I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 24 October 2023

1.00pm

Local Board Office
560 Mount Albert Road

Three Kings

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Maria Meredith

 

Deputy Chairperson

Debbie Burrows

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Chris Makoare

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jessica Prasad

Democracy Advisor

 

18 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 027 228 0253

Email: Jessica.Prasad@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation: The Friends Society Incorporated                                                5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     6

11        Governing Body Member's Update                                       9

12        Chairperson's Report                                                            11

13        Board Member's Reports                                                      13

14        Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                   15

15        Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan                                                                       21

16        Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                                                                                25

17        Te Ara Hauāuru - Northwest Rapid Transit                        33

18        Adoption of the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Plan 2023                                                                                         39

19        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One and Multiboard RoundOne 2023/2024 grant allocations          45

20        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local parks land classification programme                                                                             57

21        Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025                                           65

22        Mount Wellington Community Provision Investigation    71

23        Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)                           81

24        Approval for a new public road name at 13 Pirangi Street, Point England                                                                        87

25        Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation                                                                              93

26        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar  99

27        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                                                                               101

28        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 September 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.


 

 

 

8.1       Deputation: The Friends Society Incorporated

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for the Friends Society Incorporated  to deliver a presentation to the local board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

2.   Tea Ropati and Steve Carroll will be in attendance to present their annual report and vison for the Friends Society Incorporated.

3.   As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from the Friends Society Incorporated.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Thank Tea Ropati and Steve Carroll for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2023/14617

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2023/14615

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

24 October 2023 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Business Meeting: Item 11 - Chairperson's report, document

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2023/14616

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)   receive the board member’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2023/14989

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of the reduction to its local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) for the 2022-2025 political term.

2.       To confirm the projects the local board will deliver with a reduced budget and set a priority order for currently unfunded but authorised LBTCF projects, setting local board expectations should any further budget become available.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Auckland Transport (AT) manages the Local Board Transport Capital Fund on behalf of the Maungakiekie-Local Board.  AT provides quality advice to support local board decision-making. A decision relating to the allocation of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund is being sought.

4.       The confirmed budget for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is now $1.365 million. This includes an additional approved budget of $112,000 to cover current contractual commitments and a further adjustment due to $170,000 being brought forward by local board resolution from FY2023/2024 to FY2022-2023. The figure of $1.365 million now replaces the indicative budget of $2.080 million discussed in the June 2023 Auckland Transport report.

5.       The reduction in the LBTCF reflects the pressure AT and its funding partners are under due to flood recovery work following the severe weather events in early 2023, inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

6.       In this report, Auckland Transport recommends that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocate its funding to completing the raised crossing on Tripoli Road; Victoria Street traffic calming; taking the Eastview Innovating Streets project through to permanence and getting the Onehunga Mall/Grey Street roundabout ready for construction.

7.       These projects have already had partial investment during design processes and support the local board outcome of transport choices being accessible, sustainable and safe.

8.       If other budget becomes available in the 2022-2025 political term, the local board direction is to continue the investment in the Onehunga Mall/Grey Street roundabout project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2025 as follows:

i)       $362,000 to Tripoli Road, Panmure crossing project.

ii)       $299,700 to making the Eastview Innovating Streets project permanent.

iii)      $235,000 to traffic calming in Victoria Street, Onehunga

iv)      $356,140 to continue the design of the Onehunga Mall/Grey Street Roundabout and getting this project ready for construction.

b)      confirm its priority to invest any further funds that may become available this term to progressing the Onehunga Mall/Grey Street roundabout. 

c)       noting that $112,000 additional budget has been approved to cover current contractual commitments.

Horopaki

Context

9.       The LBTCF is an AT fund established in 2012 to allow local boards to deliver small projects in their local area that would not normally be prioritised by Auckland Transport. In 2014, the LBTCF budget was set at $20 million spread across all local boards and distributed based on Auckland Council’s Local Board Funding Policy.  Since 2020, when COVID 19 lockdowns impacted on Auckland Council’s revenue the LBTCF has been reduced. Specifically, to $15 million per annum across all local boards in the most recent Regional Land Transport Plan of which Maungakiekie-Tāmaki’s share was $2,080 million.

10.     Due to further budget reductions, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s new allocation of LBTCF for the 2022 – 2025 political term is $1.365 million.

11.     Therefore, the local board must now review the programme of work that was planned and reduce it to match the new budget. The local board’s role is to review the work programme supported by AT’s quality advice, consider options, and then decide about re-prioritisation. This report confirms the new programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Auckland Transport held three workshops with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board in 2023 to discuss the LBTCF and its allocation.

·    Workshop One on 14 February gathered suggestions from board members for allocating the LBTCF in the new term as well as give progress reports on projects from the last political term.

·    Workshop Two on 16 May reported back on cost estimates for the proposed new projects along with the indicative budget for the new term. This was followed up by a decision report from AT in June 2023 that established the projects that the local board wished to support.

·    Following Workshop Three on 19 September AT confirms the budget for the new term as $1.365 million. This is considerably less than the figure anticipated in Workshop Two.  The reduction in budget also reflects the pressures on AT and our funding partners following the devastating floods of early 2023 and the roading repair bill, the reduction in AT’s overall budget as required by Auckland Council plus inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

13.     AT has also made an adjustment to the figures presented at Workshop Three to reflect the local board’s resolution (2022/177) which brought forward $170,000 from FY 2023/2024 to FY 2022/2023 to support the continuing design and development of the Onehunga Mall/Grey Street roundabout.

14.     AT’s advice to the local board presented at Workshop Three was to continue to progress the raised crossing on Tripoli Road; traffic calming on Victoria Street and taking Eastview Innovating Streets project to permanence. These projects have already had partial investment during design processes and support the local board outcome of transport choices being accessible, sustainable, and safe.

15.     AT also requested the local board to identify which projects it wished to support with the remainder of the fund.

16.     The direction given by the local board at the workshop was to continue with the projects it had already made investment in and to use the remaining funds to continue with the Onehunga Mall/Grey Street roundabout.

Projects identified for LBTCF in 2022 – 2025 Political Term

Project

Description and Amount already invested

Funding required to complete the projects

33 Tripoli Road Raised Crossing

The project will provide a raised zebra crossing at 33 Tripoli Road, Panmure.

($87,362)

$362,000

 

Eastview Rd IS Pathway to Permanence

 

Replacing the temporary innovating streets measures in Eastview Road, Glen Innes with structures of a more permanent nature.

($72,290)

$299,700

 

Victoria Street Traffic Calming

 

This provides for traffic calming features between Mt Smart Road and Princes Street, Onehunga.

($70.643)

$235,000

 

Total

 

$896,700

 

17.     After the prioritisation of the above projects, there is a remaining budget of $356,140

18.     The direction given at the workshop was that the remaining funds be applied to continuing the design and development of the Onehunga Mall/Grey Street roundabout and should further budget become available this term, that it be used to continue to advance with the roundabout project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency and has developed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

20.     AT therefore urges the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to consider prioritisation of projects that help reduce carbon emissions.

21.     The proposed projects above will encourage either safe walking or cycling and will contribute to reducing carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Any engagement required with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual-project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board discussed this programme of work at three workshops with AT in 2023. This report reflects the views of the local board as expressed in the workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The actions being consider do not have specific impacts on Māori.  Both AT and council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the AT website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about.

25.     Any AT project that requires consultation with iwi will include that activity within its project plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     This report requires consideration of a significant financial commitment of up to $1.365 million by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

27.     Noting in FY 2022/2023, the local board resolved that $170,000 be brought forward from its LBTCF allocation of FY2023-2024 to complete the design and tender construction contract for the Onehunga Mall/Grey Street roundabout project. As only $36,826 was spent in the last political term on the design of this project the remainder has been added to the new term budget.

28.     The costs calculated above are based on estimates and it is possible that costs on some projects may be under or over the estimations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that some new projects may cost more than is budgeted in this report, but equally some projects may reduce in scope after further investigation work is carried out. 

30.     As resources and budgets are constrained, delaying decision making means that there is less time for planning for the investigation, design, and subsequent delivery of the projects that the local board wishes to progress. Timely decision making will provide the best opportunity for these projects to be delivered in the current political term.

31.     Finally, future budgets are not confirmed meaning that there may be sudden changes to the programme next year after Auckland Council sets budgets through the Long-Term Plan process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     AT will take note of the local board’s confirmed projects and continue to work towards public consultation and delivery.

33.     Throughout the process, AT will keep the local board updated and when a decision is required, a report will be made to a public meeting so the members can consider it and decide on next steps.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lorna Stewart, Elected Member Relationship Partner

Authorisers

John Gillespie, Head of Stakeholder and Elected Member Relationships

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan

File No.: CP2023/14707

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031 and to provide information received from public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) is seeking feedback from local boards on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP). In particular, AT is seeking feedback on the service improvements proposed for the local board’s area.

3.       The RPTP is the main plan for public transport services in Auckland. It also includes a vision, goals, policies, and targets that relate to the planning and delivery of the public transportation system.

4.       AT will use the local board’s formal views, along with feedback received via public consultation, to finalise the plan. The AT Board is expected to adopt the final plan in November 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to Auckland Transport on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031, in line with the template provided in Attachment A.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Regional Public Transport Plan is Auckland’s main plan for public transport (PT) services. It outlines how PT will be managed and improved over the next eight years, with a detailed focus on the first three years. This includes the services that will operate during this period (and how they will change) and the goals, policies and actions that will shape PT.

6.       The purpose of the RPTP is to enable consultation with the public and PT operators on the planning of PT services. This is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act 2003.

7.       Public consultation on the draft RPTP ran from 17 July to 17 August 2023, and AT received over 3,200 responses. This compares well to the 462 responses the previous (2018) RPTP received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Public feedback was generally very supportive of the content of the draft RPTP. This includes:

·    strong support for the plan’s vision and goals

·    support for the action areas within the plan

·    support for most proposed service improvements (with the main exception of the removals of ferry services to Gulf Harbour and Northcote Point).

9.       Feedback that was not supportive of the content of the draft RPTP included:

·    wanting further improvement and/or faster delivery

·    concerns that PT is too expensive or does not provide value for money

·    comments that a greater percentage of the cost of operating PT should come from users (via fares).

10.     The RPTP includes AT’s aspirations to do more in further improvements and faster delivery if and when more funding for PT becomes available.

11.     AT has provided a breakdown of the top areas submitters from each local board commented to assist the board in providing feedback (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Public transport has a key role to play in helping to reduce emissions, as set out in Auckland Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP). The RPTP acknowledges the ambitious targets the TERP has for increased PT usage, and the actions and improvements included in the RPTP will play an important role in making progress towards those targets.

13.     One of the RPTP’s goals is ‘enhancing the environment and tackling the climate emergency’. This goal guides efforts of transition to a low-emission PT system, encouraging mode shift, and adapting infrastructure to a changing climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Auckland Council’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee endorsed the overall strategic direction for the draft RPTP in April 2023. This included the vision and goals for the plan, and a ‘balanced’ approach to service improvements.

15.     Following public consultation closing, AT also engaged with the council’s advisory panels to get specific feedback about aspects of the plan relevant to the panels’ expertise.

16.     AT has also worked with Auckland Council and Eke Panuku staff to ensure, where possible, the draft RPTP is aligned with other strategic plans and projects across the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     AT held a range of public information events across the region at libraries, community centres, bus and train stations. AT also held two on-line drop-in sessions. Across all of these events, AT had hundreds of conversations with the public which will also be used to inform changes to the plan. In addition, some members of the public called AT to ask questions and seek clarification on content in the plan.

18.     Public feedback was generally supportive of the vision and goals in the draft RPTP and requested additional service improvements (beyond what AT is currently funded to deliver).

19.     Proposed service improvements in the draft RPTP in the local board’s area were set out in a memo from AT, dated 12 July 2023.

20.     AT set out the feedback received from residents of the local board’s area in a memo and supporting material (Attachment B and Attachment C) provided for a workshop on the draft RPTP held on 3 October 2023.

21.     Workshops to date have been positive, with most local boards supporting AT’s proposals for service improvements and initiatives to reduce the cost of public transport to users (such as the proposed weekly fare cap and extended transfer window).

22.     Some local boards have also requested more information around the use of existing services and expressed an interest in exploring the potential for on-demand AT Local services to operate in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     AT has held multiple hui with mana whenua as part of the development of the RPTP and will be making changes to the draft RPTP based on their feedback.

24.     The draft RPTP includes a Māori outcomes section (part 3.7), which outlines key areas of concern to mana whenua and mataawaka and where more detail can be found in the plan.

25.     AT intends to revise part 3.7, and other relevant parts of the RPTP, to reflect feedback received from Māori (both mana whenua and mataawaka).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications of providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

27.     The RPTP is required to be a realistically fundable plan, and AT’s budget for additional services is constrained (and fully allocated to the service improvements proposed in the draft RPTP).

28.     Any feedback provided regarding service level improvements should take into account AT’s financial constraints, and the trade-offs that may be required to implement them (for example, increasing services on one route is likely to require reductions on another route).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no risks associated with providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     AT will use the feedback provided by the local board, along with feedback received from the public and other stakeholders, to finalise the draft RPTP.

31.     The AT Board will consider adopting the revised RPTP at their 29 November 2023 meeting.

32.     If adopted, the final RPTP will be publicly released in early December 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

RPTP feedback template for local boards

 

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area snapshot

 

c

memo - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/14953

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with a summary of public consultation feedback, respond to previous queries and seek formal resolutions supporting the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (AT) have adopted a Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. AT is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       A speed management plan for the Auckland region is a government requirement and will set safe and appropriate speed limits to reduce road deaths and serious injuries. Katoa, Ka Ora is the name of this plan, and it is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all.

5.       AT workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora with local boards in February and March 2023, and local boards provided formal feedback about the proposal in March and April 2023, specifically the five development approaches within the speed management plan.

6.       Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023.

7.       AT has analysed and summarised the consultation feedback received and provided responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora. This information is provided as a series of attachments to this report for local board members to review.

8.       Further, the report seeks local board support for the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes within its area.

9.       Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the summary of public consultation feedback received on the proposed Katoa, Ka Ora speed limit changes (Attachment D) 

b)      note AT’s responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora (Attachment A) 

c)       note AT’s legal obligations under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (Rule) and that the Rule requires best efforts to complete safe and appropriate speed limit setting near schools by 2027 

d)      note that since June 2020, when the programme started, road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed  

e)      support the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes identified for this local board area (Attachment C and Attachment E) 

f)       support speed limit review of additional locations requested in public consultation feedback and recommended for the next future consultation in Attachment C. 

Horopaki

Context

10.     AT is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use. 

Alignment with Central Government policy

11.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy.  The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to school.

12.     The strategy’s action plan includes the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires road controlling authorities to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

13.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications; category one and category two. Most Auckland schools are classified as category one, or schools where children may be out and about outside the school gate. To comply with the Rule, speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) are required in the area outside of the school. Category two schools are where children are more likely to be picked up or dropped off within the school grounds.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency).

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent, easy-to-understand changes that communities can understand. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

Auckland Transport’s role

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury. So, after receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board, the safe speeds programme has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland reducing speed limits on many roads.

18.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes, the programme focuses on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation. The phases can be summarised as follows:

a)   Phase One covered approximately 11 per cent of the local road network and focused on the highest risk roads.

b)   Phase Two covered approximately 8 per cent of the network and had a significant focus on safe speeds for rural roads and roads near schools.

c)   Phase Three covered approximately 19 per cent of the network and included roads around schools, rural roads, town centre roads, rural marae and roads requested by the community.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on safety around schools so AT directly surveyed all schools with proposed speed limit changes in late-2022 and early 2023. The summary results of the local schools survey was shared with each local board as part of the February/March 2023 workshop follow-up.

22.     Information about the iterative engagement process used to develop Katoa, Ka Ora was shared with local boards in two rounds of workshops held in February/March 2022 and in February/March 2023.

23.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on. Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. 7801 pieces of feedback were received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Katoa, Ka Ora has been consulted on with the public and with local boards. This report updates local boards on:

a)   The results of the public consultation conducted from 24 July to 28 August 2023 in each local board area, including AT’s responses to the changes requested by members of the public.

b)   AT’s response to the local board feedback provided in April 2023, including AT’s responses to changes requested by members of the public.

25.     This information is included in attachments to this report and AT’s overall considerations for this local board area are summarised in a two-page summary infographic (Attachment B).

26.     Additionally, the full consultation report will be published on the AT website by early November 2023.

27.     The attachments provide a clear summary of what people in this local board area said about the programme so local board members are aware of community sentiment as they consider AT’s technical advice.

Technical advice

28.     AT’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system; the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. This includes finalising a speed management plan within legal timeframes and setting safe speed limits near all schools by 2027. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by 2027, we are proposing to include a review of permanent speed limits near all remaining schools in a future consultation.

30.     Further, the impact of speed reduction on the number of DSI is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

a)   Since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.

b)   In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a 9 per cent increase in road deaths.

31.     30km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed around schools is used for the safe speed programme.

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that Katoa, Ka Ora meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. The proposed speed of 30km/h near schools is consistent with legislative requirements and is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.  

33.     Additionally, speed reductions delivered to date by the programme are already reducing DSI. It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the local board is to support the programme.

Customer research

34.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

35.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

36.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. Their experiences of high-speed vehicles, near misses, crime and ‘stranger danger’ around schools mean an increasing number of parents drive their children to and from school. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

38.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

39.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The Safe Speeds Programme was endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning committee and the current term Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     AT has visited all local boards during February and March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes.

42.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February and March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

43.     In post-workshop resolutions local boards indicated their level of support for the programme. Common themes were higher levels of support near schools, town centres and places where people are out and about.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

45.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka. Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora.

46.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

47.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at their workshops in February and March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications.  Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. Comprehensive communications including the evidence and key facts have been provided to increase understanding and support of safe speeds. 

50.     Funding constraints may require the scale of the plan to be reduced or delivery to be slowed or delayed.  Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback received from local boards. We will use this, along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our legal and safety obligations as a road controlling authority, to help edit and finalise Katoa, Ka Ora, a speed management plan for Auckland.

52.     We have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee in November 2023. Confirmation of a date is yet to be received.

53.     Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board – Response to Resolutions

 

b

Attachment B 231024 Maungakiekie Tamaki Local Board - Infographic

 

c

Attachment C Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board – Responses to site specific feedback

 

d

Attachment D Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Safe Speeds - LB  feedback summary

 

e

Attachment E Katoa Ka Ora Map Maungakiekie-Tamaki

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Te Ara Hauāuru - Northwest Rapid Transit

File No.: CP2023/14838

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek views into rapid transit corridor investigations from Brigham Creek to the city centre alongside the Northwestern Motorway, State Highway 16.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and partners have re-commenced work on Northwest Rapid Transit (NWRT) with a Detailed Business Case (DBC).

3.       The purpose of the Northwest Rapid Transit project is to provide a fast, frequent and efficient rapid transport option to the northwest of Auckland, from Brigham Creek to the City Centre, alongside State Highway 16 (SH16).

a.      Note, Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth has developed a long-term Strategic Plan for the Northwest which includes a rapid transit corridor from Kumeū to a new interchange at Brigham Creek on SH16 which would connect to the Northwest Rapid Transit project.

4.       This mahi is being led by Waka Kotahi in partnership with Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua and other iwi partners, and in close collaboration with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport who, along with iwi representatives, have members on the project steering committee.

 

5.       The project area covers from Brigham Creek to the city centre along SH16 and includes providing:

a.      Rapid transit on a dedicated corridor – investigations will determine the best mode (bus or rail) and location for the corridor which could be along, or either side of, SH16.

b.      Station locations, and facilities – such as seating, passenger information displays, CCTV, lighting and bike racks.

c.       Access and connections to local bus services – we’re working with Auckland Transport to look at improvements to the supporting transport network (including feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling).

6.       The DBC process will confirm a recommended way forward for the project. The DBC will:

a.      confirm recommended mode and route for the NWRT, for an integrated rail, or independent bus solution

b.      confirm staging (and any triggers) of recommended options

c.       ensure affordable and stageable solutions are at the heart of what we are doing

d.      provide clarity on how this corridor interfaces with the wider rapid transit network and urban aspirations for the region

e.      provide a compelling investment case for the recommended option. 

7.       It’s important that we undertake a robust analysis of all the potential bus and rail rapid transit options in order to deliver the best outcome for the Northwest.

8.       We have made progress on establishing and assessing a long list of potential rapid transit modes and alignments along the Northwestern Motorway (State Highway 16).

9.       We are currently carrying out more detailed investigations as we work to confirm an emerging short list of options. 

10.     We look forward to discussing the potential rapid transit options with you at local board workshops in the coming months, prior to the second phase of engagement early next year which will involve public consultation on the shortlisted options.

11.     The second phase of public engagement was initially planned to be in November-December this year. However, more time is needed to further our detailed investigations. Therefore, the second phase of engagement has been moved to early 2024, which will put us in a better position to have more informed discussions with stakeholders and communities.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on their position for the need for rapid transit in the Northwest

b)      provide feedback on what Waka Kotahi and partners should consider as part of our investigations, including views on:

i)       access and connections on locals roads – i.e. feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling connections

ii)       issues on local roads that you feel need to be addressed for rapid transit on SH16 to work well

iii)      facilities or design features you would like to see at rapid transit stations (the ones along the motorway).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

12.    This project will be an important part of Auckland’s public transport infrastructure to facilitate growth in the Northwest, provide attractive and equitable transport choice, and encourage mode shift. This project will help to reduce reliance on private vehicles, thus helping to build more resilience in the network while contributing to a healthier transport system that protects the climate.

13.     The investment objectives of the project are:

a.      providing an attractive, equitable rapid transit service that improves access to social, cultural and economic opportunities and is well integrated with the current and future transport system

b.      a transport intervention that reduces Auckland’s carbon footprint

c.       supporting a compact urban form and enabling quality integrated communities.

14.     Te Kawerau ā Maki have gifted the name ‘Te Ara Hauāuru’ to the project. This name references the wind that blows from the west, a powerful force and story for the iwi. The west wind carries the voice and vision of the community of the west, and the path of connection between these communities and Tāmaki Makaurau.   

15.     Waka Kotahi is incredibly grateful to Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua and other iwi partners for sharing their knowledge (mātauranga) of the land, waters and its peoples. We acknowledge their role as kaitiaki (guardians) with responsibility for the protection of te taiao (environment) and taonga tuku iho (heritage).

Why improvements are needed

16.     The Northwest is growing with more houses, more jobs, and more people needing to travel. It’s anticipated that by 2051, the Northwest will have more than:

a.      100,000 extra people living in the Northwest

b.      40,000 new households

c.       increased congestion

d.      increased pressure on our public transport network.

17.     People living in the Northwest currently have limited public transport options and many rely heavily on their car:

a.      over 60 per cent of people living in the Northwest commute out of the area

b.      more travel to work by car than in any other region in Auckland.

Improving transport equity and wellbeing

18.     Improving transport equity in the Northwest is a key focus for this project.

19.     The Northwest is an area that’s long lacked viable public transport options. This has resulted in people relying on their cars – causing increasing congestion and carbon emissions. For many people, the lack of public transport choice has stopped them from accessing key essential services and participating in everyday activities.

20.     Providing a faster and more reliable public transport choices will transform the daily lives of many people in the Northwest for generations to come and help provide for a more vibrant and better-connected community.

More sustainable transport choice

21.     More transport choice and reducing reliance on private vehicles can help build more resilience in our networks, contribute towards a healthier, safer transport system and reliably get everyone where they need to go in a way that also helps to protect the climate.

22.     The contributions we make today towards a more sustainable future will add up to help form a healthier and safer future for us all.

23.     Better transport options will also help the Government and Aotearoa New Zealand’s commitment to reaching net zero emissions by 2050.

24.     This project will align with the Government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP), which describes how we are going to meet emissions budgets and make progress towards meeting the 2050 target. This includes reduced carbon emissions, reduced embodied carbon emissions and ways to build resilience in the transport network.

Scope

Mode and route 

25.     Confirmation of the final mode (bus or rail) is required for the Detailed Business Case, and this must consider any potential future development and potential mode switch as continued growth occurs along the corridor. Transport demand for various scenarios of the wider rapid transit network will also be assessed, including a NWRT-only scenario.

26.     It’s important that we undertake a robust analysis of all the potential bus and rail rapid transit options in order to deliver the best outcome for the Northwest.

27.     A previous investigation, as part of the Indicative Business Case, looked at the Westgate to Newton Road section of the Northwestern Motorway and recommended bus as the preferred mode.

28.     However, those investigations didn’t include the city centre components of the journey, from Newton Road to downtown, where the most critical constraints are. Previous work was also undertaken five years ago, so it is important to reflect any changes that have occurred since then such as further development of other rapid transit projects in Auckland as well as more recent city centre planning by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

29.     This means we need to undertake some further technical work to confirm the best mode for the corridor, as part of developing a Detailed Business Case for the project.

30.     The recommended mode will be determined based on a number of factors, including consideration of:

a.      demand

b.      capacity

c.       journey times

d.      how long the solution will continue to operate effectively, and potential for it to be upgraded

e.      engineering factors

f.       cost and value for money

g.      land acquisition

h.      integration and staging the delivery of the wider rapid transit network

i.        as well as other detailed analysis (e.g. environmental impacts).

31.     The overall route alignment and station placements along the NWRT corridor will be assessed with consideration to respective urban hubs and business developments, as well as key local feeder bus routes that will need to be established to support the project outcomes. 

32.     We will share the outcomes of our investigations into mode and route as the Detailed Business Case progresses.

Integration with the local network

33.     The success of a rapid transit solution along SH16 will be dependent on reliable walking, cycling and bus journeys on local roads connecting to stations along the motorway.

34.     The scope of this project includes access and connections to local bus services – we’re working with Auckland Transport to look at improvements to the supporting transport network (including feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling).

Integration with the wider rapid transit network

35.     This project will provide connections to the growing rapid transit network and make Tāmaki Makaurau a better place to live, while at the same time moving us towards a healthier transport network.

36.     As part of this project, we’re taking a whole of network approach and working closely with the Wāitemata Harbour Connections, Auckland Light Rail and Te Tupu Ngātahi – Supporting Growth.

37.     Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth has developed a long-term Strategic Plan for the Northwest which includes a rapid transit corridor from Kumeū to a new interchange at Brigham Creek on SH16 which would connect to the Northwest Rapid Transit project.

38.     Further planning work on NWRT will integrate wider strategic planning including the Auckland Plan 2050 and the Auckland Rapid Transit Plan.

Community engagement

39.     The first phase of community engagement ran from 24 August to 24 September 2023 and nearly 4000 people completed our engagement survey.

40.     We are currently analysing what we’ve heard from communities. When a report is ready, we will send you a high-level summary of the community feedback with some local board specific findings.  We are aiming to share this with you in November 2023.

41.     The aim of the first phase was to let people know about the project and ask some high-level questions about their experiences and what they think we should consider as part of our investigations.

42.     The second phase of community engagement is scheduled for early 2024 (March TBC) and will involve consultation on the emerging shortlist.

43.     The first phase of engagement involved workshops with 11 local boards (presentation available Attachment B). We are very grateful for your time and inputs, some of the key things we heard in workshops with you included:

a.      support of the need for rapid transit to the Northwest and better public transport options to support urban growth

b.      the importance of improvements to local roads feeding into rapid transit stations on the motorway, and making it easy for people to transfer between services

c.       integration with the rapid transit network

d.      support for active modes and the ability to take bikes/scooters on public transport

e.      the importance of consulting widely and selling the vision for the project and its benefits

f.       the need for better public transport options further north to Kumeu and Huapai

g.      the need for better public transport connections to the North Shore along SH18

h.      the need to find ways to speed up delivery timeframes and consideration of staging options

i.        the ability to retrofit a bus solution to light-rail in the future

j.        park and ride facilities at Brigham Creek.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     We have made progress on establishing and assessing a long list of potential rapid transit modes and alignments along the Northwestern Motorway (State Highway 16).

45.     We are currently carrying out more detailed investigations as we work to confirm an emerging short list of options. 

46.     Any feedback you provide now will feed into the investigation work currently underway. Your formal submission will be considered alongside the stakeholder and community views heard through the first phase of engagement which saw nearly 4000 people complete our survey.

47.     We intend to publish a public feedback report (which will include local board feedback) before the end of the year.

48.     We look forward to discussing the potential rapid transit options with you at local board workshops in the coming months, prior to the second phase of engagement early next year which will involve public consultation on the shortlisted options.

49.     The second phase of public engagement was initially planned to be in November-December this year. However, more time is needed to further our detailed investigations. Therefore, the second phase of engagement has been moved to early 2024, which will put us in a better position to have more informed discussions with stakeholders and communities.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo to local boards 26 July 2023

 

b

Local board workshop presentation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Adoption of the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Plan 2023

File No.: CP2023/15858

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption every three years and use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

3.       A draft version of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period for the SCP ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

4.       The local board has considered all submissions and feedback received from the consultation period. A few substantive changes and minor edits for clarification are proposed.

5.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023, which includes the proposed changes, is attached to this report.

6.       The key sections of the Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) are:

·   Māori outcomes

·   Climate action

·   Our people

·   Our environment

·   Our community

·   Our places

·   Our economy.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to approve any minor edits that may be necessary to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 prior to publication.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·   adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·   use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

9.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki  Local Board Plan 2023

10.     Māori outcomes are detailed in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement section of this report.

11.     Climate actions are detailed in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement section of this report.

12.     Our People: Our people feel a sense of belonging and our diversity is celebrated. We prioritise support to those who need it most. Our community is empowered to lead and overcome challenges. Mana whenua and Māori are our treaty partners; Māori initiatives are Māori-led.

Objectives under Our People:

·    Mana whenua and Māori are active partners and participants in local decision-making

·    Communities are given the opportunity to fully participate in local decision-making

·    Communities feel a sense of belonging and are supported to thrive

·    Communities are equipped and empowered to sustainably overcome challenges and succeed.

13.     Our Environment: Our arawai / waterways and whenua / land are healthy and thriving. We are resilient to the impacts of climate change. Mana whenua and community are supported to be kaitiaki / guardians for our environment.

Objectives under Our Environment:

·    We support mana whenua and Māori to fulfil their role as kaitiaki and enhance the mauri of te taiao

·    Our ecosystems are respected, protected, and restored

·    Our community is resilient and feels prepared for the effects of climate change

14.     Our Community: Our facilities and open spaces are accessible, cost-effective and fit-for-purpose. Te ao Māori is seen throughout our community. We plan for the future and are open to all the opportunities that can enable greater and more targeted investment in our community.

Objectives under Our Community:

·    Community places are accessible and welcoming to our diverse communities

·    Māori culture and identity are visible

·    We are prepared for future investment

·    Our community facilities and open spaces are interconnected, cost efficient, and fit-for-purpose

·    We empower our community organisations and sporting groups to collaborate and be financially resilient through strategic partnerships

15.     Our Places: Growth in our rohe is well-planned and environmentally aware. We have connected neighbourhoods where people feel safe in our community. Our town centres, open spaces and facilities have a range of accessible and reliable transport links to get people to places. Our transport infrastructure is fit for purpose and supports future growth.

Objectives under Our Places:

·    We encourage well-planned and sustainable infrastructure that supports our growth

·    People and traffic move more freely and safely around our area.

16.     Our Economy: Our town centres are thriving, and our businesses are resilient. We can live, work, and play locally. We are skilled and our businesses thrive. Our quality of life is high, and we can develop to our full potential.

Objectives under Our Economy:

·    People are empowered and have access to local employment, education and training opportunities

·    We encourage enterprise and innovation in our community

·    Thriving local businesses

·    Local businesses are supported to provide an environmentally sustainable future

Consideration of submissions and feedback

17.     A draft version of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

18.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has considered the submissions and feedback received.

19.     Public feedback on the draft plan was predominantly supportive of the themes within the plan. A summary of feedback for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 can be found online at: https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/local-board-plans-2023-feedback.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 contains a specific Climate Action section, focusing on the impacts and challenges regarding climate change, and outlines key climate actions the local board is aiming to deliver.

21.     Climate actions woven throughout the plan include:

·   enable Māori to fulfil their role as kaitiaki / guardians, embedding mātauranga Māori and te ao Māori principles that guide how our community works together to ensure an equitable transition to a low carbon, resilient future.

·   explore affordable options to reduce climate impacts, such as developing our shared paths away from areas vulnerable to coastal hazards

·   continue to implement the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Ngahere Action Plan 2021 to achieve and exceed our goal of increasing the canopy cover by 3 per cent

·   develop a local emergency response plan, to ensure our communities feel prepared for future emergencies, including natural disasters such as severe weather events.

22.     The impact on the climate of the final plans has been considered. The final publication will be an online document to minimise printing hard copies. 

23.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The adoption of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 will inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. It will also form the basis for the development of the following three years’ work programmes.

25.     Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft and final plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the final Maungakiekie-Tamaki  Local Board Plan 2023. Workshops were held to discuss and consider feedback and agree any changes.

27.     In developing the plan, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board considered:

·   what is already known about our communities and what is important to them

·   submissions received via online forms, hardcopy forms, emails and post

·   feedback provided at engagement events

·   regional strategies and policies

·   staff advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Māori make up 14 per cent of the local population of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki. There are fourteen iwi that have an interest in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board rohe:

·   Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust and Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board),

·   Ngāti Whātua,

·   Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki,

·   Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei,

·   Te Kawerau a Maki,

·   Ngāti Tamaoho,

·   Te Ākitai Waiohua,

·   Ngāti Te Ata,

·   Ngaati Whanaunga,

·   Ngāti Maru,

·   Ngāti Tamaterā,

·   Te Patukirikiri,

·   Ngāti Hako,

·   Waikato.

29.     As well as a number of marae within the rohe:

·   Ruapōtaka marae,

·   Te Tira Hou marae,

·   Te Poho o Tāmaki marae (Tāmaki College),

·   Puakiekie marae (One Tree Hill College),

·   Te Haerenga marae (Onehunga High School).

30.     Māori outcomes are woven throughout the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023, including the following initiatives:

·   strengthening our relationship mana whenua in the rohe, with a focus on building our relationship with iwi who have indicated that they have capacity to do this: Ngāti Pāoa, Ngāti Whātua, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Kawerau a Maki, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata, Ngaati Whanaunga, Ngāti Maru, and Te Patukirikiri

·   support mana whenua to fulfil their role as kaitiaki, by guiding the local board and wider community’s environmental initiatives

·   work alongside Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust to co-manage Ōmaru / Point England Reserve

·   te ao Māori to be felt throughout our community and reflected through our facilities and open spaces

·   support kaupapa Māori programmes that deliver Māori outcomes and are guided or led by Māori

·   continue building our relationships with marae and continue to work with Ruapōtaka Marae in their marae redevelopment.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plan informs this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There are no risks identified in adopting the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Staff recommend that responsibility for approving any minor edits following adoption be delegated to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Plan 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mal Ahmu - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One and Multiboard RoundOne 2023/2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2023/15710

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One and Multiboard Round One 2023/2024

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     This report presents applications received for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One (Attachment B) and Multiboard Round One (Attachment C) 2023/2024.

3.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

5.     Forty-two applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One 2023/2024, requesting a total of $326,407.57. Eight applications were received for Multiboard Round One 2023/2024, requesting a total of $321,995.90.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

 

 

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants One 2023/2024

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2411-123

He Waka Eke Noa Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of 100 new chairs.

$6,955.65

Eligible

LG2411-124

Dolphin Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the royalty fees, advertising, electricity, cleaning, promotional photography, and promotional materials printing costs for a theatre production "The Ocean Star" with season dates from 11 November 2023 - 17 March 2023.

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-126

The Dust Palace Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, equipment hire, sound and lighting hire, design and printing of documents/resources and promotional materials, technical and marketing support, coach's fee, project manager/support coach, guest tutor's costs for "the Dust Palace Youth Circus showcase".

$9,815.00

Eligible

LG2411-133

Naomi Toland

Arts and culture

Towards facilitator's fees, room hire, educational resources, marketing, accounting fees, administration, and program planning costs to provide 15 fully funded Astro Art Adventure Educational Learning Program in the local board area(Onehunga) from 6 February to 11 April 2024.

$9,845.00

Eligible

LG2411-134

Ha'ape Mata Mei Langi 'O Glen Innes

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of 4 sewing machines, two tool storage trollies, a sewing instructor's koha, purchase of fabric, art materials, and stationeries for the 'Ngafa' project from 8 November 2023 to 29 May 2024.

$17,320.00

Ineligible

LG2411-144

TAP Live Events Limited

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and performer's fee for the series of comedy shows "Factory Funny" held at the "Factory Theatre" in Onehunga from 10 November 2023 to 15 March 2024.

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-148

Street Art Aotearoa Limited

Arts and culture

Towards operational costs, including rent, power, internet, insurance, business software subscriptions, and gallery assistants' salaries to deliver two community arts group exhibitions at The Good The Bad Gallery in 2024.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-101

Shiloh Creative Life Centre Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the facilitators' fees and catering costs to deliver two six-week workshops around healthy lifestyles, food choices, and well-being from 3 July 2024 to 20 November 2024.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-106

DNA 1ST Solution Limited

Community

Towards the cost of delivering a health and well-being programme for their staff including the purchase of materials to build and maintain seven vegetable beds and gymnasium costs.

$7,887.94

Eligible

LG2411-107

Fix Up, Look Sharp

Community

Towards the annual rental cost including the utility cost of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Fix Up branch in Onehunga from 8 November 2023 to 8 November 2024.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-108

Onehunga Playcentre

Community

Towards bathroom upgrade and renovation at the Onehunga Playcentre.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-111

Onehunga Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the operating costs and events expenses including the costs of venue hire (Pearce Street Hall), website design and maintenance, social media marketing, volunteer expenses, administration, Christmas celebration, and other activity costs from 1 November 2023 to 30 June 2024.

$9,550.00

Eligible

LG2411-114

Mount Wellington Playcentre

Community

Towards the purchase of a large water trough with a lid and stand and the cost of extending the climbing frame equipment to reduce trip hazards during outdoor and gross motor skill plays.

$5,144.00

Eligible

LG2411-116

Rākau Tautoko Limited

Community

Towards social media marketing, venue hire, catering, and administration for bimonthly meetings, promotion, website upgrade, and maintenance costs for the “Year of Healthy Relationships Campaign 2024”.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-117

Communicare CMA (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the weekly venue hire cost of the Communicare Friendship Centres at St Peter's Presbyterian Church, Ellerslie, and St Matthias Church, Panmure for one year from 6 November 2023 to 12 December 2024 and the coordinators' wages.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-119

Glen Innes Chinese Groups Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, bus hire, purchase of traditional clothing for a fashion show, table tennis tables, and nets, coordination, and administration costs for "Christmas, Chinese New Year celebrations and planting trees" from 21 November 2023 to 24 June 2024.

$7,280.00

Eligible

LG2411-120

CCS Disability Action Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of New Zealand Signage Language interpreters, catering, natural remedy resources, and seedling resources for "Whanaau Hauaa Open Day".

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-127

EcoMatters Environment Trust

Community

Towards the cost of delivering "Eco Festival 2024" in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area from 15 March to 14 April 2024, specifically the cost of coordination, administration, marketing, and promotion.

$6,692.40

Eligible

LG2411-129

Agape Christian Life Centre Church New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of indoor and outdoor active play and sports equipment and catering costs for a free family-focused program "Stay Active, Stay Healthy, Together" from 14 January to 10 March 2024..

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-130

Everybody Eats Charitable Trust

Community

Towards marketing and communication, cultural consultation. translation and competency training, venue, and volunteer expenses including the cost of t-shirts, food, and stationery materials for the Everybody Eats Volunteers Outreach Project.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-131

Bhartiya Samaj Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of hosting a Diwali celebration at the Mount Roskill War Memorial Hall on 25 November 2023, including the venue hire, decorations, marketing including printing of banners, sound, photography, videography, performers koha.

$6,135.48

Eligible

LG2411-136

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards the venue hire, and the facilitators' costs to deliver the “RYDA Programme” for the students from the Tamaki College.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-137

Saint Marys Cooperating Parish of Glen Innes

Community

Towards venue hire, food, and facilitation costs for the "Men's Koru", supporting at-risk men from the local board area.

$9,900.00

Ineligible

LG2411-139

Communities Against Alcohol Harm Incorporated

Community

Toward the mileage costs of the Māori wardens' street patrols 1 January to 1 July 2024.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-140

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards the printing and production costs of the "Street Smart" life skills resource handbook for 616 Year-13 students in Māungakiekie-Tāmaki schools, Tamaki College, One Tree Hill College, and Onehunga High School.

$2,156.00

Eligible

LG2411-141

Warriors Community Foundation

Community

Towards the staffing costs for the programme delivery in the Māungakiekie-Tāmaki schools.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-142

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the costs of clinical supervision of the triage staff and triage support of the volunteer counsellors from 1 November 2023 to 30 June 2024.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-145

Panmure Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire cost from 1 January to 30 June 2024.

$5,361.12

Eligible

LG2411-147

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards the overall costs to deliver a health and well-being programme to 300 students from two schools in the local board area, including the costs of educational resources, insurance, and teachers' salaries.

$3,276.00

Eligible

LG2411-149

ReCreators Charitable Trust

Community

Towards free or subsidised classes of Community Upcycling DIY Workshops in the local board area from 2 November 2023 to 29 February 2024, including creative facilitator costs, project management, tools, equipment, materials, marketing, prep and design, and administration costs.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-154

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards the programme facilitation, supervision, and coordination costs for the "Arts 4 Us", "Stars", and "Dance 4 Us" Programmes from October 2023 to March 2024.

$10,000.00

Ineligible

LG2411-138

Onehunga High School

Environment

Towards the purchase and installation of three carbon cycle community composting systems (including three bins), drag fork, and labour costs for the "Onehunga High School Food Waste Composting System"

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-151

Tread Lightly Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards costs of engaging qualified teachers and towing costs for the Tread Lightly mobile classroom to three schools in the local board area from 2 October 2023 to 20 December 2024.

$6,000.00

Ineligible

LG2411-121

Onehunga Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards the costs of a brass band, professional entertainment, master of ceremonies fee, sound, portaloo, graphic design, and photography for the "Onehunga Christmas Parade" on 2 December 2023.

$9,150.00

Eligible

LG2411-102

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards the coaching fees, and affiliation fees for a "Portable Junior Basketball Program" in the local board area from 1 November 2023 to 28 June 2024.

$9,055.00

Eligible

LG2411-103

The Auckland Table Tennis Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of three table tennis tables, coaches' salaries, affiliation fees, and insurance costs for the 'Tables in Communities” project.

$9,698.35

Eligible

LG2411-122

Auckland Rowing Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of coaching, and rowing camp including accommodation, transport, and catering costs for the "Te Kapa Rangatahi Kaihoe / Ōtāhuhu College & Auckland Rowing Club" rowing programme.

$9,780.00

Eligible

LG2411-128

Skate Seen Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of equipment, venue hire at the Sonskate Indoor Skatepark, coaching, storage, and advertising cost for a "learn to skate" programmes in the local board area targetting women over 18 years old.

$6,584.40

Eligible

LG2411-135

Ruapotaka Marae Society Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of the funder/sponsors' banners and branding materials, branding event wear, and equipment (purchase of a Rogue Ohio Deadlift Bar). advertising, event videography, photography, keynote speakers' fees, and administration for the "Raise The Bar Amateur Deadlift Event 2023" on 2 December 2023.

$5,421.23

Eligible

LG2411-143

The Eden Roskill District Cricket Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of cricket kits, maintenance, security, and coaching costs to deliver a cricket program targeted at girls.

$10,000.00

Ineligible

LG2411-146

Athletics Auckland Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards marquee hire, portaloo hire, and opening ceremony entertainment costs for the 46th annual Colgate Games held at Go Media (Mt Smart) Stadium from 4 to 7 January 2024.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2411-153

Pakuranga Outrigger Canoe Club Te Tahawai o Pakuranga Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of 30 life jackets.

$4,400.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$326,407.57

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multiboard Round One 2023/2024

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-139

Shine School of Confidence

Arts and culture

Towards speech and drama lessons including tuition fees, venue hire, and teaching resources at various community centers or local schools (January 2024 - December 2024)

$13,760.00

Ineligible

MB2324-145

Charlotte Harland

Arts and culture

Towards the writing process and research for the television series "Dabble" in Auckland (April 2023 - August 2024)

$0.00

Ineligible

MB2324-149

Ngapuhi Ki Tamaki

Arts and culture

Towards event related furniture and feature cost and venue hire to deliver Ngapuhi Ki Tamaki Waiata & Hitori project on 16 December 2023

$10,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-122

CNSST Foundation

Community

Towards marketing costs, tutor fee, venue hire, Programme Coordination and Educational Support, operating and admin cost to run Chinese Cultural Competency Training Programme from 15 January 2024 to 30 November 2024

$5,250.00

Eligible

MB2324-132

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards Nurse Educator Expertise cost from 4 December 2023 to 31 March 2024

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-136

Upside Youth Mentoring Aotearoa

Community

Toward a portion of the wages of the mentoring manager and three mentoring coordinators (December 2023 - November 2024)

$7,700.00

Eligible

MB2324-158

Better Men Limited

Community

Towards start-up cost to deliver Defying Depression, Cool2Care project from 1 January 2024 to 31 December 2024

$250,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-159

Anxiety NZ Trust

Community

Towards wages to employ part-time specialist community educators to work across Auckland (December 2023 - November 2024)

$5,200.00

Eligible

MB2324-161

Glen Innes Family Centre

Community

Towards running costs such as facilitator wages and contractor facilitator for the programmes offered at Glen Innes Family Centre (December 2023 - February 2023)

$10,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-164

Bravo Company Charitable Trust

Community

Towards tramping and tenting related costs to deliver the Well-being for Fathers project from 4 December 2023 to 31 July 2024

$5,085.90

Eligible

MB2324-101

Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards uniforms for the Aotearoa Māori Rugby League inaugural tournament at Te Atatu South Park and Ngati Otara Park from 22 September 2024 to 27 October 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$321,995.90

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

· local board priorities

· lower priorities for funding

· exclusions

· grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

· any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024, which sets application guidelines for community contestable grants (Attachment A)

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.    The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13. Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.  Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16. Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17. The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

19.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

20.     Forty-two applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One 2023/2024, requesting a total of $326,407.57. Eight applications were received for Multiboard Round One 2023/2024, requesting a total of $321,995.90.

21.      Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocating funding for round one of the local grants and multiboard, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

MaungakiekieTamaki Programme 2023-2024

 

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki LG R1 Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki MB R1 Application Summary

 

     


 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local parks land classification programme

File No.: CP2023/11028

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To declare and classify land held under the Local Government Act 2002, and to classify and reclassify land held under the Reserves Act 1977 and approve public notification where required.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A comprehensive land status investigation of all Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local parks has been completed. The investigation identified a large number of unclassified reserves held under the Reserves Act 1977. This is a preliminary task in the development of a local parks management plan.

3.       There are 265 parcels of park land within the scope of the local parks management plan. The investigation identified 208 land parcels as held under the Reserves Act 1977 (RA) and 57 as held under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA).

4.       Considerations associated with the decision to retain land under the Local Government Act 2002, or declare and classify reserves under the Reserves Act 1977, include:

·        current and likely future use

·        continuity with adjoining land parcels

·        benefits and constraints of legislation.

5.       For the 57 parcels of park land held under the Local Government Act 2002, the local board has the option to continue to hold land under the Local Government Act 2002, or to declare the land as a reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and classify it appropriately.

6.       Staff have individually assessed the merits of each option (refer Attachments B and C) and propose that:

·        43 parcels be retained under the Local Government Act 2002 (Attachment B)

·        14 parcels be declared as a reserve and classified under the Reserves Act 1977 (Attachment C).

7.       Of the 208 land parcels held under the Reserves Act 1977 that have been investigated:

·        78 are unclassified and require classification to be included in the local park management plan (Attachments D and E)

·        25 parcels require reclassification to better reflect current or future use (public consultation is required) (Attachment F)

·        105 parcels require no further action.

8.       Staff developed a set of criteria to guide the assessment of each land parcel incorporating guidance from the Reserves Act 1977 Guide[1] as follows:

·        consideration of the local park’s values

·        current and likely future use of the local park

·        workshop feedback from the local board

·        consultation with mana whenua.

9.       Staff have also considered the benefits and disadvantages of the Reserves Act 1977 or Local Government Act 2002 in managing and enabling the use, protection and development of each local park.

10.     Staff recommend that the local board approve classifying land parcels that do not require public notification, and notifying the reclassification of other land parcels as outlined in this report.

11.     Completing the reserve declaration, classification and reclassification processes will enable staff to update land status references in the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Parks Management Plan.

12.     Further investigation is required to determine the proposed classification for Lot 1 DP 103286 at Hamlin Park and for Lot 107 DP 43819 at Ian Shaw Park. Following this investigation, the proposed classifications will be reported to the local board for a decision.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      confirm that 43 parcels of land will continue to be held under the Local Government Act 2002 as described in Attachment B of the agenda report.

b)      approve 14 parcels of land to be declared as reserve and classified according to their primary purpose, pursuant to section 14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977, as proposed in Attachment C of the agenda report.

c)       approve public notification of proposals to classify 12 parcels of reserve land pursuant to section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977, as described in Attachment D of the agenda report.

d)      approve the proposed classification of 66 parcels of reserve land pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, as described in Attachment E of the agenda report.

e)      approve public notification of the proposals to reclassify 25 parcels of reserve land pursuant to section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977 described in Attachment F of the agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

Background information

13.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has allocated decision-making responsibility for all local parks in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area.

14.     On 26 May 2020, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board resolved to publicly notify its intention to prepare the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Parks Management Plan (resolution number: MT/2020/55).

15.     The local parks management plan will cover park land held under either the Reserves Act 1977 (RA) or the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA), including land covered by existing reserve management plans.

16.     The local parks management plan will be a statutory reserve management plan prepared in accordance with section 41 of the RA.

17.     As part of preparing the local parks management plan, it is necessary to review whether the local parks to be included in the plan are held under the LGA or RA. If local parks are held under the RA, it is necessary to ensure that they have been appropriately classified.

18.     A comprehensive review of the land status of all local parks in the local board area has been completed.

19.     Principles underpinning the land classification process were presented to the local board at workshops in May, July and August 2023.

20.     Key outcomes of the investigation were presented to the local board at a workshop held in September 2023.

What we found

21.     A total of 508 land parcels, covering approximately 106 parks, were investigated to determine whether they should be in scope of the local parks management plan.

22.     The local board does not have delegated decision-making authority for 243 land parcels that are out of scope of the plan. Examples of this are regional parks, land managed by the Department of Conservation, and road to road accessways.

23.     Just over half (265 parcels) are within scope of the LPMP with 208 held under the RA and 57 held under the LGA. A further 4 parcels are advocacy parcels. This includes unformed legal road which have a park function. 

24.     Of the 208 parcels held under the RA, 78 are currently unclassified.

25.     This report makes recommendations on actions for both land held under the RA and land held under the LGA.

26.     Further investigation is required to determine the proposed classification for Lot 1 DP 103286 at Hamlin Park and for Lot 107 DP 43819 at Ian Shaw Park. Following the investigation, the results will be reported to the local board for a classification decision on these parcels of land. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Classification options depend on the legislation under which land is held

27.     The local board has the option to hold parks under the LGA or the RA.

28.     For park land currently held under the LGA the following options have been considered:

LGA
OPTIONS
•	continue to retain the land under the LGA, or
•	declare land currently held under the LGA to be reserve under section 14 of the RA and classify appropriately.
 

 

 

 


29.     For land held under the RA, the following options have been considered:

•	classify according to the land’s primary purpose, or
•	reclassify to align to the land’s primary purpose, or
•	revoke the reserve status and hold the land under the LGA, or
•	continue to hold the land as unclassified reserve under the RA.
•	
•	
 RA
OPTIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

30.     The option to continue to hold the land as unclassified reserve, has been discounted as it would mean that the local parks management plan would not comply with the RA. This would mean that council was not meeting its statutory obligations under the RA. Staff would also not be able to recommend public notification of the draft plan.

31.     The different options for land held under the LGA as well as land held under the RA are summarised in Attachment A. The summary also indicates the most common classes for land held under the RA.

32.     In considering whether to proceed with the options for each land parcel, staff have contemplated:

·        the intended purpose of the land when it was acquired, for example, was it vested as a recreation or esplanade reserve on subdivision

·        the long-term preservation and protection that the RA provides for reserve land including from inappropriate use and development

·        the benefits of unified and integrated management of individual parks and the local parks network as a whole

·        whether underlying Crown ownership of the local park prevents the reserve status being revoked

·        whether statutory processes and future decision-making will be streamlined

·        the need for greater flexibility and choice in how local parks are used by the public

·        whether revoking the reserve status of a particular land parcel would materially lead to a greater range of park activities being able to occur.

33.     The sections below outline in more detail the options for land held under the LGA and RA, and the criteria on which assessments of each land parcel have been based.

Proposed actions for land held under the LGA

34.     When reviewing the future land status options for land under the LGA, staff considered the following:

·        Why does the council own the land and how was it acquired?

·        What is the primary purpose of the land?

·        What is the status of adjacent parcels of land within the same park?

·        What is the current and likely future main use of the land?

·        What potential does the land have for protection, enhancement and development?

·        Is there likely to be a need to retain flexibility for future use?

Proposal to retain some land under the LGA

35.     Applying the criteria above, 43 parcels of land have been identified as best suited to remain under the LGA (Attachment B). This is primarily because either the current use does not align with any of the classification options in the RA, and/or there is a likely need to retain flexibility for future use. Gloucester Park North is an example of an activity where this occurs.

36.     No further action is required by the local board for land that is to remain under the LGA.

Proposal to declare and classify some land currently held under the LGA

37.     Any land held under the LGA which the local board wishes to manage under the RA, must be declared reserve and classified appropriately in accordance with the RA.

38.     Thirteen parcels of land held under the LGA have been identified and recommended for declaring and classifying as reserve under the RA (Attachment C). 

39.     The predominant reason for declaring and classifying these parcels is to reflect the primary purpose of the land. Most of these parcels align with either recreation, local purpose or scenic classifications.

40.     Section 14(2) of the RA requires public notification when declaring and classifying land as reserve, where land is not zoned open space in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

41.     The parcels proposed to be declared and classified are consistent with Auckland Unitary Plan zoning. This means that public notification is not required.

42.     Staff recommend that the local board declare and classify the land identified in Attachment C.

Proposed actions for land held under the Reserves Act 1977

43.     As outlined above, there are three valid options for land held under the RA:

·        classification, or

·        reclassification, or

·        revocation of the RA status.

44.     In the context of this investigation, staff have not identified any parcels of local park that warrant the reserve status to be revoked to enable management of the land under the LGA.

Classification of land held under the Reserves Act 1977

45.     Classification involves assigning a reserve (or part of a reserve) a primary purpose, as defined in sections 17 to 23 of the Act, that aligns with its present values. Consideration is also given to potential future values and activities, and uses, as outlined in the Reserves Act Guide (see paragraph 8).

46.     The investigation found 78 land parcels (Attachments D and E) currently held as unclassified reserve under the RA, requiring classification under sections 16(1) or 16(2A) of the RA.

Public notification of classification

47.     The RA requires public notification of the proposed classification of a reserve except where:

·        the proposed classification aligns with the open space zoning in the Auckland Unitary Plan, or

·        the reserve has been held under previous legislation for a similar purpose, or

·        the proposed classification was a condition under which the land was acquired. 

48.     Attachment D identifies 12 parcels that require public notification subject to section 16(1) of the Act as the zoning of the parcels are not aligned to the proposed classification.

49.     Objectors and submitters may request a hearing. In which case it is proposed that a hearings panel, consisting of at least three local board members, is formed to hear any objections or submissions. The hearings panel will make recommendations to the local board on classification decisions.

Reclassification of some land held under the RA

50.     Reclassification involves assigning a different class to a reserve (or part of a reserve) to better cater for its primary purpose.

51.     During the land classification investigation, 25 parcels of classified reserves were identified as requiring reclassification (see Attachment F) for the following reasons:

·        to better align with the current or anticipated future use of the reserve, or

·        to correct previous classification errors.

52.     Section 24(2)(b) of the RA requires all proposals to reclassify reserves to be publicly notified together with the reasons for the proposed change in classification.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

53.     The classification decisions in this report are largely administrative and are unlikely to cause any direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

54.     However, the future management and development of park land, which is determined by its purpose, could have a potential positive or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions. The degree and nature of the impact is dependent on the specific management and development of each park. Two examples of potential impacts are:

·        a potential offsetting of emissions by classifying land as scenic reserve. The purpose of a scenic reserve is largely to protect and restore the natural environment; ecological restoration of a site could result in an increase in carbon sequestration.

·        a potential increase in emissions through increased traffic, following the development of a community facility; the development of facilities could be enabled through the classification of local purpose (community use) or recreation reserves.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The land classification proposals have been discussed widely with staff from various council units including Infrastructure and Environmental Services (biodiversity and stormwater specialists), Parks and Community Facilities (parks, leasing and land advisory specialists,) Plans and Places (heritage), and Auckland Transport. All are supportive of the recommendations.

56.     Staff advise that LGA land may be retained under that Act when it allows for a wider range of uses (consistent with council’s role under that legislation). While the RA can provide for increased protection and preservation of park values including recreation, natural and environment, heritage, and landscape.

57.     It is noted that the local parks management plan will provide a consistent management direction for all parks and reserves, regardless of whether the land is managed under the RA or LGA.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

58.     At a workshop held in May 2023, staff presented to the local board the principles and criteria that underpinned the land status investigation process.

59.     Feedback from the local board members was generally supportive of the rationale and proposals for classification under sections 16(1) and 16(2) and the proposals to reclassify land under section 24(2)(b).

60.     At workshops held in July and August 2023, staff presented to the local board all details of the proposed classifications programme and the rationale. Local board members expressed support to retain some land under the LGA. An example of this was the land parcels on which Gloucester Park North is situated.

61.     Amendments have been made to the proposed classification programme based on feedback from local board members present at the workshop.

62.     Completion of the classification process will ensure that each parcel of park land in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki area has a clear strategic purpose. This will allow for good decision-making for local parks that complies with the Reserves Act.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

Engagement with mana whenua

63.     Staff attended the Parks, Sport and Recreation Mana Whenua Forum in August 2022 and introduced both the wider local parks management plan project, and the land classification work.

64.     Mana whenua representatives from Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngaati Whanaunga, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust and Ngāti Paoa Trust Board have expressed interest in being involved in the development of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Parks Management Plan.

65.     Individual hui were held with the six mana whenua representatives. The discussions included land classifications.

66.     The mana whenua representatives who had particular interest in land classifications were Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngaati Whanaunga and Ngāti Tamaoho.

67.     During the individual hui, most of the land parcels proposed for classification or reclassification, and land parcels held under the LGA, were reviewed.

68.     Mana whenua feedback generally supported staff’s assessment, rationale and proposals for land classification. Key feedback included:

·        For some of the land parcels, mana whenua expressed a desire to give them a higher level of protection under the RA, i.e. classify a reserve as local purpose esplanade instead of the proposed recreation reserve classification.

·        Mana whenua recognise the need for ample access to recreational land in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki.

69.     Mana whenua proposals were discussed further with parks and biodiversity staff. Amendments were then made to land classification recommendations to accommodate mana whenua feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

70.     This report has no financial implications for the local board. The costs for surveying, public notices and gazette notices for the classifications will be covered through existing departmental budgets.

71.     There are no financial implications associated with retaining land under the LGA.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     The following table outlines the risks and mitigation associated with classification and reclassification of reserves, and declaring and classifying land to be reserve:

Risk

Risk level

Mitigation

IF land is held under the LGA

THEN there may be a perception that the land is at risk of sale or disposal

 

 

Low

There are restrictions on disposal of parks under section 138 of the LGA, and the requirement to undertake consultation, including prior to granting leases for more than six months.

IF land is classified under the RA

THEN this constrains what the land can be used for

 

 

Low

Each individual land parcel proposed to be held under the RA has been assessed based on the criteria in paragraph eight and the Reserves Act Guide (refer to footnote 1). Recommendations reflect current and likely future uses of each individual parcel and do not cause/infer additional restrictions.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     If the recommended classification actions are approved, the next steps vary depending on whether land is held under the LGA or RA, and whether public notification is required.

74.     Following the classification investigation for Lot 1 DP 103286 at Hamlin Park and for Lot 107 DP 43819 at Ian Shaw Park., the outcome will be reported to the local board for a classification decision. 

75.     The next steps for each classification action for land held under the LGA or RA is outlined in Attachment G.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Possible actions under the Local Government Act 2002 vs Reserves Act 1977

 

b

Parcels to be retained under the Local Government Act 2002

 

c

Parcels to be declared and classified (public notification not required)

 

d

Parcels to be classified (public notification required)

 

e

Parcels to be classified (public notification not required)

 

f

Parcels to be reclassified (public notification required)

 

g

Outline of next steps

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sheryne Lok - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Angela Clarke - Acting General Manager Regional Services & Strategy

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025

File No.: CP2023/15550

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted on as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

3.       This report seeks the feedback of the local board on consultation on proposed changes to local fees and charges.

4.       There are proposed changes to the following local fees and charges:

·    Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·    Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

5.       The Governing Body will agree regional consultation items including proposed changes to fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

6.       Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      whakarite / to seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 for the following:

i)       Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review

A)      Membership Fees

1)      The alignment of legacy memberships to current rates over 3 years

2)      The introduction of a new Auckland wide membership option that allows access to all Auckland Council Pool & Leisure sites regardless of operator.

B)      Aquatic Entrance Fees

1)      The introduction of baseline aquatic entrance fees for all Auckland Council Pool and Leisure sites.

2)      An increase to the concessionary discount from 15 per cent to 40 per cent.

C)      Swim School Fees

1)      An increase to swimming lesson prices closer to market rates whilst maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders

2)      A new 30 per cent discount for Community Service Card Holders and their dependents

3)      A new 40 per cent discount for those with special needs that require private lessons.

D)      Recreation Fees

1)      An increase to holiday programme and OSCAR (before and after school care) fees

2)      To simplify recreation term programme pricing.

 

ii)       Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review

A)      To adjust fees in line with Hire Fee Framework July 2014.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

8.       A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 10 October 2023. This report seeks the feedback of the local board on proposed changes to fees and charges that will be included alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation.

9.       A three-year cycle of fee reviews was introduced in the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. Over the years the cost of delivering these services have increased but the fees and charges for users have not been adjusted accordingly.

10.     Local boards could choose to increase or decrease its fees and charges from the proposal. This may result in extra funding for the local board if fees are increased or a top-up may be required from the local board funding if fees are reduced from the proposal.

11.     The Governing Body will agree on consultation items including proposed fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

12.     Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

13.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This is the third year of the fee review cycle. There are changes proposed to the following local fees and charges:

·        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·        Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

Active Communities

15.     There are 45 Active Communities sites (pool and leisure facilities) across the Auckland region. 25 of these are currently managed directly by Auckland Council. A Request for Proposal process is currently underway for council owned pool and leisure services. Relevant fees and charges proposed will be included as part of the contract negotiations.

16.     The review of fees and charges for Active Communities services has been split into two phases due to its size and complexity. Council managed bookable spaces were reviewed and adopted in 2023 as phase one.

17.     In this second phase, staff have reviewed the majority of the remaining fees to ensure an appropriate level of cost recovery to enable the council to provide an equitable service across the network.

Membership fees

18.     Some customers are on membership rates that we no longer offer. They include memberships may have been in place prior to amalgamation in 2010, or membership types that have since been discontinued. We are proposing to align these legacy memberships with current membership options over three years. In year one, we estimate that around 4,500 memberships (approximately 20 per cent) will increase by up to 7 per cent. The estimated increase in revenue is $260,000 in year one across the region.

19.     We are also proposing to introduce an Auckland wide membership option to allow customers to access all 45 pool and leisure sites, both council-managed and contracted. The estimated increase in revenue from this proposal is expected to be around $90,000 per year across the region.

Aquatic entrance fees

20.     The baseline aquatic entrance fees for all council managed and contracted pools and leisure sites are proposed to change. This will include fees for swimming, spa, sauna and steam room use for adults as well as spectator and supervising adult fees.

21.     Alongside this proposed fee change, we are proposing an increased discount rate for seniors (over 65 years), students (over 17), Community Services card and permanent disability card holders, from 15 per cent currently to 40 per cent. This proposal will increase revenue by an estimated $77,000 per annum across the region and will ensure equitable access for users of these services.

22.     Officers have reviewed data available and found no conclusive evidence to support a significant change to the targeted rate for Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara Papatoetoe local boards at this stage. It is recommended that the targeted rate be adjusted by the forecast council rate of inflation for 2024/2025. As of the time this report was written the forecast rate of inflation for council’s arts and recreation services was 3.5 per cent for 2024/2025. This will be used to calculate the targeted rate amount to be included in the 10-year budget consultation. The final rate amount will be set in June 2024 based on the updated inflation forecast available to the council at that point.

Swim school fees

23.     An increase in swim school fees is proposed. This will align swimming lesson pricing closer to market rates while maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders. This proposal includes a new 30 per cent discount for Community Services card holders and their dependents and a 40 per cent discount for those with special needs requiring private lessons. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $745,000 per year across the region.

Recreation fees

24.     We are also proposing to increase OSCAR before and after school care and holiday programme fees to maximise government subsidies and to ensure higher levels of cost recovery. Term programme fees have also been adjusted across the network to provide a simpler charging framework and recover costs appropriately. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $196,000 per year across the region.

25.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached (Attachment A).

 

Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces

26.     Venue hire and bookable spaces incorporates community halls, community centres, art centres and bookable library spaces. Fees for 252 bookable spaces at 110 venues are included in this review.

27.     A review of fees has been split into two phases. The Hire Fee Framework considers the size, condition and quality of each bookable space, the levels of staffing, the amenities available, and current patterns of utilisation of the spaces. It also addresses variations within local board and adjacent areas to bring pricing of comparable venues closer together. Phase one of this review will ensure that fees across similar venues are charged appropriately across the portfolio.

28.     Fees for around half of the venues reviewed are not proposed to change as they have been set at an appropriate level when compared to spaces nearby or with similar types of spaces or capacity.

29.     Around 40 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $2 to align them to similar or nearby venues and a further 8 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $12 for this reason. For a small number of venues, we are proposing to decrease fees to generate interest in hiring these facilities.  Overall, these proposed changes to venue hire fee are expected to the generate an increase in revenue of around $160,000.

30.     In phase two we will investigate the cost to serve and assess the balance between rates and user pays to ensure we are providing good value to the ratepayer, whilst providing accessibility to customers and communities.  This review will include input from local boards.

31.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached. (Attachment A).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     The local board input into consultation on fees and charges is procedural in nature. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The fees and charges review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. There are no impacts to the Council group wider than the parent (Auckland Council).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 05 October 2023.

35.     The local board has the opportunity to input on the local fees and charges before the governing body makes a decision on consulting on changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

36.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement and adopting local fees and charges.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The council does not hold information on the ethnicity of fee payers so is not able to identify the exact impact on the proposed changes on Māori. The impact of the proposed rates and fees changes on Māori will be similar to that on other residents in Auckland.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The local board provides input to regional plans and proposals. There will be information in the council’s consultation material for each proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

39.     The table below summarises the total financial implications for all local boards:

A blue and white list with black text

Description automatically generated

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The proposed changes to rates fees and charges will allow the council to meet its cost recovery targets for the relevant activities for the 2024/2025 financial year. If these adjustments are not made the level of general rates increase may have to be higher than set out in the Mayoral proposal or further alternative budget mitigations found.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The Governing Body will adopt the consultation document and supporting information content the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 including the changes to fees and changes for 2024/2025 on 6 December 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Fees and Charges 2024/2025

 

     


 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sugenthy Thomson - Lead Financial Advisor, Financial Strategy & Planning

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Manager - Local Board Financial Advisors

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Mount Wellington Community Provision Investigation

File No.: CP2023/13280

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the findings and note the recommendations of the Mount Wellington community provision investigation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have completed action 125 of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan: “investigate community need in Mt Wellington, including partnership opportunities”.

3.       The investigation assesses community space provision over a 30-year horizon against adopted provision metrics in the Community Facilities Network Plan. It supports the Governing Body’s prioritisation of investment in community services and spaces across the whole of Auckland.

4.       The key findings of the investigation are:

·    there is no current gap in provision: community provision for Mount Wellington residents meets the guidelines outlined in the Community Facilities Network Plan

·    community spaces within the study area are in satisfactory or good condition

·    the exception is Dunkirk Road Activity Centre, outside but within driving distance of the study area. Its poor condition needs to be addressed to maintain the current level of provision. A renewal project is underway

·    there is no anticipated gap in community provision in the future: staff assess that community provision is likely to meet provision guidelines by 2051

·    demand for arts and culture services is likely to increase as Mount Wellington’s young, growing, largely Asian, Pacific and Māori population create additional demand. However social research does not point to any evidence of unmet demand now or in the future

·    based on calculations against providing guidelines, Glen Innes Library is likely to reach capacity between 2031 and 2041, noting that this might change as demand for library services is evolving fast.

5.       The recommended next steps are that the local board:

a)   monitor demand for arts and culture services in the Mount Wellington area

b)   progress the renewal project at Dunkirk Road Activity Centre to address condition issues

6.       Recommendations to address future capacity issues at Glen Innes Library will be covered as part of the Tāmaki community provision investigation, to be reported to the local board in 2023.

7.       There is a risk that actual rates of population growth may be different to projections. There will be opportunities in later years to reassess provision and mitigate the impacts of unforeseen growth.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)    whiwhi / receive the findings of the Mount Wellington community facility provision investigation as follows:

Arts, community, library and venue for hire spaces.

i)       There is no current or anticipated gap in provision of arts and culture, community, library or venue for hire spaces

ii)       Mount Wellington’s young, growing, largely Asian, Pacific and Māori population is likely to create additional demand for arts and culture spaces, but social research does not point to any evidence of unmet demand for arts and culture facilities

iii)      Community spaces serving Mount Wellington residents are in good condition, except Dunkirk Road Activity Centre, where a renewal project is under way.

iv)      The six libraries serving Mount Wellington residents are projected to have capacity through to 2051, except for Glen Innes Library which is likely to run out of capacity between 2031 and 2041.

v)      There is no assessed gap in venue for hire space now or in the future.

Aquatic and leisure services.

vi)      There are no assessed gaps in provision of aquatic services for Mount Wellington residents now or in the future.

vii)     Auckland Council is currently reviewing provision guidelines for aquatic services, which will provide further clarity as to network requirements.

viii)    There are no assessed gaps in provision of leisure services for Mount Wellington residents now or in the future.

b)    tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that demand for arts and culture services may evolve over time and will be considered by action 88 of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan, “regional arts and culture services needs assessment”.

c)    tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that the renewal project under way at Dunkirk Road Activity Centre needs to be prioritised to maintain provision in the local board area.

d)    tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that Glen Innes Library is likely to exceed capacity between 2031 and 2041 and that a staff recommendation will be reported to the local board in 2023 as part of the Tāmaki community provision investigation.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background to the investigation into community provision

8.       The Community Facilities Network Plan is the adopted regional policy that guides council’s investment in the provision of community spaces. It supports the Governing Body to prioritise investment in community services and spaces across the whole of Auckland.

9.       Local boards have delegated authority over the number of new local community facilities and their specific location, design, build and fit out within budget parameters agreed by the Governing Body. Local boards may choose to provide above the provision levels adopted in the Community Facilities Network Plan, and can fund new acquisitions through budget re-prioritisation, optimisation, and / or targeted rates.

10.     Action 25 of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan directs staff to investigate community provision in Mount Wellington against the Community Facilities Network Plan.  The investigation aims to determine whether there are gaps or duplication in current provision, now and in the future.

11.     The Mount Wellington study area sits entirely within Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area. It contains two local centres identified in the Auckland Plan: Mount Wellington centre in the north and the Panama Road centre in the south.

12.     The area located between the two local centres is zoned for commercial-industrial use and makes up 52 per cent of the study area’s spatial footprint. The Community Facilities Network Plan does not outline provision requirements for non-residential zones, so those areas were excluded from this investigation.

Methodology

13.     Auckland Council uses a three-stage process for planning investment in new or substantially changed community facilities. This process is based on the New Zealand Treasury Better Business Case model.

14.     To complete the investigation, staff completed four streams of research.

·    Community profile - provides an overview of the current state and likely future state of the study area using census data, growth data and other primary research.

·    Social research summary - summarises the findings from recent social research, surveys community engagement to show how residents perceive and feel about their environment and their concerns and aspirations for Mount Wellington.

·    Community facility stocktake - identifies the network of existing (council and non-council) facilities in the study area and analyses available data on the current state including condition.

·    Gap analysis – analyses evidence from the community profile, social research and community facilities stocktake, assessing whether current provision is sufficient to support demand, whether demand for services and facilities is likely to exceed supply, and where and when this might occur.

15.     Data sources for this investigation are as follows:

Community profile

Demographic and site-specific data including:

·     New Zealand Census 2013 and 2018

·     projected growth data: Statistics New Zealand (SNZ) Growth Estimates (2018), ART Model Zone projections – Scenario I Version 11

·     rental and housing prices, available from www.qv.co.nz.

 

Previous reports and plans including:

·     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan

·     local board profiles

 

Social research

·     Quality of Life Survey 2020

·     Sport and Recreation in the Lives of Young Aucklanders, 2011

·     Sport New Zealand Sports Insight Tool 2018

·     public feedback submissions on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020

Community facility stocktake

The stocktake was developed using:

·     data on facility users and non-users, where available

·     a review of existing documentation on facilities, including catchment studies, condition reports

·     GIS data on ownership and management and key spatial components

·     data on the condition and planned renewals and maintenance

·     an audit of school facilities and community access.

16.     The volume of data, information, research and feedback from engagement relevant to the study area was deemed sufficient. No new research was commissioned and no additional public engagement was conducted.

17.     Key assumptions and limitations associated with the data are:

·    it has been assumed that the data was accurate on the date it was received

·    some information was only available at the local board level, and so in some cases generalisations about the local board area were applied to the smaller study area

·    the investigation is based on resources available to council staff, for example the council’s facility network mapping tool SCOUT, internal GIS data and asset/facility condition assessments completed by quantity surveyors

·    geographic areas used for different data modelling methods are not always the same. For example, the Macrostrategic Model (MSM) zones used for future population projections are similar but not the same as Statistical Area 2 (SA2) areas used for current population demographics. A best-fit approach was used to reconcile the SA2 and MSM units included in the Mount Wellington study area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The high-level findings of the Mount Wellington community provision investigation are provided in a technical report (Attachment A).

Demographic research provides insights into community behaviour and needs

19.     Figure 1. Key demographic features of the Mount Wellington study areaOver 33,000 people live in Mount Wellington. The demographic profile of the resident population is summarised in Figure 1.

Icon

Description automatically generated

Population

33,213 residents in Mount Wellington

(2.1% of the Auckland population).

 

Increasing to more than 58,000 (2.5% of Auckland population) by 2051.

Icon

Description automatically generated

Place of birth

48% born overseas,

47% of whom arrived in the last nine years.

 

Auckland region:

41% born overseas

42% of whom arrived in the last nine years.

 

Icon

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Ethnic composition

Predominant ethnic groups:

Asian ethnicities 37%

Pacific peoples 21%

 

Auckland region:

Asian ethnicity 28%

Pacific peoples 15%

 

Icon

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Socioeconomics

46% of households live in a home they own; 55% of residents in deprivation deciles 6,7,8.

 

Auckland:

59% live in a home they own; 28% in deciles 6, 7, 8.

 

The area is experiencing considerable growth

20.     The resident population of Mount Wellington is projected to grow by 77 per cent over the next 30 years, exceeding 58,000 people by 2051. This is a faster growth rate than Auckland as a whole. It will increase demand for community services and spaces.

Social research

21.     66 per cent of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area residents feel that a sense of community is important, but only 43 per cent experience feeling a sense of community in their local neighbourhood.

22.     Membership in neighbourhood groups is at five per cent across Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area, half of the membership rate across Auckland as a whole.

23.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board residents are twice as likely to rate their physical health as “poor” compared to residents across Auckland as a whole.

24.     The New Zealand Arts and Culture Survey 2020 found that residents aged 15 to 17 and Māori, Pacific peoples and Asian New Zealanders are more likely than others across Auckland to engage with the arts, to feel that taking part in the arts supports their identity, and to feel that the arts are important to their personal wellbeing.

25.     Mount Wellington’s young, growing, largely Asian, Pacific and Māori population is likely to create additional demand for arts and culture spaces. However, social research does not point to any evidence of unmet demand.

Community facility stocktake

26.     Residents in the study area can access community services through existing community spaces in Mount Wellington as well as those within driving distance in adjacent areas.

27.     Figure 2. Identified community facilities providing services to Mount Wellington residentsFigure 2 summarises the facilities providing community services to Mount Wellington residents. A full list of facilities and mapping of their locations and catchments is included in Attachment A.

Gap Analysis

28.     The Community Facilities Network Plan details provision guidelines as well as provision approach for different types of spaces. They are summarised in Table 1.

Table 1: Provision guidelines to support gap identification

Community space

Provision guideline

Arts and culture spaces

Based on evidence of sustained community demand.

Community space

Within 15-minute walk from local or town centres (‘small’ facility less than 600m2) or within a 15-minute drive (‘large’ facility over 600m2).

Library space

41m2/1000 population in the local catchment; maximum distance of 30 minutes’ travel.

Venues for hire

Within 15-minute walk from local or town centres.

Aquatic and leisure space

Local facilities service a catchment of five kilometres

·     Local pools target a population threshold of 35,000-50,000

·     Local leisure centres target a population threshold of 18,000-40,000

Destination facilities service a catchment of ten kilometres and a 30-minute drive

Regional facilities respond to clear evidence of demand or a catchment of ten kilometres and a 30-minute drive.

29.     Community provision was assessed against the provision guidelines in the Community Facilities Network Plan, using findings from the demographic profile, the social research and the stocktake of existing facilities, to assess potential gap and duplication now and in the future.

30.     Table 2 summarises the key findings from the gap analysis.

Table 2: Key findings from the gap analysis

Arts and culture spaces provision

·          There is no dedicated arts and culture space in the study area.

·          Mount Wellington residents have access to arts and culture services at seven spaces within driving distance: Metro Theatre, Otara Music Arts Centre, Howick Little Theatre, Howick Historical Village, Te Oro, Te Tuhi, and Panmure Stone Cottage.

·          There are no current gaps in provision: the summary of social research found no evidence of unmet demand for arts and culture spaces.

·          Research found that Māori, Asian and Pacific peoples and young people are most likely to engage with the arts. Mount Wellington’s young, growing, largely Asian, Pacific and Māori population is likely to create additional demand for arts and culture spaces in the future.

·          While there are no anticipated future gaps for arts and culture spaces for Mount Wellington residents, demand for arts and culture services should be monitored.

·          Action 88 of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan 2022, “regional arts and culture services needs assessment”, aims to assess this demand into the future.

Community spaces provision

·          There is a small community centre in the study area: Taha Awa Riverside Community Centre is located within fifteen minutes’ walk of the Panama Road Centre.

·          Mount Wellington residents also have access to four large community centres within fifteen minutes’ driving distance: Dunkirk Road Activity Centre, Oranga Community Centre, Ellerslie War Memorial Community Hall and Ōtāhuhu Community Hall.

·          There are no current gaps in provision.

·          To maintain the current level of provision, Dunkirk Road Activity Centre’s poor condition should be addressed. A renewal project is under way.

·          There are no anticipated future gaps for community spaces for Mount Wellington residents. Existing provision is expected to cater for additional demand.

Library spaces provision

·          There is no dedicated library space in the study area.

·          Mount Wellington residents have access to library services at six libraries within ten minutes’ driving distance: Panmure Library, Glen Innes Library, Pakuranga Library, Toia Ōtāhuhu Library, Onehunga Library and Remuera Library.

·          There are no current gaps in provision: all six libraries fall below the provision guideline of 41m2 of library space per 1,000 population in the local catchment in 2023.

·          There are no anticipated future gaps for library spaces for Mount Wellington residents.

·          Glen Innes Library is likely to exceed capacity between 2031 and 2041, with the population of the local catchment exceeding the provision guidelines’ ratio. However, demand for library services is changing with digital access becoming more popular. It is unclear how library demand will evolve moving forward.

 

Venue for hire provision

·    Mount Wellington residents have access to six non-council owned venues for hire within the study area: Bill McKinlay Clubrooms, Ōtāhuhu Leopards Clubroom, Northern Sports Car Club Hall, Stanhope Road School Hall, Panama Road School Hall and Mount Wellington Community Church.

·    Mount Wellington residents also have access to venue for hire spaces at eight council owned venue for hire facilities within ten minutes’ driving distance: Thomas Clements Senior Citizens Hall, Pakuranga Community Hall, Tahapa Crescent Hall, Panmure Community Hall, Jack Dickey Community Centre, Fergusson Hall, Leicester Community Hall and Ellerslie War Memorial Hall, as well as venue for hire spaces offered by Taha Awa – Riverside Community Centre.

·    There are no current gaps in provision of venue for hire spaces. Both local centres within Mount Wellington are within a 15-minute walk of a venue for hire:

Mount Wellington local centre is within a 15-minute walk of Mount Wellington Community Church

Panama Road local centre is within a 15-minute walk of Panama Road School Hall.

·    There are no anticipated future gaps for venue for hire spaces for Mount Wellington residents.

Aquatic spaces provision

·          Mt Wellington residents have access aquatic services at the Lagoon Pool and Leisure Centre within the study area.

·          Mount Wellington residents also have access to aquatic services at three aquatic centres within driving distance: Onehunga War Memorial Pool and Leisure Centre, Toia Ōtāhuhu Pool and Leisure Centre and Glen Innes Pool and Leisure Centre.

·          There are no current gaps in provision of aquatic spaces.

·          There are no anticipated future gaps for aquatic spaces for Mount Wellington residents based on available information.

·          Auckland Council is currently reviewing provision guidelines for aquatic services as part of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan action 13, “a regional review of Auckland’s aquatic network”. This work will provide further clarity as to network requirements.

Leisure spaces provision

·          Mount Wellington residents have access to leisure services at the Lagoon Pool and Leisure Centre within the study area.

·          Mount Wellington residents also have access to leisure services at six leisure centres within driving distance: Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre, Ellerslie Leisure Centre, and Pakuranga Leisure Centre as well as Onehunga War Memorial Pool and Leisure Centre, Toia Ōtāhuhu Pool and Leisure Centre and Glen Innes Pool and Leisure Centre.

·          There are no current gaps in provision of leisure spaces.

·          There are no anticipated future gaps for leisure spaces for Mount Wellington residents.

 

Recommended next steps

31.     The assessment of community provision against adopted provision guidelines in the Community Facilities Network Plan has found no current or projected gaps in the future in Mount Wellington.

32.     To ensure residents have continued access to services in the future, staff recommend that:

·    demand for arts and culture services in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area is monitored. This will be considered through action 88 of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan 2022, “regional arts and culture services needs assessment”

·    the renewal project at Dunkirk Road Activity Centre is progressed to address condition issues

33.     The community provision investigation for Tāmaki (Action 154 of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan) will provide recommendations to address the anticipated capacity issues at Glen Innes Library.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Staff presented the key findings of the community profile, social research summary, and facilities stocktake at a workshop with Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board in September 2022.

35.     Local board members provided feedback on the facility stocktake, which resulted in the Mount Wellington Community Church has been added to the list of non-council owned facilities.

36.     A second workshop was held with Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board in July 2023 to present the key findings of the gap analysis.

37.     Local board members expressed concern about the lack of facilities in the study area and the expectation that Mt Wellington residents have to travel to facilities in adjacent areas.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Māori make up 11 per cent of the population of the Mount Wellington study area, similar to Auckland as a whole.

39.     Compared to other demographic groups, Māori make high use of arts and culture and aquatic services.

40.     Arts and culture services can be accessed through seven facilities within driving distance of Mount Wellington. Social research has not pointed to any evidence of unmet demand, but staff have recommended monitoring demand for arts and culture facilities going forward. Ensuring continued access to services will be important to the Māori community.

41.     Mount Wellington residents have sufficient access to aquatic services, and further clarity as to network requirements will be provided as part of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan 2022 action 13, “a regional review of Auckland’s aquatic network”.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     There are no financial implications associated with this report. The renewal of Dunkirk Road Community Centre is funded through existing budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     This community provision investigation is based on Auckland Council’s latest population projections, which estimate that the study area will be home to more than 58,000 residents by 2051. There is a risk that the rate of growth may differ from projections.

44.     To mitigate this risk, staff will monitor population growth for the study area as new population information becomes available.

IF

THEN

MITIGATION

The actual population growth differs from the modelled growth.

The provision analysis based on the population threshold will be impacted.

The findings and recommendations may not accurately reflect the needs of the study area population.

This and future provision assessments at the local and regional level will continue to use the most up-to-date population projections to ensure that their findings and recommendations remain current.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     The findings of the investigation will be reported to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee as part of the monitoring report for the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mount Wellington Community Facility Provision Investigation Technical Report

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Harry Vossen - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)

File No.: CP2023/15035

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with an update on the Joint Council-controlled Organisation (CCO) Engagement Plans, CCO work programme (Jul-Sep 2023), and expected milestones in its area for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were adopted in June 2022. These plans record CCO responsibilities and local board commitments with Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare.

3.       CCOs provide local boards with the CCO work programme in their area. Each work programme item lists the engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

4.       The engagement plans expired in June 2023 and have not been updated since June 2022. Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts on CCOs delayed a review starting in the first half of 2023.

5.       A current review of the plans is not recommended due to disruptions and unknowns from:

·    Water Services Reform Programme

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer having dedicated staff to support local boards

·    Auckland Transport rolling out a new local board relationship programme

·    reviewing the CCO Accountability Policy through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

6.       This report does not include work programme updates from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited or Auckland Transport.

7.       Auckland Transport will provide their work programme updates through Forward Work Programme briefing packs coming to November 2023 local board workshops.

8.       This report provides an update on Eke Panuku and Watercare work programme items from July to September 2023 and the engagement approach and anticipated milestones for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

9.       The next CCO quarterly report will be provided in February 2024.  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the council-controlled organisation update on engagement plans, the work programme (Jul-Sep 2023) and anticipated milestones and engagement approaches for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023).

 

Horopaki

Context

What are CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans?

10.     The 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations recommended that CCOs and local boards adopt an engagement plan to:

·    help cement CCO and local board relations

·    agree on a common understanding of accountability between CCOs and local boards

·    coordinate CCO actions better at the local level.

11.     These plans record the commitment between Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Watercare and the local boards to work together.

12.     Each local board adopted their 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans in June 2022. These plans include CCO responsibilities and local board commitments.

CCO work programme items

13.     CCOs provide local boards with a work programme that lists the different CCO projects happening in the local board area.

14.     The work programme is not a full list of projects in the local board area. It includes work programme items for engagement purposes.

15.     Each work programme item records an engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

16.     The engagement approach is based on the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) standards which are provided in Table 1 below. Note that the “involve” and “empower” categories are not included in the CCO reporting as decided when the joint engagement plans were adopted.

Table 1: International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Engagement Approach Levels

CCO engagement approach

Commitment to local boards

Inform

CCOs will keep local boards informed.

Consult

CCOs will keep local boards informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and aspirations, and provide feedback on how local board input influenced the decision. CCOs will seek local board feedback on drafts and proposals.

Collaborate

CCOs will work together with local boards to formulate solutions and incorporate their advice and recommendations into the decisions to the maximum extent possible.

 

CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans have expired

17.     The CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans expired in June 2023. The plans have not been updated since June 2022.

18.     The plans were not updated in the first half of 2023 due to disruptions to CCOs caused from Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts.  

19.     A current review of the Joint CCO Engagement Plans is not recommended since:

·    the Water Services Reform Programme may replace Watercare with a new water entity

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer has dedicated support staff to support local board engagement and liaison following Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts

·    Auckland Transport is currently rolling out work which future engagement plans would need to consider, such as:

Forward Works Programme (full list of Auckland Transport projects in the local board area)

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

Regional Land Transport Plan

Local Board Transport Plans

·    the CCO Accountability Policy will be updated as part of the next Long-term Plan which the CCO engagement plans would need to align. 

What are the next steps?

20.     The CCO quarterly reporting will continue to provide work programme updates from Watercare and Eke Panuku.

21.     Local board staff will:

·    work with Auckland Transport on providing clarity on local transport plans and how the transport plans would either replace or integrate with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    liaise with Tātaki Auckland Unlimited on what engagement and reporting resource they are able to provide to local boards following their restructure

·    investigate what engagement requirements and role the new water entity will have with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    provide support to local boards on advocating for any changes wanted to the CCO Accountability Policy through developing the next Long-term Plan. 

22.     Auckland Transport will provide updates on their work programme through the Forward Works Programme workshops starting in November 2023. 

23.     Local boards received the last update to the CCO work programme and engagement approach in July 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     The following sections provide an update on work programme items for Eke Panuku and Watercare. 

25.     More detailed updates to the CCO work programme are provided in Attachments A-B.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

26.     There are no changes to engagement levels to report.

27.     Eke Panuku’s work programme items are provided in Attachment A.

Watercare

28.     There are no changes to engagement levels to report.

29.     Watercare’s work programme items are provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     This report does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

31.     Each CCO must work within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework. Information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Local boards advise CCOs of issues or projects of significance, communicate the interests and preferences of their communities and allow for flexibility in terms of engagement, recognising differing levels of interest.

33.     The work programme items are shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     This report on the CCO work programme items provides the communication of up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     This report does not have a direct impact on Māori, however the projects it refers to will.

36.     Local boards and CCOs provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to their decision-making processes. These opportunities will be worked on a project or programme basis. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     This report does not have financial impacts on local boards.

38.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Some local boards expressed concern over the quality of CCO work programme reporting in April and July 2023, in particular with Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport is currently working on a relationship project which has objectives to deliver:

·    an enhanced process to develop transport plans that reflect local board input and priorities

·    more consistent and timely reporting, updates and analysis on local projects and issues

·    improved support for communication and engagement with local communities.

40.     Auckland Transport will be presenting Forward Work Programme briefing packs to local boards at November 2023 workshops which will address their CCO quarterly updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The local board will receive the next CCO work programme report in February 2024 which will include an update on projects from Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023) and expected milestones for work in Quarter Three (Jan-Mar 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A – Eke Panuku Development Auckland work programme update

 

b

Attachment B – Watercare work programme update

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Approval for a new public road name at 13 Pirangi Street, Point England

File No.: CP2023/15180

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Maungakiekie -Tamaki Local Board to name a new public road created by way of a subdivision development at 13 Pirangi Street, Point England.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       The developer and applicant, Tāmaki Regeneration Limited has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new public road at 13 Pirangi Street, Point England are:

·    Te Kahu Hone Ngapera Lane (applicant’s preference)

·    Pawhau Lane (alternative)

·    Hita Lane (alternative)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approves the name Te Kahu Hone Ngapera Lane for a new public road created by way of subdivision undertaken by Tāmaki Regeneration Limited at 13 Pirangi Street in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90110462, resource consent references SUB60389254).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference SUB60389254 was approved on 19 October 2022 for the creation of three new lots, including one residential lot, one road to be vested to Council and one pedestrian accessway. The subdivision is part of a comprehensive subdivision and development named, the Pirangi Development.

7.       Location and Site plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B.

8.       In accordance with the standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       In this development, the new road requires a name because it will be vested to Council as public road, which would be serving additional lots in the future. This can be seen in Attachment B, where the road that requires a name is highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.     The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·    a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·    a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·    an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The proposed road names are to commemorate people who used to live in the area.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Te Kahu Hone Ngapera Lane

(applicant’s preference)

Te Kahu Hone Ngapera also known as Gus Ngapera was born in Hokianga. Gus and younger brother Pimo ran away from Hokianga and were placed in an orphanage in Auckland from the age of 8 to 14 years old.

At the age of 15 Gus lied about is age to enlist in the army as many did back then.

He met his wife Lillian Castle who was of Ngati Paoa descent. They both served in 28th Māori battalion in World War 2. When they returned home to New Zealand, they resided at 19 Bagnall Ave, Pt England where he brought up his whanau. Gus and Lillian had 6 children Richard, John, Evelyn, Tom, Irene and Maria.

Throughout the years Gus and Lillian took many whanau and friends into their home especially those who returned home from war, their son Tom Ngapera last residing member of his whanau recalls a time, hearing screams of men in their rooms at night reliving experiences and trauma from serving. A similar story echoed from other whanau in our community.

The Ngapera whanau are 11 generation residents of Tāmaki and proud of their tupuna. Te Kahu Ngapera Lane.

Pawhau Lane

(alternative)

Father and son Andrew and Paul Pawhau are described as pillars of the sporting community.

Andrew Pawhau is well known for being instrumental to the growth of Tāmaki Rugby, Tāmaki Touch, and Mt Wellington League, as well as the creation of touch competitions at Tāmaki Grounds from the 1980s well into the 2000s. Locals report that Pawhau family members have long been talented sportspeople.

Andrew passed away in 2018 and Paul passed away in 2022, family and friends would like to see a street named in memory of and in celebration of the ties the Pawhau whānau have to the Panmure community. 

The Pawhau whānau has lived in Tamaki since the 1930s; grandmother moved into the area with 6 children in the 1930s and long-lived at Hay Rd, Panmure, at the height of the urban drift from rural Mangamuka in the north to the city.

Hita Lane

(alternative)

The Hita whānau have been a core part of the Tāmaki-Glen Innes community since the 1960s. Especially Ma (Joan) Hita who led community groups, including Manuwai Ice Hockey for young Māori, a team that is still active today and has played around the world.

Also, Raewynne Hita who is a core member of the kaumatua kuia group of Ruapotaka Marae and is an active member of civil society, from the Ratana Haahi to sitting on several educational boards of trustees, Raewynne is also still the treasurer for the Island Child Charitable Trust.

(Submission received from Facebook)

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location. LINZ has also recommended the applicant to propose a shorter name for the road because generally the length of a road name should be shorter especially where the road itself is short. The applicant has decided to still propose ‘Te Kahu Hone Ngapera Lane’ as the preferred name, noting that the length of the names is in accordance with the guidelines, being less than 25 characters.

15.     Road Type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new road, suiting the form and layout of the road.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

17.     The applicant has consulted with the community via Facebook. obtained consent from the Ngapera whanau and Pawhau whānau but not from the Hita whānau.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     The applicant consulted with mana whenua in April 2023. Waikato-Tainui, Ngāti Manuhiri and Te Uri o Hau have advised that they defer to local iwi. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei has advised that they defer to Ngāti Paoa. While no further response has been received, it cannot be construed that a lack of response is indicative of acceptance of the names proposed. At the same time, Tāmaki Regeneration Limited has an extensive history of working closely with mana whenua and the proposed names have a close relationship with the history of the area.

23.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and it remains for the local board to determine the suitability of the names in this instance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

25.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Report Attachment A Location Map

 

b

Report Attachment B Site Plan

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amy Cao - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

File No.: CP2023/14611

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform local board members of the Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation and invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parliament’s Environment Committee has opened an Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, with submissions due on 1 November 2023.

3.       This inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.  The Ministry for the Environment has developed an Issues and Options paper to assist the Inquiry (refer Appendix A).

4.       The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

5.       Auckland Council staff are preparing a submission for the inquiry, led by the Chief Sustainability Office.  However, the tight timeframe means that we are proposing a delegated sub-group of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee will approve the submission after the draft submission has been circulated to elected members for comments.

6.       Local boards are invited to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback for inclusion into Auckland Council’s submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       On 25 August 2023, the Environment Committee opened its Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. The inquiry is open for public submissions until 1 November 2023.

8.       The inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.

9.       For the purposes of its inquiry, the Environment Committee is particularly interested in:

·    The current approach to community-led retreat and adaptation funding, its strengths, risks and costs

·    Lessons learned from severe weather events and natural disasters in Aotearoa New Zealand for community-led retreat and funding climate adaptation

·    Effective mechanisms for community-led decision making

·    The role of the private sector in managing climate risk

·    Potential institutional arrangements, including roles and responsibilities of central and local government agencies, iwi and hapū

·    Māori participation, Crown obligations, and how to best give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi, and integrate matauranga Māori and te ao Māori across the adaptation system

·    Alignment and integration with existing legislation and regulatory framework, including the reformed resource management system and any changes needed to regulatory powers and potential economic or other incentives needed to support adaptation actions (both before and after extreme events)

·    Funding sources, access to them and principles and criteria for cost sharing

·    Targets or indicators for assessing progress to more resilient communities and infrastructure.

10.     The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Ministry for the Environment released a paper to inform and support submissions titled ‘Community-led retreat and adaptation funding: issues and options’

12.     A template is attached for local board feedback (refer Attachment A).

13.     The table below sets out the key timeframes for local board input on the submission:

Date

Action

2 October 2023

Briefing for local board members

5 October 2023

Report to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee (for delegation)

6 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be considered for incorporation into the submission

20 October 2023

Draft submission shared with local boards

27 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission

1 November 2023

Closing date for submissions

2 November 2023

Copy of final council submission circulated to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee members, local board members and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     One of the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan is “to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway”.

15.     Under our current emissions pathway, Auckland will continue to experience ongoing sea-level rise, coastal inundation and erosion, and more frequent and severe weather events like those Aucklanders experienced in early 2023.

16.     Globally there needs to be urgent and rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

17.     However, regardless of the global trajectory in emissions, Auckland and New Zealand need to adapt to the impacts of climate change that are already happening and are likely to continue.

18.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will likely inform the development of national legislation which will have implications for how Auckland Council undertakes adaptation.

19.     This submission contributes to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan through action B1 (Ensure our approach to planning and growth aligns with low carbon, resilient outcomes), sub-action 8 (Collaborate to ensure climate change mitigation and adaptation is a priority in national planning legislation).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The development of the proposed Climate Adaptation Bill is likely to be informed by the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. This legislation will have significant impacts across the Auckland Council group.

21.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

22.     Learnings from the 2023 severe weather events will be incorporated into the submission by the Recovery Office and Auckland Emergency Management as they are deemed relevant to climate adaptation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Local authorities will play a key role in implementation in climate adaptation, as they:

·    are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·    have a responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience,

·    enhance community resilience through public education, infrastructure provision and land use planning processes.

24.     Local board views are being sought on the Parliamentary Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, which is considering options for community-led retreat and adaptation funding and will be appended to council’s final submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     There are implications for Māori within a potential future climate adaptation system.

26.     Central government are engaging directly with Māori regarding climate adaptation.

27.     A communication on the Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation has been sent to all iwi entities and their feedback sought. IMSB secretariat staff will work with the council’s technical team throughout the development of the submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The submission will be developed within existing resources.

29.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will be considering funding sources for climate adaptation, as well as the role of local government.

30.     There are potentially significant financial implications for local government within a future climate adaptation system. Council’s submission provides an opportunity to state our position on how funding of climate adaptation should operate in the future.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Financial and legal expertise will be sought in the development of the submission to identify possible financial, legal and reputational risks to the council associated with climate change adaptation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Given the tight timeframes provided to us by the Government, we will be requesting a delegated sub-group to finally approve the council submission by 1 November 2023.

33.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

34.     Please note that due to tight timeframes this may not align with scheduled local board business meetings and any inputs from local boards may need to either be delegated or utilise the urgent decision process.

35.     Local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission is due by 6 October 2023.

36.     Local board feedback to be appended to the council’s submission is due by 27 October 2023.

37.     Once local board feedback has been formalised (either by urgent decision or delegated authority), Local Board Services staff will email this feedback to be incorporated in or appended to council’s submission.

38.     Once the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation are released in 2024, staff will provide local boards with a memo summarising the conclusions.

39.     Any queries can be directed to Petra Pearce, Petra.Pearce@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Template for submission points on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Petra Pearce – Lead Climate Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Lauren Simpson -Chief Sustainability Officer

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2023/14618

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa/ governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

24 October 2023 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Business Meeting: Item 26 - Governance Forward Work Calendar, document

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 October 2023

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2023/14619

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 26 September, 3 and 10 October.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on 26 September, 3 and 10 October.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

24 October 2023 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Business Meeting: Item 27 - Record of Workshops, document

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 



[1] Local Government New Zealand and Department of Conservation (n.d), Reserves Act Guide, retrieved from https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/about-doc/role/legislation/reserves-act-guide.pdf