I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 25 October 2023

1.00pm

Waiheke Local Board office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Bianca Ranson

 

Members

Kylee Matthews

 

 

Robin Tucker

 

 

Paul Walden

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Lorraine Gropper

Democracy Advisor

 

19 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 027 218 6903

Email: lorraine.gropper@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      5

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              6

11        Chairperson's report                                                                                                     7

12        Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan                         17

13        AT Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                                   33

14        Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                    39

15        Adoption of the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023                                                    45

16        Update on Waiheke Local Board area emergency response planning                 89

17        Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025                                                                                                                    107

18        Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation              119

19        Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)      133

20        Waiheke Local Board - Resource Consent Applications - October 2023           141

21        Waiheke Local Board - Workshop record - October 2023                                    147

22        Waiheke Local Board - Hōtaka Kaupapa Policy Schedule - October 2023         155

23        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The meeting is opened with a karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 27 September 2023 as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

Requests for public forum will be considered at the meeting.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2023/15821

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive Chairperson, Cath Handley’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair's report - October 2023

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan

File No.: CP2023/14733

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031 and to provide information received from public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) is seeking feedback from local boards on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP). In particular, AT is seeking feedback on the service improvements proposed for the local board’s area.

3.       The RPTP is the main plan for public transport services in Auckland. It also includes a vision, goals, policies, and targets that relate to the planning and delivery of the public transportation system.

4.       AT will use the local board’s formal views, along with feedback received via public consultation, to finalise the plan. The AT Board is expected to adopt the final plan in November 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to Auckland Transport on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031, in line with the template provided in Attachment A.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Regional Public Transport Plan is Auckland’s main plan for public transport (PT) services. It outlines how PT will be managed and improved over the next eight years, with a detailed focus on the first three years. This includes the services that will operate during this period (and how they will change) and the goals, policies and actions that will shape PT.

6.       The purpose of the RPTP is to enable consultation with the public and PT operators on the planning of PT services. This is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act 2003.

7.       Public consultation on the draft RPTP ran from 17 July to 17 August 2023, and AT received over 3,200 responses. This compares well to the 462 responses the previous (2018) RPTP received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Public feedback was generally very supportive of the content of the draft RPTP. This includes:

·    strong support for the plan’s vision and goals

·    support for the action areas within the plan

·    support for most proposed service improvements (with the main exception of the removals of ferry services to Gulf Harbour and Northcote Point).

9.       Feedback that was not supportive of the content of the draft RPTP included:

·    wanting further improvement and/or faster delivery

·    concerns that PT is too expensive or does not provide value for money

·    comments that a greater percentage of the cost of operating PT should come from users (via fares).

10.     The RPTP includes AT’s aspirations to do more in further improvements and faster delivery if and when more funding for PT becomes available.

11.     AT has provided a breakdown of the top areas submitters from each local board commented to assist the board in providing feedback (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Public transport has a key role to play in helping to reduce emissions, as set out in Auckland Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP). The RPTP acknowledges the ambitious targets the TERP has for increased PT usage, and the actions and improvements included in the RPTP will play an important role in making progress towards those targets.

13.     One of the RPTP’s goals is ‘enhancing the environment and tackling the climate emergency’. This goal guides efforts of transition to a low-emission PT system, encouraging mode shift, and adapting infrastructure to a changing climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Auckland Council’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee endorsed the overall strategic direction for the draft RPTP in April 2023. This included the vision and goals for the plan, and a ‘balanced’ approach to service improvements.

15.     Following public consultation closing, AT also engaged with the council’s advisory panels to get specific feedback about aspects of the plan relevant to the panels’ expertise.

16.     AT has also worked with Auckland Council and Eke Panuku staff to ensure, where possible, the draft RPTP is aligned with other strategic plans and projects across the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     AT held a range of public information events across the region at libraries, community centres, bus and train stations. AT also held two on-line drop-in sessions. Across all of these events, AT had hundreds of conversations with the public which will also be used to inform changes to the plan. In addition, some members of the public called AT to ask questions and seek clarification on content in the plan.

18.     Public feedback was generally supportive of the vision and goals in the draft RPTP and requested additional service improvements (beyond what AT is currently funded to deliver).

19.     Proposed service improvements in the draft RPTP in the local board’s area were set out in a memo from AT, dated 12 July 2023.

20.     AT set out the feedback received from residents of the local board’s area in a memo and supporting material (Attachment B and Attachment C) provided for a workshop on the draft RPTP held 4 October 2023.

21.     Workshops to date have been positive, with most local boards supporting AT’s proposals for service improvements and initiatives to reduce the cost of public transport to users (such as the proposed weekly fare cap and extended transfer window).

22.     Some local boards have also requested more information around the use of existing services and expressed an interest in exploring the potential for on-demand AT Local services to operate in their area.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     AT has held multiple hui with mana whenua as part of the development of the RPTP and will be making changes to the draft RPTP based on their feedback.

24.     The draft RPTP includes a Māori outcomes section (part 3.7), which outlines key areas of concern to mana whenua and mataawaka and where more detail can be found in the plan.

25.     AT intends to revise part 3.7, and other relevant parts of the RPTP, to reflect feedback received from Māori (both mana whenua and mataawaka).

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications of providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

27.     The RPTP is required to be a realistically fundable plan, and AT’s budget for additional services is constrained (and fully allocated to the service improvements proposed in the draft RPTP).

28.     Any feedback provided regarding service level improvements should take into account AT’s financial constraints, and the trade-offs that may be required to implement them (for example, increasing services on one route is likely to require reductions on another route).

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no risks associated with providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     AT will use the feedback provided by the local board, along with feedback received from the public and other stakeholders, to finalise the draft RPTP.

31.     The AT Board will consider adopting the revised RPTP at their 29 November 2023 meeting.

32.     If adopted, the final RPTP will be publicly released in early December 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

RPTP feedback template for local boards

21

b

Waiheke Local Board area snapshot

25

c

Waiheke Local Board memo

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Luke Elliot - Principal Planner - Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

AT Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2023/15672

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Waiheke Local Board of the reduction to its local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) for the 2022-2025 political term.

2.       The confirmed budget for Waiheke Local Board is now $816,000, which includes the additional approved budget of $226,000 to cover current contractual commitments. This replaces the indicative budget of $901,000 discussed in the June 2023 Auckland Transport workshop.

3.       This report confirms the projects the local board will deliver with its reduced budget and sets a priority order for currently unfunded but authorised LBTCF projects, setting local board expectation should any further budget become available.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) manages the Local Board Transport Capital Fund on behalf of the Waiheke Local Board.  AT provides quality advice to support local board decision-making. A decision relating to the allocation of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund is being sought.

5.       The confirmed budget for the Waiheke Local Board this political term is $816,000. This differs from the indicative amount discussed with the local board in the June 2023 workshop.

6.       The reduction in the LBTCF reflects the pressure AT and its funding partners are under due to flood recovery work following the severe weather events in early 2023, inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

7.       In this report, Auckland Transport recommends that the Waiheke Local Board allocate $589,789 to continue with the staged design and construction of the 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce Road Roundabout Cycle Infrastructure project.

8.       The local board is asked to note that additional approved budget of $226,391 has been allocated to this project to partially fund the design and construction of the project under contractual commitments.

9.       If other budget becomes available in the 2022-2025 political term, the local board confirms its priorities as a contribution.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      allocate the Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2025 as follows:

i)        Approve the allocation of $589,789 to continue with the staged design and construction of the cycle infrastructure project - 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce Road Roundabout.

ii)       Confirms if further funds become available this term, that its priority is to continue to invest in the delivery of the 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce Road Roundabout Cycle Infrastructure project.

b)      Notes that $226,391 additional budget has been approved to cover current contractual commitments.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The LBTCF is an AT fund established in 2012 to allow local boards to deliver small projects in their local area that would not normally be prioritised by Auckland Transport. In 2014, the LBTCF budget was set at $20 million spread across all local boards and distributed based on Auckland Council’s Local Board Funding Policy.  Since 2020, when COVID 19 lockdowns impacted on Auckland Council’s revenue the LBTCF has been reduced. Specifically, to $15 million per annum across all local boards in the most recent Regional Land Transport Plan of which Waiheke’s share was $901,000.

11.     Due to further budget reductions, Waiheke Local Board’s new allocation of LBTCF for the 2022–2025 political term is $816,000, which includes the additional budget to cover contractual commitments.

12.     Therefore, the local board must now review the programme of work that was planned and reduce it to match the new budget. The local board’s role is to review the work programme supported by AT’s quality advice, consider options, and then decide about re-prioritisation. This report confirms the new programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Auckland Transport has held four workshops with the Waiheke Local Board in 2023 to discuss the LBTCF and its allocation.

·      LBTCF Workshop One on 08 March provided an update to the board members on the progress of the local board project 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce Road Roundabout Cycle Infrastructure project, and advised further funding would be required for the project.

·      LBTCF Workshop Two on 14 June reported back on the $901,000 indicative budget for the new term and presented two draft options with estimated costs of each to complete the project. The local board requested a further workshop to discuss these options in more detail.

·      A project workshop held on 19 July presented maps to the board members depicting the two project draft design options. The members provided feedback on these and requested practical options for review and items to be considered for inclusion in the design.

·      LBTCF Workshop Three on 11 October confirmed the budget for the new term as $816,000 which was less than the figure anticipated in Workshop Two. The reduction in budget reflects the pressures on AT and our funding partners following the devastating floods of early 2023 and the roading repair bill, the reduction in AT’s overall budget as required by Auckland Council, plus inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

14.     At LBTCF Workshop Three, AT’s advice to the local board was to continue to progress the 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce roundabout cycle infrastructure project including developing options for the staging of construction with a view to getting at least one stage of the project delivered this political term with the available budget.

15.     The local board confirmed at the workshop that its preference was to continue the cycling project in a staged approach rather than to choose a less costly project. If further budget becomes available in this political term, the board direction was that this should be invested in the cycling project.

16.     This project supports Waiheke Local Board’s Pathways Plan which aims to make it safe and easy for people to walk and cycle around the island. It supports mode change and works towards reducing traffic movements and giving people more choice on how they move around Waiheke.

Projects identified for LBTCF in 2022–2025 Political Term

Project

Description

Funding required to complete the project

Waiheke Cycle project – 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce roundabout (cost estimate for whole project $1.44-2m)

 

Two options for the project were presented at the workshop.

With the budget available, AT will work with the local board to stage the project in order to deliver safety improvements to benefit people on bikes.

 

$1.4 - $2 million depending on options selected

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency and has developed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

18.     AT therefore urges the Waiheke Local Board to consider prioritisation of projects that help reduce carbon emissions.

19.     The proposed project will encourage safer cycling and therefore will contribute to reducing carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Any engagement required with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual-project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Waiheke Local Board discussed this programme of work at four workshops with AT in 2023.  This report reflects the views of the local board as expressed in the workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The actions being considered do not have specific impacts on Māori.  Both AT and council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the AT website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about.

23.     Any AT project that requires consultation with iwi will include that activity within its project plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report requires consideration of a significant financial commitment of up to $816,000 by the Waiheke Local Board.

25.     It is noted that to deliver the whole project more funding is needed therefore a staged approach to delivery is necessary. AT will look to see if funding for completion of a further stage can be sourced within its departments.

26.     The costs calculated in this report are based on estimates and it is possible that cost of any project may be under or over the estimations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There is a risk that this project may cost more than is budgeted in this report, but equally the project may reduce in scope after further investigation work is carried out. 

28.     As resources and budgets are constrained, delaying decision making means that there is less time for planning for the investigation, design, and subsequent delivery of this project. Timely decision making will provide the best opportunity for this project to be delivered in the current political term.

29.     Finally, future budgets are not confirmed meaning that there may be sudden changes to the programme next year after Auckland Council sets budgets through the Long-Term Plan process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     AT will take note of the local board’s confirmed project and continue to work towards a staged approach. We will collaborate with the local board to identify and prioritise the stage that is most in need of an early delivery.

31.     Throughout the process, AT will keep the local board updated and when a decision is required, a report will be made to a public meeting so the members can consider it and decide on next steps.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorna Stewart - Elected Member Relationship Partner - Auckland Transport

Authorisers

John Gillespie - Head of Stakeholder and Elected Member Relationships - Auckland Transport

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager

 

Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/14955

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with a summary of public consultation feedback, respond to previous queries and seek formal resolutions supporting the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (AT) have adopted a Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. AT is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       A speed management plan for the Auckland region is a government requirement and will set safe and appropriate speed limits to reduce road deaths and serious injuries. Katoa, Ka Ora is the name of this plan, and it is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all.

5.       AT workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora with local boards in February and March 2023, and local boards provided formal feedback about the proposal in March and April 2023, specifically the five development approaches within the speed management plan.

6.       Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023.

7.       AT has analysed and summarised the consultation feedback received and provided responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora. This information is provided as a series of attachments to this report for local board members to review.

8.       Further, the report seeks local board support for the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes within its area.

9.       Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the summary of public consultation feedback received on the proposed Katoa, Ka Ora speed limit changes (Attachment D) 

b)      note AT’s responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora (Attachment A) 

c)      note AT’s legal obligations under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (Rule) and that the Rule requires best efforts to complete safe and appropriate speed limit setting near schools by 2027 

d)      note that since June 2020, when the programme started, road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed  

e)      support the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes identified for this local board area (Attachment C and Attachment E) 

f)       support speed limit review of additional locations requested in public consultation feedback and recommended for the next future consultation in Attachment C. 

Horopaki

Context

10.     AT is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use. 

Alignment with Central Government policy

11.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy.  The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to school.

12.     The strategy’s action plan includes the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires road controlling authorities to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

13.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications; category one and category two. Most Auckland schools are classified as category one, or schools where children may be out and about outside the school gate. To comply with the Rule, speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) are required in the area outside of the school. Category two schools are where children are more likely to be picked up or dropped off within the school grounds.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency).

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent, easy-to-understand changes that communities can understand. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

Auckland Transport’s role

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury. So, after receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board, the safe speeds programme has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland reducing speed limits on many roads.

18.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes, the programme focuses on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation. The phases can be summarised as follows:

a)   Phase One covered approximately 11 per cent of the local road network and focused on the highest risk roads.

b)   Phase Two covered approximately 8 per cent of the network and had a significant focus on safe speeds for rural roads and roads near schools.

c)   Phase Three covered approximately 19 per cent of the network and included roads around schools, rural roads, town centre roads, rural marae and roads requested by the community.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on safety around schools so AT directly surveyed all schools with proposed speed limit changes in late-2022 and early 2023. The summary results of the local schools survey was shared with each local board as part of the February/March 2023 workshop follow-up.

22.     Information about the iterative engagement process used to develop Katoa, Ka Ora was shared with local boards in two rounds of workshops held in February/March 2022 and in February/March 2023.

23.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on. Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. 7801 pieces of feedback were received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Katoa, Ka Ora has been consulted on with the public and with local boards. This report updates local boards on:

a)   The results of the public consultation conducted from 24 July to 28 August 2023 in each local board area, including AT’s responses to the changes requested by members of the public.

b)   AT’s response to the local board feedback provided in April 2023, including AT’s responses to changes requested by members of the public.

25.     This information is included in attachments to this report and AT’s overall considerations for this local board area are summarised in a two-page summary infographic (Attachment B).

26.     Additionally, the full consultation report will be published on the AT website by early November 2023.

27.     The attachments provide a clear summary of what people in this local board area said about the programme so local board members are aware of community sentiment as they consider AT’s technical advice.

Technical advice

28.     AT’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system; the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. This includes finalising a speed management plan within legal timeframes and setting safe speed limits near all schools by 2027. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by 2027, we are proposing to include a review of permanent speed limits near all remaining schools in a future consultation.

30.     Further, the impact of speed reduction on the number of DSI is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

a)   Since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.

b)   In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a 9 per cent increase in road deaths.

31.     30km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed around schools is used for the safe speed programme.

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that Katoa, Ka Ora meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. The proposed speed of 30km/h near schools is consistent with legislative requirements and is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.  

33.     Additionally, speed reductions delivered to date by the programme are already reducing DSI. It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the local board is to support the programme.

Customer research

34.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

35.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

36.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. Their experiences of high-speed vehicles, near misses, crime and ‘stranger danger’ around schools mean an increasing number of parents drive their children to and from school. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

38.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

39.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The Safe Speeds Programme was endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning committee and the current term Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     AT has visited all local boards during February and March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes.

42.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February and March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

43.     In post-workshop resolutions local boards indicated their level of support for the programme. Common themes were higher levels of support near schools, town centres and places where people are out and about.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

45.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka. Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora.

46.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

47.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at their workshops in February and March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications.  Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. Comprehensive communications including the evidence and key facts have been provided to increase understanding and support of safe speeds. 

50.     Funding constraints may require the scale of the plan to be reduced or delivery to be slowed or delayed.  Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback received from local boards. We will use this, along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our legal and safety obligations as a road controlling authority, to help edit and finalise Katoa, Ka Ora, a speed management plan for Auckland.

52.     We have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee in November 2023. Confirmation of a date is yet to be received.

53.     Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

A list of requests made via resolution by this local board on the proposed approach for Katoa, Ka Ora in April 2023; and AT’s response to those requests.

47

b

Two-page infographic report of public feedback received on Katoa, Ka Ora – for the Local Board

49

c

List of recommended changes and requests for additional locations for the Local Board area, under the following categories:

1.    Recommended changes to draft proposal following consideration of public consultation feedback. Refer to map in attachment E.

2.    Requests for additional locations for speed limit review – summary of requests from the public consultation for this local board area and AT’s response to those requests.

51

d

Summary report of public feedback on Katoa, Ka Ora consultation for the Local Board

53

e

Map of local board proposal used in consultation, to read alongside Attachment C.

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Adoption of the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023

File No.: CP2023/15760

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption every three years and use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

3.       A draft version of the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period for the SCP ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

4.       The local board has considered all submissions and feedback received from the consultation period. Most submitters were in support for the plan and only minor edits for clarification are proposed.

5.       The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023, which includes the proposed changes, is attached to this report.

6.       The key sections of the Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) are:

·    Māori Outcomes Working and supporting mana whenua and mātāwaka to increase the wellbeing of all residents, with respect to te ao Māori and recognise the role of mana whenua as kaitiaki of land and water resources.

·    Climate Action - Working with our community and networks to progressively deliver actions from the Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua and integrate actions within the Local Board Plan.

·    Our People - Waiheke residents have a strong sense of identity, connectedness and wellbeing which is enhanced through active community participation.

·    Our Environment - We want to protect, maintain and enhance our unique islands’ land, coastline, bush, wetland and marine environments for future generations.

·    Our Facilities and Open Spaces - Our parks, reserves and beaches are enjoyed, respected and actively cared for by residents and visitors. Our community, arts and cultural facilities are well used and accessible.

·    Our Places - The special character and values of Waiheke and inner gulf islands are protected and enhanced in line with the draft Waiheke Area Plan and principles of Essentially Waiheke.

·    Our Economy - Our Waiheke community has a strong, independent, entrepreneurial spirit and our natural taonga are protected and support sustainability and appropriate economic activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      adopt the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Waiheke Local Board to approve any minor edits that may be necessary to the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 prior to publication.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·    adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

9.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the Local Board Plan 2023

10.     The key sections of the Local Board Plan 2023 are outlined in the table below:

Table 1: Summary of the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023

Kapa Haka performance

Kapa haka performance

Our People

Waiheke residents have a strong sense of identity, connectedness and wellbeing which is enhanced through active community participation.

 

Wetlands aerial view

Rangihoua Estuary

Our Environment

We want to protect, maintain and enhance our unique islands’ land, coastline, bush, wetland and marine environments for future generations.

Waiheke Library

Waiheke Library

Our Facilities and Open Spaces

Our parks, reserves and beaches are enjoyed, respected and actively cared for by residents and visitors. Our community, arts and cultural facilities are well used and accessible.

Coastal walkway

Island Bay walkway

Our Places

The special character and values of Waiheke and inner gulf islands are protected and enhanced in line with the draft Waiheke Area Plan and principles of Essentially Waiheke.

A sign on the sidewalk

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Oneroa Village

Our Economy

Our Waiheke community has a strong, independent, entrepreneurial spirit and our natural taonga are protected and support sustainability and appropriate economic activities.

 

Consideration of submissions and feedback

11.     A draft version of the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

12.     The Waiheke Local Board has considered the submissions and feedback received.

13.     Public feedback on the draft plan was generally positive. The majority of submitters were supportive of the plan, its direction and themes covered.

14.     Given the public support there were no substantive changes made to the draft plan. Feedback received has resulted in some minor edits.

15.     The key feedback points, with staff analysis and subsequent proposed edits to the outcome chapters are outlined in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Minor edits to the draft Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023

Section

Key point of feedback

Analysis

Proposed change

Māori outcomes

No significant feedback received

No changes required

Minor grammatical updates

Climate action

General support for climate action plan and related projects including climate change resiliency, ecological restoration and improving infrastructure

The draft plan has key initiatives and advocacy which support these area. No changes needed.

Minor addition of Transport Emission Reduction Pathway (TERP) reference

 

Our people

General support for this section with requests for increased focus on health facilities and older person services, worker accommodation and housing accessibility, and ferry services.

The plan includes initiatives to support health and social services. Housing initiatives are included within the ‘Our Places’ section. 

 

Minor addition to advocacy area prioritising Waiheke resident’s transport needs. Addition of reduction of harm from vaping.

Our environment

General support for this section with requests for increased focus on fire and drought resiliency, stormwater and septic tank management, dog control and bird protection, weed management, waste and composting.

The draft plan includes initiatives and advocacy areas addressing many of the points raised. Some additions required.

Minor additions including:

·    noxious weed disposal initiative.

·    replace pest eradication with pest control programmes.

·    acknowledgement of bi-cultural eco system strategies

·    dark sky protection

·    responsible pet ownership

·    refresh Hauraki Gulf Island Waste Management Plan

Our facilities and open spaces

General support for this section with a focus on maintenance of the track network and parks/reserves, safe pedestrian access and cycleways, Rakino hall replacement, Mana whenua cultural/ interpretative signs.

The draft plan includes initiatives addressing many of the points raised. Some additions required.

Minor grammatically updates and additions including:

·    suitable provision of equestrian access and facilities

·    upgrade of community facilities in line with Climate Action Plan and Dark Sky criteria

 

 

Our places

General support for this section with a focus on affordable ferry services, public transport, affordable housing, regulatory restraints and costs, safe pedestrian access.

The local board has limited decision-making over regulatory restraints and costs. There is continued advocacy for housing and transport areas.

No changes required to the advocacy.

Minor grammatically updates and additions including:

·    HGIDP provisions for Dark Sky status, helipad consenting and housing

·    creation of a natural burial area and children’s cemetery at the Waiheke Lawn Cemetery

·    supporting community-led initiatives that align with the revised Waiheke Housing Strategy

 

Our economy

General support for this section including the arts and concept of a sanctuary in the Haruaki Gulf. More focus on visitor numbers, worker accommodation, eco-tourism and pest control.

The draft plan includes initiatives addressing many of the points raised. Some additions required.

Minor grammatically updates and additions including:

·    supporting sustainable lifestyles

·    Dark Sky certification

·    remove Chamber of Commerce initiative (currently no local need)

·    remove reference to the Young Enterprise Scheme (no longer relevant)

 

16.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) incorporates the proposed minor edits to the outcome chapters as described in Table 2.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 contains a specific Climate action section, focusing on the scope of challenges posted by climate change. It considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

18.     The plan includes specific objectives and initiatives which align with the Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua, including:

·        To reduce and eventually eliminate our use of fossil fuels (petrol, oil diesel, gas, coal).

·        To educate, encourage and incentivise changes to our lifestyles, businesses, infrastructure. buildings, consumption patterns, behaviour and environment that reduce or eliminate greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation).

·        To restore the natural environment (taiao on land (whenua) and sea (moana).

·        To increase our ability to respond to the climate changes already locked in by helping tāngata (people) prepare, adapt, and become more resilient.

19.     The impact on the climate of the final plans has been considered. The final publication will be an online document to minimise printing hard copies. 

20.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Waiheke Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and work programme processes.

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The adoption of the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023 will inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. It will also form the basis for the development of the following three years’ work programmes.

22.     Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft and final plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the final Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023. Workshops were held on 13 September and 4 October to discuss and consider feedback and possibly changes to the plan.

24.     In developing the plan, the Waiheke Local Board considered:

·    advice from mana whenua and mataawaka

·    what is already known about our communities and what is important to them

·    submissions received via online forms, hardcopy forms, emails and post

·    feedback provided at engagement events

·    regional strategies and policies

·    staff advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     In developing the plan, the Waiheke Local Board:

·    considered views and advice expressed by mana whenua

·    considered existing feedback from Māori with an interest in the local board area

26.     In addition to initiatives woven within the plan that align with Māori aspirations (such as environmental programmes and water quality) the draft plan has objectives to strengthen collaboration and partnership with Māori and to enhance Māori wellbeing and potential. There are also advocacy areas that will be progressed in partnership with mana whenua, such as elimination of exotic Caulerpa from the Hauraki Gulf.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plan informs this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There are no risks identified in adopting the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Staff recommend that responsibility for approving any minor edits following adoption be delegated to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Waiheke Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board Plan 2023

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Update on Waiheke Local Board area emergency response planning

File No.: CP2023/15832

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update on Waiheke Local Board area emergency response planning and endorse the proposed Waiheke Emergency Management Structure.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an update on Waiheke Local Board area emergency response planning following the board’s resolution of 23 August 2023:

19

Approval of the Waiheke Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2023/24

 

Resolution number WHK/2023/111

MOVED by Member R Tucker, seconded by Member K Matthews: 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a.   approve the Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2023/2024 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b.   establish a working group consisting of the two board member representatives to Waiheke Emergency Response Network (WERN) and relevant Council staff to develop the plan and the structures to set up the emergency response framework for Waiheke.

3.       A working group was formed in line with resolution 19b. and consists of Board member Tucker, Deputy Chair Ranson and relevant council staff. The group has been meeting weekly to update the Waiheke Emergency Response handbook and draft the proposed framework structure.

4.       The proposed framework structure has been developed based on information from Auckland Council emergency management (AEM) training sessions and workshops, similar structures in other regions, and input from emergency response experts. The proposed structure is included under Attachment A (slide 8).

5.       Following the board’s endorsement of the structure at this meeting, the working group will seek feedback from the Waiheke Emergency Response Network and Auckland Council Emergency Management team prior to finalisation.

6.       The board’s AEM FY24 work programme includes Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget of $10,000 for FY24 to support community/resident group resiliency hui’s and provide necessary training, resources and equipment (Attachment B).

7.       The remaining LDI budget of $25,000 will support an on-island emergency response co-ordinator to support ongoing review of the emergency response plan, community readiness, training, volunteer network and coordination.

8.       The Ostend War Memorial Hall has been identified as the Waiheke Civil Defence Centre and evacuation and shelter supplies have been provided to support this function.

9.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         receive an update on Waiheke Local Board area emergency response planning.

b)         endorse the proposed Waiheke Emergency Management Structure (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Emergency Management Structure and roles

109

b

Waiheke Local Board AEM Work Programme 2023/24

123

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025

File No.: CP2023/15292

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted on as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

3.       This report seeks the feedback of the local board on consultation on proposed changes to local fees and charges.

4.       There are proposed changes to the following local fees and charges:

·    Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·    Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

5.       The Governing Body will agree regional consultation items including proposed changes to fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

6.       Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      whakarite / to provide feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 for the following:

i)        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review

A)      Membership Fees

1)      The alignment of legacy memberships to current rates over 3 years

2)      The introduction of a new Auckland wide membership option that allows access to all Auckland Council Pool & Leisure sites regardless of operator.

B)      Aquatic Entrance Fees

1)      The introduction of baseline aquatic entrance fees for all Auckland Council Pool and Leisure sites.

2)      An increase to the concessionary discount from 15 per cent to 40 per cent.

 

 

C)     Swim School Fees

1)      An increase to swimming lesson prices closer to market rates whilst maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders

2)      A new 30 per cent discount for Community Service Card Holders and their dependents

3)      A new 40 per cent discount for those with special needs that require private lessons.

D)     Recreation Fees

1)      An increase to holiday programme and OSCAR (before and after school care) fees

2)      To simplify recreation term programme pricing.

ii)       Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review

A)      To adjust fees in line with Hire Fee Framework July 2014.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024.

8.       A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 18 October 2023. This report seeks the feedback of the local board on proposed changes to fees and charges that will be included alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation.

9.       A three-year cycle of fee reviews was introduced in the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. Over the years the cost of delivering these services have increased but the fees and charges for users have not been adjusted accordingly.

10.     Local boards could choose to increase or decrease its fees and charges from the proposal. This may result in extra funding for the local board if fees are increased or a top-up may be required from the local board funding if fees are reduced from the proposal.

11.     The Governing Body will agree on consultation items including proposed fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

12.     Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

13.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This is the third year of the fee review cycle. There are changes proposed to the following local fees and charges:

·        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·        Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

 

 

 

Active Communities

15.     There are 45 Active Communities sites (pool and leisure facilities) across the Auckland region. 25 of these are currently managed directly by Auckland Council. A Request for Proposal process is currently underway for council owned pool and leisure services. Relevant fees and charges proposed will be included as part of the contract negotiations.

16.     The review of fees and charges for Active Communities services has been split into two phases due to its size and complexity. Council managed bookable spaces were reviewed and adopted in 2023 as phase one.

17.     In this second phase, staff have reviewed the majority of the remaining fees to ensure an appropriate level of cost recovery to enable the council to provide an equitable service across the network.

 

Membership fees

18.     Some customers are on membership rates that we no longer offer. They include memberships may have been in place prior to amalgamation in 2010, or membership types that have since been discontinued. We are proposing to align these legacy memberships with current membership options over three years. In year one, we estimate that around 4,500 memberships (approximately 20 per cent) will increase by up to 7 per cent. The estimated increase in revenue is $260,000 in year one across the region.

19.     We are also proposing to introduce an Auckland wide membership option to allow customers to access all 45 pool and leisure sites, both council-managed and contracted. The estimated increase in revenue from this proposal is expected to be around $90,000 per year across the region.

 

Aquatic entrance fees

20.     The baseline aquatic entrance fees for all council managed and contracted pools and leisure sites are proposed to change. This will include fees for swimming, spa, sauna and steam room use for adults as well as spectator and supervising adult fees.

21.     Alongside this proposed fee change, we are proposing an increased discount rate for seniors (over 65 years), students (over 17), Community Services card and permanent disability card holders, from 15 per cent currently to 40 per cent. This proposal will increase revenue by an estimated $77,000 per annum across the region and will ensure equitable access for users of these services.

22.     Officers have reviewed data available and found no conclusive evidence to support a significant change to the targeted rate for Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara Papatoetoe local boards at this stage. It is recommended that the targeted rate be adjusted by the forecast council rate of inflation for 2024/2025. As of the time this report was written the forecast rate of inflation for council’s arts and recreation services was 3.5 per cent for 2024/2025. This will be used to calculate the targeted rate amount to be included in the 10-year budget consultation. The final rate amount will be set in June 2024 based on the updated inflation forecast available to the council at that point.

 

Swim school fees

23.     An increase in swim school fees is proposed. This will align swimming lesson pricing closer to market rates while maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders. This proposal includes a new 30 per cent discount for Community Services card holders and their dependents and a 40 per cent discount for those with special needs requiring private lessons. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $745,000 per year across the region.

 

 

Recreation fees

24.     We are also proposing to increase OSCAR before and after school care and holiday programme fees to maximise government subsidies and to ensure higher levels of cost recovery. Term programme fees have also been adjusted across the network to provide a simpler charging framework and recover costs appropriately. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $196,000 per year across the region.

25.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached (Attachment A).

 

Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces

26.     Venue hire and bookable spaces incorporates community halls, community centres, art centres and bookable library spaces. Fees for 252 bookable spaces at 110 venues are included in this review.

27.     A review of fees has been split into two phases. The Hire Fee Framework considers the size, condition and quality of each bookable space, the levels of staffing, the amenities available, and current patterns of utilisation of the spaces. It also addresses variations within local board and adjacent areas to bring pricing of comparable venues closer together. Phase one of this review will ensure that fees across similar venues are charged appropriately across the portfolio.

28.     Fees for around half of the venues reviewed are not proposed to change as they have been set at an appropriate level when compared to spaces nearby or with similar types of spaces or capacity.

29.     Around 40 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $2 to align them to similar or nearby venues and a further 8 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $12 for this reason. For a small number of venues, we are proposing to decrease fees to generate interest in hiring these facilities.  Overall, these proposed changes to venue hire fee are expected to the generate an increase in revenue of around $160,000.

30.     In phase two we will investigate the cost to serve and assess the balance between rates and user pays to ensure we are providing good value to the ratepayer, whilst providing accessibility to customers and communities.  This review will include input from local boards.

31.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached. (Attachment A).

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     The local board input into consultation on fees and charges is procedural in nature. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The fees and charges review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. There are no impacts to the Council group wider than the parent (Auckland Council).

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 18 October 2023.

35.     The local board has the opportunity to input on the local fees and charges before the governing body makes a decision on consulting on changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

36.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement and adopting local fees and charges.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The council does not hold information on the ethnicity of fee payers so is not able to identify the exact impact on the proposed changes on Māori. The impact of the proposed rates and fees changes on Māori will be similar to that on other residents in Auckland.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The local board provides input to regional plans and proposals. There will be information in the council’s consultation material for each proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

39.     The table below summarises the total financial implications for all local boards:

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Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The proposed changes to rates fees and charges will allow the council to meet its cost recovery targets for the relevant activities for the 2024/2025 financial year. If these adjustments are not made the level of general rates increase may have to be higher than set out in the Mayoral proposal or further alternative budget mitigations found.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The Governing Body will adopt the consultation document and supporting information content the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 including the changes to fees and changes for 2024/2025 on 6 December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Full schedule of proposed changes to fees

131

b

Feedback form

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sugenthy Thomson - Lead Financial Advisor - Financial Strategy & Planning

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Manager Local Board Financial Advisors

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

File No.: CP2023/14730

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform local board members of the Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation and invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parliament’s Environment Committee has opened an Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, with submissions due on 1 November 2023.

3.       This inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.  The Ministry for the Environment has developed an Issues and Options paper to assist the Inquiry.

4.       The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

5.       Auckland Council staff are preparing a submission for the inquiry, led by the Chief Sustainability Office.  However, the tight timeframe means that we are proposing a delegated sub-group of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee will approve the submission after the draft submission has been circulated to elected members for comments.

6.       Local boards are invited to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback for inclusion into Auckland Council’s submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       On 25 August 2023, the Environment Committee opened its Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. The inquiry is open for public submissions until 1 November 2023.

8.       The inquiry will consider what new powers, roles and responsibilities will be needed to support community-led retreat and how the costs of adaptation will be met.

9.       For the purposes of its inquiry, the Environment Committee is particularly interested in:

·    The current approach to community-led retreat and adaptation funding, its strengths, risks and costs

·    Lessons learned from severe weather events and natural disasters in Aotearoa New Zealand for community-led retreat and funding climate adaptation

·    Effective mechanisms for community-led decision making

·    The role of the private sector in managing climate risk

·    Potential institutional arrangements, including roles and responsibilities of central and local government agencies, iwi and hapū

·    Māori participation, Crown obligations, and how to best give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi, and integrate matauranga Māori and te ao Māori across the adaptation system

·    Alignment and integration with existing legislation and regulatory framework, including the reformed resource management system and any changes needed to regulatory powers and potential economic or other incentives needed to support adaptation actions (both before and after extreme events)

·    Funding sources, access to them and principles and criteria for cost sharing

·    Targets or indicators for assessing progress to more resilient communities and infrastructure.

10.     The inquiry is expected to report back in 2024, and its findings are expected to inform development of a Climate Change Adaptation Bill. This bill would be the third piece of legislation in the resource management reforms, following the Spatial Planning Act and the Natural and Built Environments Act.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Ministry for the Environment released a paper to inform and support submissions titled ‘Community-led retreat and adaptation funding: issues and options’

12.     A template is attached for local board feedback (refer Attachment A).

13.     The table below sets out the key timeframes for local board input on the submission:

Date

Action

2 October 2023

Briefing for local board members

5 October 2023

Report to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee (for delegation)

6 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be considered for incorporation into the submission

20 October 2023

Draft submission shared with local boards

27 October 2023

Deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission

1 November 2023

Closing date for submissions

2 November 2023

Copy of final council submission circulated to Planning, Environment and Parks Committee members, local board members and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     One of the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan is “to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway”.

15.     Under our current emissions pathway, Auckland will continue to experience ongoing sea-level rise, coastal inundation and erosion, and more frequent and severe weather events like those Aucklanders experienced in early 2023.

16.     Globally there needs to be urgent and rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

17.     However, regardless of the global trajectory in emissions, Auckland and New Zealand need to adapt to the impacts of climate change that are already happening and are likely to continue.

18.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will likely inform the development of national legislation which will have implications for how Auckland Council undertakes adaptation.

19.     This submission contributes to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan through action B1 (Ensure our approach to planning and growth aligns with low carbon, resilient outcomes), sub-action 8 (Collaborate to ensure climate change mitigation and adaptation is a priority in national planning legislation).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The development of the proposed Climate Adaptation Bill is likely to be informed by the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation. This legislation will have significant impacts across the Auckland Council group.

21.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

22.     Learnings from the 2023 severe weather events will be incorporated into the submission by the Recovery Office and Auckland Emergency Management as they are deemed relevant to climate adaptation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Local authorities will play a key role in implementation in climate adaptation, as they:

·    are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·    have a responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience,

·    enhance community resilience through public education, infrastructure provision and land use planning processes.

24.     Local board views are being sought on the Parliamentary Environment Committee’s Inquiry into Climate Adaptation, which is considering options for community-led retreat and adaptation funding and will be appended to council’s final submission.

 


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     There are implications for Māori within a potential future climate adaptation system.

26.     Central government are engaging directly with Māori regarding climate adaptation.

27.     A communication on the Auckland Council submission on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation has been sent to all iwi entities and their feedback sought. IMSB secretariat staff will work with the council’s technical team throughout the development of the submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The submission will be developed within existing resources.

29.     The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation will be considering funding sources for climate adaptation, as well as the role of local government.

30.     There are potentially significant financial implications for local government within a future climate adaptation system. Council’s submission provides an opportunity to state our position on how funding of climate adaptation should operate in the future.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Financial and legal expertise will be sought in the development of the submission to identify possible financial, legal and reputational risks to the council associated with climate change adaptation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Given the tight timeframes provided to us by the Government, we will be requesting a delegated sub-group to finally approve the council submission by 1 November 2023.

33.     A technical team, made up of experts from across the council group, will prepare a first draft of the council’s submission.

34.     Please note that due to tight timeframes this may not align with scheduled local board business meetings and any inputs from local boards may need to either be delegated or utilise the urgent decision process.

35.     Local board feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission is due by 6 October 2023.

36.     Local board feedback to be appended to the council’s submission is due by 27 October 2023.

37.     Once local board feedback has been formalised (either by urgent decision or delegated authority), Local Board Services staff will email this feedback to be incorporated in or appended to council’s submission.

38.     Once the findings of the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation are released in 2024, staff will provide local boards with a memo summarising the conclusions.

39.     Any queries can be directed to Petra Pearce, Petra.Pearce@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Template for submission points on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Petra Pearce - Lead Climate Resilience Advisor

Lauren Simpson - Chief Sustainability Officer

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Janine Geddes – Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)

File No.: CP2023/15240

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with an update on the Joint Council-controlled Organisation (CCO) Engagement Plans, CCO work programme (Jul-Sep 2023), and expected milestones in its area for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were adopted in June 2022. These plans record CCO responsibilities and local board commitments with Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare.

3.       CCOs provide local boards with the CCO work programme in their area. Each work programme item lists the engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

4.       The engagement plans expired in June 2023 and have not been updated since June 2022. Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts on CCOs delayed a review starting in the first half of 2023.

5.       A current review of the plans is not recommended due to disruptions and unknowns from:

·    Water Services Reform Programme

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer having dedicated staff to support local boards

·    Auckland Transport rolling out a new local board relationship programme

·    reviewing the CCO Accountability Policy through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

6.       This report does not include work programme updates from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited or Auckland Transport.

7.       Auckland Transport will provide their work programme updates through Forward Work Programme briefing packs coming to November 2023 local board workshops.

8.       This report provides an update on Eke Panuku and Watercare work programme items from July to September 2023 and the engagement approach and anticipated milestones for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023). 

9.       The next CCO quarterly report will be provided in February 2024.  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the council-controlled organisation update on engagement plans, the work programme (Jul-Sep 2023) and anticipated milestones and engagement approaches for Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023).

 

Horopaki

Context

What are CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans?

10.     The 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations recommended that CCOs and local boards adopt an engagement plan to:

·    help cement CCO and local board relations

·    agree on a common understanding of accountability between CCOs and local boards

·    coordinate CCO actions better at the local level.

11.     These plans record the commitment between Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Watercare and the local boards to work together.

12.     Each local board adopted their 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans in June 2022. These plans include CCO responsibilities and local board commitments.

CCO work programme items

13.     CCOs provide local boards with a work programme that lists the different CCO projects happening in the local board area.

14.     The work programme is not a full list of projects in the local board area. It includes work programme items for engagement purposes.

15.     Each work programme item records an engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

16.     The engagement approach is based on the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) standards which are provided in Table 1 below. Note that the “involve” and “empower” categories are not included in the CCO reporting as decided when the joint engagement plans were adopted.

Table 1: International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Engagement Approach Levels

CCO engagement approach

Commitment to local boards

Inform

CCOs will keep local boards informed.

Consult

CCOs will keep local boards informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and aspirations, and provide feedback on how local board input influenced the decision. CCOs will seek local board feedback on drafts and proposals.

Collaborate

CCOs will work together with local boards to formulate solutions and incorporate their advice and recommendations into the decisions to the maximum extent possible.

 

CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans have expired

17.     The CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans expired in June 2023. The plans have not been updated since June 2022.

18.     The plans were not updated in the first half of 2023 due to disruptions to CCOs caused from Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts.  

19.     A current review of the Joint CCO Engagement Plans is not recommended since:

·    the Water Services Reform Programme may replace Watercare with a new water entity

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer has dedicated support staff to support local board engagement and liaison following Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts

·    Auckland Transport is currently rolling out work which future engagement plans would need to consider, such as:

Forward Works Programme (full list of Auckland Transport projects in the local board area)

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

Regional Land Transport Plan

Local Board Transport Plans

·    the CCO Accountability Policy will be updated as part of the next Long-term Plan which the CCO engagement plans would need to align. 

What are the next steps?

20.     The CCO quarterly reporting will continue to provide work programme updates from Watercare and Eke Panuku.

21.     Local board staff will:

·    work with Auckland Transport on providing clarity on local transport plans and how the transport plans would either replace or integrate with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    liaise with Tātaki Auckland Unlimited on what engagement and reporting resource they are able to provide to local boards following their restructure

·    investigate what engagement requirements and role the new water entity will have with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    provide support to local boards on advocating for any changes wanted to the CCO Accountability Policy through developing the next Long-term Plan. 

22.     Auckland Transport will provide updates on their work programme through the Forward Works Programme workshops starting in November 2023. 

23.     Local boards received the last update to the CCO work programme and engagement approach in July 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     The following sections provide an update on work programme items for Eke Panuku and Watercare. 

25.     More detailed updates to the CCO work programme are provided in Attachments A, B and C.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

26.     There are no changes to engagement levels to report.

27.     Eke Panuku’s work programme items are provided in Attachment A.

Watercare

28.     There are no work programme items from Watercare for the Waiheke Local Board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     This report does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

30.     Each CCO must work within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework. Information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Local boards advise CCOs of issues or projects of significance, communicate the interests and preferences of their communities and allow for flexibility in terms of engagement, recognising differing levels of interest.

32.     The work programme items are shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     This report on the CCO work programme items provides the communication of up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     This report does not have a direct impact on Māori, however the projects it refers to will.

35.     Local boards and CCOs provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to their decision-making processes. These opportunities will be worked on a project or programme basis. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This report does not have financial impacts on local boards.

37.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     Some local boards expressed concern over the quality of CCO work programme reporting in April and July 2023, in particular with Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport is currently working on a relationship project which has objectives to deliver:

·    an enhanced process to develop transport plans that reflect local board input and priorities

·    more consistent and timely reporting, updates and analysis on local projects and issues

·    improved support for communication and engagement with local communities.

39.     Auckland Transport will be presenting Forward Work Programme briefing packs to local boards at November 2023 workshops which will address their CCO quarterly updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The local board will receive the next CCO work programme report in February 2024 which will include an update on projects from Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023) and expected milestones for work in Quarter Three (Jan-Mar 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Eke Panuku Waiheke work programme update

157

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Waiheke Local Board - Resource Consent Applications - October 2023

File No.: CP2023/15795

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Attached is the list of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island and inner Hauraki Gulf islands received from 19 September to 5 October 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the list of resource consents applications (Attachment A) related to Waiheke Island and inner Hauraki Gulf islands 19 September to 5 October 2023. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board - resource consent applications - October 2023

161

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Waiheke Local Board - Workshop record - October 2023

File No.: CP2023/15789

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waiheke Local Board proceedings taken at the workshops held on 4, 11 and 18 October 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/ExecutiveSummary.aspx

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion.  No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held on 4, 11 and 18 October 2023 is appended to the report.

5.       These can also be viewed at this link https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on 4, 11 and 18 October 2023. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board - workshop record - October 2023

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

Waiheke Local Board - Hōtaka Kaupapa Policy Schedule - October 2023

File No.: CP2023/15788

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waiheke Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule, formerly called the Waiheke Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar, is appended to the report as Attachment A. The policy schedule is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff for reference and information only.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendars aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note / tuhi ā-taipitopito the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for the political term 2022-2025 as at 25 October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board - Hōtaka Kaupapa - October 2023

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorraine Gropper - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 October 2023

 

 

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