice.

Technical advice

28.     Auckland Transport’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system; the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. This includes finalising a speed management plan within legal timeframes and setting safe speed limits near all schools by 2027. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by 2027, we are proposing to include a review of permanent speed limits near all remaining schools in a future consultation.

30.     Further, the impact of speed reduction on the number of DSI is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

a)      Since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed

b)      In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a nine per cent increase in road deaths.

31.     Thirty km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed around schools is used for the safe speed programme.

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that Katoa, Ka Ora meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. The proposed speed of 30km/h near schools is consistent with legislative requirements and is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.  

33.     Additionally, speed reductions delivered to date by the programme are already reducing DSI. It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the local board is to support the programme.

Customer research

34.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

35.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

36.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. Their experiences of high-speed vehicles, near misses, crime and ‘stranger danger’ around schools mean an increasing number of parents drive their children to and from school. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

38.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

39.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The Safe Speeds Programme was endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning committee and the current term Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     Auckland Transport has visited all local boards during February and March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes.

42.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February and March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

43.     In post-workshop resolutions local boards indicated their level of support for the programme. Common themes were higher levels of support near schools, town centres and places where people are out and about.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

45.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka. Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora.

46.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

47.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at their workshops in February and March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications. Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. Comprehensive communications including the evidence and key facts have been provided to increase understanding and support of safe speeds. 

50.     Funding constraints may require the scale of the plan to be reduced or delivery to be slowed or delayed. Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback received from local boards. We will use this, along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our legal and safety obligations as a road controlling authority, to help edit and finalise Katoa, Ka Ora, a speed management plan for Auckland.

52.     We have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee in November 2023. Confirmation of a date is yet to be received.

53.     Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

A list of requests made via resolution by this local board on the proposed approach for Katoa, Ka Ora in April 2023; and AT’s response to those requests

27

b

Two-page infographic report of public feedback received on Katoa, Ka Ora

31

c

List of recommended changes and requests for additional locations for the Local Board area, under the following categories:
1.     recommended changes to draft proposal following consideration of         public consultation feedback. Refer to map in Attachment E.

2.     requests for additional locations for speed limit review – summary         of requests from the public consultation for this local board area         and AT’s response to those requests.

33

d

Summary report of public feedback on Katoa, Ka Ora consultation

35

e

Map of local board proposal used in consultation, to read alongside Attachment C

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Eric van Essen – Programme Director, Strategic Programmes, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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24 October 2023

 

 

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24 October 2023

 

 

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24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan

File No.: CP2023/15156

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031 and provide information received from public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport is seeking feedback from local boards on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan. In particular, Auckland Transport is seeking feedback on the service improvements proposed for the local board’s area.

3.       The draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan is the main plan for public transport services in Auckland. It also includes a vision, goals, policies, and targets that relate to the planning and delivery of the public transportation system.

4.       Auckland Transport will use the local board’s formal views, along with feedback received via public consultation, to finalise the plan. The Auckland Transport Board is expected to adopt the final plan in November 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback to Auckland Transport on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031, in line with the template provided in Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) is Auckland’s main plan for public transport (PT) services. It outlines how PT will be managed and improved over the next eight years, with a detailed focus on the first three years. This includes the services that will operate during this period (and how they will change) and the goals, policies and actions that will shape PT.

6.       The purpose of the RPTP is to enable consultation with the public and PT operators on the planning of PT services. This is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act 2003.

7.       Public consultation on the draft RPTP ran from 17 July to 17 August 2023, and Auckland Transport (AT) received over 3,200 responses. This compares well to the 462 responses the previous (2018) RPTP received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Public feedback was generally very supportive of the content of the draft RPTP. This includes:

·        strong support for the plan’s vision and goals

·        support for the action areas within the plan

·        support for most proposed service improvements (with the main exception of the removals of ferry services to Gulf Harbour and Northcote Point).

9.       Feedback that was not supportive of the content of the draft RPTP included:

·        wanting further improvement and/or faster delivery

·        concerns that PT is too expensive or does not provide value for money

·        comments that a greater percentage of the cost of operating PT should come from users (via fares).

10.     The RPTP includes AT’s aspirations to do more in further improvements and faster delivery if, and when more funding for PT becomes available.

11.     Auckland Transport has provided a breakdown of the top areas submitters from each local board commented to assist the board in providing feedback (Attachment B to the agenda report).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Public transport has a key role to play in helping to reduce emissions, as set out in Auckland Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP). The RPTP acknowledges the ambitious targets the TERP has for increased PT usage, and the actions and improvements included in the RPTP will play an important role in making progress towards those targets.

13.     One of the RPTP’s goals is ‘enhancing the environment and tackling the climate emergency’. This goal guides efforts of transition to a low-emission PT system, encouraging mode shift, and adapting infrastructure to a changing climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Auckland Council’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee endorsed the overall strategic direction for the draft RPTP in April 2023. This included the vision and goals for the plan, and a ‘balanced’ approach to service improvements.

15.     Following public consultation closing, AT also engaged with the council’s advisory panels to get specific feedback about aspects of the plan relevant to the panels’ expertise.

16.     Auckland Transport has also worked with Auckland Council and Eke Panuku staff to ensure, where possible, the draft RPTP is aligned with other strategic plans and projects across the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Auckland Transport held a range of public information events across the region at libraries, community centres, bus and train stations. They also held two on-line drop-in sessions. Across all these events, AT had hundreds of conversations with the public which will also be used to inform changes to the plan. In addition, some members of the public called AT to ask questions and seek clarification on content in the plan.

18.     Public feedback was generally supportive of the vision and goals in the draft RPTP and requested additional service improvements (beyond what AT is currently funded to deliver).

19.     Proposed service improvements in the draft RPTP in the local board’s area were set out in a memo from AT, dated 12 July 2023.

20.     Auckland Transport set out the feedback received from residents of the local board’s area in a memo and supporting material (Attachment B and Attachment C to the agenda report) provided at a workshop on the draft RPTP held on 19 September 2023.

21.     Workshops to date have been positive, with most local boards supporting AT’s proposals for service improvements and initiatives to reduce the cost of public transport to users (such as the proposed weekly fare cap and extended transfer window).

22.     Some local boards have also requested more information around the use of existing services and expressed an interest in exploring the potential for on-demand AT local services to operate in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Auckland Transport has held multiple hui with mana whenua as part of the development of the RPTP and will be making changes to the draft RPTP based on their feedback.

24.     The draft RPTP includes a Māori outcomes section (part 3.7), which outlines key areas of concern to mana whenua and mataawaka and where more detail can be found in the plan.

25.     Auckland Transport intends to revise part 3.7, and other relevant parts of the RPTP, to reflect feedback received from Māori (both mana whenua and mataawaka).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications of providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

27.     The RPTP is required to be a realistically fundable plan, and AT’s budget for additional services is constrained (and fully allocated to the service improvements proposed in the draft RPTP).

28.     Any feedback provided regarding service level improvements should consider AT’s financial constraints, and the trade-offs that may be required to implement them (for example, increasing services on one route is likely to require reductions on another route).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no risks associated with providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Auckland Transport will use the feedback provided by the local board, along with feedback received from the public and other stakeholders, to finalise the draft RPTP.

31.     The AT Board will consider adopting the revised RPTP at their 29 November 2023 meeting.

32.     If adopted, the final RPTP will be publicly released in early December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback template for local boards

51

b

Consultation 2023 snapshot

55

c

Post consultation memo

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Luke Elliot – Principal Planner, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2023/16077

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board reduced Local Board Transport Capital Fund budget for the 2022-2025 political term and seek local board approval of the projects to be delivered.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport manages the Local Board Transport Capital Fund on behalf of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. Auckland Transport provides quality advice to support local board decision-making. A decision relating to the allocation of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund is being sought.

3.       The confirmed budget for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is now $1,888,965 which includes the additional approved budget of $35,000 to cover current contractual commitments. This replaces the indicative budget of $2,830,661 discussed in the June 2023 Auckland Transport report.

4.       The reduction in the Local Board Transport Capital Fund reflects the pressure Auckland Transport and its funding partners are under due to flood recovery work following the severe weather events in early 2023, inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

5.       Of the confirmed budget, $35,000 has been approved as additional budget to cover Ōrewa Boulevard Stage 3’s contractual commitments, from the previous term.

6.       In this report, Auckland Transport recommends that projects with no contractual commitments are prioritised by Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and the remaining budget of $1,888,965 is allocated to construct:

·        Hibiscus Coast Highway/ Whangaparāoa Road pedestrian treatment ($1,300,000)

·        Saddleback Rise, Murrays Bay - Raised Zebra Crossing ($375,000)

·        East Coast Bays Schools Safety Improvements ($148,965)

·        Torbay Bollards project ($30,000).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      allocate the Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2025 as follows:

i)        whakaae / approve $1,300,000 to install pedestrian treatment at the intersection of Whangaparāoa Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway

ii)       whakaae / approve $375,000 to construct a raised pedestrian crossing at Saddleback Rise, Murrays Bay

iii)      whakaae / approve $148,965 to make safety improvements for East Coast Bays Schools

iv)      whakaae / approve $30,000 for Torbay Bollards project.

b)      whakaū / confirm priorities for further projects should funds become available as:

i)        $375,000 for a pedestrian crossing at 141 Deep Creek Road, Torbay

ii)       $450,000 for one-way traffic treatment at Bakehouse Lane, Ōrewa

iii)      $150,000 for a new pedestrian refuge island on Whangaparāoa Road, Manly, near the Fire Station

iv)      $600,000 for a safe crossing at or near 672 Beach Road, Browns Bay.

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that $35,000 additional budget has been approved to cover current contractual commitments for Ōrewa Boulevard Stage 3.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is an Auckland Transport (AT) fund established in 2012 to allow local boards to deliver small projects in their local area that would not normally be prioritised by Auckland Transport. In 2014, the LBTCF budget was set at $20 million spread across all local boards and distributed based on Auckland Council’s Local Board Funding Policy.

8.       Since 2020, when COVID-19 lockdowns impacted on Auckland Council’s revenue the LBTCF has been reduced specifically to $15 million per annum across all local boards in the most recent Regional Land Transport Plan of which Hibiscus and Bays share was $2,830,661.

9.       Due to further budget reductions, as outlined above, Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s new allocation of LBTCF for the 2022–2025 political term is $1,888,965.

10.     Therefore, the local board must now review the programme of work that was planned and reduce it to match the new budget. The local board’s role is to review the work programme supported by AT’s quality advice, consider options, and then decide about re-prioritisation. This report confirms the new programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Auckland Transport held three workshops with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in 2023 to discuss the LBTCF and its allocation.

12.     Workshop one on 14 February 2023: suggestions were gathered from local board members for allocating the LBTCF in the new term as well as to progress reports on projects from the last political term.

13.     Workshop two on 16 May 2023: AT reported back on cost estimates for the proposed new projects along with the indicative budget for the new term. This was followed up by a decision report from AT in July 2023 that established the projects that the local board wished to support [HB/2023/91].

14.     Workshop three on 19 September 2023: AT confirmed the budget for the new term as $1,888.965 which was considerably less than the figure anticipated in workshop two. The reduction in budget reflects the pressures on AT and our funding partners following the devastating floods of early 2023 and the roading repair bill, the reduction in AT’s overall budget as required by Auckland Council plus inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

15.     At workshop three, AT’s advice to the local board was to continue to progress projects with contractual commitments that had been resolved in the previous term. A significant amount of the local board’s LBTCF has already been invested in Ōrewa Boulevard and Stage 3 has some remaining contractual commitments.

16.     At the third workshop AT also recommended that the local board identify which projects it wished to support with the remainder of the fund in the current term.

17.     New projects identified for LBTCF in 2022–2025 Political Term:

Project

Description

Project cost estimates

Hibiscus Coast Highway/ Whangaparāoa Road pedestrian treatment

Option 1: Raised crossing, a footpath on the island, driver feedback sign and new footpath to connect all the way to Titan Place $1.3m. This is what was presented in the workshop.

Option 2: A raised pedestrian crossing, footpath on the island, driver feedback sign and new footpath to the first driveway to connect to an existing footpath - $800k. AT is likely to fund the remaining connection to Titan Place.

Option 3: Do nothing. AT is seeking alternative funding which may fund the whole project. A decision on this is likely to be made by end of October 2023.

$1,300,000

 

 

 

$800,000

 

 

 

$0

Saddleback Rise, Murrays Bay Pedestrian Crossing

Providing a new raised zebra crossing at 81 Saddleback Rise, Murrays Bay

$375,000

East Coast Bays Schools safety improvements

Request to make small improvements only such as ‘SLOW’ or ‘SCHOOL’ markings on red surfacing

$148,965

Torbay Bollards project

Planter boxes are recommended by the local board to be considered to discourage trucks from parking and using the area for loading / unloading outside the shops.
As part of the feasibility process, truck loading areas will be investigated.

$30,000

 

18.     If the local board declines to fully fund the Hibiscus Coast Highway/Whangapāraoa Road pedestrian treatment ($1,300,000 – Option 1) there will be unallocated budget available which will need to be allocated to the next highest priority projects.

19.     Priority order for projects if further budget is identified:

Project

Description

Project cost estimates

141 Deep Creek Road pedestrian crossing

request for a new crossing outside the kindergarten at 141 Deep Creek Road, Torbay

$375,000

Bakehouse Lane one-way northbound treatment

convert Bakehouse Lane into a one-way road which includes physical changes to restrict traffic

$450,000

Whangaparāoa Road, Manly crossing

 

request for a new pedestrian refuge island near the Fire Station to help pedestrians cross the road

$150,000

Crossing at 672 Beach Road, Browns Bay

 

request to investigate a safe crossing at or near 672 Beach Road, Browns Bay

$600,000

 

20.     Note that the previously discussed project of a raised crossing between 478 and 511 Beach Road Beach Road, Murrays Bay is not listed in the table above as this is now to be funded through Auckland Transport’s Walking Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency and has developed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

22.     Auckland Transport therefore urges the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to consider prioritisation of projects that help reduce carbon emissions.

23.     Most of the proposed projects above will encourage either safe walking or cycling and will contribute to reducing carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Any engagement required with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual-project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Hibiscus and Bays Local Board discussed this programme of work at three workshops with AT in 2023.  This report reflects the views of the local board as expressed in the workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The actions being considered do not have specific impacts on Māori.  Both AT and council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about.

27.     Any Auckland Transport project that requires consultation with iwi will include that activity within its project plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     This report requires consideration of a significant financial commitment of up to $1,888,965 by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

29.     The costs calculated are based on estimates and it is possible that costs on some projects may be under or over the estimations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     There is a risk that some projects may cost more than is budgeted in this report, but equally some projects may reduce in scope after further investigation work is carried out. 

31.     As resources and budgets are constrained, delaying decision making means that there is less time for planning for the investigation, design, and subsequent delivery of the projects that the local board wishes to progress. Timely decision making will provide the best opportunity for these projects to be delivered in the current political term.

32.     Finally, future budgets are not confirmed meaning that there may be sudden changes to the programme next year after Auckland Council sets budgets through the Long-term Plan process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Auckland Transport will take note of the local board’s confirmed projects and continue to work towards public consultation and delivery.

34.     Throughout the process, AT will keep the local board updated and when a decision is required, a report will be made to a public meeting so the members can consider it and decide on next steps.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Beth Houlbrooke – Elected Member Relationship Partner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

John Gillespie - Head of Stakeholder and Elected Member Relationships, Auckland Transport

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Adoption of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023

File No.: CP2023/15905

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption every three years and use the special consultative procedure to engage with their communities.

3.       A draft version of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period for the special consultative procedure ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

4.       The local board has considered all submissions and feedback received from the consultation period. Some substantive changes are proposed.

5.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023, which includes the proposed changes, is included as Attachment A to the agenda report.

6.       The key sections of the Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) are:

·        Māori outcomes

·        Climate action

·        Our people

·        Our environment

·        Our community

·        Our places / Our economy.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023 as set out in Attachment A.

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to approve any minor edits that may be necessary to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023 prior to publication.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·        adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·        use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

9.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the Local Board Plan 2023

10.     Our people - The voices of our community are heard, our youth thrive, and everyone feels welcome. Our resilience networks enable us to be prepared for emergencies.

11.     Our environment - Native birds, plants and animals thrive in an environment where pests are controlled. We have planned and designed our coastlines to be resilient to storms and the effects of climate change, our waterways and coastal areas are clean, and we minimise waste as we move to a circular economy.

12.     Our community - In a word, vibrant. Our past is remembered, and our facilities cater for future needs. Our open spaces can be used by all, and we have an abundance of recreation facilities.

13.     Our places and Our economy - Our town centres are lively and dynamic, with a network of paths and cycleways that are as equally connected as our current roading network, all serving to create a safe, busy, and pleasant neighbourhoods.

Consideration of submissions and feedback

14.     A draft version of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

15.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has considered the submissions and feedback received.

16.     Public feedback on the draft plan was generally positive. The majority of submitters were supportive of the plan, its direction and the themes covered.

17.     When asked whether the draft local board plan reflected what submitters wanted for the hibiscus and bays community, 67 percent of individuals and 77 percent of organisations were positive.

18.     This reflects that targeted engagement that the local board had with community organisations in the development of the plan.  This resulted in greater understanding by these stakeholders of the intentions and implications of the objectives and initiatives in the document.

19.     The key feedback points, with staff analysis and subsequent proposed changes to the outcome chapters are outlined in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Substantive changes to the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023

Key point of feedback

Analysis

Proposed change

Lack of understanding about what the local board funds, and the point of doing advocacy.

There is a need for the local board to fund a proactive effort to communicate and engage about the types of decision making, and advocacy undertaken

In the chairs message there is a clear statement about the role of the local board. There are also two initiatives that seek to communicate and engage to “do democracy better”

Too much money was spent on projects for Māori, and too much emphasis on Māori.

Budgets are not mentioned in the plan, and the submissions conflict with the statutory obligations of the local board.

Changes were made to include the local heritage of all, not just Māori and European.

There is a need for more facilities, especially for youth.

Statements promoting informal recreation could be made more obvious

Rewording to include provision for play, in both facilities and in town centre design

Need for service and facilities to be inclusive, for seniors, migrants, youth and people with disabilities

Reference to accessibility needs to be made more explicit

The term “access for all” is added where appropriate

 

20.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) incorporates the proposed substantive changes to the outcome chapters as described in Table 1 and other minor changes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023 contains a specific Climate Action section, focusing on the scope of challenges posted by climate change. It considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

22.     The plan includes specific objectives including:

·        Hibiscus and Bays: where native birds and plants flourish, and the water is pure and clean through education, advocacy and restoration work

·        our local economy is centred around being resilient, and circular or re-generative

·        advocating and supporting travel by active transport to be as easy as travel by car, with a transport network and infrastructure that enables and connects us

·        planning and engaging locally on how to mitigate and manage risks from climate change upon council owned land and the assets located upon it.

23.     The impact on the climate of the final plans has been considered. The final publication will be an online document to minimise printing hard copies. 

24.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     The adoption of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023 will inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. It will also form the basis for the development of the following three years’ work programmes.

26.     Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft and final plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the final Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023. Workshops were held on 5 September and 3 October 2023 to discuss and consider feedback and agree any changes.

28.     In developing the plan, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board considered:

·        advice from mana whenua and mataawaka

·        what is already known about our communities and what is important to them

·        submissions received via online forms, hardcopy forms, emails and post

·        feedback provided at engagement events

·        regional strategies and policies

·        staff advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     In developing the plan, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

·        considered views and advice expressed by mana whenua and mataawaka

·        considered existing feedback from Māori with an interest in the local board area

·        reviewed submissions received.

30.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023 promotes outcomes or issues of importance to Māori by:

·        acknowledging the mana whenua we work closest with, Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara by initiating conversations intended to lead to the development of relationship agreements

·        support the youth networks in our area to help our young people thrive and to have a voice in local board decision-making

·        support the development of community led resilience networks in our area, so our community and organisations will know who does what, where to get information and how to help, including in emergencies

·        supporting Ngāti Manuhiri, other mana whenua and mataawaka to draw on mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) to enrich the work of those groups working to restore the land and the sea

·        supporting Ngāti Manuhiri, other mana whenua and mataawaka to draw on mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) to enrich the work of those groups working to restore the land and the sea

·        engage with our communities during the planning and process of adapting our coastal reserves to prepare for and mitigate damage from storms, flooding, and erosion, with projects such as the shoreline adaptation plans

·        support and advocate for further protection of our sea, soil and fresh water from contamination and sedimentation through methods such as re-naturalisation, or daylighting

·        continue to support the telling of our local heritage stories, resulting in the adoption of te reo Māori names to add to the English names of parks and places of our area, as well as making the historical stories from all peoples from this area more accessible

·        engage with our community, and in particular mana whenua, on the future recreational uses of our undeveloped reserves, and older established ones, and investigate cost effective options for other informal recreation and play in these areas

·        continue to support activities that promote vibrancy, diversity and showcases creativity in our area, such as events, festivals, and other shared experiences in our public spaces for all.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plan informs this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There are no risks identified in adopting the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Staff recommend that responsibility for approving any minor edits following adoption be delegated to the chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Matthew Kerr - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)

File No.: CP2023/15127

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with an update on the Joint council-controlled organisation Engagement Plans, council-controlled organisation work programme (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones in its area for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 Council-controlled organisation Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were adopted in June 2022. These plans record council-controlled organisation responsibilities and local board commitments with Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare.

3.       Council-controlled organisations provide local boards with the work programme in their area. Each work programme item lists the engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

4.       The engagement plans expired in June 2023 and have not been updated since June 2022. Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts on council-controlled organisations delayed a review starting in the first half of 2023.

5.       A current review of the plans is not recommended due to disruptions and unknowns from:

·        Water Services Reform Programme

·        Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer having dedicated staff to support local boards

·        Auckland Transport rolling out a new local board relationship programme

·        reviewing the CCO Accountability Policy through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

6.       This report does not include work programme updates from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited or Auckland Transport.

7.       Auckland Transport will provide their work programme updates through Forward Work Programme briefing packs coming to November 2023 local board workshops.

8.       This report provides an update on Eke Panuku and Watercare work programme items from July to September 2023 and the engagement approach and anticipated milestones for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

9.       The next council-controlled organisation quarterly report will be provided in February 2024.  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the council-controlled organisation update on engagement plans, the work programme (Jul-Sep 2023) and anticipated milestones and engagement approaches for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023).

 

Horopaki

Context

What are CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans?

10.     The 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations recommended that council-controlled organisations (CCOs) and local boards adopt an engagement plan to:

·        help cement CCO and local board relations

·        agree on a common understanding of accountability between CCOs and local boards

·        coordinate CCO actions better at the local level.

11.     These plans record the commitment between Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Watercare and the local boards to work together.

12.     Each local board adopted their 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans in June 2022. These plans include CCO responsibilities and local board commitments.

Council-controlled organisation work programme items

13.     Council-controlled organisations provide local boards with a work programme that lists the different CCO projects happening in the local board area.

14.     The work programme is not a full list of projects in the local board area. It includes work programme items for engagement purposes.

15.     Each work programme item records an engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

16.     The engagement approach is based on the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) standards which are provided in Table 1 below. Note that the “involve” and “empower” categories are not included in the CCO reporting as decided when the joint engagement plans were adopted.

Table 1: International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Engagement Approach Levels

CCO engagement approach

Commitment to local boards

Inform

CCOs will keep local boards informed.

Consult

CCOs will keep local boards informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and aspirations, and provide feedback on how local board input influenced the decision. CCOs will seek local board feedback on drafts and proposals.

Collaborate

CCOs will work together with local boards to formulate solutions and incorporate their advice and recommendations into the decisions to the maximum extent possible.

 

Council-controlled organisation Local Board Joint Engagement Plans have expired

17.     The CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans expired in June 2023. The plans have not been updated since June 2022.

18.     The plans were not updated in the first half of 2023 due to disruptions to CCOs caused from Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts.  

19.     A current review of the Joint CCO Engagement Plans is not recommended since:

·        the Water Services Reform Programme may replace Watercare with a new water entity

·        Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer has dedicated support staff to support local board engagement and liaison following Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts

·        Auckland Transport is currently rolling out work which future engagement plans would need to consider, such as:

-        Forward Works Programme (full list of Auckland Transport projects in the local board area)

-        Local Board Transport Capital Fund

-        Regional Land Transport Plan

-        Local Board Transport Plans

-        the CCO Accountability Policy will be updated as part of the next Long-term Plan which the CCO engagement plans would need to align. 

What are the next steps?

20.     The CCO quarterly reporting will continue to provide work programme updates from Watercare and Eke Panuku.

21.     Local board staff will:

·        work with Auckland Transport on providing clarity on local transport plans and how the transport plans would either replace or integrate with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·        liaise with Tātaki Auckland Unlimited on what engagement and reporting resource they are able to provide to local boards following their restructure

·        investigate what engagement requirements and role the new water entity will have with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·        provide support to local boards on advocating for any changes wanted to the CCO Accountability Policy through developing the next Long-term Plan. 

22.     Auckland Transport will provide updates on their work programme through the Forward Works Programme workshops starting in November 2023. 

23.     Local boards received the last update to the CCO work programme and engagement approach in July 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     The following sections provide an update on work programme items for Eke Panuku and Watercare. 

25.     More detailed updates to the CCO work programme are provided in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·        there are no changes to engagement levels to report.

26.     Eke Panuku’s work programme items are provided in Attachment A.

Watercare

·        There are no changes to engagement levels to report.

27.     Watercare’s work programme items are provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     This report does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

29.     Each CCO must work within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework. Information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Local boards advise CCOs of issues or projects of significance, communicate the interests and preferences of their communities and allow for flexibility in terms of engagement, recognising differing levels of interest.

31.     The work programme items are shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     This report on the CCO work programme items provides the communication of up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     This report does not have a direct impact on Māori, however the projects it refers to will.

34.     Local boards and CCOs provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to their decision-making processes. These opportunities will be worked on a project or programme basis. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     This report does not have financial impacts on local boards.

36.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     Some local boards expressed concern over the quality of CCO work programme reporting in April and July 2023, in particular with Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport is currently working on a relationship project which has objectives to deliver:

·        an enhanced process to develop transport plans that reflect local board input and priorities

·        more consistent and timely reporting, updates and analysis on local projects and issues

·        improved support for communication and engagement with local communities.

38.     Auckland Transport will be presenting Forward Work Programme briefing packs to local boards at November 2023 workshops which will address their CCO quarterly updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     The local board will receive the next CCO work programme report in February 2024 which will include an update on projects from Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023) and expected milestones for work in Quarter Three (Jan-Mar 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Eke Panuku Development Auckland work programme update

81

b

Watercare work programme update

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025

File No.: CP2023/15468

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted on as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

3.       This report seeks the feedback of the local board on consultation on proposed changes to local fees and charges. A feedback form has been provided and is included as Attachment B to the agenda report.

4.       There are proposed changes to the following local fees and charges:

·        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·        Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

5.       The Governing Body will agree regional consultation items including proposed changes to fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

6.       Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 for the following:

i)        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review

A)      Membership Fees

1)      the alignment of legacy memberships to current rates over three years

2)      the introduction of a new Auckland wide membership option that allows access to all Auckland Council Pool and Leisure sites regardless of operator.

B)      Aquatic Entrance Fees

1)      the introduction of baseline aquatic entrance fees for all Auckland Council Pool and Leisure sites

2)      an increase to the concessionary discount from 15 per cent to 40 per cent.

C)     Swim School Fees

1)      an increase to swimming lesson prices closer to market rates whilst maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders

2)      A new 30 per cent discount for Community Service Card Holders and their dependents

3)      A new 40 per cent discount for those with special needs that require private lessons.

D)     Recreation Fees

1)      an increase to holiday programme and OSCAR (before and after school care) fees

2)      to simplify recreation term programme pricing.

 

ii)       Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review

A)      To adjust fees in line with Hire Fee Framework July 2014

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

8.       A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 17 October 2023. This report seeks the feedback of the local board on proposed changes to fees and charges that will be included alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation.

9.       A three-year cycle of fee reviews was introduced in the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. Over the years the cost of delivering these services have increased but the fees and charges for users have not been adjusted accordingly.

10.     Local boards could choose to increase or decrease its fees and charges from the proposal. This may result in extra funding for the local board if fees are increased or a top-up may be required from the local board funding if fees are reduced from the proposal.

11.     The Governing Body will agree on consultation items including proposed fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

12.     Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

13.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This is the third year of the fee review cycle. There are changes proposed to the following local fees and charges:

·        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·        Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

Active Communities

15.     There are 45 Active Communities sites (pool and leisure facilities) across the Auckland region. Twenty five of these are currently managed directly by Auckland Council. A Request for Proposal process is currently underway for council owned pool and leisure services. Relevant fees and charges proposed will be included as part of the contract negotiations.

16.     The review of fees and charges for Active Communities services has been split into two phases due to its size and complexity. Council managed bookable spaces were reviewed and adopted in 2023 as phase one.

17.     In this second phase, staff have reviewed the majority of the remaining fees to ensure an appropriate level of cost recovery to enable the council to provide an equitable service across the network.

Membership fees

18.     Some customers are on membership rates that we no longer offer. They include memberships may have been in place prior to amalgamation in 2010, or membership types that have since been discontinued. We are proposing to align these legacy memberships with current membership options over three years. In year one, we estimate that around 4,500 memberships (approximately 20 per cent) will increase by up to seven per cent. The estimated increase in revenue is $260,000 in year one across the region.

19.     We are also proposing to introduce an Auckland wide membership option to allow customers to access all 45 pool and leisure sites, both council-managed and contracted. The estimated increase in revenue from this proposal is expected to be around $90,000 per year across the region.

Aquatic entrance fees

20.     The baseline aquatic entrance fees for all council managed and contracted pools and leisure sites are proposed to change. This will include fees for swimming, spa, sauna and steam room use for adults as well as spectator and supervising adult fees.

21.     Alongside this proposed fee change, we are proposing an increased discount rate for seniors (over 65 years), students (over 17), Community Services card and permanent disability card holders, from 15 per cent currently to 40 per cent. This proposal will increase revenue by an estimated $77,000 per annum across the region and will ensure equitable access for users of these services.

22.     Officers have reviewed data available and found no conclusive evidence to support a significant change to the targeted rate for Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara Papatoetoe local boards at this stage. It is recommended that the targeted rate be adjusted by the forecast council rate of inflation for 2024/2025. At the time this report was written the forecast rate of inflation for council’s arts and recreation services was 3.5 per cent for 2024/2025. This will be used to calculate the targeted rate amount to be included in the 10-year budget consultation. The final rate amount will be set in June 2024 based on the updated inflation forecast available to the council at that point.

Swim school fees

23.     An increase in swim school fees is proposed. This will align swimming lesson pricing closer to market rates while maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders. This proposal includes a new 30 per cent discount for Community Services card holders and their dependents and a 40 per cent discount for those with special needs requiring private lessons. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $745,000 per year across the region.

Recreation fees

24.     We are also proposing to increase OSCAR before and after school care and holiday programme fees to maximise government subsidies and to ensure higher levels of cost recovery. Term programme fees have also been adjusted across the network to provide a simpler charging framework and recover costs appropriately. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $196,000 per year across the region.

25.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces

26.     Venue hire and bookable spaces incorporates community halls, community centres, art centres and bookable library spaces. Fees for 252 bookable spaces at 110 venues are included in this review.

27.     A review of fees has been split into two phases. The Hire Fee Framework considers the size, condition and quality of each bookable space, the levels of staffing, the amenities available, and current patterns of utilisation of the spaces. It also addresses variations within local board and adjacent areas to bring pricing of comparable venues closer together. Phase one of this review will ensure that fees across similar venues are charged appropriately across the portfolio.

28.     Fees for around half of the venues reviewed are not proposed to change as they have been set at an appropriate level when compared to spaces nearby or with similar types of spaces or capacity.

29.     Around 40 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $2 to align them to similar or nearby venues and a further eight per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $12 for this reason. For a small number of venues, we are proposing to decrease fees to generate interest in hiring these facilities. Overall, these proposed changes to venue hire fee are expected to the generate an increase in revenue of around $160,000.

30.     In phase two we will investigate the cost to serve and assess the balance between rates and user pays to ensure we are providing good value to the ratepayer, whilst providing accessibility to customers and communities. This review will include input from local boards.

31.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached (Attachment A).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     The local board input into consultation on fees and charges is procedural in nature. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The fees and charges review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. There are no impacts to the council group wider than the parent (Auckland Council).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 17 October 2023.

35.     The local board has the opportunity to input on the local fees and charges before the Governing Body makes a decision on consulting on changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

36.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement and adopting local fees and charges.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The council does not hold information on the ethnicity of fee payers so is not able to identify the exact impact on the proposed changes on Māori. The impact of the proposed rates and fees changes on Māori will be similar to that on other residents in Auckland.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The local board provides input to regional plans and proposals. There will be information in the council’s consultation material for each proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

39.     The table below summarises the total financial implications for all local boards:

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The proposed changes to rates fees and charges will allow the council to meet its cost recovery targets for the relevant activities for the 2024/2025 financial year. If these adjustments are not made the level of general rates increase may have to be higher than set out in the Mayoral proposal or further alternative budget mitigations found.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The Governing Body will adopt the consultation document and supporting information content the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 including the changes to fees and changes for 2024/2025 on 6 December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Full schedule of proposed changes to fees

91

b

Feedback form

95

     


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sugenthy Thomson - Lead Financial Advisor, Financial Strategy and Planning

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Financial Advisors

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

File No.: CP2023/15155

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform local board members of the Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation and invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parliament’s Environment Committee has opened an Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, with submissions due on 1 November 2023.

3.       This inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met. The Ministry for the Environment has developed an Issues and Options paper to assist the inquiry.

4.       The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

5.       Auckland Council staff are preparing a submission for the inquiry, led by the Chief Sustainability Office. However, the tight timeframe means that we are proposing a delegated sub-group of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee to approve the submission after the draft submission has been circulated to elected members for comments.

6.       Local boards are invited to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback for inclusion into Auckland Council’s submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       On 25 August 2023, the Environment Committee opened its Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. The inquiry is open for public submissions until 1 November 2023.

8.       The inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.

9.       For the purposes of its inquiry, the Environment Committee is particularly interested in:

·        the current approach to community-led retreat and adaptation funding, its strengths, risks and costs

·        lessons learned from severe weather events and natural disasters in Aotearoa New Zealand for community-led retreat and funding climate adaptation

·        effective mechanisms for community-led decision making

·        the role of the private sector in managing climate risk

·        potential institutional arrangements, including roles and responsibilities of central and local government agencies, iwi and hapū

·        Māori participation, Crown obligations, and how to best give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi, and integrate matauranga Māori and te ao Māori across the adaptation system

·        alignment and integration with existing legislation and regulatory framework, including the reformed resource management system and any changes needed to regulatory powers and potential economic or other incentives needed to support adaptation actions (both before and after extreme events)

·        funding sources, access to them and principles and criteria for cost sharing

·        targets or indicators for assessing progress to more resilient communities and infrastructure.

10.     The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Ministry for the Environment released a paper to inform and support submissions titled ‘Community-led retreat and adaptation funding: issues and options’

12.     A template is attached for local board feedback (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

13.     The table below sets out the key timeframes for local board input on the submission:

Date

Action

2 October 2023

briefing for local board members

5 October 2023

report to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee (for delegation)

6 October 2023

deadline for local board feedback to be considered for incorporation into the submission

20 October 2023

draft submission shared with local boards

27 October 2023

deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission

1 November 2023

closing date for submissions

2 November 2023

copy of final council submission circulated to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee members, local board members and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

 


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     One of the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan is “to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway”.

15.     Under our current emissions pathway, Auckland will continue to experience ongoing sea-level rise, coastal inundation and erosion, and more frequent and severe weather events like those Aucklanders experienced in early 2023.

16.     Globally there needs to be urgent and rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

17.     However, regardless of the global trajectory in emissions, Auckland and New Zealand need to adapt to the impacts of climate change that are already happening and are likely to continue.

18.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will likely inform the development of national legislation which will have implications for how Auckland Council undertakes adaptation.

19.     This submission contributes to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan through action B1 (Ensure our approach to planning and growth aligns with low carbon, resilient outcomes), sub-action 8 (Collaborate to ensure climate change mitigation and adaptation is a priority in national planning legislation).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The development of the proposed Climate Adaptation Bill is likely to be informed by the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. This legislation will have significant impacts across the Auckland Council group.

21.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

22.     Learnings from the 2023 severe weather events will be incorporated into the submission by the Recovery Office and Auckland Emergency Management as they are deemed relevant to climate adaptation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Local authorities will play a key role in implementation in climate adaptation, as they:

·        are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·        have a responsibility to plan for, and invest in improving community resilience

·        enhance community resilience through public education, infrastructure provision and land use planning processes.

24.     Local board views are being sought on the Parliamentary Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, which is considering options for community-led retreat and adaptation funding and will be appended to council’s final submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     There are implications for Māori within a potential future climate adaptation system.

26.     Central government are engaging directly with Māori regarding climate adaptation.

27.     A communication on the Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation has been sent to all iwi entities and their feedback sought. Independent Māori Statutory Board secretariat staff will work with the council’s technical team throughout the development of the submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The submission will be developed within existing resources.

29.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will be considering funding sources for climate adaptation, as well as the role of local government.

30.     There are potentially significant financial implications for local government within a future climate adaptation system. Council’s submission provides an opportunity to state our position on how funding of climate adaptation should operate in the future.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Financial and legal expertise will be sought in the development of the submission to identify possible financial, legal and reputational risks to the council associated with climate change adaptation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Given the tight timeframes provided to us by the Government, we will be requesting a delegated sub-group to finally approve the council submission by 1 November 2023.

33.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

34.     Please note that due to tight timeframes this may not align with scheduled local board business meetings and any inputs from local boards may need to either be delegated or utilise the urgent decision process.

35.     Local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission is due by 6 October 2023.

36.     Local board feedback to be appended to the council’s submission is due by 27 October 2023.

37.     Once local board feedback has been formalised (either by urgent decision or delegated authority), Local Board Services staff will email this feedback to be incorporated in or appended to council’s submission.

38.     Once the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation are released in 2024, staff will provide local boards with a memo summarising the conclusions.

39.     Any queries can be directed to Petra Pearce, Petra.Pearce@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Template for submission points on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Petra Pearce - Lead Climate Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

Lauren Simpson – Chief Sustainability Officer

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on council’s submission to the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making

File No.: CP2023/15886

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the views of the local board on the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making for inclusion into the council submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

2.       The Ministry for the Environment’s draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making is open for public submission from 18 September 2023, with a closing date of 20 November 2023.

3.       The draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making aims to direct how decision-makers consider natural hazard risk in planning decisions relating to new development under the Resource Management Act 1991. The draft covers all natural hazards and applies to council decisions regarding resource consents, plan changes, and notices of requirement for new development only. Natural hazard risk assessment is required, categorised as high, moderate, or low risk, with restrictions in high-risk areas and mitigation in moderate-risk areas.

4.       Auckland Council will be making a submission on the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making for consideration by the Planning and Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023. With final approval delegated to Councillor Hill’s, Councillor Dalton and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

5.       A memo was sent to all local board members on 29 September 2023 providing information on the council’s submission process to the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making (Attachment A to the agenda report). A briefing was held on 2 October 2023.

6.       Local boards are invited to provide feedback by 10 November 2023 to be appended to the council submission. The closing date of the submission is 20 November 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback to be appended to the council submission on the draft National Policy Statement Natural Hazard Decision-Making.

OR

b)      tautapa / delegate to either the chairperson, deputy chairperson or local board member to provide formal feedback on behalf of the local board to be appended to the council submission on the draft National Policy Statement Hazard Decision-Making.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - AC submission on the draft NPS for Natural Hazard Decision-Making

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Saskia Coley - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local and Multi-board Grants Round One, and Transitional Rates Grants 2023/2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2023/14430

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with information on applications in the 2023/2024 Contestable Local and Multi-board Grants Round One, and Transitional Rates Grants 2023/2024 to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Hibiscus and Bays Contestable Local Grants Round One 2023/2024 (Attachment A to the agenda report), Multi-board Grants Round One (Attachment B to the agenda report), and Transitional Rates Grants 2023/2024 (Attachment C to the agenda report).

3.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 25 July 2023 (Attachment D to the agenda report). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $425,523 for the 2023/2024 financial year with $150,000 of this set for the Facilities grants.

5.       At their September 2023 business meeting, the local board reallocated $25,623 of this funding to operational costs for Kauri Kids (HB/2023/142).

6.       This leaves a total of $399,900 to be allocated to two local grants rounds, two multi-board grants rounds, and one facilities grants round.

7.       Forty-eight applications were received for the Local Grants Round One 2023/2024, requesting a total of $280,770.17. Five Multi-board grants applications were received, requesting a total of $40,187.74, and four Transitional Rates grants applications were also received, requesting a total of $42,961.28.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whakaae / agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Hibiscus and Bays Local Grants Round One 2023/2024, listed in Table One:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2406-102

Campbells Bay Tennis Club Inc

Sport and recreation

Towards tennis court resurfacing at Campbells Bay Tennis Club

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-103

Hibiscus Coast Senior Citizens Association Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire at Ōrewa Community Hall

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-104

New Zealand Guitar Ensemble Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, catering, and koha for the director and assistant teachers for the New Zealand Guitar Ensemble Charitable Trust annual camp at YMCA Shakespeare lodge

$4,609.11

Eligible

LG2406-105

East Coast Bays Cricket Club Inc

Sport and recreation

Towards coaching fees for a junior coaching programme at Windsor Park

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-107

Coast Community Trust

Community

Towards annual operational costs of food, marketing, a van, equipment, and fuel/vehicle maintenance for the Meals & More programme

$2,300.00

Eligible

LG2406-109

Manly Park Tennis Club Cheque

Sport and recreation

Towards equipment replacement at Manly Park Seniors Tennis Club including a fridge, vacuum cleaner, computer, projector, and a sound system (speaker and microphone)

$3,419.18

Eligible

LG2406-112

Friends of Okura Bush Incorporated

Environment

Towards costs of contracting a community outreach worker, and koha to Te Kaweraua Maki and Ngati Manuhiri for community engagement

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-114

Mairangi Bay Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards stage hire, sound system hire, organiser fee, koha for performers, shopping vouchers, advertising, and waste removal for the Christmas in Mairangi Bay event

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-115

Torbay Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards speaker fees, catering, marketing, graphic design, prizes and vouchers, road cones, and high vis vests for community and networking events

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-116

Age Concern Rodney Charitable Trust

Community

Funding to cover technical operations, venue hire, and advertising for the Age Concern Rodney Christmas Concert at Centrestage Theatre

$2,304.00

Eligible

LG2406-117

Dairy Flat Community Hall

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of advertising music and dance activities for young people in the Hibiscus Matters Newspaper

$2,500.00

Ineligible

LG2406-118

Browns Bay Business Association

Events

Towards staging, portaloos, inflatables, performer fees, and advertising for the Summer Spectacular carnival at Browns Bay Beach Reserve and the Phoenix Plaza

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-119

Love Soup

Community

Towards warehouse rent for food storage

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-121

Long Bay Chinese Association Incorporate

Community

Towards venue hire at Long Bay College and Primary School, instructors/teachers tuition fee, staff allowance, and tools/equipment for activities for members, and maintenance and tree planting at local reserves

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-127

Air Training Corps No. 5 (Rodney Dist) Squadron

Community

Towards cadet uniforms

$10,000.00

Ineligible

LG2406-129

Rotary Club of Ōrewa-Millwater Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, technical audio-visual services, lighting, food costs, and catering equipment hire at the Ōrewa Arts & Events Centre

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-130

Sir Peter Blake Marine Education and Recreation Trust Board

Sport and recreation

Towards safety helmets and VHF radios

$9,474.00

Eligible

LG2406-131

Tindale Marine Research Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards materials for the manufacture of receptacles for fishing rubbish collection

$2,625.20

Eligible

LG2406-133

Torbay Dramatic Society Inc

Arts and culture

Towards lighting hire for the "Grease" The musical production at the Torbay Community Hall

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-134

Ōrewa Croquet Club Inc

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of croquet mallets

$4,600.00

Eligible

LG2406-137

Mairangi Arts Centre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards display technician, marketing, event karakia and consultation, practitioners fee, art resources, and workshop facilitator

$5,630.00

Eligible

LG2406-138

North Shore Community Toy Library

Community

Towards the replacement of damaged electronic children's toys

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-140

Hibiscus Coast Community Patrol Charitable Trust

Community

Towards security camera system purchase, installation, and maintenance at entry points to the Ōrewa area

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-141

Ōrewa Elevate Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, stationary, drink bottles, t-shirts, stress balls, and keynote speaker fee

$6,370.69

Eligible

LG2406-143

Hibiscus Coast and Bays Sea Cadets

Community

Towards website establishment and promotions for a recruitment drive

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-144

Rodney Aphasia Group

Community

Towards venue hire and admin costs for an active engagement project for community members living with Aphasia

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG2406-145

Abuse Prevention Services Inc

Community

Towards food, childcare, facilitator, follow up support, and venue hire

$9,835.00

Eligible

LG2406-146

Business Whangaparāoa Incorporated

Community

Towards annual operational expenses for event and project delivery

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-147

Agora Connections Trust

Community

Towards food, trailer and generator hire, toy hire, bouncy castle hire and set up, and supervision for a Children's Day event at Manly Park

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-148

Families Growth and Thrive Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, salaries, and advertising and promotion for the delivery of kid's flea markets

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2406-149

Mairangi Bay Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards tables, chairs, and marquees for the Mairangi Bay Food and Wine Festival

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-150

Families Growth and Thrive Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards transport, wages, catering, and guided tour costs

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-152

The Sustainable North Trust

Environment

Towards volunteer koha, waste disposal, and volunteer management costs for event delivery in the Hibiscus and Bays local board area.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-154

Kingsway School

Environment

Towards wood for recovery stations and bins, trays, labels, discard bin, and food caddy

$3,312.00

Eligible

LG2406-155

New Zealand Blue Light Ventures Inc

Community

Towards the costs of printing the Blue Light Street Smart handbooks for distribution at Ōrewa College, Whangaparāoa College, and Kingsway School

$2,177.00

Eligible

LG2406-156

Salt Community Trust

Community

Towards the cost of a website rebuild

$5,698.00

Eligible

LG2406-157

Ahutoetoe School Board

Environment

Towards compost kit sets, materials for resource recovery stations, and wood

$2,700.00

Ineligible

LG2406-158

Mairangi Arts Centre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards practitioner fee, design, mats, and marketing costs for community workshops

$3,205.00

Eligible

LG2406-159

Silverdale & Districts Historical Society Inc

Arts and culture

Towards hot water cylinder replacement

$2,642.01

Eligible

LG2406-161

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards counsellor training and supervision for providing a helpline service in the Hibiscus and Bays local board area

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-162

North Harbour Volleyball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards programme coaches, referee fees, coordinators fee, and tournament director fee

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-163

Whangaparāoa Primary School

Environment

Towards wood and bins for waste recovery stations

$2,400.00

Eligible

LG2406-165

Families Growth and Thrive Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, office rent, promotional material, salaries, tools, and accessories.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2406-166

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards venue hire and facilitators fee for a Road Safety Youth Development project at the Ōrewa Arts & Events Centre

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-167

Open and Connect NZ Inc

Community

Towards venue hire, a macbook, marketing and promotional material, zoom subscription, projector, microphones, banners stationary, and first aid kits

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2406-168

Mapura Studios Division of Panacea Art Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards wages and travel reimbursement

$4,397.00

Eligible

LG2406-169

Silverdale School Board of Trustees

Environment

Towards book printing and sandwich wraps and bags for the Waste Less Lunches programme

$7,475.98

Eligible

LG2406-174

Mountains To Sea Conservation Trust EMR

Environment

Towards facilitator and coordinator fees, and transport costs for the EMR Summer Series at Waiake Beach, Army Bay, Shakespear Regional Park, Awaruku Reserve, Deborah Reserve, and Okura-Long Bay Marine Reserve

$9,596.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$280,770.17.

 

 

b)      whakaae / agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Hibiscus and Bays Multi-board Grants Round One 2023/2024, listed in Table Two:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-104

North Shore Centres of Mutual Aid Inc

Community

Towards overall operating expenses for service delivery from 1 January 2024 to 31 December 2024

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-120

Harbour Sport Trust

Events

Towards transportation, waste management, potable loo, security and temporary fencing cost to run Shore to Shore Fun Run event on 7 April 2024

$3,921.00

Eligible

MB2324-133

North Harbour Community Patrol

Community

Towards fuel and vehicle related cost to continue community patrol in North Shore area from 1 December 2023 to 29 November 2024

$1,241.00

Ineligible

MB2324-146

Rainbow Youth Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of venue hire, marketing and promotion costs, food from countdown, tote bags, art supplies, koha for facilitators, Orange Sky annual subscription, and catering costs of meetings (November 2023 - December 2023)

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-153

Ōrewa Tennis Club

Sport and recreation

Towards replacement of lights at the Ōrewa Tennis Club (November 2023)

$23,025.74

Ineligible

Total

 

 

 

$40,187.74

 

 

c)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Hibiscus and Bays Transitional Rates Grants 2023/2024, listed in Table Three:

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2406-125

Rothesay Bay Ratepayers and Residents Association

Transitional Rates Grant 2023/2024

$5,343.63

Eligible

LG2406-142

Browns Bay Bowling Club Inc - NPO

Transitional Rates Grant 2023/2024

$19,447.64

Eligible

LG2406-164

Murrays Bay Sailing Club Inc

Transitional Rates Grant 2023/2024

$15,085.32

Eligible

LG2406-172

Nippon Judo Club Incorporated

Transitional Rates Grant 2023/2024

$3,084.69

Eligible

Total

 

 

$42,961.28

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocate grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

9.       Auckland Council Community Grant Policy supports each local board to adopt a grant programme.

10.     The local board grant programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

11.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted its grant programme for 2023/2024 on 25 July 2023 (Attachment D). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grant.

12.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grant webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grant Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Grant Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grant programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Community Grant Programme 2023/2024.

18.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grant Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $425,523 for the 2023/2024 financial year with $150,000 of this set for the Facilities grants.

21.     $25,623 was reallocated from the community grants budget to Kauri Kids Early Childcare Education services.

22.     This leaves a total of $399,900 to be allocated to two local grants rounds, two multi-board grants rounds, and one facilities grants round.

23.     Forty-eight applications were received for the Local Grants Round One 2023/2024, requesting a total of $280,770.17. Five Multi-board grants applications were received, requesting a total of $40,187.74, and four Transitional Rates Grants applications were also received, requesting a total of $42,961.28.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grant Policy and the local board grant programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocation of funding for Local and Multi-board Grants Round One and Transitional Rates Grants 2023/2024, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local Grants Round One 2023/2024 - Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Multi-board Grants Round One 2023/2024 - Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Transitional Rates Grants 2023/2024 - Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Grants Programme 2023/2024 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vincent Marshall - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants and Incentives Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Adoption of a business meeting schedule for 2024

File No.: CP2023/12959

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting schedule for 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules. In particular, clause 19, Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act on general provisions for meetings requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings. Sections 46, 46A and 47 in Part 7 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 require that meetings be publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting, and that local board meetings are open to the public.

3.       Adopting a meeting schedule helps with meeting these requirements. It also allows for a planned approach to workloads and ensures that local board members have clarity about their commitments.

4.       A draft meeting schedule for 2024 has been developed and is included below for adoption by the local board.

5.       Frequency: one business meeting per month (excluding January) is sufficient for formal business to be considered. There are some instances for which the local board may need to have additional meetings for important decisions such as local board plans, local board agreements or to provide input into regional strategies, policies and plans. Local board meeting schedules will be updated with any additional meetings once those details are confirmed. Outside of its scheduled meetings, local boards can call extraordinary and/or emergency meetings as and when required.

6.       Timing: the standard practice in previous terms is to hold the monthly ordinary meeting in the final half of the month (weeks three or four) which enables local boards to prepare for any workshop items for these meetings in the first half of the month.

7.       Other matters: commencing the business meeting during business hours will enable meetings to be productive, maximise access to staff and ensures best use of resources. Having the meetings in a set location ensures consistency and ability to use technology that is built into council facilities, as required. This can include the use of screens, speakers and Wi-Fi connections that enable remote attendance.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the meeting schedule outlined below for 2024:

 

Year

Date

Time

Venue

2024

Tuesday 27 February

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 26 March

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 23 April

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 28 May

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 25 June

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 23 July

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 27 August

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 24 September

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 22 October

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 26 November

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

Tuesday 10 December

10am

Local board office – 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2023/15962

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to provide a report on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the report from local board member A Poppelbaum for October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

A Poppelbaum - October 2023

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa - Policy Schedule October 2023

File No.: CP2023/15885

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for October 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule, a schedule of items that will come before the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at business meetings over the coming months.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is included as attachment A to the agenda report.

4.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

5.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed, and the schedule is subject to change.  Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for October 2023

135

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2023/15883

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for October 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the workshop records for October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for October 2023

139

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

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