I hereby give notice that an extraordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

 

 

Wednesday, 1 November 2023

10am

Rodney Local Board office, 3 Elizabeth Street Warkworth

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Brent Bailey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Louise Johnston

 

Members

Michelle Carmichael

 

 

Mark Dennis

 

 

Tim Holdgate

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

Geoff Upson

 

 

Ivan Wagstaff

 

 

Guy Wishart

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Ignacio Quinteros

Democracy Advisor

 

27 October 2023

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21 579 581

Email: ignacio.quinteros@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Local Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Central Shooters Inc

President

Auckland Shooting Club

Member

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

Member

Kaipara ki Mahurangi Act Party

Candidate

Michelle Carmichael

Fight the Tip Tiaki te Whenua Inc

Deputy chairperson

Tapora School Board of Trustees

Staff representative

Mark Dennis

Helensville Tennis Club

Elected member

 

Parakai Springs Complex

Operations manager

South Kaipara Community Patrol Steering Group

Member

Tim Holdgate

Landowners Contractors Association

Vice chairman

Agricultural & Pastoral Society Warkworth

Committee member

 

Rodney Co-Operative Lime Company Limited

Director

 

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Colin Smith

Landowners Contractors Association

Committee member

Geoff Upson

 

 

Ivan Wagstaff

 

 

Guy Wishart

Huapai Kumeū Lions

 

President and zone chairperson

Kaipara ki Mahurangi LEC

Member

Kumeū Community Centre

Committee member

Kumeu Small Landowners Assoc

Member

Future Kumeū Inc Committee

Member

Kumeū Live (Music Events)

Manager

Kumeu Emergency Network

Member

Kumeu Community Action

Member

Kaipara ki Mahurangi Labour Party

Candidate


Rodney Local Board

01 November 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

5          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

6          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

7          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                5

9          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     5

10        Adoption of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023                                                                                7

11        Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                             55

12        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration

            of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

5          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

6          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

8          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

9          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Rodney Local Board

01 November 2023

 

 

Adoption of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023

File No.: CP2023/16574

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption every three years and use the special consultative procedure to engage with their communities.

3.       A draft version of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period for the special consultative procedure ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

4.       The local board has considered all submissions and feedback received from the consultation period. Substantive changes and minor edits have been made as per table 1 below.

5.       The Rodney Local Board Plan 2023, which includes the proposed changes, is attached as Attachment A to this agenda report.

6.       The key sections of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 are:

·    Māori outcomes

·    Climate action

·    Our people

·    Our environment

·    Our community

·    Our places

·    Our transport.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson of the Rodney Local Board to approve any minor edits that may be necessary to the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 prior to publication.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·    adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       Due to the timing pressures of the Annual Budget 2023/2024 including the uncertainty of local board budgets during the local board plan process, the adoption of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 will take place on 1 November 2023.

9.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

10.     The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget (Long-term plan). They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the Local Board Plan 2023

11.     Māori outcomes – Māori outcomes are the way Auckland Council supports Māori aspirations and responds to council’s legislative obligations and to extensive engagement with Auckland’s Māori communities.

12.     Climate action – Local boards have an important role to play in leading and supporting Auckland’s response to the climate emergency, including supporting regional climate plan initiatives, integrating climate awareness into all decisions including community investment. 

13.     Our people - Our people support each other, have what they need to live well and are able to adapt to change.

14.     Our environment - Our land, waterways and coastlines are cared for and protected.

15.     Our community – Our community libraries, facilities and parks are great places to connect, play and learn.

16.     Our places – Our towns, villages and rural areas are vibrant, prosperous and liveable.

17.     Our economy – Our transport networks are safe, accessible, and well maintained.

Consideration of submissions and feedback

18.     A draft version of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 was prepared for consultation with the local communities. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 14 August 2023.

19.     The Rodney Local Board has considered the submissions and feedback received.

20.     The majority of submissions that provided feedback on whether the plan reflected the needs and aspirations of their community over the next three years agreed or strongly agreed that it did. Submitters expressed a high level of support for and/or the need for ongoing work towards transport and environmental matters.

21.     Most of the feedback was supportive of the draft plan either by noting support for specific objectives, or in submitter comments where the priorities expressed can be found in the plan’s initiatives and advocacy.

22.     Submitters to the local board plan represented a good cross section of the Rodney Local Board area demographics particularly in terms of gender and ethnicity. However very few under 24-year-olds provided feedback.

23.     The key feedback points, with staff analysis and subsequent proposed changes to the outcome chapters are outlined in Table 1 below.

 

 

 

Table 1: Substantive changes to the draft Rodney Local Board Plan 2023

Key point of feedback

Analysis

Change to the plan

Climate Action

Difficult to prioritise Our Environment objectives as all interconnected. All extremely important and interlinked.

Acknowledge the interconnectedness of all living things and the delicate environmental balance.

Added in: “It is essential to recognise that our survival is intrinsically tied to the wellbeing of our environment

Important to discuss coastal/cliff erosion and impacts on Muriwai and coast toward Te Henga

Add to effects of climate change paragraph

Added in “…with extreme rainfall making Muriwai and Te Henga susceptible to coastal and cliff erosion”

Our People

Plan is a bit vague, not specific enough, what will actually be done?

Reword some of the initiatives to include specific example so community can better understand what is being proposed.

Added examples of some of the specific activities the local board would like to support, such as “tools, appliances, skills and community pantries”, “such as community gardens and food rescue projects, bike kitchens and repair cafes” and “by supporting neighbourhood champions and community-based activities and events

Our Environment

Many submitters spoke about waste management being about less rubbish in nature and not about waste minimisation. A few noted their opposition to proposed landfill in the Dome Valley.

Include support for zero waste and a circular economy to ensure that there is less waste in the environment and less to dump

Updated text to include “provide our residents with sustainable waste management options as we strive for zero waste outcomes” and “delivering educational programmes to support a circular economy”

Critical to not lose iconic endangered/at risk species. “Once gone they are gone forever.”

Include reference to what the local board is supporting to protect endangered and at-risk species. 

Updated an initiative to include threatened and at-risk species.

And added the following advocacy:

Advocate to the community for responsible pet ownership, particularly in areas where threatened species occur

Feedback from Kawau Island community about the need to be actively included and involved in moving to pest free

Update advocacy point to reflect this

Advocate to the Governing Body for Kawau Island to become pest free by actively involving and empowering the Kawau community, along with the support of the community, iwi, the Department of Conservation and stakeholders.

Our Community

Large amount of feedback supporting libraries as being: very important/vital/ excellent/essential/ heart of any community

Change wording of outcome to include the word library as this is most recognised and supported facility to the community and remove “spaces”

Our community: Our community libraries, facilities and parks are great places to connect, play and learn

Submissions from Both Aktive and Harbour Sport urging the local board to advocate for more investment in the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund and the Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operating Grant

Add in advocacy point along with support from other local boards

Added advocacy point:

Advocate to the Governing Body for retention and increase in investment in the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund and Regional Sport and Recreational Facilities Operating Grant which enables our residents to participate in a community sports and recreation activities

Our Places

We should avoid building in flood plains.

Need better planning for intensification and away from flood plains.

 

Update the advocacy regarding better planning that considers the impacts of climate change to reflect recent local board feedback on the National Policy Statement on Highly Productive Land and on the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and the Making Space for Water programme

Updated advocacy point: “This would include consideration such as blue-green networks, the location of town centres, the protection of highly productive land and more stringent zoning and consenting guidelines”.

Expect flooding to keep occurring. People are suffering. Climate change getting worse with financial /social consequence.

Also acknowledge that climate change contributes to drought and the impact on the community

Added in two advocacy points: “Support Watercare’s plans to make the drinking water supplies more resilient for areas such as Helensville, Parakai and Wellsford

and “Advocate to individual ratepayers in Rodney, who are not on Watercare’s metropolitan network, to build individual water resilience, including installing additional water storage capacity and adopting water conservation practices on their property”.

Our Transport

Large amount of feedback requesting the local board to address poor roading infrastructure

Roading is not core local board business. However, text makes clear that this is mostly achieved through advocacy and that initiatives listed can only be delivered through the local board’s transport targeted rate

Added a line in the table: “Initiatives to be delivered with the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate”

Request for shuttle/linkage buses in Warkworth. 

More public transport (support for minibuses) and less traffic.

As decision whether to use the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate for further buses in the Warkworth subdivision has yet to be made change language to reflect this. 

Changed wording from “deliver public transport options” and “increase the provision” of public transport to “investigate

Increase in Auckland Transport’s Unsealed Roads Improvement Programme from $121 million to $124 million as part of the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034

Update first advocacy point

Updated: “$124 million for Auckland Transport’s Unsealed Roads Improvement Programme to improve unsealed roads through strengthening and other methods”

 

24.     The Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 (Attachment A) incorporates the proposed substantive changes to the chapters as described in Table 1 and other minor changes.

25.     Other minor changes to the plan include updating the text to reflect changes since the draft plan was written, such as:

·    The Ara Tuhono – Puhoi to Warkworth motorway extension opening

·    The Rodney Local Parks Management Plan being adopted

·    The Warkworth Community Transport Hub becoming fully operational

·    the disestablishment of economic development department at Tataki Auckland Unlimited.

26.     Other key feedback points which did not materially result in changes to the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 with staff analysis and responses are outlined in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Other feedback points and responses

Key point of feedback

Analysis

Response

The greatest amount of feedback was in relation to the poor conditions of roads, the lack of sealed roads and the lack of public transport options

While the Rodney Local Board has some limited discretionary funding through their transport targeted rate and the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, most of the feedback received in regard to roading and public transport cannot be responded to other than through advocacy to Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency.

Continue communications clarifying role of the local board and in particular their limited scope to address roading and public transport other than through their transport targeted rate.

Objections to the constitutional recognition of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the related principle

No changes to substantive content in Māori Outcome section

Continue communications clarifying role of the local board and their obligations to recognise the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the related principle

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 contains a specific climate action section, focusing on the scope of challenges posted by climate change. It considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

28.     The plan includes specific climate action initiatives including:

·    support community initiatives that will encourage sharing and reuse of resources such as tools, appliances, skills, and community pantries at the local level

·    support the community, and resource recovery park and community recycling centres, to minimise waste, turn waste into resources, and to promote education on waste reduction

·    investigate further increasing the provision and uptake of public transport to reduce congestion, make roads safer and mitigate climate change

·    develop our town centres, parks and facilities so they are fit for the future, high quality, low carbon and resilient while protecting the natural environment as we grow

·    support community access to skills and knowledge that will help households to be more resilient and self-reliant such as community gardens and food rescue projects, bike kitchens and repair cafes

·    support communities to develop local community emergency leadership groups and emergency action plans

·    support the development of shoreline adaptation plans to address and mitigate the impacts of climate change.

29.     The impact of the final plans on the climate has been considered. The final publication will be an online document to minimise printing hard copies. 

30.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Rodney Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The adoption of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 will inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget (Long-term plan). It will also form the basis for the development of the following three years’ work programmes.

32.     Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft and final plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the final Rodney Local Board Plan 2023. Workshops were held on 6 September and 11 October to discuss and consider feedback and agree any changes.

34.     In developing the plan, the Rodney Local Board considered:

·    advice from mana whenua and mataawaka

·    what is already known about our communities and what is important to them

·    submissions received via online forms, hardcopy forms, emails and post

·    feedback provided at engagement events

·    regional strategies and policies

·    staff advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     In developing the plan, the Rodney Local Board:

·    considered views and advice expressed by mana whenua and mataawaka during previous consultations

·    considered existing feedback from Māori with an interest in the local board area

·    reviewed submissions received.

36.     The Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 promotes outcomes or issues of importance to Māori by:

·    support Māori-led initiatives that build whānau wellbeing and strengthen resilience

·    build relationships with Te Uri o Hau, Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara and create opportunities to understand what is important to them

·    develop partnerships and projects with mana whenua, matāwaka and Māori groups that respond to and further their aspirations

·    support mana whenua to enhance and restore biodiversity in Rodney including coastal infrastructure, waterways, sites of significance, urupa, wāhi tapu

·    partner with mana whenua to support community groups to build an understanding of te ao Māori and support opportunities for collaboration between iwi and community groups on biodiversity projects of mutual interest

·    protect and develop areas of particular importance to mana whenua in ways that are in accordance with mana whenua tikanga and aspirations

·    create more opportunities to share Māori stories, heritage and te ao Māori with local communities

·    support and celebrate events of significance in the Māori calendar – Matariki, Waitangi Day, Te Matatini

·    work with mana whenua and matāwaka to integrate Māori design into local parks and facilities and include Māra Hūpara elements (traditional Māori play) in play areas and outdoor spaces

·    reflect Māori cultural values and history in placemaking and town improvement projects and include mana whenua as a critical part of planning and design processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plan informs this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There are no risks identified in adopting the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Staff recommend that responsibility for approving any minor edits following adoption be delegated to the chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Rodney Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Rodney Local Board Plan 2023

15

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Zigi Yates – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Rodney Local Board

01 November 2023

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

01 November 2023

 

 

Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/16661

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with a summary of public consultation feedback, respond to previous queries and seek formal resolutions supporting the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted a Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries  within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce deaths and serious injuries. Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and has completed three phases of changes to date.

4.       A speed management plan for the Auckland region is a government requirement and will set safe and appropriate speed limits to reduce road deaths and serious injuries. Katoa, Ka Ora is the name of this plan, and it is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all.

5.       Auckland Transport workshopped Katoa, Ka Ora with local boards in February and March 2023, and local boards provided formal feedback about the proposal in March and April 2023, specifically the five development approaches within the speed management plan.

6.       Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023.

7.       Auckland Transport has analysed and summarised the consultation feedback received and provided responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora. This information is provided as a series of attachments to this report for local board members to review.

8.       Further, the report seeks local board support for the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes within its area.

9.       Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the summary of public consultation feedback received on the proposed Katoa, Ka Ora speed limit changes (Attachment D to the agenda report) 

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note Auckland Transport’s responses to previous local board queries about Katoa, Ka Ora (Attachment A to the agenda report) 

c)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note Auckland Transport’s legal obligations under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (Rule) and that the Rule requires best efforts to complete safe and appropriate speed limit setting near schools by 2027 

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that since June 2020, when the programme started, road deaths reduced by 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed  

e)      tautoko / support the location and scope of the proposed speed limit changes identified for the Rodney Local Board area (Attachment C and Attachment E to the agenda report) 

f)       tautoko / support speed limit review near schools that do not have current or proposed safe speed limits including Hare Krishna School  

g)      tautoko / support speed limit review of additional locations requested in public consultation feedback and recommended for the next future consultation in Attachment C to the agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

10.     Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use. 

Alignment with Central Government policy

11.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy. The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to school.

12.     The strategy’s action plan includes the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires road controlling authorities to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads outside schools completed by December 2027, and these changes must be built into speed management plans.

13.     The Rule groups schools into two classifications; category one and category two. Most Auckland schools are classified as category one, or schools where children may be out and about outside the school gate. To comply with the Rule, speed limits of 30km/h (fixed or variable) are required in the area outside of the school. Category two schools are where children are more likely to be picked up or dropped off within the school grounds.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency.

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent, easy-to-understand changes that communities can understand. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

Auckland Transport’s role

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury. So, after receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board, the safe speeds programme has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland reducing speed limits on many roads.

18.     In the most recent phase of speed limit changes, the programme focuses on town centres, roads near schools and rural marae.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation. The phases can be summarised as follows:

a)      Phase One covered approximately 11 per cent of the local road network and focused on the highest risk roads

b)      Phase Two covered approximately eight per cent of the network and had a significant focus on safe speeds for rural roads and roads near schools

c)      Phase Three covered approximately 19 per cent of the network and included roads around schools, rural roads, town centre roads, rural marae and roads requested by the community.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on safety around schools so AT directly surveyed all schools with proposed speed limit changes in late-2022 and early 2023. The summary results of the local schools survey was shared with each local board as part of the February/March 2023 workshop follow-up.

