I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 26 October 2023

4.00pm

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Office
39 Glenmall Place
Glen Eden

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN ADDENDUM AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Greg Presland

 

Deputy Chairperson

Michelle Clayton

 

Members

Mark Allen

Liz Manley

 

Sandra Coney, QSO

Linda Potauaine

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Nataly Anchicoque

Democracy Advisor

 

24 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 0272872403

Email: Nataly.Anchicoque@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

 

12        Adoption of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023                                                               5

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

26 October 2023

 

 

Adoption of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023

File No.: CP2023/15822

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption every three years and use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

3.       A draft version of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

4.       The local board has considered submissions and feedback received from the consultation period, and made a number of changes in response.

5.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023, which includes the proposed changes, is attached to this report.

6.       The key sections of the Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) are: Māori outcomes; Climate action; Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area; Our people; Our environment; Our community; Our places; Our economy.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023 as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board to approve any minor edits that may be necessary to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023 prior to publication.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·    adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

9.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the Local Board Plan 2023

10.     Māori Outcomes, Climate Action, and the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area are overarching themes in the plan. These are reflected in five focus areas, along with a range of other outcomes that are important for the local area:

Our People: Our distinctive and diverse communities are thriving, resilient and adaptable. People are connected, feel a sense of belonging, and work together to support wellbeing

Our Environment: Biodiversity is enhanced, significant ecological areas are protected and restored as a sanctuary for native plants and wildlife. Our people are connected to and care for the environment. The mauri of our freshwater streams, the Manukau Harbour, and West Coast lagoons and wetlands are restored

Our Community: Parks, facilities and services are accessible and meet the needs of our diverse urban and rural communities. Arts, culture, and creativity are a celebrated part of living in the West. Māori culture and identity is visible and valued

Our Places: We have thriving town and village centres, connected by a reliable, resilient and sustainable transport network. The Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area is protected and restored for current and future generations. The relationship with Te Kawerau ā Maki and Ngati Whātua is acknowledged

Our Economy: Sustainable local economic activity is supported. Our business centres are active and successful. Home-based businesses and innovation is fostered.  Opportunities for rural activities continue.

Consideration of submissions and feedback

11.     A draft version of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

12.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has considered the submissions and feedback received.

13.     Public feedback on the draft plan was mixed. Submissions were reported to the local board on 14 September 2023 and a summary report is available on the Auckland Council engagement website: https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/local-board-plans-2023-feedback.

14.     A quarter of respondents said they supported the draft plan overall, a further 50 percent said they supported it in part, while just over 15 percent said they did not support the draft plan. The level of support was highest in the ‘Our Environment’ theme (with 60 percent saying they supported the focus, and 23 percent saying they supported it in part), and lowest in the ‘Our Places’ theme (with 35 percent support and 39 percent support in part).

15.     The level of participation was a notable feature. There were a total of 99 written submissions. This is less than in previous local board plan consultations where submission numbers have varied between 160 and 240. Additional feedback was received through Have Your Say events.

16.     As a proportion of the population, younger age groups were significantly under-represented, as were those who identified as being of Pacifika, Asian and Māori ethnicity.


 

 

17.     The analysis and subsequent changes to the outcome chapters are outlined in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Changes to the draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023

Area of feedback

Analysis

Proposed change

Climate Action (p.12-14 *)

 

 

 

 

* Note: all page references in this table refer to the Local Board Plan (LBP) in Attachment A.

Concern over road maintenance and road slips was a submission theme. While this is an Auckland Transport responsibility, and outside of the local board’s direct control, it is recommended it be acknowledged as an advocacy issue.

New paragraph added:

“Roads are a critical lifeline. We will advocate for transport assets to be managed and maintained to face the challenges of the future “.

 

This is carried through into the Our Places section for advocacy.

Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area (WRHA) (p.15-16)

Consequential amendment. The five-yearly WRHA Monitoring Report was approved after the draft LBP was developed. 

Reference to the ‘State of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area 2023’ monitoring report updated to reflect its publication.

 

The aspiration to become a dark sky place is reflected in the WRHA section of the LBP and the ‘Our Economy’ section to diversify the areas visitor attractions. It also has important environmental benefits for an area with significant birds and other wildlife.

Added an acknowledgement of the environmental benefit of becoming a dark sky place.

Our People (p.17- 20)

Recommend as additional initiatives to reflect the significant work happening around recovery, as well as the ongoing challenge of ensuring engagement is effective.

The following initiatives have been added:

“Support the recovery of people and communities impacted by the early 2023 storms”.

“Improve engagement with established and new communities”.

 

 

Under the objective, ‘We work effectively with neighbouring local boards as a voice for west Auckland’, added examples of what this could include.

Our Environment (p.21-25)

Urban trees contribute positively to neighbourhood amenity, biodiversity, and climate change mitigation/adaptation. Housing development is a pressure in some areas as well as a lack of protection. Recommended as an addition through the submissions and deliberation process

Added a new objective: “Protection and enhancement of urban tree cover”.

 

As noted earlier, the five-yearly WRHA Monitoring Report was approved after the draft LBP was developed. A new advocacy point has been added in response new information, and a submission point.

In the advocacy table, added a request for:

“A review of monitoring for future Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Monitoring Reports”.

 

Recommended as an addition through the submissions and deliberation process.

“Continued education, research and controls to protect kauri forests from the threat of kauri dieback’.

 

Recommended as an addition through the submissions and deliberation process.

“Protection of the urban ngahere through tree scheduling, plan changes, as well as non-regulatory programmes”.

 

Recommended as an addition through the submissions and deliberation process.

“Information and resources are available to support remediation and planting of landslides”.

 

Recommended as an addition through the submissions and deliberation process.

“Restoration of Te Henga wetland”.

Our Community (p.26–29)

There is a large and diverse range of community leases that provide significant community value. An amendment was proposed during deliberations for clarity and to avoid misinterpretation.

Under opportunities, deleted the following:

‘Improving knowledge of the community lease portfolio will help us understand the value and benefits’.

 

Development of a new local parks management plan is due to start and will be a significant body of work during the local board plan period.

New initiatives added, including: 

Prepare a Waitākere Ranges Local Parks Management Plan for the more than 200 local parks in the area.

 

Track closures are a recurrent submission theme. The revised LBP supports the intent in the Waitākere Ranges Regional Parks Management Plan.

Advocacy, added:

‘Developing a recreation plan for the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park, including a track network’.

Our Places (p. 30-34)

A lack of recognition of particular places was a submission theme. Revisions of the draft plan have aimed to be encompassing of the range of places, rather than list specific places.

In the Our plan table, amended the objective to

“Thriving village, sustainable villages that people take pride in” and broadened the accompanying initiative to encompass all public places rather than just Glen Eden.”

 

A conservation plan has been prepared for this significant community building in Titirangi, which is due to be refurbished.

Added the initiative:

“Nominate Titirangi War Memorial Hall for scheduling in the Unitary Plan as a heritage place”.

 

Piha and Te Henga on the West Coast, as well as Manukau Harbour beaches, are popular visitor destinations with limited infrastructure. 

Added initiative:

“Plan and implement actions to address visitor management issues and monitor visitor impact on the area in collaboration with local residents, community organisations, emergency services, council and other agencies”.

 

Responds to concern about road maintenance and repairs.

See earlier comment under Climate Action.

Added advocacy:

Investment in transport assets to ensure roads and footpaths are managed and maintained to be resilient to future challenges and to meet community expectations”

Our Economy (p35-37)

Changes to the Our Economy section were recommended through deliberations.

Vision statement amended to read:

“Sustainable local economic activity is supported. Our business centres are active and successful. Home-based businesses and innovation is fostered. Opportunities for rural activities continue.”

 

 

Objective amended to read:

“Economic wellbeing for rangatahi”.

 

Changes have been recommended through the deliberations process to make the intent clearer.

Initiatives relating to Glen Eden Business Improvement District updated.

 

Recommended amendment to make the intent clearer.

Objective amended to read:

Sustainable economic activity that supports people, places and the natural environment

 

Recommended change through the deliberations process.

New initiative:

Work with council agencies and community art partners to attract tourism to our art facilities.

 

18.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) incorporates the proposed substantive changes to the outcome chapters as described in Table 1 and other minor changes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023 contains a specific Climate Action section, focusing on the scope of challenges posted by climate change. It considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

20.     The plan includes specific objectives and initiatives including:

·    To enhance the health, wellbeing and resilience of local communities.

Support the recovery of people and communities impacted by the early 2023 storms

Community resilience plans to help our people prepare for future emergencies

·    We understand climate change risks, take action to reduce our climate impact, and are prepared to adapt and respond to future events.

Complete the Waitākere Ranges Climate Plan and progress priority actions

Research to understand land stability and flooding risks in our area for roads and critical infrastructure to ensure we are prepared for future events (advocacy)

Information and resources to support remediation and planting of landslides (advocacy).

·    Parks and facilities are adaptable in the face of climate change, growth and other pressures.

Investigate and support the relocation of Bethells Beach Surf Lifesaving Patrol clubhouse in Te Henga Park, and United North Piha Lifeguard Service campground at Les Waygood Park.

21.     The impact on the climate of the final plans has been considered. The final publication will be an online document to minimise printing hard copies. 

22.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Waitākere Ranges Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The adoption of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023 will inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. It will also form the basis for the development of the following three years’ work programmes.

24.     Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft and final plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the final Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023. Workshops were held in September and October to discuss and consider feedback and agree on any changes.

26.     In developing the plan, the Waitākere Ranges Local Board considered:

·    advice from mana whenua, Te Kawerau ā Maki; and mataawaka

·    what is already known about our communities and what is important to them

·    submissions received via online forms, hardcopy forms, emails and post

·    feedback provided at engagement events

·    regional strategies and policies

·    staff advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     In developing the plan, the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

·    considered views and advice expressed by mana whenua, Te Kawerau ā Maki, at a governance hui held in August; and at a hui hosted by Hoani Waititi Marae

·    considered existing feedback from Māori with an interest in the local board area

·    reviewed submissions received.

28.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023 promotes outcomes or issues of importance to Māori by:

·    Strong and productive mana whenua and mataawaka relationships.

Hold regular hui with Te Kawerau ā Maki as part of our partnering relationship

Support and engage with Hoani Waititi Marae as a hub for west Auckland Māori

Fund or support events and activities that promote Māori culture, for example, Matariki

Progress a Deed of Acknowledgement Te Kawerau ā Maki

Advocacy for funding to develop Te Henga Marae and Papakainga.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plan informs this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     There are no risks identified in adopting the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Staff recommend that responsibility for approving any minor edits following adoption be delegated to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2023

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Brett Lane - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager