I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 26 October 2023

9:30am

Upper Harbour Local Board Office
6-8 Munroe Lane
Albany
Auckland 0632 and Via Microsoft Teams

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Anna Atkinson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

Members

Callum Blair

Kyle Parker

 

John Mclean

Sylvia Yang

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Max Wilde

Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

 

18 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Max.Wilde@AucklandCouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Northshore City Baseball Club - Use of grounds at Rosedale Park              5

8.2     Cameron Harrison - Greenhithe Community Basketball Court                      6

8.3     Dairy Flat Land Owners Group - Auckland Transport use of Notice's of Requirement on unfunded projects within 30 years.                                       7

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              7

11        Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth Alliance) North Notices of Requirement    9

12        Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025                                                                                                                      25

13        Upper Harbour Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Grants Round One applications 2023/2024                                                                                                37

14        Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                                         55

15        Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023 - 2031    63

16        Te Ara Hauāuru - Northwest Rapid Transit                                                               79

17        Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                  103

18        Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)      131

19        Adoption of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023                                       141

20        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance forward work calendar                                        149

21        Workshop records                                                                                                     153

22        Local Board Members' Reports - October 2023                                                     163

23        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The Chairperson A Atkinson will open the meeting with a Karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)         Whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 28 September 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Northshore City Baseball Club - Use of grounds at Rosedale Park

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from the Northshore City Baseball Club on their usage of grounds at Rosedale Park and future opportunities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       David Fegan, President Northshore City Baseball Club and Adam Lough, committee member Northshore City Baseball Club, representing the Northshore City Baseball Club, will be in attendance to provide an update on the Northshore City Baseball Clubs usage of grounds at Rosedale Park and future opportunities.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the deputation from David Fegan, President Northshore City Baseball Club and Adam Lough, committee member Northshore City Baseball Club, on behalf of the Northshore City Baseball Club and thank them for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Cameron Harrison - Greenhithe Community Basketball Court

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from Cameron Harrison on the need for a community basketball court in Greenhithe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mr Cameron Harrison and Master Deacon Harrison will be in attendance to provide an update on the need for a community basketball court in Greenhithe.

3.       Note – on slide two of the attached presentation there is a still caption of a video presentation. This video shows three children and the reasons why they think there is a need for a community basketball court in Greenhithe. The video will be played at the meeting.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the deputation from Mr Cameron Harrison and Master Deacon Harrison and thank them for their attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Greenhithe Community Basketball Court presentation............................... 169

 

 

8.3       Dairy Flat Land Owners Group - Auckland Transport use of Notice's of Requirement on unfunded projects within 30 years.

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Brian Sutton, Chairman, Dairy Flat Land Owners Group, on behalf of the Dairy Flat Land Owners Group, on Auckland Transport’s use of Notices of Requirement on unfunded projects within 30 years.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Brian Sutton, Chairman, Dairy Flat Land Owners Group, on behalf of the Dairy Flat Land Owners group, will be in attendance to provide a presentation on Auckland Transport’s use of Notices of Requirement for unfunded projects that may or may not be required within 30 years. The presentation will include a brief background as to community opposition and preferred outcomes.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the deputation from Brian Sutton, Chairman, Dairy Flat Land Owners Group, on behalf of the Dairy Flat Land Owners Group  and thank him for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth Alliance) North Notices of Requirement

File No.: CP2023/15669

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide information regarding the Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth Alliance) North projects and seeks local board confirmation regarding the Strategic Transport Network programme and the associated Notices of Requirement.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Transport Board approved the Detailed Business Case on 26 September 2023 for the projects and lodgement of Notices of Requirement subject to:

·    receiving a formal statement from the Rodney, Upper Harbour and Hibiscus and Bays local boards outlining their position on the Strategic Transport Network.”

3.       The Auckland Transport Board has requested this to provide them with assurance there are no material issues that would preclude lodging these Notices of Requirement.

4.       The Auckland Transport Board also noted current council and Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth Alliance) alignment around the Future Development Strategy, but that this will be reconsidered by the Auckland Transport Board if there are any future changes.

5.       Auckland Council’s Planning, Environment and Parks Committee was set to consider at its 5 October 2023 meeting whether to discontinue the Future Urban Zone or defer the decision pending further investigations. The meeting was deferred to 2 November 2023. Subsequently, Te Tupu Ngātahi requested and received informal feedback from the local boards within a limited timeframe which was greatly appreciated. The informal feedback was to confirm the engagement that has occurred with the local boards over the development of the Indicative and Detailed Business Cases. The feedback was sought in relation to the matter addressed in this report.

6.       With the resulting delay of a decision by  the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee meeting, we have been asked by the Auckland Transport Board to seek a “formal written statement”, by way of a resolution from local boards.

7.       Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth Alliance) seeks your acknowledgement of the intent to lodge the 13 Notices of Requirement with Auckland Council in early November 2023.

8.       Te Tupu Ngātahi has attended a number of workshops with the local board over the past 4-5 years gaining valuable insights into community values and aspirations, our engagement activity with the local community, and informal feedback on the development of our Strategic Network.

9.       Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth acknowledge local boards usual way of providing formal written feedback is through its agreed approach with Auckland Council for participating in Resource Management Act 1991 processes which will happen following public notification of the Notices of Requirement. We also look forward to receiving formal feedback as part of this process.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the report regarding the request from the Auckland Transport Board for a formal statement from the Upper Harbour Local Board outlining their position on the Strategic Transport Network.

b)      whakamihi / acknowledge the forthcoming lodgement of the 13 Notices of Requirement associated with the Te Tupu Ngātahi Strategic Network and note that there are not any significant concerns / issues regarding the lodgement.

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that future formal local board feedback on the Notices of Requirement will be provided through the agreed approach with Auckland Council for participating in Resource Management Act 1991 processes.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Te Tupu Ngātahi is an alliance between Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) for the purpose of planning and route protecting the strategic transport networks needed to support Auckland Councils’ future urban growth areas identified in the Auckland Plan, Future Urban Land Supply Strategy (FULSS) and Unitary Plan over the next 30 plus years.

11.     In North Auckland (Dairy Flat, Wainui, Silverdale and Orewa), the council’s FULSS forecasts a threefold increase in growth with 41,000 new houses, 22,000 new jobs and 110,000 more people (see Attachment A to the agenda report). Auckland Council’s draft Future Development Strategy (FDS) which will replace the FULSS, recommends slower staging of this growth over the next 30 years plus a large area for further investigation in south Dairy Flat. There are live development proposals currently underway in Milldale, Wainui and Silverdale West.

12.     Te Tupu Ngātahi’s North Detailed Business Case (DBC) identifies the Strategic Transport Network (see Attachment B to the agenda report) for North Auckland and recommends this for route protection. This was developed by Te Tupu Ngātahi, Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi in collaboration with partners, Auckland Council and mana whenua. It builds on previous Auckland Transport Board approved business cases to develop the network (i.e., Transport for Future Urban Growth (TFUG) Programme Business Case (PBC 2016) Case and Supporting Growth Indicative Business Case (IBC 2019).

13.     The Auckland Transport Board at its September meeting requested feedback from the local board prior to them making a decision regarding the Detailed Business Case and lodgement of the Notices of Requirement.

14.     Te Tupu Ngātahi acknowledge and appreciated the informal feedback that has been received from the local boards and individual local board members throughout our programme development. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Te Tupu Ngātahi’s recommended Strategic Transport Network for North Auckland supports planned greenfield growth by:

·    Providing a comprehensive public transport network initially anchored around interim State Highway 1 bus shoulder improvements and then a new Rapid Transit Corridor (RTN) through Dairy Flat from Albany to Milldale. New stations at Milldale, Pine Valley Road and indicative stations through Dairy Flat are supported by a comprehensive multimodal arterial network.

·    Improving access to existing and planned business areas to encourage more employment activities to locate in North Auckland is critical to removing reliance on long-distance travel to access jobs. Improvements to State Highway One including new and upgraded interchanges at O Mahurangi Penlink, Wilks Road and Silverdale will improve access for freight supported by a comprehensive multimodal arterial network.

·    Providing multimodal upgrades to Dairy Flat Highway and East Coast Road will improve north-south network resilience for all modes as an alternative to State Highway One. A ladder network of east-west arterials will connect these corridors to State Highway One and the new and upgraded interchanges providing efficient access to key land uses and corridors for al modes.

·    With over half of the future urban area within the walking catchment of the RTN, and all corridors including active modes and/or provision for public transport this will enable significant mode shift in North Auckland and improved public transport access to and from Auckland.  This will support Auckland Transport’s long-term climate change and mode shift targets.

16.     The network has also been designed to enable optimal long-term outcomes for other significant transport projects including O Mahurangi Penlink and interim bus improvements on State Highway One being constructed by Waka Kotahi; and Milldale Highgate Bridge, Argent Lane and New Pine Valley Road being delivered by developers in partnership with Crown Infrastructure Partners and Auckland Transport/Auckland Council. The Waitematā Harbour Connections project has also confirmed light rail as the current preferred RTN mode to North Auckland and its extension beyond Albany.

17.     The North DBC assumes that the proposed network is delivered over four decades to align with the Council’s latest land use timing and climate change considerations as set out in the draft FDS. Irrespective of this timing, there are large active developments underway and pressure for growth from established developers including Fulton Hogan, Hugh Green, Fletchers, AV Jennings, and the Ministry of Education. A significant part of Auckland Transport’s Strategic Transport Network is expected to be delivered by developers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Te Tupu Ngātahi has been aware of the likely impacts of climate change since its establishment in 2018. An eliminate/avoid, reduce/defer and optimise/offset approach has been adopted for the IBC, DBC and NoR phases respectively. Enabled and embodied carbon considerations have also been embedded in businesses cases processes.

19.     For the North, modelling shows the Strategic Transport Network will reduce Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKTs) by 12,400 km in 2048+ and CO2 emissions by12,800 tonnes per year compared to the baseline. Route protecting further contributes to emission reductions by supporting compact land use, corridor alignments that reduce embodied carbon during construction and enabling land release to be timed with sustainable mode improvements. The majority of unquantified savings will be achieved by conversion of the vehicle fleet.

20.     Long-term resilience has also been a focus of the business case processes. Flood modelling has been assessed at 2.1 degrees warming and 16 percent increase in rainfall events based on guidance from council. Given the uncertainty of climate change effects in the future, the assessment also considers a more severe climate change scenario of 3.8 degrees warming and a 32.7 per cent increase on rainfall. All infrastructure within the recommended network has been designed to withstand 1-in-100 flooding events.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Auckland Council is a partner of Te Tupu Ngātahi and are regularly updated on the programme, including North Auckland. Te Tupu Ngātahi worked collaboratively with Auckland Council undertaking parallel workstreams to integrate land use and transport for the RTN and future urban zones including joint public consultation. Work is also being undertaken between Auckland Transport and Auckland Council on how future urban growth areas are funded.

22.     Te Tupu Ngātahi updates Watercare regularly on its projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Ngā kiritaki / Customers

23.     Feedback from landowners and public engagement in July/August 2022 resulted in changes to the preferred options, with the impacts on property owners being a key consideration.

24.     Regular engagement throughout the Detailed Business Case with developers, community interest groups and infrastructure providers (i.e., KiwiRail, utilities and Ministry of Education) has informed option development, selection, and refinement.

25.     The response from the community and stakeholders has been generally positive, and overall, there has been general support for the recommended network and route protection. The exception being some potentially impacted property owners who have concerns regarding individual property effects from the proposed designations, particularly the new RTN. Te Tupu Ngātahi has and will continue to engage with landowners as part of the NoR phase. A summary of engagement is included as Attachment C.

Ngā mema pōti / Upper Harbour Local Board

26.     Te Tupu Ngātahi has regularly engaged with the three relevant local boards being Rodney, Upper Harbour and Hibiscus and Bays, seeking input on the public engagement approach, and updating on preferred options and the feedback received. There is a high level of understanding of our network and the route protection we are seeking. There has been a high level of interest in resilience and council’s approach to growth following the January flooding.

27.     In the period between 2018 and 2023 Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth has presented to the Upper Harbour Local Board on six occasions and provided eight written memoranda for information. Key themes and informal feedback received is outlined below:

Urban growth and Transport

·    There is a clear understanding from the local boards of the importance of route protection and the need for an integrated transport network that encourages people towards mass rapid transport, reduce commute times and increase productivity across the region. The success of the Northern Busway was noted.

·    The Upper Harbour Local Board has also expressed a desire for north-facing ramps at the proposed Redvale Interchange.

Property and impact on landowners

·    Throughout the engagement the local boards have expressed awareness and concern for the impacts of the projects on local landowners, and how the property effects will be managed through the Public Works Act 1981. There was acknowledgement of the long lapse periods and that the projects are not currently funded and the uncertainty this creates for landowners.

·    It was noted that the preferred route for the Rapid Transit Corridor (RTN) travels through some the most built-up established lifestyle properties in the most expensive parts of Dairy Flat such as Grace Hill and Goodland Estate and the implications for the cost of land acquisition. 

Future Development Strategy

·    The Strategic Transport Network is aligned with council’s recommendation on the FDS, which is available on Auckland Council website https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2023/10/20231005_PEPCC_ATT_11310_EXCLUDED_WEB.htm.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Mana whenua are a partner of Te Tupu Ngātahi and continue to be engaged with through regular hui. Kaitiaki representatives supplied input into the option development process. Mana whenua support the DBC and the next stages of route protection, but some have opposed Auckland Council’s identification of the North Auckland future urban growth areas. Mana whenua in the North have advised that they strongly support lodgement of the Strategic Transport Network.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi boards approved Supporting Growth Programme Alliance Agreement includes funding for Indicative Business Cases, Detailed Business Cases and route protection for the entire programme.

30.     Funding has also been sought through the draft Joint Transport Plan and draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 review. The work of Tupu Ngātahi remains a priority in both these plans at this stage in the process.

31.     Early property acquisition risk from the designation is estimated at $37 million (P50 escalated) over the Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2031 period and a funding bid has been submitted into the draft Joint Transport Plan and draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-24 review through a regional “Route Protection and Encroachments Property” line.

32.     There are no funding implications for the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Key risks and mitigations are outlined in the table below.

Key risk

Mitigation

Ongoing confusion and uncertainty within the community regarding long term growth in the area

Lodgement of Notices of Requirement which are aligned with council recommendations regarding the FDS. This enables landowners and the community to participate in a formal notification process prior to any decision which would be later in 2024.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Following receipt of formal feedback, the Auckland Transport Board will make its decision regarding the North Detailed Business Case and lodgement of Notice of Requirements.

35.     Should Notices of Requirement be lodged, we anticipate public notification by Auckland Council in mid-November with Hearings to be take place in 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Council's vision and growth for North.

15

b

Recommended North Strategic Transport Network.

17

c

Feedback Summary - North.

19

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Julie Boucher - Te Tupu Ngātahi Owner Interface Manager – Communications & Engagement AT

Philippa White, Te Tupu Ngātahi North Engagement Lead

Authorisers

Alastair Lovell – Te Tupu Ngātahi Owner Interface Manager, Auckland Transport

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Local board feedback on proposals for fees and charges for the financial year 2024/2025

File No.: CP2023/15314

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted on as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February 2024 – 28 March 2024.

3.       This report seeks the feedback of the local board on consultation on proposed changes to local fees and charges.

4.       There are proposed changes to the following local fees and charges:

·    Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·    Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

5.       The Governing Body will agree regional consultation items including proposed changes to fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

6.       Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whakarite / to seek feedback on the proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content which will be consulted as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 for the following:

i)        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review

A)      Membership Fees

1)      the alignment of legacy memberships to current rates over 3 years

2)      the introduction of a new Auckland wide membership option that allows access to all Auckland Council Pool & Leisure sites regardless of operator.

B)      Aquatic Entrance Fees

1)      the introduction of baseline aquatic entrance fees for all Auckland Council Pool and Leisure sites

2)      an increase to the concessionary discount from 15 per cent to 40 per cent.

C)     Swim School Fees

1)      an increase to swimming lesson prices closer to market rates whilst maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders

2)      a new 30 per cent discount for Community Service Card Holders and their dependents

3)      a new 40 per cent discount for those with special needs that require private lessons.

D)      Recreation Fees

1)      an increase to holiday programme and OSCAR (before and after school care) fees

2)      to simplify recreation term programme pricing.

 

ii)    Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review

A)      To adjust fees in line with Hire Fee Framework July 2014.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Council will be consulting on proposed changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation. The consultation is planned to take place from 28 February 2024 – 28 March 2024.

8.       A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 19 October 2023. This report seeks the feedback of the local board on proposed changes to fees and charges that will be included alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation.

9.       A three-year cycle of fee reviews was introduced in the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. Over the years the cost of delivering these services have increased but the fees and charges for users have not been adjusted accordingly.

10.     Local boards could choose to increase or decrease its fees and charges from the proposal. This may result in extra funding for the local board if fees are increased or a top-up may be required from the local board funding if fees are reduced from the proposal.

11.     The Governing Body will agree on consultation items including proposed fees and charges on 6 December 2023.

12.     Local boards will also be asked to approve their local consultation content between 28 and 30 November 2023.

13.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February 2024 to 28 March 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This is the third year of the fee review cycle. There are changes proposed to the following local fees and charges:

·        Phase two of Active Communities fees and charges review – Membership fees, Aquatic entrance fees, Swim school fees and Recreation fees

·        Phase one of Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces review.

Active Communities

15.     There are 45 Active Communities sites (pool and leisure facilities) across the Auckland region. 25 of these are currently managed directly by Auckland Council. A Request for Proposal process is currently underway for council owned pool and leisure services. Relevant fees and charges proposed will be included as part of the contract negotiations.

16.     The review of fees and charges for Active Communities services has been split into two phases due to its size and complexity. Council managed bookable spaces were reviewed and adopted in 2023 as phase one.

17.     In this second phase, staff have reviewed the majority of the remaining fees to ensure an appropriate level of cost recovery to enable the council to provide an equitable service across the network.

Membership fees

18.     Some customers are on membership rates that we no longer offer. They include memberships may have been in place prior to amalgamation in 2010, or membership types that have since been discontinued. We are proposing to align these legacy memberships with current membership options over three years. In year one, we estimate that around 4,500 memberships (approximately 20 per cent) will increase by up to 7 per cent. The estimated increase in revenue is $260,000 in year one across the region.

19.     We are also proposing to introduce an Auckland wide membership option to allow customers to access all 45 pool and leisure sites, both council-managed and contracted. The estimated increase in revenue from this proposal is expected to be around $90,000 per year across the region.

Aquatic entrance fees

20.     The baseline aquatic entrance fees for all council managed and contracted pools and leisure sites are proposed to change. This will include fees for swimming, spa, sauna and steam room use for adults as well as spectator and supervising adult fees.

21.     Alongside this proposed fee change, we are proposing an increased discount rate for seniors (over 65 years), students (over 17), Community Services card and permanent disability card holders, from 15 per cent currently to 40 per cent. This proposal will increase revenue by an estimated $77,000 per annum across the region and will ensure equitable access for users of these services.

22.     Officers have reviewed data available and found no conclusive evidence to support a significant change to the targeted rate for Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara Papatoetoe local boards at this stage. It is recommended that the targeted rate be adjusted by the forecast council rate of inflation for 2024/2025. As of the time this report was written the forecast rate of inflation for council’s arts and recreation services was 3.5 per cent for 2024/2025. This will be used to calculate the targeted rate amount to be included in the 10-year budget consultation. The final rate amount will be set in June 2024 based on the updated inflation forecast available to the council at that point.

Swim school fees

23.     An increase in swim school fees is proposed. This will align swimming lesson pricing closer to market rates while maintaining accessible pricing for Aucklanders. This proposal includes a new 30 per cent discount for Community Services card holders and their dependents and a 40 per cent discount for those with special needs requiring private lessons. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $745,000 per year across the region.

Recreation fees

24.     We are also proposing to increase Out of School Care and Recreation (OSCAR) fees for before and after school care and holiday programmes to maximise government subsidies and to ensure higher levels of cost recovery. Term programme fees have also been adjusted across the network to provide a simpler charging framework and recover costs appropriately. This proposal is estimated to increase revenue by approximately $196,000 per year across the region.

25.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached (Attachment A).

 

Venue Hire and Bookable Spaces

26.     Venue hire and bookable spaces incorporates community halls, community centres, art centres and bookable library spaces. Fees for 252 bookable spaces at 110 venues are included in this review.

27.     A review of fees has been split into two phases. The Hire Fee Framework considers the size, condition and quality of each bookable space, the levels of staffing, the amenities available, and current patterns of utilisation of the spaces. It also addresses variations within local board and adjacent areas to bring pricing of comparable venues closer together. Phase one of this review will ensure that fees across similar venues are charged appropriately across the portfolio.

28.     Fees for around half of the venues reviewed are not proposed to change as they have been set at an appropriate level when compared to spaces nearby or with similar types of spaces or capacity.

29.     Around 40 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $2 to align them to similar or nearby venues and a further 8 per cent of fees are proposed to increase by up to $12 for this reason. For a small number of venues, we are proposing to decrease fees to generate interest in hiring these facilities.  Overall, these proposed changes to venue hire fee are expected to the generate an increase in revenue of around $160,000.

30.     In phase two we will investigate the cost to serve and assess the balance between rates and user pays to ensure we are providing good value to the ratepayer, whilst providing accessibility to customers and communities.  This review will include input from local boards.

31.     A full schedule of proposed changes to fees is attached. (Attachment A).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     The local board input into consultation on fees and charges is procedural in nature. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The fees and charges review ensures that the cost recovery decisions previously made by the council continue to be met. There are no impacts to the Council group wider than the parent (Auckland Council).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     A local board workshop on fees and charges was held on 19 October 2023.

35.     The local board has the opportunity to input on the local fees and charges before the governing body makes a decision on consulting on changes to fees and charges alongside the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

36.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement and adopting local fees and charges.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The council does not hold information on the ethnicity of fee payers so is not able to identify the exact impact on the proposed changes on Māori. The impact of the proposed rates and fees changes on Māori will be similar to that on other residents in Auckland.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The local board provides input to regional plans and proposals. There will be information in the council’s consultation material for each proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

39.     The table below summarises the total financial implications for all local boards:

A blue and white list with black text

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Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The proposed changes to rates fees and charges will allow the council to meet its cost recovery targets for the relevant activities for the 2024/2025 financial year. If these adjustments are not made the level of general rates increase may have to be higher than set out in the Mayoral proposal or further alternative budget mitigations found.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The Governing Body will adopt the consultation document and supporting information content the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 including the changes to fees and changes for 2024/2025 on 6 December 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board Fees and Charges 2024/2025

31

b

Feedback form for proposed changes to local fees and charges consultation content.

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sugenthy Thomson - Lead Financial Advisor, Financial Strategy & Planning

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

      

Upper Harbour Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Grants Round One applications 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/15100

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Upper Harbour Local Boards Local Grants Round One and Multi-board Grants Round One applications in 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the 27 July 2023 business meeting, the local board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

3.       This report presents applications received in the Upper Harbour Local Board Local Grants Round One (Attachment B) and Multi-board Grants Round One (Attachment C) in 2023/2024.

4.       The Upper Harbour Local Board has set a total of $100,000 community grants budget for the 2023/2024 financial year. An additional $26,000 was allocated to Community Grants work programme from Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget in the 14 September 2023 business meeting.

5.       This takes the budget to $126,000 to be allocated to the two local grant rounds and two Multi-board rounds for 2023/2024.

6.       Twenty-one applications were received for Upper Harbour Local Board Local Grants Round One and requesting $97,676.24. Seven applications were received for the Multi-board Grants Round One requesting $30,344.60.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whakaae / agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the Upper Harbour Local Board Boards Local Grants Round One applications 2023/2024, listed below:

App ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2417-101

Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Community

Towards cost of workshop host time, project management, tools and equipment, marketing, prep and design, and admin to run Community Upcycling Workshops in local libraries and community centers from 2 November 2023 to 29 March 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-104

Seema Rambisheswar

Community

Towards hall hire, promotional materials and advertising cost to deliver Medicine and Lifestyle seminars at Meadowood Community Center from 8 November 2023 to 8 March 2024

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-105

Herald Island Community Wharf Trust

Community

Towards council annual charge, liability insurance and property insurance charge at Twin Wharf Road from 1 November 2023 to 31 October 2024

$1,385.00

Eligible

LG2417-106

Meadowood Community Centre

Community

Towards event related cost for Christmas Celebration at Meadowood House on 1 December 2023

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-108

East Coast Bays Cricket Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards cost to re-carpeting the cricket lane at East Coast Bays Cricket Club from 2 November 2023 to 9 November 2024

$4,025.00

Eligible

LG2417-109

Marist North Harbour Rugby Club

Sport and recreation

Towards coaching and administration cost to deliver Junior and Community Development Programme from 1 November 2023 to 28 June 2024

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-110

Fusion Productions Limited

Community

Towards exercise equipment cost to run community classes at Whenuapai Village Hall and Hobsonville Community Hall from 6 November 2023 to 6 November 2024

$1,745.00

Eligible

LG2417-112

AFL New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire cost to run Youth Festival Day project at North Harbour Stadium from 10 December 2023 to 29 February 2024

$5,850.00

Eligible

LG2417-113

North Harbour Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards artificial turf and installation cost at North Harbour Softball from 1 November 2023 to 31 March 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-114

Eyeview Ethnic Trust

Arts and culture

Towards Art workshop facilitator and food cost to deliver Cultural Canvas project on 6A/231 Dairy Flat Highway from 1 November 2023 to 31 March 2024

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-117

Camp Maynard

Community

Towards replacement of fire tank at Camp Maynard from 6 November 2023 to 39 November 2023

$10,810.00

Eligible

LG2417-118

Albany Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire cost at Oteha Valley School, Albany Community Hub from 1 November 2023 to 30 April 2024

$2,800.00

Eligible

LG2417-119

Upper Waitematā Ecology Network Incorporated

Community

Towards purchasing video conference system, branding design cost, Te Reo classes and Te Reo classes cost in the local board area from 14 November 2023 to 31 May 2024

$9,277.00

Eligible

LG2417-120

Sustainable Paremoremo Group

Environment

Towards purchasing gardening equipment to maintain Sanders Reserve from 1 November 2023 to 1 April 2024

$2,180.00

Eligible

LG2417-123

Greenhithe Playcentre

Community

Towards cost to replace the screen/blinds at Greenhithe Playcentre from 1 August 2023 to 2 August 2023

$11,820.60

Ineligible

LG2417-124

Greenhithe Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards coaching wages to deliver Greenhithe Football Girls Development Program from 1 February 2024 to 1 June 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-125

North Shore Women's Centre

Community

Towards two social worker wages for service delivered in Upper Harbour Local Board area from 13 November 2023 to 12 November 2024

$4,313.64

Eligible

LG2417-127

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards Street Smart handbooks print cost to support high school students in Upper Harbour area from 29 November 2023 to 29 March 2024

$4,900.00

Eligible

LG2417-128

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards venue hire and facilitator fee to run Road Safety and Youth Development project at Netball North Harbour from 1 January 2024 to 30 June 2024

$4,570.00

Eligible

LG2417-129

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards a contribution of annual costs to supervise and train volunteers at the Youthline House North Shore from 1 November 2023 to 30 June 2024

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-130

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the cost to deliver twenty Spoken Word Poetry workshops at Hobsonville Point Secondary School from 6 November 2023 to 28 June 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$97,676.24

 

 

 

 

b)      whakaae / agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the Upper Harbour Local Board Boards Multi-board grants Round One applications 2023/2024, listed below:

App ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-104

North Shore Centres of Mutual Aid Inc

Community

Towards overall operating expenses for service delivery from 1 January 2024 to 31 December 2024

$7,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-112

English Language Partners New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards stationery costs to run English lessons from 1 January 2024 to 31 December 2024

$300.00

Eligible

MB2324-120

Harbour Sport Trust

Events

Towards transportation, waste management, potable loo, security and temporary fencing cost to run Shore to Shore Fun Run event on 7 April 2024

$1,600.00

Eligible

MB2324-133

North Harbour Community Patrol

Community

Towards fuel and vehicle related cost to continue community patrol in North Shore area from 1 December 2023 to 29 November 2024

$744.60

Eligible

MB2324-139

Shine School of Confidence

Arts and culture

Towards speech and drama lessons including tuition fees, venue hire, and teaching resources at various community centers or local schools from January 2024 to December 2024

$13,760.00

Eligible

MB2324-142

Bellyful New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards meal production, service delivery costs, sustaining volunteer support and engagement, attracting and onboarding new volunteers in North Shore from November 2023 to November 2024

$1,740.00

Eligible

MB2324-159

Anxiety NZ Trust

Community

Towards wages to employ part time specialist community educator to work across Auckland from December 2023 to November 2024

$5,200.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$30,344.60

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds, and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment A. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

13.     Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

14.     Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage. Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Upper Harbour Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The local board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states:
“We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

19.     A summary of each application received through 2023/2024 Upper Harbour Local Grants Round One (Attachment B) and Multi-board Grants Round One (Attachment C) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

22.     This report presents applications received in the Upper Harbour Local Board Local Grants Round One (Attachment B) and Multi-board Grants Round One (Attachment C) in 2023/2024.

23.     The Upper Harbour Local Board has set a total of $100,000 community grants budget for the 2023/2024 financial year. $26,000 was allocated to Community Grants work programme from Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget in September business meeting.

24.     This takes the budget to $126,000 to be allocated to the two local grant rounds and two Multi-board rounds for 2023/2024.

25.     Twenty-one applications were received for Upper Harbour Local Board Local Grants Round One and requesting $97,676.24. Seven applications were received for the Multi-board Grants Round One requesting $30,344.60.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Following the Upper Harbour Local Board allocating funding for these grants, staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2023/2024 Upper Harbour Local Board Community Grant Programme

47

b

2023/2024 Upper Harbour Local Grant Round One Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

2023/2024 Upper Harbour Multi-Board Grant Round One Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Amber Deng - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2023/15384

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Upper Harbour Local Board of the reduction to the local board transport capital fund and seek local board approval of the projects to be delivered for the 2022-2025 political term.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport manages the Local Board Transport Capital Fund on behalf of the Upper Harbour Local Board. Auckland Transport provides quality advice to support local board decision-making.

3.       The total confirmed budget for the Upper Harbour Local Board for the 2022 – 2025 political term is $1,542,210 which includes the additional approved budget of $421,949 to cover current contractual commitments. This replaces the previous indicative budget of $1.71 million discussed in the June 2023 Auckland Transport workshop.

4.       The reduction in the local board transport capital fund reflects the pressure Auckland Transport and its funding partners are under due to flood recovery work following the severe weather events in early 2023, inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

5.       Of the confirmed budget, $421,949 has been approved as additional budget to cover the following projects with contractual commitments from the previous term:

·   Bush Road shared path ($271,950)

·   Kyle Road footpath ($150,000).

 

6.       In this report, Auckland Transport recommends that the Upper Harbour Local Board allocate an additional $100,000 from the new term budget to complete construction of the Bush Road shared path. This project has received approved budget of $271,950 to partially fund completion of this construction ready project with contractual commitments.

7.       Auckland Transport recommends the Upper Harbour Local Board allocate the remaining amount of $1,020,260 to the non-contractual projects listed below:

·   Stage 1 Oteha Valley Road Shared Path Cycleway and connection/crossing ($393,430)

·   Stage 3 (southern side) of Oteha Valley Road Shared Path Cycleway and connection/crossing ($326,830) and recommend that any cost saving from other projects or future funding should fund the completion of Stage 3 costed at $780,000

·   Herald Island Lighting project ($300,000).

 

8.       The concept overview plan for the Oteha Valley shared path cycleway and connection / crossing can be found in Attachment A of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      tohatoha / approve the allocation of $1,120,260 Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2025 as follows:

i)        $100,000 for the completion of the Bush Road Shared Path project.

ii)       $393,430 for Stage 1 Oteha Valley Road Shared Path Cycleway and connection/crossing.

iii)      $326,830 for Stage 3 (southern side) of Oteha Valley Road Shared Path Cycleway and connection/crossing and that any cost saving from other projects or future funding should fund the completion of Stage 3 costed at $780,000.

iv)      $300,000 to Herald Island Lighting project.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that $421,949 additional budget has been approved to cover current contractual commitments for Bush Road shared path ($271,950) and Kyle Road footpath ($150,000).

c)      approve the following projects as priorities for delivery should additional funding become available:

i)        Stage 3 completion (southern side) of Oteha Valley Road Shared Path Cycleway ($453,170)

ii)       Wayfinding signage project prioritising Fairview, Oteha Valley and Harrowglen ($62,000)

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) is an Auckland Transport (AT) fund established in 2012 to allow local boards to deliver small projects in their local area that would not normally be prioritised by Auckland Transport. In 2014, the LBTCF budget was set at $20 million spread across all local boards and distributed based on Auckland Council’s Local Board Funding Policy. 

10.     Since 2020, when COVID-19 lockdowns impacted on Auckland Council’s revenue the LBTCF has been reduced. Specifically, to $15 million per annum across all local boards in the most recent Regional Land Transport Plan of which Upper Harbour Local Board share was previously $1.71 million.

11.     Due to further budget reductions, (as outlined above), Upper Harbour Local Board’s allocation of LBTCF for the 2022–2025 political term is $1,542,210.

12.     Therefore, the local board must now review the programme of work that was planned and reduce it to match the new budget. The local board’s role is to review the work programme supported by AT’s quality advice, consider options, and then decide about re-prioritisation. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Auckland Transport held three workshops with the Upper Harbour Local Board in 2023 to discuss the LBTCF and priorities for allocation of the funding.

14.     Workshop one on the 2 February 2023 gathered suggestions from board members for allocating the LBTCF in the new term as well as progress reports on projects from the last political term.

15.     Workshop two on 6 July 2023 reported back on cost estimates for the proposed new projects along with the indicative budget for the new term.

16.     Workshop three on 7 September confirmed the budget for the new term as $1,542,210 which was considerably less than the figure anticipated in Workshop Two. The reduction in budget reflects the pressures on AT and our funding partners following the devastating floods of early 2023 and the roading repair bill, the reduction in AT’s overall budget as required by Auckland Council plus inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

17.     At Workshop three, AT’s advice to the local board was to allocate $100,000 from the new term budget to complete construction of the Bush Road Shared Path. This project has received additional budget of $271,950 to fund completion of this project that is construction ready.

18.     AT also requested the local board to identify which projects it wished to support with the remainder budget of $1,020,260 and to list its remaining projects in priority order should more funding become available.

Previous Term Projects identified for LBTCF in 2022–2025 Political Term

Project

Description and Amount already invested

Funding required to complete the projects

Bush Road Shared Path

Construction of a shared path on Bush Road

($123,050)

($100,000)

Addition budget approved.

($271,950)

Kyle Road Footpath

Under Construction

($400,176)

NIL

Additional budget approved.

(150,000)

 

New Term Projects identified for LBTCF in 2022–2025 Political Term

Project

Description

Funding required to complete the projects

Clark Road Crossing (Scott Road School Zone Safety Infrastructure)

Pedestrian crossing on Scott Road close to Scott Point School

Pedestrian Crossing on Clark Road by the church

Note:  Being delivered by the Developer.

(No amount invested)

NIL

Oteha Valley Road Shared Path Cycleway and connection/crossing

Stage 1 - Improvements on sections of the footpath that are relatively narrow (less than approximately 2m) to increase the width. ($393,430)

Stage 2 - Improving crossing facilities at major side road intersections where there are currently limited facilities for pedestrians and cyclists. ($1,885m)

Stage 3 – Full upgrade to provide a 3m shared path (long term) ($780,000).

 

$1,173,430

Herald Island lighting Upgrade

Adding street lighting on Kingsway Road, Herald Island.

$300,000

Wayfinding

Not prioritised as there is insufficient budget for Wayfinding.

(No amount invested)

$62,000

 

 

19.     AT request the local board prioritise the below list so if more budget becomes available AT can automatically start work on these projects and delivery will be in the prescribed order; unless funding is limited and a decision between projects is required.

Priority Order for Projects if further budget is identified

Project

Description

Estimates

Oteha Valley

Stage 3 completion

(Total cost $780,000)

$453,170

Wayfinding

Wayfinding signs for walkways, street to street connections and park entrances prioritising the following areas:

·    Fairview

·    Oteha Valley

·    Harrowglen subdivisions.

$62,000

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency and has developed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

21.     AT recommends the local board consider prioritisation of projects that help reduce carbon emissions.

22.     The projects proposed in this report will encourage either safe walking or cycling and will contribute to reducing carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Any engagement required with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual-project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Upper Harbour Local Board discussed the LBTCF programme at three workshops with AT in 2023.  This report reflects the views of the local board as expressed in the workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     The actions being considered do not have specific impacts on Māori.  Both AT and council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mātāwaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the AT website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about.

26.      Any AT project that requires consultation with iwi will include this within its project plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     This report requires consideration of a significant financial commitment of up to $1,120,260 by the Upper Harbour Local Board.

28.     The costs calculated are based on estimates and it is possible that costs on some projects may be under or over the estimations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that some projects may cost more than is budgeted in this report, but equally some projects may reduce in scope after further investigation work is carried out. 

30.     As resources and budgets are constrained, delaying decision making means that there is less time for planning for the investigation, design, and subsequent delivery of the projects that the local board wishes to progress. Timely decision making will provide the best opportunity for these projects to be delivered in the current political term.

31.     Finally, future budgets are not confirmed, meaning that there may be sudden changes to the programme next year after Auckland Council sets budgets through the Long-Term Plan 2024 – 2034 process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     AT will take note of the local board’s confirmed projects and continue to work towards public consultation and delivery.

33.     Throughout the process, AT will keep the local board updated and when a decision is required, a report will be made to a public meeting so the members can consider it and decide on next steps.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Overview - concept plan Oteha Valley shared path

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster, Elected member Relationship Partner, Auckland Transport.

Authorisers

John Gillespie, Head of Stakeholder and Elected Member Relationships, Auckland Transport

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Feedback on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023 - 2031

File No.: CP2023/14746

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031 and to provide information received from public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) is seeking feedback from local boards on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP). In particular, Auckland Transport is seeking feedback on the service improvements proposed for the local board’s area.

3.       The Regional Public Transport Plan is the main plan for public transport services in Auckland. It also includes a vision, goals, policies, and targets that relate to the planning and delivery of the public transportation system.

4.       Auckland Transport will use the local board’s formal views, along with feedback received via public consultation, to finalise the plan. The Auckland Transport Board is expected to adopt the final plan in November 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback to Auckland Transport on the draft Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2023-2031, in line with the template provided in Attachment A.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) is Auckland’s main plan for public transport (PT) services. It outlines how PT will be managed and improved over the next eight years, with a detailed focus on the first three years. This includes the services that will operate during this period (and how they will change) and the goals, policies and actions that will shape PT.

6.       The purpose of the RPTP is to enable consultation with the public and PT operators on the planning of PT services. This is a requirement of the Land Transport Management Act 2003.

7.       Public consultation on the draft RPTP ran from 17 July to 17 August 2023, and Auckland Transport (AT) received over 3,200 responses. This compares well to the 462 responses the previous (2018) RPTP received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Public feedback was generally very supportive of the content of the draft RPTP. This includes:

·    strong support for the plan’s vision and goals

·    support for the action areas within the plan

·    support for most proposed service improvements (with the main exception of the removals of ferry services to Gulf Harbour and Northcote Point).

9.       Feedback that was not supportive of the content of the draft RPTP included:

·    wanting further improvement and/or faster delivery

·    concerns that PT is too expensive or does not provide value for money

·    comments that a greater percentage of the cost of operating PT should come from users (via fares).

10.     The RPTP includes AT’s aspirations to do more in further improvements and faster delivery if and when more funding for PT becomes available.

11.     AT has provided a breakdown of the top areas submitters from each local board commented to assist the board in providing feedback (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Public transport has a key role to play in helping to reduce emissions, as set out in Auckland Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP). The RPTP acknowledges the ambitious targets the TERP has for increased PT usage, and the actions and improvements included in the RPTP will play an important role in making progress towards those targets.

13.     One of the RPTP’s goals is ‘enhancing the environment and tackling the climate emergency’. This goal guides efforts of transition to a low-emission PT system, encouraging mode shift, and adapting infrastructure to a changing climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Auckland Council’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee endorsed the overall strategic direction for the draft RPTP in April 2023. This included the vision and goals for the plan, and a ‘balanced’ approach to service improvements.

15.     Following public consultation closing, AT also engaged with the council’s advisory panels to get specific feedback about aspects of the plan relevant to the panels’ expertise.

16.     AT has also worked with Auckland Council and Eke Panuku staff to ensure, where possible, the draft RPTP is aligned with other strategic plans and projects across the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     AT held a range of public information events across the region at libraries, community centres, bus and train stations. AT also held two on-line drop-in sessions. Across all of these events, AT had hundreds of conversations with the public which will also be used to inform changes to the plan. In addition, some members of the public called AT to ask questions and seek clarification on content in the plan.

18.     Public feedback was generally supportive of the vision and goals in the draft RPTP and requested additional service improvements (beyond what AT is currently funded to deliver).

19.     Proposed service improvements in the draft RPTP in the local board’s area were set out in a memo from AT, dated 12 July 2023.

20.     AT set out the feedback received from residents of the local board’s area in a memo and supporting material (Attachment B and Attachment C) provided for a workshop on the draft RPTP held on 16 September 2023.

21.     Workshops to date have been positive, with most local boards supporting AT’s proposals for service improvements and initiatives to reduce the cost of public transport to users (such as the proposed weekly fare cap and extended transfer window).

22.     Some local boards have also requested more information around the use of existing services and expressed an interest in exploring the potential for on-demand AT Local services to operate in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     AT has held multiple hui with mana whenua as part of the development of the RPTP and will be making changes to the draft RPTP based on their feedback.

24.     The draft RPTP includes a Māori outcomes section (part 3.7), which outlines key areas of concern to mana whenua and mataawaka and where more detail can be found in the plan.

25.     AT intends to revise part 3.7, and other relevant parts of the RPTP, to reflect feedback received from Māori (both mana whenua and mataawaka).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications of providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

27.     The RPTP is required to be a realistically fundable plan, and AT’s budget for additional services is constrained (and fully allocated to the service improvements proposed in the draft RPTP).

28.     Any feedback provided regarding service level improvements should take into account AT’s financial constraints, and the trade-offs that may be required to implement them (for example, increasing services on one route is likely to require reductions on another route).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no risks associated with providing feedback to AT on the draft RPTP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     AT will use the feedback provided by the local board, along with feedback received from the public and other stakeholders, to finalise the draft RPTP.

31.     The AT Board will consider adopting the revised RPTP at their 29 November 2023 meeting.

32.     If adopted, the final RPTP will be publicly released in early December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft RPTP feedback template for local boards

67

b

Draft RPTP Upper Harbour Local Board consultation 2023 snapshot.

71

c

Draft RPTP post-consultation memo.

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Luke Elliot, principal Planner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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26 October 2023

 

 

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26 October 2023

 

 

Te Ara Hauāuru - Northwest Rapid Transit

File No.: CP2023/14820

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek views into rapid transit corridor investigations from Brigham Creek to the Auckland City Centre alongside the Northwestern Motorway, State Highway 16.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and partners have re-commenced work on Northwest Rapid Transit with a Detailed Business Case.

3.       The purpose of the Northwest Rapid Transit project is to provide a fast, frequent and efficient rapid transport option to the northwest of Auckland, from Brigham Creek to the Auckland City Centre, alongside State Highway 16. (Note, Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth has developed a long-term strategic plan for the northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert)  which includes a rapid transit corridor from Kumeū to a new interchange at Brigham Creek on State Highway16 which would connect to the Northwest Rapid Transit project.)

4.       This mahi is being led by Waka Kotahi in partnership with Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua and other iwi partners, and in close collaboration with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport who, along with iwi representatives, have members on the project steering committee.

 

5.       The project area covers from Brigham Creek to the Auckland City Centre along State Highway 16 and includes providing:

·   Rapid transit on a dedicated corridor – investigations will determine the best mode (bus or rail) and location for the corridor which could be along, or either side of, State Highway 16.

·   Station locations, and facilities – such as seating, passenger information displays, Closed Circuit Television, lighting and bike racks.

·   Access and connections to local bus services – we’re working with Auckland Transport to look at improvements to the supporting transport network (including feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling).

6.       The detailed business case process will confirm a recommended way forward for the project. The Detailed Business Case will:

·   confirm recommended mode and route for the Northwest Rapid Transit project, for an integrated rail, or independent bus solution

·   confirm staging (and any triggers) of recommended options

·   ensure affordable and stageable solutions are at the heart of what is being proposed

·   provide clarity on how this corridor interfaces with the wider rapid transit network and urban aspirations for the region

·   provide a compelling investment case for the recommended option. 

7.       It is important that a robust analysis is undertaken of all the potential bus and rail rapid transit options in order to deliver the best outcome for the northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert).

8.       The Northwest Rapid Transit project has made progress on establishing and assessing a long list of potential rapid transit modes and alignments along the Northwestern Motorway (State Highway 16).

9.       The Northwest Rapid Transit project is carrying out more detailed investigations as we work to confirm an emerging short list of options. 

10.     The Northwest Rapid Transit project team will discuss the potential rapid transit options with the local board in the coming months, prior to the second phase of engagement early next year which will involve public consultation on the shortlisted options.

11.     The second phase of public engagement was initially planned to be in November-December 2023. However, more time is needed to further our detailed investigations. Therefore, the second phase of engagement has been moved to early 2024, which will enable more informed discussions with stakeholders and communities.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on Northwest Rapid Transit project.

b)      whakarite / provide feedback on what Waka Kotahi and partners should consider as part of our investigations, including views on:

i)        access and connections on local roads – i.e. feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling connections

ii)       issues on local roads that you feel need to be addressed for rapid transit on State Highway 16 to work well

iii)      facilities or design features you would like to see at rapid transit stations (the ones along the motorway).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     This project will be an important part of Auckland’s public transport infrastructure to facilitate growth in the northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert) , provide attractive and equitable transport choice, and encourage mode shift. This project will help to reduce reliance on private vehicles, helping to build more resilience in the network while contributing to a healthier transport system that protects the climate.

13.     The investment objectives of the project are:

·   providing an attractive, equitable rapid transit service that improves access to social, cultural and economic opportunities and is well integrated with the current and future transport system

·   a transport intervention that reduces Auckland’s carbon footprint

·   supporting a compact urban form and enabling quality integrated communities.

14.     Te Kawerau ā Maki have gifted the name ‘Te Ara Hauāuru’ to the project. This name references the wind that blows from the west, a powerful force and story for the iwi. The west wind carries the voice and vision of the community of the west, and the path of connection between these communities and Tāmaki Makaurau.   

15.     Waka Kotahi is grateful to Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua and other iwi partners for sharing their knowledge (mātauranga) of the land, waters and its peoples. We acknowledge their role as kaitiaki (guardians) with responsibility for the protection of te taiao (environment) and taonga tuku iho (heritage).

Why improvements are needed

16.     The northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert) is growing with more houses, more jobs, and more people needing to travel. It’s anticipated that by 2051, the northwest will have more than:

·   100,000 extra people living in the northwest

·   40,000 new households

·   increased congestion

·   increased pressure on our public transport network.

17.     People living in the northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert) currently have limited public transport options and many rely heavily on their car:

·   over 60 per cent of people living in the northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert) commute out of the area

·   more travel to work by car than in any other region in Auckland.

Improving transport equity and wellbeing

18.     Improving transport equity in the northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert)  is a key focus for this project.

19.     The northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert)  is an area that’s long lacked viable public transport options. This has resulted in people relying on their cars – causing increasing congestion and carbon emissions. For many people, the lack of public transport choice has stopped them from accessing key essential services and participating in everyday activities.

20.     Providing a faster and more reliable public transport choices will transform the daily lives of many people in the northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert)  for generations to come and help provide for a more vibrant and better-connected community.

More sustainable transport choice

21.     More transport choice and reducing reliance on private vehicles can help build more resilience in our networks, contribute towards a healthier, safer transport system and reliably get everyone where they need to go in a way that also helps to protect the climate.

22.     The contributions we make today towards a more sustainable future will add up to help form a healthier and safer future for us all.

23.     Better transport options will also help the central government and Aotearoa New Zealand’s commitment to reaching net zero emissions by 2050.

24.     This project will align with the Government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP), which describes how we are going to meet emissions budgets and make progress towards meeting the 2050 target. This includes reduced carbon emissions, reduced embodied carbon emissions and ways to build resilience in the transport network.

Scope

Mode and route 

25.     Confirmation of the final mode (bus or rail) is required for the Detailed Business Case, and this must consider any potential future development and potential mode switch as continued growth occurs along the corridor. Transport demand for various scenarios of the wider rapid transit network will also be assessed, including a Northwest Rapid Transit (NWRT)-only scenario.

26.     It’s important that we undertake a robust analysis of all the potential bus and rail rapid transit options in order to deliver the best outcome for the northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert).

27.     A previous investigation, as part of the Indicative Business Case, looked at the Westgate to Newton Road section of the Northwestern Motorway and recommended bus as the preferred mode.

28.     However, those investigations did not include the city centre components of the journey, from Newton Road to downtown, where the most critical constraints are. Previous work was also undertaken five years ago, so it is important to reflect any changes that have occurred since then such as further development of other rapid transit projects in Auckland as well as more recent city centre planning by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

29.     This requires some further technical work to confirm the best mode for the corridor, as part of developing a Detailed Business Case for the project.

30.     The recommended mode will be determined based on a number of factors, including consideration of:

·   demand

·   capacity

·   journey times

·   how long the solution will continue to operate effectively, and potential for it to be upgraded

·   engineering factors

·   cost and value for money

·   land acquisition

·   integration and staging the delivery of the wider rapid transit network

·   as well as other detailed analysis (e.g environmental impacts).

31.     The overall route alignment and station placements along the NWRT corridor will be assessed with consideration to respective urban hubs and business developments, as well as key local feeder bus routes that will need to be established to support the project outcomes. 

32.     The Northwest Rapid Transit project team will share the outcomes of investigations into mode and route as the Detailed Business Case (DBC) progresses.

Integration with the local network

33.     The success of a rapid transit solution along State Highway 16 (SH16) will be dependent on reliable walking, cycling and bus journeys on local roads connecting to stations along the motorway.

34.     The scope of this project includes access and connections to local bus services – the Northwest Rapid Transit project team is working with Auckland Transport to look at improvements to the supporting transport network (including feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling).

Integration with the wider rapid transit network

35.     This project will provide connections to the growing rapid transit network and make Tāmaki Makaurau a better place to live, while at the same time moving us towards a healthier transport network.

36.     As part of this project, the Northwest Rapid Transit project team is taking a whole of network approach and working closely with the Wāitemata Harbour Connections, Auckland Light Rail and Te Tupu Ngātahi – Supporting Growth.

37.     Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth has developed a long-term Strategic Plan for the northwest (Huapai, Riverhead, and Hobsonville to Te Atatū, Massey and Mt Albert) which includes a rapid transit corridor from Kumeū to a new interchange at Brigham Creek on SH16 which would connect to the Northwest Rapid Transit project.

38.     Further planning work on NWRT will integrate wider strategic planning including the Auckland Plan 2050 and the Auckland Rapid Transit Plan.

Community engagement

39.     The first phase of community engagement ran from 24 August 2023 to 24 September 2023 and nearly 4000 people completed our engagement survey.

40.     The Northwest Rapid Transit project team is currently analysing feedback from communities. When a report is ready, a high-level summary of the community feedback with some local board specific findings will be provided.  This is proposed to be available in November 2023.

41.     The aim of the first phase was to let people know about the project and ask some high-level questions about their experiences and what they think we should consider as part of our investigations.

42.     The second phase of community engagement is scheduled for early 2024 (March) and will involve consultation on the emerging shortlist.

43.     The first phase of engagement involved workshops with 11 local boards (presentation available Attachment B). The Northwest rapid Transit project team is grateful for local board input, some of the key feedback from workshops with the local board included:

·   support of the need for rapid transit to the northwest and better public transport options to support urban growth

·   the importance of improvements to local roads feeding into rapid transit stations on the motorway, and making it easy for people to transfer between services

·   integration with the rapid transit network

·   support for active modes and the ability to take bikes/scooters on public transport

·   the importance of consulting widely and selling the vision for the project and its benefits

·   the need for better public transport options further north to Kumeu and Huapai

·   the need for better public transport connections to the North Shore along State Highway18

·   the need to find ways to speed up delivery timeframes and consideration of staging options

·   the ability to retrofit a bus solution to light-rail in the future

·   park and ride facilities at Brigham Creek.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     The Northwest Rapid Transit project team have made progress on establishing and assessing a long list of potential rapid transit modes and alignments along the Northwestern Motorway (State Highway 16).

45.     The Northwest Rapid Transit project team are currently carrying out more detailed investigations to confirm a short list of options. 

46.     Local board feedback will feed into the investigation work currently underway. The local board’s formal submission will be considered alongside the stakeholder and community views heard through the first phase of engagement which saw nearly 4000 people complete our survey.

47.     It is intended to publish a public feedback report (which will include local board feedback) before the end of the year.

48.     The Northwest Rapid Transit project team will discuss the potential rapid transit options with the  local board in the coming months, prior to the second phase of engagement early next year which will involve public consultation on the shortlisted options.

49.     The second phase of public engagement was initially planned to be in November-December 2023. However, more time is needed to further the Northwest Rapid Transit project team’s detailed investigations. Therefore, the second phase of engagement has been moved to early 2024, which will put the Northwest Rapid Transit project team in a better position to have more informed discussions with stakeholders and communities.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo to local boards 26 July 2023

87

b

Local board workshop presentation

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Daniel McCabe , Principal Communications and Engagement Advisor, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/14959

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with a summary of public consultation feedback, respond to previous queries and seek formal resolutions supporting the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted a Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce deaths and serious injuries. Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       A speed management plan for the Auckland region is a government requirement and will set safe and appropriate speed limits to reduce road deaths and serious injuries. Katoa, Ka Ora is the name of this plan, and it is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all.

5.       Auckland Transport workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora with local boards in February and March 2023, and local boards provided formal feedback about the proposal in March and April 2023, specifically the five development approaches within the speed management plan.

6.       Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July 2023 to 28 August 2023.

7.       Auckland Transport has analysed and summarised the consultation feedback received and provided responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora. This information is provided as a series of attachments to this report for local board members to review.

8.       Further, the report seeks local board support for the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes within its area.

9.       Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the summary of public consultation feedback received on the proposed Katoa, Ka Ora speed limit changes (Attachment D). 

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note Auckland Transports responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora (Attachment A). 

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note Auckland Transports legal obligations under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (Rule) and that the Rule requires best efforts to complete safe and appropriate speed limit setting near schools by 2027. 

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that since June 2020, when the programme started, road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.  

e)      tautoko / support the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes identified for this local board area (Attachment C and Attachment E) 

f)       tautoko / support speed limit review near schools that do not have current or proposed safe speed limits including Kristin School, Pinehurst School, City Impact Church School, Albany Senior High School, Vanguard Military School, Ridgeview School, Marina View School and Albany Junior High School

g)      tautoko / support speed limit review of additional locations requested in public consultation feedback and recommended for the next future consultation in Attachment C. 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use. 

Alignment with Central Government policy

11.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy.  The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to school.

12.     The strategy’s action plan includes the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires road controlling authorities to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

13.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications; category one and category two. Most Auckland schools are classified as category one, or schools where children may be out and about outside the school gate. To comply with the Rule, speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) are required in the area outside of the school. Category two schools are where children are more likely to be picked up or dropped off within the school grounds.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency).

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent, easy-to-understand changes that communities can understand. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

Auckland Transport’s role

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury. So, after receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board, the safe speeds programme has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland reducing speed limits on many roads.

18.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes, the programme focuses on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation. The phases can be summarised as follows:

·   Phase One covered approximately 11 per cent of the local road network and focused on the highest risk roads.

·   Phase Two covered approximately 8 per cent of the network and had a significant focus on safe speeds for rural roads and roads near schools.

·   Phase Three covered approximately 19 per cent of the network and included roads around schools, rural roads, town centre roads, rural marae and roads requested by the community.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on safety around schools so AT directly surveyed all schools with proposed speed limit changes in late-2022 and early 2023. The summary results of the local schools survey was shared with each local board as part of the February/March 2023 workshop follow-up.

22.     Information about the iterative engagement process used to develop Katoa, Ka Ora was shared with local boards in two rounds of workshops held in February/March 2022 and in February/March 2023.

23.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on. Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July 2023 to 28 August 2023. 7801 pieces of feedback were received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Katoa, Ka Ora has been consulted on with the public and with local boards. This report updates local boards on:

·   the results of the public consultation conducted from 24 July to 28 August 2023 in each local board area, including AT’s responses to the changes requested by members of the public.

·   AT’s response to the local board feedback provided in April 2023, including AT’s responses to changes requested by members of the public.

25.     This information is included in attachments to this report and AT’s overall considerations for this local board area are summarised in a two-page summary infographic (Attachment B).

26.     Additionally, the full consultation report will be published on the AT website by early November 2023.

27.     The attachments provide a clear summary of what people in this local board area said about the programme so local board members are aware of community sentiment as they consider AT’s technical advice.

Technical advice

28.     AT’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system, the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. This includes finalising a speed management plan within legal timeframes and setting safe speed limits near all schools by 2027. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by 2027, we are proposing to include a review of permanent speed limits near all remaining schools in a future consultation.

30.     Further, the impact of speed reduction on the number of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

·   since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.

·   in comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a 9 per cent increase in road deaths.

31.     30km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed around schools is used for the safe speed programme.

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that Katoa, Ka Ora meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. The proposed speed of 30km/h near schools is consistent with legislative requirements and is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.  

33.     Additionally, speed reductions delivered to date by the programme are already reducing DSI. It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the local board is to support the programme.

Customer research

34.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

35.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

36.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. Their experiences of high-speed vehicles, near misses, crime and ‘stranger danger’ around schools mean an increasing number of parents drive their children to and from school. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

38.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

39.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The Safe Speeds Programme was endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning committee and the current term Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     AT has visited all local boards during February 2023 and March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes.

42.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February 2023 and March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

43.     In post-workshop resolutions local boards indicated their level of support for the programme. Common themes were higher levels of support near schools, town centres and places where people are out and about.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

45.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka. Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora.

46.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

47.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at their workshops in February and March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications.  Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. Comprehensive communications including the evidence and key facts have been provided to increase understanding and support of safe speeds. 

50.     Funding constraints may require the scale of the plan to be reduced or delivery to be slowed or delayed.  Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback received from local boards. We will use this, along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our legal and safety obligations as a road controlling authority, to help edit and finalise Katoa, Ka Ora, a speed management plan for Auckland.

52.     We have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee in November 2023. Confirmation of a date is yet to be received.

53.     Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board - Response to resolutions.

109

b

Upper Harbour Local Board - Infographic.

115

c

Upper Harbour Local Board - Response to site specific feedback

117

d

Upper Harbour Local Board - Feedback summary.

119

e

E_Katoa Ka Ora Map Upper Harbour.

129

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Eric van Essen, Programme Director, Strategic Programmes, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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26 October 2023

 

 

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26 October 2023

 

 

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26 October 2023

 

 

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26 October 2023

 

 

Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones (Oct-Dec 2023)

File No.: CP2023/15061

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with an update on the Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, council-controlled organisation work programme (July - September 2023) and expected milestones in its area for Quarter Two (October - December 2023). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 Council-Controlled Organisation Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were adopted in June 2022. These plans record council-controlled organisation responsibilities and local board commitments with Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare.

3.       Council-controlled organisations provide local boards with the council-controlled organisation work programme in their area. Each work programme item lists the engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

4.       The engagement plans expired in June 2023 and have not been updated since June 2022. Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts on council-controlled organisations has delayed a review that was intended to start in the first half of 2023.

5.       A current review of the plans is not recommended due to disruptions and unknowns from:

·    Water Services Reform Programme

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer having dedicated staff to support local boards

·    Auckland Transport rolling out a new local board relationship programme

·    reviewing the CCO Accountability Policy through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

6.       This report does not include work programme updates from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited or Auckland Transport.

7.       Auckland Transport will provide their work programme updates through Forward Work Programme briefing packs coming to November 2023 local board workshops.

8.       This report provides an update on Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare work programme items from July to September 2023 and the engagement approach and anticipated milestones for Quarter Two (October -December 2023). 

9.       The next council-controlled organisation quarterly report will be provided in February 2024.  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the council-controlled organisation update on engagement plans, the work programme (July - September 2023) and anticipated milestones and engagement approaches for Quarter Two (October - December 2023).

 

Horopaki

Context

What are Council-controlled Organisation Local Board Joint Engagement Plans?

10.     The 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations recommended that council-controlled organisations and local boards adopt an engagement plan to:

·    help cement council-controlled organisation (CCO) and local board relations

·    agree on a common understanding of accountability between CCOs and local boards

·    coordinate CCO actions better at the local level.

11.     These plans record the commitment between Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Watercare and the local boards to work together.

12.     Each local board adopted their 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans in June 2022. These plans include CCO responsibilities and local board commitments.

CCO work programme items

13.     CCOs provide local boards with a work programme that lists the different CCO projects happening in the local board area.

14.     The work programme is not a full list of projects in the local board area. It includes work programme items for engagement purposes.

15.     Each work programme item records an engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

16.     The engagement approach is based on the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) standards which are provided in Table 1 below. Note that the “involve” and “empower” categories are not included in the CCO reporting as decided when the joint engagement plans were adopted.

Table 1: International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Engagement Approach Levels

CCO engagement approach

Commitment to local boards

Inform

CCOs will keep local boards informed.

Consult

CCOs will keep local boards informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and aspirations, and provide feedback on how local board input influenced the decision. CCOs will seek local board feedback on drafts and proposals.

Collaborate

CCOs will work together with local boards to formulate solutions and incorporate their advice and recommendations into the decisions to the maximum extent possible.

 

CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans have expired

17.     The CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans expired in June 2023. The plans have not been updated since June 2022.

18.     The plans were not updated in the first half of 2023 due to disruptions to CCOs caused from Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts.  

19.     A current review of the Joint CCO Engagement Plans is not recommended since:

·    the Water Services Reform Programme may replace Watercare with a new water entity

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer has dedicated support staff to support local board engagement and liaison following Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts

·    Auckland Transport is currently rolling out work which future engagement plans would need to consider, such as:

Forward Works Programme (full list of Auckland Transport projects in the local board area)

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

Regional Land Transport Plan

Local Board Transport Plans

·    the CCO Accountability Policy will be updated as part of the next Long-term Plan which the CCO engagement plans would need to align. 

What are the next steps?

20.     The CCO quarterly reporting will continue to provide work programme updates from Watercare and Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

21.     Local board staff will:

·    work with Auckland Transport on providing clarity on local transport plans and how the transport plans would either replace or integrate with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    liaise with Tātaki Auckland Unlimited on what engagement and reporting resource they are able to provide to local boards following their restructure

·    investigate what engagement requirements and role the new water entity will have with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    provide support to local boards on advocating for any changes wanted to the CCO Accountability Policy through developing the next Long-term Plan. 

22.     Auckland Transport will provide updates on their work programme through the Forward Works Programme workshops starting in November 2023. 

23.     Local boards received the last update to the CCO work programme and engagement approach in July 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     The following sections provide an update on work programme items for Eke Panuku and Watercare. 

25.     More detailed updates to the CCO work programme are provided in Attachments A-B.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     This report does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

27.     Each CCO must work within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework. Information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Local boards advise CCOs of issues or projects of significance, communicate the interests and preferences of their communities and allow for flexibility in terms of engagement, recognising differing levels of interest.

29.     The work programme items are shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report on the CCO work programme items provides the communication of up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     This report does not have a direct impact on Māori, however the projects it refers to will.

32.     Local boards and CCOs provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to their decision-making processes. These opportunities will be worked on a project or programme basis. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     This report does not have financial impacts on local boards.

34.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     Some local boards expressed concern over the quality of CCO work programme reporting in April 2023 and July 2023, in particular with Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport is currently working on a relationship project which has objectives to deliver:

·    an enhanced process to develop transport plans that reflect local board input and priorities

·    more consistent and timely reporting, updates and analysis on local projects and issues

·    improved support for communication and engagement with local communities.

36.     Auckland Transport will be presenting Forward Work Programme briefing packs to local boards at November 2023 workshops which will address their CCO quarterly updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     The local board will receive the next CCO work programme report in February 2024 which will include an update on projects from Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023) and expected milestones for work in Quarter Three (Jan-Mar 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Eke Panuku Development Auckland work programme update.

137

b

Watercare work programme update.

139

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Adoption of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023

File No.: CP2023/14103

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption every three years and use the special consultative procedure to engage with their communities.

3.       A draft version of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period for the special consultative procedure ran from 13 July 2023 to 14 August 2023.

4.       77 per cent of submissions by individuals and 82 per cent of submissions from organisations strongly or mostly agreed with the draft local board plan. A full analysis of the submissions and feedback on the draft local board plan 2023 can be found here: https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2023/09/20230914_UH_AGN_11915_AT_WEB.htm

5.       The local board has considered all submissions and feedback received from the consultation period. Minor edits to the draft local board plan are proposed to reflect community feedback.

6.       The final draft Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023, which includes the proposed changes will be tabled at the 26 October 2023 business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023 tabled at the 26 October 2023 business meeting.

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson to approve any minor edits that may be necessary to the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023 prior to publication.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·    adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

9.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the draft Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023

10.     The local board plan strategic framework consists of five key themes which includes objectives, key initiatives, measures of success, advocacy.

11.     Table one below provides an explanation of the strategic framework applied in the local board plan:

Strategic Framework

Item

Description

Theme

Five key themes throughout the local board plan that are the areas of focus. These key focus areas are:

·    Our people

·    Our environment

·    Our community

·    Our places

·    Our economy.

Objective

A goal the local board seeks to achieve that is realistic (in the current financial environment), measurable and relevant to its roles and responsibilities

Key Initiative

A program of work, project or activity that brings the objective and outcome to life: should be deliverable (‘actionable’) and meaningful but not specific solutions

Measure of Success

A tool that outlines what success looks like and how we have achieved the objective or initiatives outlined in the plan.

Advocacy

Initiatives that the local board may not have decision-making responsibilities or funding for but recognise the value it will add to the local community.

 

Table 1: local board plan Strategic Framework

12.     The five key themes of the local board plan include:

·        Our people: Our goal is to create an inclusive and connected community, adapting to the changing needs of our growing diverse population and ensuring everyone has a voice in decisions that affect them

·        Our environment: Upper Harbour is an area with unique natural landscapes. We will continue to work alongside our volunteers and community to enhance and protect our natural environment

·        Our community: Our commitment is to provide access to well-maintained sports fields, parks, coastal amenities, and community facilities for everyone

·        Our places: With better planning and appropriate infrastructure, we aspire to create an area that allows our residents to easily connect between each other and within their neighbourhoods

·        Our economy: We will continue to support our local businesses and communities to create a thriving, resilient and sustainable economy.

13.     The local board plan includes sections for Māori Outcomes and Climate Action, providing a summary of the considerations that have been addressed throughout the plan.

Consideration of submissions and feedback

14.     A draft version of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period ran from 13 July 2023 to 14 August 2023

15.     The Upper Harbour Local Board has considered the submissions and feedback received.

16.     Public feedback on the draft plan was generally positive. The majority of submitters were supportive of the plan, its direction and themes covered.

17.     A full analysis of the submissions and feedback on the draft local board plan 2023 can be found here: https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2023/09/20230914_UH_AGN_11915_AT_WEB.htm

18.     The key feedback points and subsequent proposed changes to the draft local board plan are outlined in Table 2 below:

 

Key point of feedback

Proposed change/s

Requests for crime prevention and community safety initiatives

Page 12

New Challenge:

Increase in crime rate is adversely impacting on our residents and their sense of safety.

Page 12

New Opportunity:

Partnering with community organisations that have existing safety programmes focusing on crime prevention and community reassurance.

Page 13

Amended key initiative:

Support a geographic/local neighbourhood approach to initiatives which bring communities together and creates sense of identity and connection to place including through inter-generational and youth focused activities

Page 14

Amended objective:

Our communities feel safe and supported and are resilient to adversity and change

Page 14

Amended initiative:

Support initiatives that build community networks and connections, including crime prevention and safety initiatives which help communities feel safer and better prepared to respond to emergencies and the impacts of climate change

Page 14

New measure of success:

Our communities are connected and feel safe in their neighbourhoods.

 

Page 14

New Advocacy:

Whenever the opportunities arise, advocate to Central Government for greater social equity acknowledging the crime prevention outcomes that can be achieved.

 

Request for advocacy to retain the Natural Environment Targeted Rate and Water Quality Targeted Rate

Page 17

New Advocacy:

Advocate to the Governing Body for the retention of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate and Water Quality Targeted Rate.

Request to see more support for the arts and initiatives for the elderly

Page 19

Amended objective:

Support and encourage our community organisations to deliver relevant and diverse activities that connect the community and reflect their needs such as events, art programmes and digital literacy

Request for advocacy to retain and increase regional sports and recreation funding

Page 21

Advocate to Governing Body for retention and increase in investment in the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund and Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operational Grants which enables our residents to participate in community sport and recreation activities. 

 

Request to see support for local business outside the Business North Harbour Business Improvement District

Page 26

Amended initiative:

Work with council departments, local businesses, and Business North Harbour to support local businesses to engage in initiatives to reduce waste, and become low carbon and climate resilient

 

Page 26

Amended initiative:

Support local businesses, Business North Harbour and community groups to build new skills and deliver projects which support businesses and employment growth

Page 27

Amended initiative:

Support local businesses, Business North Harbour and community groups to encourage social and local procurement and retail opportunities that contribute to a successful economy

 

Table 2: Proposed changes to the draft Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023 following public consultation.

19.     The local board plan (o be tabled) for approval will incorporate the proposed changes as described in Table 2 and other minor changes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     The local board plan contains a specific Climate Action section, focusing on the scope of challenges posted by climate change. It considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

21.     Specific objectives and initiatives included in the plan are outlined in Table 3 below: 

 

Objective

Key Initiative

Our communities feel safe and supported and are resilient to adversity and change

Support initiatives that build community networks and connections, including crime prevention and safety initiatives which help communities feel safer and better prepared to respond to emergencies and the impacts of climate change

Our indigenous and culturally valued biodiversity is improved and protected by preserving and enhancing the habitats that support it

Continue to implement actions from the Upper Harbour Local Board Urban Ngahere (forest)  Strategy

Support initiatives that deliver on the Upper Harbour Pest Free Strategy and Upper Harbour Ecological Connectivity Strategy

Our communities are resilient to climate change and care for their surrounding environment

Support community-led initiatives and projects that foster sustainable lifestyles, including waste minimisation, emissions reduction and climate resilience

Continue to support community restoration, environmental groups and sustainable education initiatives that protect and enhance our natural assets

The lifeforce (mauri) of our harbour and waterways is respected and restored

Support schools, businesses, environmental groups and community volunteers to carry out stream restoration projects including pollution reduction, stream clean-ups,

habitat improvement and native riparian planting.

 

Our communities have opportunities to minimise their carbon emissions and waste.

Support low carbon and waste minimisation initiatives that support our communities in reducing waste to landfill.

 

An accessible walking and cycling network within neighbourhoods.

 

Continue to implement the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan to provide a fit for purpose, accessible and safe network of pathways and cycleway connections in our area.

 

Invest in wayfinding signage within our walking and cycling network to improve connections.

Target transport investment to the most significant transport related challenges

 

Continue to prioritise our limited Local Board Transport Capital Fund budget to projects that deliver the most network benefits for safety, climate action, our economy, public health, and social outcomes

Our local businesses and industry are resilient and sustainable

Work with council departments, local businesses, and Business North Harbour to support local businesses to engage in initiatives to reduce waste, and become low carbon and climate resilient

 

Support businesses, groups, and event organisers to produce safe and sustainable events and activities that deliver local benefits, cater for local participation, and increase visitors to the area.

 

 

 

Table 3: local board plan Climate Action related objectives and initiatives 

22.     The impact on the climate of the final plans has been considered. The final publication will be an online document to minimise printing hard copies. 

23.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Upper Harbour Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The adoption of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023 will inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. It will also form the basis for the development of the following three years’ work programmes.

25.     Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft and final plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the final Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023. Workshops were held on 28 September 2023 to discuss and consider feedback and provide direction on any changes.

27.     In developing the local board plan, the Upper Harbour Local Board considered:

·    what is already known about our communities and what is important to them

·    submissions received via online forms, hardcopy forms, emails and post

·    feedback provided at engagement events

·    regional strategies and policies

·    staff advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The draft Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023 was developed with consideration given to existing feedback from mana whenua and mātāwaka. This included seeking their views and values throughout the development of the local board plan 2023.

29.     Two online information sessions for mana whenua were held on 8th and 13th June 2023.  These sessions provided an opportunity for mana whenua to hear about local board plans, how the perspective of Māori could be reflected through their input, the feedback process and timelines.

30.     Mana whenua organisations were asked which (of the 21) draft local board plans they wanted to review, and those requested were shared, along with tailored feedback forms.

31.     Ngāti Manuhiri, Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua and Te Kawerau a Maki requested and were provided with a copy of the draft Upper Harbour Local Board plan.  A copy of the Māori Outcome summary for Upper Harbour was also provided to Ngāti Manuhiri and Te Kawerau a Maki.

32.     No feedback has been received from mana whenua or mātāwaka on the draft Upper Harbour Local Board Plan.

33.     The local board plan includes a section for Māori Outcomes, as well as these considerations being addressed throughout the plan. Specific objectives and initiatives included in the plan are outlined in Table 4 below: 

 

Objective

Key Initiative

We have meaningful relationships with Māori and celebrate Māori culture and identity in Upper Harbour

 

Partner with mana whenua and mātāwaka to deliver initiatives that support sharing Māori cultural knowledge and practices through storytelling projects and celebrating te reo Māori

 

Work with mana whenua who have an interest in our area to respond to their aspirations

 

Our communities practice te ao Māori kaitiakitanga (guardianship) principles

Partner with mana whenua, mātāwaka and community groups to restore te taiao (the environment), prepare for the effects of climate change and deliver initiatives that increase understanding of mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge)

 

Young people including rangatahi Māori have the skills and training needed for quality, sustainable employment

Support initiatives that provide access to business mentoring and work experience for young people including rangatahi Māori

 

 

 

Table 4: draft Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023 Māori Outcome related objectives and initiatives 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plan informs this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     There are no risks identified in adopting the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Staff recommend that responsibility for approving any minor edits following adoption be delegated to the Chairperson Upper Harbour Local Board.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Heather Skinner - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2023/12541

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the updated Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar for October 2023 – December 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A to the agenda report. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Upper Harbour Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar for October 2023 – December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar October 2023 - December - 2023

151

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Workshop records

File No.: CP2023/12542

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 14, 21 and 28 September 2023. A copy of the workshop records is attached (refer to attachments A, B and C).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 14, 21 and 28 September 2023 (refer to attachments A,B and C).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board - record of workshop 14 September 2023.

155

b

Upper Harbour Local Board - record of workshop 21 September 2023.

157

c

Upper Harbour Local Board - record of workshop 28 September 2023

161

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Local Board Members' Reports - October 2023

File No.: CP2023/12544

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Upper Harbour Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Upper Harbour Local Board to provide a report on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal and written local board members reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Greenhithe Community Basketball Court presentation.                                                  Page 169


Upper Harbour Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

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