22.     Information about the iterative engagement process used to develop Katoa, Ka Ora was shared with local boards in two rounds of workshops held in February/March 2022 and in February/March 2023.

23.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on. Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. 7801 pieces of feedback were received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Katoa, Ka Ora has been consulted on with the public and with local boards. This report updates local boards on:

a)      The results of the public consultation conducted from 24 July to 28 August 2023 in each local board area, including AT’s responses to the changes requested by members of the public

b)      AT’s response to the local board feedback provided in April 2023, including AT’s responses to changes requested by members of the public.

25.     This information is included in attachments to this report and AT’s overall considerations for this local board area are summarised in a two-page summary infographic (Attachment B to the agenda report).

26.     Additionally, the full consultation report will be published on the AT website by early November 2023.

27.     The attachments provide a clear summary of what people in this local board area said about the programme so local board members are aware of community sentiment as they consider AT’s technical advice.

Technical advice

28.     Auckland Transport’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system; the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. This includes finalising a speed management plan within legal timeframes and setting safe speed limits near all schools by 2027. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by 2027, we are proposing to include a review of permanent speed limits near all remaining schools in a future consultation.

30.     Further, the impact of speed reduction on the number of deaths and serious injuries (DSI) is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

a)      Since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced by 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed

b)      In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a nine per cent increase in road deaths.

31.     Thirty km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed around schools is used for the safe speed programme.

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that Katoa, Ka Ora meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. The proposed speed of 30km/h near schools is consistent with legislative requirements and is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.  

33.     Additionally, speed reductions delivered to date by the programme are already reducing DSI. It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the local board is to support the programme.

Customer research

34.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

35.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

36.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. Their experiences of high-speed vehicles, near misses, crime and ‘stranger danger’ around schools mean an increasing number of parents drive their children to and from school. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive.

38.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

39.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The Safe Speeds Programme was endorsed by the Auckland Council Planning committee and the current term Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     Auckland Transport has visited all local boards during February and March 2023 to discuss the proposed changes.

42.     Summaries of community, school and mana whenua requests were provided to local boards in February and March 2023 to support their consideration of this topic.

43.     In post-workshop resolutions local boards indicated their level of support for the programme. Common themes were higher levels of support near schools, town centres and places where people are out and about.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are overrepresented in DSI statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population and 16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

45.     Engagement with iwi at the northern, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place regarding the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka. Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora.

46.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

47.     Ongoing engagement regarding further requests are being reviewed and considered for inclusion in the full Katoa, Ka Ora Speed Management Plan. These requests have been shared with local boards at their workshops in February and March 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing views on Katoa, Ka Ora, the introduction of safe speed limits has considerable social cost implications.  Reducing the harm caused by road crashes impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs, all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that the local board represents.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Public understanding regarding the ‘why’ for safe speeds needs continued communication. Comprehensive communications including the evidence and key facts have been provided to increase understanding and support of safe speeds. 

50.     Funding constraints may require the scale of the plan to be reduced or delivery to be slowed or delayed.  Clear updates will be given should there be changes to funding throughout the duration of the programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The Safe Speeds Programme Team will review and consider all feedback received from local boards. We will use this, along with feedback from the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Mana Whenua Treaty Partners and our legal and safety obligations as a road controlling authority, to help edit and finalise Katoa, Ka Ora, a speed management plan for Auckland.

52.     Auckland Transport have requested to workshop Katoa, Ka Ora a Speed Management Plan for Auckland with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee in November 2023. Confirmation of a date is yet to be received.

53.     Once all feedback has been considered and edits and reviews completed, the team will seek approval of the plan from the Regional Transport Committee in early 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Response to Resolutions (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Attachment B - Infographic (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Attachment C - Responses to public feedback (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Attachment D - Local board feedback summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Attachment E - Safe speeds improvements for Rodney map (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager