I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 November 2023

5.00pm

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office
Shop 17B
93 Bader Drive
Māngere

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

 

Deputy Chairperson

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Members

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo, JP

 

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacqueline Robinson

Democracy Advisor

 

10 November 2023

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: jacqui.robinson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Drowning Prevention Auckland                                                      5

8.2     Deputation - Beautification Trust              6

8.3     Deputation - Brown Womxn Who Cycle   6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

9.1     Destiny Harris - TUIA rangatahi                 6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Governing Body member Update                       9

12        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                                              11

13        Chairperson's Report                                         15

14        2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant, Round One and Multiboard Grant, Round One Grant Allocations                                                17

15        Local Board Transport Capital Fund                25

16        Implementation of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2023/2024                                                             31

17        Endorsement of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Paths Refresh                                                      41

18        Aorere Pocket Park concept plan                     49

19        Tāmaki Makaurau Streets for People – Māngere Trials                                                    55

20        Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group                                                                   61

21        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quarter One report             65

22        Change of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Extraordinary Business Meeting time                                       73

23        Urgent Decision - National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback                        75

24        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendars                                                             77

25        Record of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                                 79

26        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

 

 

 

 

1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 18 October 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 


 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Drowning Prevention Auckland

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Harry Aonga (Team Leader Community Education and Events) and Ants Lowe (General Manager) from Drowning Prevention Auckland will be in attendance to talk about their legacy plans, share their vision and how they can serve the community.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Harry Aonga and Ants Lowe for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Beautification Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Daniel Barthow (CEO) and Sterling Ruwhiu (Community Programmes Manager) from Beautification Trust will be in attendance to talk about the impact the trust has had in our South Auckland communities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Daniel Barthow and Sterling Ruwhiu for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Brown Womxn Who Cycle

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Louise Tu’u, Director of We Should Practice will be in attendance to talk about “Brown Womxn Who Cycle”, an event that encourages woman of colour to take up cycling.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Louise Tu’u for her attendance and presentation.

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Destiny Harris - TUIA rangatahi

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Destiny Harris, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu TUIA rangatahi, will be in attendance to talk about her experiences in the programme. TUIA is an intentional, long-term, intergenerational approach to develop and enhance the way in which rangatahi Māori contribute to communities throughout New Zealand.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Destiny Harris for her attendance and public forum presentation.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Governing Body member Update

File No.: CP2023/17254

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2023/17255

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allow the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead roles, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

2.       To make any appointments to vacant positions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Members have an opportunity to update the board on their activities as topic area leads.

4.       The table below outlines the current leads and alternates for topic areas of local board business meetings and organisations on which the board is represented through a formal appointment.

Topic Area

Lead

Alternate

Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee Appointments Committee

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Staff consultation over landowner approval applications (excluding applications for filming and events)

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Staff consultation on applications for filming

Christine O’Brien

Makalita Kolo

Liquor licence matters, to prepare and provide objections, if any, and speak to any local board views at any hearings on applications for liquor licences

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Resource consent matters to:

i)         provide the local board views, if any, on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

ii)        prepare and provide local board’s views, if any, on notified resource consents and speak to those views at any hearings if required

iii)       provide the local board’s views on matters relating to or generated by the COVID-19 (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020 while this legislation remains in force

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Christine O’Brien

Local Government New Zealand Auckland Zone

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Select shared representatives to council working groups, working parties and other internal bodies, where there is a limited number of local board representatives to be selected from amongst all 21 or clusters of local boards

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Manukau Harbour Forum joint committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Ara Kōtui (formerly Māori input into local board decision-making political steering group)

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Staff consultation on applications for events and other activities on local parks and local facilities that also require regulatory approval, or may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Approve the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, when timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Arts, Community and Events (including libraries)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Christine O’Brien

Local planning, housing, and heritage – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

1st half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

2nd half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Transport

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Economic development

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Makalita Kolo

Youth, Children, Seniors and Uniquely Abled

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Water care COMMUNITY

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Auckland Airport Community Trust for Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Ambury Park Centre

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Christine O’Brien

Department of Corrections - Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Māngere Bridge Business Association

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Christine O’Brien

Māngere East Village Business Association

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Māngere Mountain Education Trust

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Makalita Kolo

Māngere Town Centre Business Association

Makalita Kolo

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Ōtāhuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Christine O’Brien

Ōtāhuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated Society joint committee

Makalita Kolo

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

South Harbour Business Association

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Makalita Kolo

Te Pūkaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

The Southern Initiative (TSI) Steering Group

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal and written reports from local board members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2023/17256

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the chairperson’s verbal and written report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant, Round One and Multiboard Grant, Round One Grant Allocations

File No.: CP2023/16490

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round One and Multiboard Grant Round One.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Programme 2023/2024, provided as Attachment A, which sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the board.

3.       This report presents applications received in the 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round One provided as Attachment B, and Multiboard Grant Round One as Attachment C.

4.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $252,068 for the 2023/2024 financial year, which including ring-fenced funding of $80,000 for applications that meet Revitalising Town Centre criteria and $40,000 for applications that meet environmental outcomes. 

·        A total of $8,500 was reallocated to 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Youth Grant.

·        A total of $24,910.50 was allocated to Māngere-Otāhuhu Quick Response Grant Round One.

This will leave $219,811.10 for two Local Grant rounds, two Multiboard Grant rounds and one Quick Response Grant round.

5.       Twenty-Four applications have been submitted to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round One, requesting a total of $ $180,066.08. Ten applications have been submitted to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Multiboard Grant Round One, requesting a total of $307,393.72.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round One

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

LG2409-105

Counties Manukau Touch Association

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire and equipment cost to run Community Growth Programme at Williams Park from 4 November 2023 to 3 March 2024

$15,731.66

LG2409-106

AFL New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards purchasing medals, youth uniform tops and delivery footballs to deliver Youth Programme at Walter Massey Park from 5 November 2023 to 10 December 2023

$2,189.00

LG2409-111

Bridge Breakers Limited

Arts and culture

Towards project management, staff wage, flight ticket, marketing, equipment and venue hire cost to run SandyFace project from 1 February to 31 March 2024

$10,000.00

LG2409-117

Counties Manukau Sport Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards event setting up, venue hire, promoting, operational cost, prize and vouchers and other related cost for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Junior Sports Awards event at Manukau Rovers Rugby Football Club on 22 February 2024

$8,870.00

LG2409-119

Māngere Hawks Netball Club

Sport and recreation

Towards cost of exterior cleaning, replacement of locks and alarms, and gate modification at Māngere Hawks Netball Club in June 2024

$3,765.88

LG2409-120

Ambury Park Centre Incorporated

Community

Towards purchasing hay for horses at the Ambury Park Centre 1 December 2023 to 30 June 2024

$9,997.00

LG2409-122

Pakuranga Outrigger Canoe Club Te Tahawai O Pakuranga Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards cost of life jackets, paddles, uniforms and internet resource to attend National Waka Ama Sprint Championships in Jan 2024

$10,000.00

LG2409-125

Ōtāhuhu Softball Club

Sport and recreation

Towards cost of trophies, port-a-loo, Official Scorers & Umpires fee, catering to run Ōtāhuhu Softball Wayne Roper Tournament from 19 January 2024 to 21 January 2024

$2,000.00

LG2409-128

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards a contribution of annual costs to supervise and train volunteers at the Youthline House in Papatoetoe from 1 December 2023 to 30 September 2024

$6,000.00

LG2409-129

Jireh Transportation Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire cost, sports and fitness equipment cost to run JTS Sports & Fitness project in South Auckland from 6 December 2023 to 6 December 2024

$2,000.00

LG2409-130

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the cost to deliver twenty Spoken Word Poetry workshops at Zayed College for Girls from 11 December 2023 to 28 June 2024

$5,000.00

LG2409-131

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards associated cost to deliver Life Education sessions at seven schools Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area from 13 February 2024 to 28 June 2024

$23,000.00

LG2409-133

Warriors Community Foundation

Community

Towards Project Coordinator wage to deliver community project at twenty-five schools in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area from 1 February 2024 to 30 April 2024

$10,000.00

LG2409-134

Māngere Bridge Residents & Ratepayers Incorporated

Community

Towards cost of a defibrillator to be placed at Fresh Choice building on Coronation Road from December 2023

$2,325.00

LG2409-135

Disability Sport Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards office consumable items to support Disability Sport Auckland from 1 December 2023 to 30 December 2023

$1,602.54

LG2409-137

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards cost of venue hire and facilitator fee to deliver Road Safety programme for schools in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu at Mount Smart Stadium from 1 February 2024 to 30 June 2024

$2,500.00

LG2409-139

Māngere 275 Times

Community

Towards cost of gift vouchers for youth contributors and newsletter print associated with "Māngere Youth Voices" from 1 March 2024 to 1 December 2024

$10,000.00

LG2409-140

Next Generation Sport Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards cost to install the Grandstand and build viewing platform at King's College for Global Youth Sevens tournament from 15 December 2023 to 17 December 2024

$15,000.00

LG2409-141

Ōtāhuhu College

Environment

Towards cost of recycling bins, mulcher, trailer, signage, tricycle, compost tumbler and bike horn to deliver Ōtāhuhu College recycling initiative from 26 January 2024 to 13 December 2024

$10,000.00

LG2409-142

Mapura Studios Division of Panacea Arts Charitable Trust

Community

Towards Music Therapist fee, Musician fee and admin cost to run Mapura Ōtāhuhu Singing Group at Ōtāhuhu Town Hall from 6 May 2024 to 5 July 2024

$2,085.00

LG2409-144

South Auckland Seniors and Youth Association Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards food, refreshment and associated cost to run monthly meetings at 90 High Street from 1 February 2023 to 31 January 2024

$2,000.00

LG2409-146

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards event associated cost and staff wage to deliver Raise Up Youth Development Programme from 1 December 2023 to 30 November 2024

$10,000.00

LG2409-147

Tread Lightly Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards staff wage and towing cost for Tread Lightly mobile environmental classroom visiting Māngere-Ōtāhuhu schools from 4 December 2023 to 25 October 2024

$6,000.00

LG2409-148

Pacific Advance Secondary School

Sport and recreation

Towards purchasing two W6 used waka for Auckland Secondary School Waka Ama Sprint Championship on 2 March 2024

$10,000.00

Total

 

 

 

$180,066.08

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Multiboard Grant Round One

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

MB2324-101

Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards uniforms for the Aotearoa Māori Rugby League inaugural tournament at Te Atatu South Park and Ngati Otara Park from 22 September 2024 to 27 October 2024

$5,000.00

MB2324-111

Kila's Style Trust

Community

Towards venue hire of Nora Swann HQ in Burswood from (January 2024 - January 2025)

$10,000.00

MB2324-122

CNSST Foundation

Community

Towards marketing cost, tutor fee, venue hire, Programme Coordination and Educational Support, operating and admin cost to run Chinese Cultural Competency Training Programme from 15 January 2024 to 30 November 2024

$2,625.00

MB2324-131

Disability Sport Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, MC, design costs, backdrop, banners, flags, flowers, trophies, and photographer for the Disability Sport Auckland 2023 Wards Dinner at Ellerslie Event Centre

$2,500.00

MB2324-136

Upside Youth Mentoring Aotearoa

Community

Toward a portion of wages of mentoring manager and three mentoring coordinators (December 2023 - November 2024)

$7,700.00

MB2324-141

John Walker Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards swimming instructor and bus driver cost to deliver Community Swim project in five swimming facilities in Auckland from 1 February 2024 to 13 December 2024

$15,000.00

MB2324-148

Migrant Action Trust

Community

Towards facilitator fees for job search coaching, English classes, and immigration clinic in Wesley Community Centre, other venues, and online (January 2024 - December 2024)

$3,000.00

MB2324-151

Yoga Limited T/A Hot Yoga Works

Sport and recreation

Towards support due to hardship during COVID and Auckland rains (Auckland CBD August 2023 - December 2023)

$7,500.00

MB2324-158

Better Men Limited

Community

Towards start up cost to deliver Defying Depression, Cool2Care project from 1 January 2024 to 31 December 2024

$250,000.00

MB2324-164

Bravo Company Charitable Trust

Community

Towards tramping and tenting related cost to deliver Well-being for fathers project from 4 December 2023 to 31 July 2024

$4,068.72

Total

 

 

 

$307,393.72

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

7.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   higher priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds, and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

8.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Programme as presented in Attachment A. The programme sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the board.

9.       The community grant programme has been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

12.     Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

13.     Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction, increasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation, local tree planting and streamside revegetation, and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage. Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants so they can increase their chances of success next time.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Outcomes Delivery, Ngā Mātārae has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $252,068 for the 2023/2024 financial year, which including ring-fenced funding of $80,000 for applications that meet Revitalising Town Centre criteria and $40,000 for applications that meet environmental outcomes. 

·        A total of $8,500 was reallocated to 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Youth Grant.

·        A total of $24,910.50 was allocated to Māngere-Otāhuhu Quick Response Grant Round One.

This will leave $219,811.10 for two Local Grant rounds, two Multiboard Grant rounds and one Quick Response Grant round.

20.     Twenty-Four applications have been submitted to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round One, requesting a total of $ $180,066.08. Ten applications have been submitted to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Multiboard Grant Round One, requesting a total of $307,393.72.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Following the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board allocating funding, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2023/2024 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Community Grant Programme

 

b

2023/2024 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grant Round One Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

2023/2024 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Multiboard Grant Round One Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amber Deng - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2023/17387

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To Inform the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board about a reduction to the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) for the remainder of 2022-2025 political term.

2.       To seek direction for re-prioritising the LBTCF work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Auckland Council need to reduce budgets after 2023’s extreme weather events severely damaged infrastructure requiring funds to be allocated to recovery. This revision of the Council budgets impacts on the LBTCF.

4.       This report discusses the specific impact on Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and requests a decision regarding allocation of the remaining LBTCF.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamana / authorise Auckland Transport to allocate a total of $1,861,066 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2025 and the 2027 Financial Year’s allocation as follows:

i)       $1,433,475 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2025

ii)       $427,591 from Financial Year 2027.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that $39,952 additional budget has been approved to cover contractual commitments for Criterion Square project.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The LBTCF was established in 2012 and provides local boards with a budget to deliver small projects that are not on AT’s work programme. The original budget was $10 million spread across all 21 local boards using Council’s ‘Local Board Funding Policy.

6.       In 2014, Council increased the LBTCF budget to $20 million spread across all local boards and distributed as before.

7.       Since 2020, COVID 19 lockdowns impacted on Auckland Council’s revenue and the LBTCF had to be reduced from $20 million to $15 million per annum.

8.       After this reduction Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s share was $2,188,650 for this electoral term. Later, in 2023 after two extreme weather incidents in Auckland, the Council needed to further reduce budgets so extra funds could be made available for recovery and the LBTCF was reduced again.

9.       Due to the 2023 Council budget reductions the LBTCF’s annual budget allocations are now as follows:

a)      23-24 Financial Year – $ 7,489,000

b)      24-25 Financial Year – $ 7,000,000

c)      25-26 Financial Year – $ 15,000,000.

 

10.     After this change Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s LBTCF allocation for this electoral term is $1,473,427. This amount includes $39,952 that AT provided to finish design on the Criterion Square Project. 

11.     This reduction means that the local board needs to review its LBTCF programme and provide directions to AT.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Auckland Transport supported Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s consideration of how the LBTCF is used, providing technical advice at four workshops in 2023:

a)      1 March 2023: The first workshop with the newly elected Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. The aim of which was to report on projects from the previous electoral term and to provide options and gather suggestions from Members about possible LBTCF projects in this term.

b)      8 March 2023: After feedback from the local board another workshop was conducted with Members that provided additional advice.

c)      28 June 2023: A third workshop, at which cost estimates for projects were provided to the local board to support decisions about the work programme. Generally, the advice at these workshops would inform the board’s decisions about the LBTCF work programme and be finalised at their June meeting. In this case, the work programme was not finalised by resolution and decision-making was postponed until the impact of proposed budget reductions was confirmed.

d)      4 October 2023: The local board was informed about the impact of Council’s reduced budget on the proposed programme and provided with expert advice about prioritisation. 

13.     On 4 October 2023, AT’s advice to Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board can be summarized as follows:

a)      the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s current LBTCF budget is $1,473,427

b)      the local board has one major project, the Criterion Square Upgrade, this project is designed and ready to build. Currently, the estimated cost is $1,861,066

c)      this is more than the local board has available within its LBTCF ($1,473,427)

d)      AT provided advice that it will be willing to underwrite the remainder of the cost using $427,591 of funds from the next electoral term, specifically from the 2027 Financial Year’s allocation. This option includes the following risk and an opportunity:

a.       the risk is that if the LBTCF is reduced or stays the same there will be a requirement to reduce the board’s allocation next electoral term

b.       however, if the LBTCF increases next financial year, or in the Regional Land Transport Plan then there is unlikely to be an issue in the next electoral term because money will be available to finish the project. Additionally, in a worst-case scenario if the LBTCF is stopped AT historically meets commitments to construction, meaning that there is an opportunity to ensure that the project is delivered.

e)      The board has a list of other project ideas with no contractual commitments as listed below with their estimated costs:

a.       Walter Massey Park Shared Path (2nd Stage) - $625,000

b.       Māngere-Ōtāhuhu LB Bus Stop Shelters - $300,000

c.       Boyd Avenue and House Avenue intersection refuge islands - $300,000

d.       Ashgrove Reserve Shared Path - $1,000,000

e.       Nixon Avenue/Tamaki Avenue intersection - $600,000 or $180,000

14.     AT’s advice is to deliver the Criterion Square Upgrade project. This project is large but is designed and ready to build. By committing now, it will be contracted soon, and the local board’s commitment guarantees that it will be delivered regardless of budget fluctuations.

15.     In simple terms, the Criterion Square Upgrade project is ready to deliver, and a contractor could have been procured in July.  However, due to the sudden budget reduction, AT and the local board were not able to resolve on the project at that time slowing delivery down. AT recommends the board provide direction by resolution at this meeting so that procurement can start as quickly as possible.  It should also be noted that once a project is contracted for construction AT has historically ensured that the commitment is met regardless of LBTCF reductions.  

16.     The other potential option, building a package of projects from projects that are not ready for construction is not recommended because it will take longer, thereby increasing the risk that funding reductions could impact on the programme; or that no projects get delivered. Building the Criterion Square Upgrade, even with the implicit risk of using future funds is a sensible option even when balanced against the risk of the next electoral term’s budget being lower than normal, because funds were brought forward to this term to complete the project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency and has developed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

18.     AT therefore urges the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to consider prioritisation of projects that help reduce carbon emissions.

19.     Most of the proposed projects above will encourage either safe walking or cycling and will contribute to reducing carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Any engagement required with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual-project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board discussed this programme of work at three workshops with AT in 2023.  This report reflects the views of the local board as expressed in the workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The actions being consider do not have specific impacts on Māori.  Both AT and council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the AT website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about.

23.     Any AT project that requires consultation with iwi will include that activity within its project plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report requires consideration of a significant financial commitment of up to $1,861,066 by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

25.     The costs calculated are based on estimates and it is possible that costs on some projects may be under or over the estimations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There is a risk that some projects may cost more than is budgeted in this report, but equally some projects may reduce in scope after further investigation work is carried out. 

27.     As resources and budgets are constrained, delaying decision making means that there is less time for planning for the investigation, design, and subsequent delivery of the projects that the local board wishes to progress. Timely decision making will provide the best opportunity for these projects to be delivered in the current political term.

28.     Finally, future budgets are not confirmed meaning that there may be sudden changes to the programme next year after Auckland Council sets budgets through the Long-Term Plan process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     AT will take note of the local board’s resolution and start delivery of the Criterion Square Upgrade project on the following rough timeline:

a)      by the end of 2023 - complete landowner approval and right to occupy process and procure a contractor

b)      early 2024 – start the construction phase of the project

c)      no later than 31 June 2024 – complete the project.

30.     Throughout the process, AT will keep the local board updated, providing more detailed timelines, and reporting if any issues arise.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Stallworthy, Principal Advisor

Authoriser

John Gillespie, Head of Stakeholder and Elected Member Relationships

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Implementation of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/17156

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whakaae / seek approval of grant funding allocation towards priority projects identified within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan was adopted in September 2021 to provide strategic guidance on the provision of the local sporting facilities network [MŌ/2021/122].

3.       On 26 July 2023 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024 including item 4018; Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan implementation [MŌ/2023/84].

4.       The board allocated $80,000 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget towards implementation of the plan by way of grants to community led projects.

5.       Following the analysis of live and eligible priority projects, the recommendation is to allocate the $80,000 to Manukau Rugby League and Sports Club to investigate long-term clubroom options and implement short-term solutions to enable the club to deliver rugby league and serve their community.

6.       Should the board resolve to allocate the grant, staff will work with the grant recipient to set in place a funding agreement and project plan to achieve the desired outcomes. The funding agreement template that will be used has been approved by council’s legal team.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve funding up to $80,000 to support Manukau Rugby League Football and Sports Club Incorporated to:

i)       undertake geotechnical assessment work and develop a feasibility study examining clubroom facility options

ii)       implement the preferred option for a short-term clubroom facility as identified as part of the feasibility study

 

Horopaki

Context

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024

7.       On 26 July 2023 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024 including item 4018; Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan implementation [MŌ/2023/84].

8.       The approved activity description is to support priority projects and key moves identified within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan and assess investment options on an annual basis before allocating grants to support community-led or partnership projects.

9.       This item has $80,000 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget allocated for 2023/2024 with a further $80,000 approved in principle for 2024/2025 and 2025/2026.

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2023

10.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan was adopted in September 2021 to provide strategic guidance on the provision of the local sporting facilities network [MŌ/2021/122].

11.     The plan outlines the current network of sport and active recreation facilities across Māngere-Ōtāhuhu (irrespective of ownership) and identifies existing and future provision challenges and needs.

12.     Key outputs of the plan include:

·        consolidated inventory of sport and active recreation facilities

·        themes and trends of local facility needs and issues

·        assessment of potential impacts of demographic and infrastructure changes

·        identification of gaps in facility provision against current and future needs

·        framework for prioritising projects/potential opportunities for further analysis and assessment

·        prioritised list of projects/opportunities to provide clear direction to support advocacy, resource allocation, and leasing decisions.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Overview of findings within the plan

13.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu is well resourced with a comprehensive and unique network of parks, open spaces, water access and bespoke sport facilities, although, there is a high rate of inactivity.

14.     The local board area has high deprivation, is home to the highest Pasifika population in Tāmaki Makaurau, and relatively young compared to the wider Auckland region. Therefore, the right mix of facilities (in terms of type, function, condition, access, and location) is critical to meet the diverse community need.

15.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu sport and active recreation facility network faces multiple challenges and opportunities – those that are common across the sector and wider Auckland region, and those uniquely associated with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu.

Priority projects and general key moves

16.     The plan identifies a full range of capital developments, repair and maintenance, and spatial/master planning projects. In total, 56 projects were independently assessed and categorised by priority.

17.     Priority projects identified in the plan were assessed using guiding principles derived from Auckland Council’s Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 and supported by a series of components from The New Zealand Sporting Facilities Framework.

18.     The project assessment criteria including principles of investment and sub-criteria weightings can be found in Attachment A as Appendix G.

 

 

Community grant recommendations

19.     The board allocated $80,000 LDI operational budget towards implementation of the plan by way of grants to community led projects.

20.     Of the 56 projects within the plan, there was a relatively even spread of asset ownership or project lead, as categorised below:

·        39 community projects, typically clubs or trusts

·        3 school projects including unlocking access to their existing facilities

·        4 mixed in nature including groups seeking access to facilities or proposing new infrastructure

·        10 council projects ranging from planning to $3 million + construction.

 

21.     Fourteen projects were deemed eligible for this type of funding, with a series of further projects linked. Three of the fourteen priority projects were considered live and could realistically utilise funding over the next 12-18 months.

22.     An analysis of grant options and the level of recommended support can be found in the table below.

Table 1: Assessment and recommended funding for live community led priority projects

Project

Analysis

Recommendation

Māngere Hawks Netball Club

#23

Construct toilets & repair roof frame

Operating for more than 20 years, the Hawks are a key satellite club for netball feeding into the Māngere Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre for game days. The club is located at Walter Massey Park, as an offshoot of the adjacent rugby league club, catering to more than 200 winter season netballers.

The membership base is around 80 per cent female tamariki with a high proportion of all members identifying as Māori and Pasifika. The club delivers the traditional seasonal offering as well as social competitions and free programmes.

The clubroom facility was included in the 2021 Asset Advisory Group (AAG) condition assessment report which identified defects in the roof frame. In total 22 elements of the facility were given a condition rating and associated projected lifespan and renewal costings.

Development of a masterplan is currently in progress however it is not expected minor maintenance or renewals work will conflict with this project.

Lease (under rugby league club) expires 31 March 2033.

Not recommended for funding in this financial year

Medium-High

 

Manukau Magpies Rugby League Club

#24/25

Remediate subsidence & flooding issues

With over 110 years of history, Manukau Magpies Rugby League, originally Manukau Northern Union Football Club, has a history littered in on-field success whilst also being a cornerstone of the local community. Based at Te Ara Tāwhana/Moyle Park, with their clubrooms under a community ground lease, the club have faced a series of major facility issues.

Issues with the foundations meant strengthening works had to be carried out to improve the seismic strength bringing the facility out of an “earthquake-risk building” category.

A recent building condition assessment noted cracking and slumping of the concrete hardstanding and other elements which occurred or became noticeable by users during or shortly after construction works in the neighbouring housing development.

The facility is located in a floodplain and has historical flooding issues. Most recently, the January 2023 Auckland floods ravaged the facility with reports of the water reaching between 1.0-1.5 meters high around the facility. The clubrooms have since been stickered/closed by council’s compliance team due to health and safety concerns with the club operating through the 2023 season effectively homeless.

The club caters to more than 350 members, made up by approximately 25 per cent rangatahi and a high proportion Māori and Pasifika. The facility itself has been an asset to various community groups, churches, and social gatherings over the years and now in its current state leaves a gap in provision.

Lease expires 20 October 2040.

$80,000

Geotechnical assessment work, development of a feasibility study & implementation of a short-term clubroom option

 

Medium-High

 

Bridge Park Tennis Club

#31

Upgrade existing lighting & add new lighting

Established as Manukau Rovers Tennis Club in 1934 the club relocated to the foot of Te Pane o Mataoho in the early 1970’s before rebranding to Bridge Park Tennis Club in 1993.

This is the largest tennis club in the local board area providing opportunities for ‘Grasshopper’s’ (4-6 years) through to seniors (18 years+). In recent years the club has delivered a very popular free holiday programme and partnered with Tennis NZ to offer free ‘Love Tennis’ have-a-go days.

The courts are also utilised by Māngere Bridge Vipers Netball Club with dual court markings an outcome achieved as part of a $150,000 local board grant to renew the courts in 2016/2017. There is also a small uptake of ‘Little Sticks’ hockey, circa 50 junior players.

The club has applied for community grants for this purpose in the past two financial years and been declined on both occasions. The total project cost is $67,415 which would replace the existing halogen lights with energy efficient LED lights noting that the existing poles are in good condition and would be reused. The club have raised $15,000 to date.

Lease expires 31 March 2034.

Not recommended for funding in this financial year

Medium

 

23.     Following the analysis of live and eligible priority projects, the recommendation is to allocate the $80,000 to Manukau Rugby League and Sports Club to investigate long-term clubroom options and implement short-term solutions to enable the club to deliver rugby league and serve their community.

Manukau Magpies Rugby League Club

Hexa Building Condition Assessment 2023

24.     In March 2023, Auckland Rugby League funded Hexa Consultants Limited to carry out a building condition assessment to record the fabric condition of the building’s external envelope, internal linings, immediate grounds and boundaries.

25.     Following the initial assessment, a written report was produced detailing findings and outlining recommendations for any immediate repair, replacement, maintenance, or further inspections deemed necessary following the visual assessment.

26.     A condition rating was applied to differing facility elements using the following rating scale:

·        C1: Very good condition – only normal maintenance required

·        C2: Minor defects only – minor maintenance required (5 per cent)

·        C3: Maintenance required to return to accepted level of service – significant maintenance required (10 per cent-20 per cent)

·        C4: Requires renewal – significant renewal/upgrade required (20 per cent-40 per cent)

·        C5: Asset unserviceable – over 50 per cent of asset requires replacement.

 

27.     The table below displays all facility elements which were given a C4 or C5 condition assessment rating.

Table 2: C4 and C5 Condition ratings

 

Main structure

 

Lean-to structure

 

External

C4

Soffit linings

C4

Concrete floor slab

C4

Concrete hardstanding

C4

Suspended fibreboard flooring

C4

Horizontal timber weatherboards

C4

Painted plasterboard walls

C4

Exposed timber framing

 

 

C4

Vinyl flooring

C4

Aluminium windows

 

 

C4

Exposed concrete floor slab

C4

Painted plasterboard walls

 

 

 

 

C4

Plasterboard ceiling linings

 

 

 

 

C4

Vinyl flooring

 

 

 

 

C4

Finishing trims

 

 

 

 

C5

Hardware

 

 

 

 

C5

Fittings

 

 

 

 

C5

Insulated wall panels

 

 

 

28.     Signs of suspected significant structural damage were identified during the visual inspection, including:

·        significant and widespread cracking to the internal plasterboard wall and ceiling linings in the lean-to structure

·        separation between the structural walls and partition walls lined with plasterboard in the lean-to structure

·        unevenness and cracking to the exposed concrete slab in the lean-to structure

·        unevenness to the concrete hardstanding adjacent to the property.

29.     The Hexa report provides several recommendations on the next steps to be carried out to the facility including the need to carry out further investigations to determine ground movement to ascertain conditions which will cause further damage to occur.

Current state

30.     Auckland Council’s compliance team has restricted use of the facility to the upstairs office space only, with a maximum of 12 people inside the facility at any one time.

31.     Several months after the Auckland floods, black mould was observed to be growing rapidly on the water damaged floors and walls.

32.     An initial assessment was undertaken by the council Compliance Team on 13 April 2023. During this visit it was noted that the club had not been opened up nor had any remedial works been attempted since the flooding and there was a strong odour present along with damp conditions to the majority of the grounds level.

33.     Staff from the Compliance Team gave advice to remove affected wall lining and insulation in order to dry out the framing, remove the damaged particle board flooring, and engage an electrician and drainlayer.

34.     The facility was restricted to the use of the first floor (office purposes) only, with a maximum of 12 persons at any one time.

35.     A follow up site visit was undertaken on 29 August 2023 to check progress with the remedial works which are still in progress, as illustrated by Attachment B. The initial restrictions remain in place.

36.     The club have been quoted more than $300,000 to repair the damage caused by the Auckland floods. The subsidence related issues remain and are largely visible in cracks in the walls and roof above the level of flood damage.

Next steps

37.     Given the nature of the subsidence and flooding issues and the uncertainty of funding to rectify issues which may persist, staff recommend broader investigation work be carried out to ascertain the future of the existing clubroom facility or a potential new facility.

38.     Staff have supported the club to engage an external provider to quote the following scope of works:

a)      undertake a geotechnical assessment of the land where the existing clubrooms is and potentially elsewhere in the park upon agreement if there is merit ahead of exploring potential future clubroom locations

b)      provide a high-level overview and costing of options moving forwards including; full renewal of existing clubrooms, demolition and rebuild options (scale high-medium-low) with key considerations and progress the preferred option as far as possible dependent on availability of funding

c)      identify and price short-term temporary clubroom options with the intent to enable the club to operate over the next few seasons and considering council’s landowner approval requirements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     There will be no impact on greenhouse gas emissions from the investigation work required for this project.

40.     The purpose of funding is to support investigation work to better understand the feasibility of retaining the existing clubroom facility or developing a new facility. The built environment is one of eight priorities within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

41.     Staff will develop the funding agreement which will outline the requirement to assess the environmental impact of proposed future clubroom options.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     The nature of the existing facility issues are complex and will require input from across the organisation as well as the support of external agencies.

43.     Staff have connected with colleagues across the organisation including:

·        Regional Services and Strategy – Principal Integration Specialist

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services – Geotechnical Practice Lead

·        Governance and CCO Partnerships – Local Board Services

·        Licensing and Regulatory Compliance – Compliance Response Team

·        Group Recovery – Recovery Specialist

·        Parks and Community Facilities – Area Operations, Leasing, Sports Facilities

·        Connected Communities – Community Broker.

44.     The club have an existing community ground lease containing responsibilities and annual reporting requirements which remain in place irrespective of funding agreements. Similarly the club must continue to work with the council Compliance Team with respect to the status of the building condition and use.

45.     Additional to the list above, there will be a need to liaise with staff from Land Advisory, Healthy Waters, Kāinga Ora, and Auckland Transport as this project progresses.

46.     There is collective staff support to assist the club in resolving the issues presented, there are no objections to this funding being granted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     The project recommended for support provides significant local participation and social outcomes across a broad range of ages and ability levels.

48.     On 11 October 2023, grant recommendations were workshopped with the local board where elected members provided direction in support of the proposed grant.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board have the fifth largest Māori population when compared to all other Auckland local board areas, with 12,861 people identifying as Māori.

50.     Manukau Magpies Rugby League club have a high proportion of membership identifying as Māori and have strong connections with local iwi, marae and kura.

51.     Te Ara Tāwhana/Moyle Park is not identified as a site of cultural significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     This item has $80,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget allocated for 2023/2024 as approved in the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme [MŌ/2023/84].

53.     The grant recommendation of $80,000 to support clubroom investigation and planning does not exceed the budget available and as such there are no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     The uncontestable nature of the funding coupled with the type of project recommended provides risks as outlined below.

Table 3: Risks and mitigations

Risks

Mitigations

Community groups who do not receive funding may feel aggrieved

The recommendation supports a medium-high priority project identified within the plan. The project has been independently assessed in alignment with council’s investment priorities for community sport.

Club expectations of future funding for construction

The purpose of the grant will be clearly detailed in the funding agreement, outlining that there is no obligation for council to fund any further community-led projects or community-owned assets.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Should the board resolve to allocate the grant, staff will work with the grant recipient to set in place a funding agreement and project plan to achieve the desired outcomes. The funding agreement template that will be used has been approved by council’s legal team.

56.     A progress update will be provided within the process for implementation of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan in 2024/2025.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport & Active Recreation Facilities Plan.pdf

 

b

Attachment B - Manukau Magpies RL - Flood Damage (1).pdf

 

c

Attachment B - Manukau Magpies RL - Flood Damage (2).pdf

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kieran Nevey - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Pippa Sommerville - Manager Sport & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Endorsement of the Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Paths Refresh

File No.: CP2023/15910

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Greenways Refresh Plan (Attachment A)

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In response to the significant population and development changes within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area, the local board allocated $10,000 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating expenditure (OPEX) budget to review the 2016 Local Paths Plan as part of the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2022/2023. The primary driver for developing the Greenways Refresh Plan is to assess whether the priority routes proposed in the 2016 Local Paths Plan still provide quality alternative transport options that support walking and cycling to key destinations around the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.  

3.       The plan looks at what priority routes have been completed, which ones should be modified and/or removed. 

4.       Since 2016, seven of the 18 priority routes have been completed and are regularly used by the public. 

5.       Taking into consideration future Auckland Transport and Kāinga Ora projects, the plan reassessed priority routes, and added additional routes to minimise gaps across the local board’s walking and cycling network.

6.       Due to the large number of routes identified in the plan, a process to prioritise the routes is needed to help programme and stage future development opportunities.

7.       Consideration was given to Auckland Transport’s proposed on-road network developments, and Kāinga Ora‘s current and future projects. This was designed to enable key transport and parks projects to be planned and delivered in an integrated way.

8.       Each route was assigned a priority of high, medium or low based on a fixed set of criteria and the resulting prioritisations ratings are recommended for adoption within this report.  

9.       The plan’s outcomes align with the local board’s continued commitment to the environment and mitigating the effects of climate change through transport initiatives. In addition, the pathways network will create an accessible community that will support the wellbeing of the local board’s emerging and diverse population. 

10.     If adopted, the priority routes located within parks will require detailed investigation for future investment and implementation through the development of future Customer and Community Services work programmes. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Greenways Refresh Plan (Attachment A). 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     In 2016, the local board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Paths Plan (MO/2016/125) which identifies walking, cycling and ecological connections across the local board area.  

12.     The aim of the Greenways Refresh Plan (Attachment A) is to provide a comprehensive overview of the 2016 Local Paths Plan and looks at what priority routes have been completed, which ones should be modified and/or removed, and where any new routes have been identified. It also ensures that Auckland Transport’s cycling programme is supported and identifies linkages between Kāinga Ora developments and key destinations.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Housing intensification programmes, led by Kāinga Ora, have and will continue to increase the population density in the local area, with greater numbers of people living in apartments and units.

14.     High density housing, where there is insufficient space to park vehicles or build the required roading infrastructure to accommodate the continued growth in car ownership, has increased the need for quality alternative transport options.

15.     The primary driver for refreshing the plan is to assess whether the priority routes proposed in the 2016 Local Paths Plan still provide quality alternative transport options that support walking and cycling to key destinations around the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area, and the recently built and proposed housing developments.

16.     Since 2016, seven of the 18 priority routes have been completed and are regularly used by the public. A summary of the 2016 priority routes is provided below in Table 1.

Table 1: Summary of 2016 priority routes  

Route

Completed

Removed or changed*

Yet to commence*

Comments

A  

Puketutu Island 

 

 

x 

Currently unfunded, no commencement date  

B 

Oruarangi Creek, Villa Maria connection 

 

 

x 

Currently unfunded, no commencement date 

C 

Oruarangi Creek, the remainder of the coastal edge 

 

x 

 

Changed – Iwi opposed the chosen route. Discussed in Land Owner Approval (LOA) process 

D 

Pūkaki Crater 

 

x 

 

Removed – Iwi strongly opposed the chosen route around the top of the crater, leading to its removal 

E 

Shared path/planting along SH20 and SH20A 

x 

x 

 

Changed – to enhance the safety of cycling facilities and expand travel options for individuals commuting to and from employment zones near the airport, as well as the neighbouring community, the decision was made to relocate the route away from SH20 

F 

SH20A to Māngere Town Centre 

x 

 

 

 

G 

Wellesley Road to Māngere coastal route 

x 

 

 

 

H 

Circumnavigation of Māngere Mountain  

x 

 

 

 

I 

Mahunga Drive to Hastie Avenue 

x 

 

 

 

J 

Hastie Avenue to Walmsley Road SHA 

x 

 

 

 

K 

Walmsley Road SHA to Favona Road 

x 

 

 

 

L 

Lenore Foreshore Reserve 

 

 

x 

Currently unfunded, no commencement date  

M 

Favona Road to Manu Street Esplanade Reserve 

 

 

x 

Currently unfunded, no commencement date  

N 

Portage Link 

 

 

x 

Currently unfunded, no commencement date  

O 

Portage link to Anns Creek 

 

 

x 

Currently unfunded, no commencement date  

P 

Ambury Park to Kiwi Esplanade 

x 

 

 

 

Q 

Seaside Park to SH1 cycleway 

 

 

x 

Currently unfunded, no commencement date  

R 

SH1 to Great South Road 

 

 

x 

Currently unfunded, no commencement date  

* Any 2016 priority routes that have been ‘changed’ or marked as ‘yet to commence’ have been carried forward to the 2023 Greenways Refresh Plan  

Analysis criteria

17.     Taking into consideration future Auckland Transport and Kāinga Ora projects, the plan reassessed priority routes, and added additional routes to minimise gaps across the local board’s walking and cycling network (Table 2).

18.     The criteria on which the priority routes were assessed were: 

·         the degree to which a route links residential and business areas 

·         the degree to which a route links to schools and community facilities 

·         the degree to which a route links to public transport hubs 

·         the physical complexity of a proposed route 

·         route safety. 

19.     A priority level was assigned to each route to guide future planning: 

·         high priority (0-5 years) 

·         medium priority (5 – 10 years) 

·         low priority (10 years+) 

20.     Consideration was given to Auckland Transport’s proposed on-road network developments, and Kāinga Ora’s current and future projects. This was designed to enable key transport and parks projects to be planned and delivered in an integrated way. 

 

Table 2: 2023 priority routes 

2023 Priority Route (ID letter may differ from 2016 route ID letter) 

New routes  

Priority 

A  

Puketutu Island 

 

Low 

B 

Coronation Road – Bader Drive 

 

Low 

C 

Oruarangi Creek, Villa Maria connection 

 

Low 

D 

Oruarangi Creek, the remainder of the coastal edge 

Iwi opposed 2016 route. Changed to avoid marae 

Low 

E 

Allan Park/Kiwi Esplanade – Wallace Road 

Connecting the missing link between the two parks 

High 

F 

Coronation Road – Bader Drive 

Identified as route E in 2016 Local Paths Plan and only half complete. The remainder of the route has been altered to avoid the highway and will instead connect into the existing path along Teararata Creek. 

High 

G 

Māngere Bridge Connection (Waterfront Road – Rimu Road) 

Connection from Māngere Town Centre 

Low 

H 

David Lange Park – Walter Massey Park 

Consistent with Auckland Transport’s plans for a new off-road/on-road bike route 

High 

I 

Bader Drive – Māngere Centre Park  

Consistent with Auckland Transport’s plans for a new off-road/on-road bike route 

High 

J 

Māngere Centre Park – Harania Marys Foreshore Reserve 

Consistent with Auckland Transport’s plans for a new off-road/on-road bike route 

Medium 

K 

Harania Marys Foreshore Reserve – Radonich Park 

 

Medium 

L 

Lenore Foreshore Reserve – Gray Avenue 

Consistent with Auckland Transport’s plans for a new off-road/on-road bike route 

Medium 

M 

Wickman Way/Tennessee Reserve  

Connection from the Māngere East Kāinga Ora development to Favona Road route 

Medium 

N 

Favona Road – Lenore Foreshore Reserve 

Connection to Favona Road route 

Medium 

O 

Favona Road – Walmsley Road 

 

Medium 

P 

Favona Road – Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board boundary  

 

Medium 

Q 

Portage link 

 

Medium 

R 

Savill Drive 

 

Medium 

S 

Seaside Park – SH1 cycleway 

 

Low 

T 

SH1 to Great South Road 

 

Low 

U 

Courtenay Crescent – Haddon Street 

Connection through Kāinga Ora Aorere development 

Medium 

 

21.     Many of the low priority routes have regulatory and land tenure complexities, however, as land is sub-divided for residential and commercial development, the plan enables council staff to acquire and protect esplanade land for the development of future connections.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:   

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and   

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.  

23.     The delivery of the Greenways Refresh Plan will provide safe and convenient walking and cycling connections to key destinations around the local area, which will:  

·        promote the uptake of walking, cycling and public transport, to increase community connectivity, improve health and reduce emissions, particularly over short distances 

·        reduce the dependence on private vehicles for transportation, which can contribute to congestion, pollution, and carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The plan identifies different types of pathway connections. Not all pathway connections are within parks. Collaboration with other groups of council, outside of Parks and Community Facilities is required to maintain connections across the local board area.

25.     With many proposed connections in road reserves, the plan refresh has involved working closely with Auckland Transport, with ongoing collaboration intended as projects are planned and delivered on the ground. 

26.     Auckland Transport are supportive of the approach laid out in the refreshed plan. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The views expressed by the local board through previous workshops in May 2022, August 2022 and August 2023 have driven the analysis process and have been integrated into the proposed priorities. 

28.     The proposed priority routes in the Greenways Refresh Plan create walking and cycling opportunities that will assist the local board in its continued commitment to the environment and mitigating the effects of climate change through transport initiatives.  

29.     A network of walking and cycling pathways creates an environment that contributes to the local board’s vision to create an age-friendly and accessible community that supports the wellbeing of the emerging and diverse population. The local board’s Accessibility Action Plan will help guide the design and construction of the proposed priority routes to ensure the network is accessible and easy to use.  

30.     The Greenways Refresh Plan responds to the increasing residential growth in the area by ensuring these developments are connected to nearby open spaces and playgrounds by quality walking and cycling paths that create and encourage active transport opportunities. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan (operative in part), Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework. 

32.     Delivery of the Greenways Refresh Plan will benefit Māori by providing increased access to open space, sporting hubs, community centres and transport links. The plan also identifies opportunities for the protection and enhancement of taonga through ecological and water quality outcomes.

33.     The activities identified in the plan will impact mana whenua. Iwi will be engaged at a project level to assist in defining cultural requirements and park enhancements as priority routes are funded. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     The local board may choose to develop priority connections funded through Local Development Initiative (LDI) capital expenditure (CAPEX), the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and, renewals funding or in combination.

35.     Parks and Community Facilities and Auckland Transport will be responsible for the implementation of the plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     The capital cost to deliver all priority routes identified in this plan over the short to medium term will be prohibitive. Therefore, it is recommended that the local board supports the recommended prioritisation of routes (high, medium, and low) that also take into consideration future Auckland Transport and Kāinga Ora projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Once the Greenways Refresh Plan is adopted, staff will work with the local board to identify possible opportunities for funding as part of future Customer and Community Services renewals and growth work programme.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Paths Refresh Draft_27102023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emily Wagon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Aorere Pocket Park concept plan

File No.: CP2023/17221

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Aorere Pocket Park concept plan (appendix A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Aorere Pocket Park is a new parcel of open space within Kāinga Ora’s Māngere Aorere Development.

3.       Working in partnership with Te Ākitai Waiohua, Kāinga Ora has finalised the Aorere Pocket Park concept plan following consultation with the community and the council’s Parks and Community Facilities staff.

4.       As a pocket park, predominately surrounded by three-story, walk-up apartments, the park aims to provide ‘door step’ access to small amenity and socialising spaces and visual relief.

5.       Aorere Park and Walter Massey Park, both scheduled for future upgrades/renewals in the local board’s work programme, are within a one-kilometre radius of the park, providing a variety of recreational opportunities to the Aorere development residents.

6.       Using the ancient narrative of Mataoho (the god of volcanic activity), Te Ākitai Waiohua have used storytelling to guide the design and placement of play elements throughout the park.

7.       Kāinga Ora would like to include three additional design elements (built shade structure, hammock swings, and garden beds). Parks and Community Facilities staff do not support their inclusion on the basis that the board’s Asset Based Service budget won’t extend to providing the level of maintenance required to service these additional assets.   

8.       Following the local board’s adoption of the concept plan and acceptance of the gifted name, an infrastructure funding agreement will be drawn-up between Auckland Council and Kāinga Ora.

9.       Resolution number MO/2020/174 states that Kāinga Ora will provide capital investment up to $290,000 (excluding GST) in the development of Aorere Pocket Park. The current development cost estimates have exceeded the agreed investment amount of $290,000.  However, due to Council’s limited ability to contribute financially to the development of new parks outside the work programme, Kāinga Ora has agreed to financially cover the whole cost of the park’s development.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Aorere Pocket Park concept plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background information about Aorere Pocket Park

10.     Aorere Pocket Park is a new parcel of open space within Kāinga Ora’s Māngere Aorere Development. Approximately 471 additional dwellings are proposed for the development, ranging in size from one to six bedrooms.

11.     The result of a land swap agreement between the council and Kāinga Ora (resolution number MO/2020/174), the new park aims to enhance the surrounding development's open space and recreation opportunities. The land swap was finalised in December 2022.

12.     Once residential development is completed, the park will predominately be surrounded by three-story, walk-up apartments. As a pocket park, the park aims to provide ‘door step’ access to small amenity and socialising spaces and visual relief in intensified development areas. It will also serve as a through route to the surrounding streets.

Surrounding open space network

Figure 1: Parcels of open space within a one-kilometre radius of Aorere Pocket Park.

 

13.     Located in the Ōtāra-Papatoetoe Local Board area, Aorere Park offers the community a large green space for informal and passive recreation, sport, and kick-about activities. Well-established trees line the perimeter of the park, providing natural shade and contributing to the board’s urban ngahere. Aorere Park has play equipment that includes swings, spinners, see-saw, and an infant swing. There is also a toilet facility.

14.     Aorere Park is classified as a suburb level playspace, however, extra work is required to meet the current and future informal and formal recreation needs of the community. Ōtāra-Papatoetoe local board’s work programme has flagged Aorere Park for future upgrades including a toilet facility, fitness stations, play and internal walking paths (depending on funding).

15.     Walter Massey Park is within a 1km radius of Aorere Pocket Park and has potential to provide active and informal recreation opportunities to the residents living within the Aorere development. The park is currently going through the master planning process (project ID #1315).

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     This report provides an overview of the final draft concept plan being proposed for adoption, including a summary of the consultation findings.

Overview of concept plan for adoption

17.     The draft concept plan presents Aorere Pocket Park as a transitional space for the local community within the surrounding buildings. The park will include play along the way, seating areas, and more green space including more tree planting and grass mounds.

18.     The design has been achieved by working with council staff, Te Ākitai Waiohua and two local schools.

Table 1: Input into design elements

Parks and Community Facilities (AC)

Community consultation (Kāinga Ora)

Strategic assessment for a pocket park

Mana whenua engagement – Te Ākitai Waiohua

Local school engagement – Kingsford Primary & Kedgley Intermediate

·    Accessible connecting footpath

·    Seating

·    Gathering space

·    Passive recreation space

·    Shade

·    Natural play (complementary to Aorere Park)

·    Storytelling and learning through play using the narrative of Mataoho (god of volcanic activity)

·    Placement of the objects

·    Incorporating Māori play elements

·    Cultural design, symbolic integration

·    Place to play, relax and meet up with friends and family

·    Shelter (featured very strongly)

·    Tables and seating

·    Play to incorporate swinging

·    Balance beams and steps designed to be challenging, but still accessible

Analysis

19.     Te Ākitai Waiohua has been actively involved in the design of Aorere Pocket Park creating a space that is rich with Māori identity and culture.

20.     Community consultation identified several play and park elements including a built shade structure, hammock swings, and garden beds. To remain consistent with the council’s Open Space and Provision Policy and on the advice of Parks and Community Facility staff, these items have not been included in the final concept plan.

21.     Instead, these elements should be included in the upgrade of Aorere Park’s suburb-level playspace to develop the park as the main parcel of open space within the Aorere neighbourhood.

22.     Numerous upgrades to Aorere Park are identified in Ōtāra-Papatoetoe Local Board’s work programme (#28592 & #20402). 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     The concept plan proposes the planting of additional trees throughout the park, which will assist the local board in creating a sustainable urban ngahere and increase tree canopy coverage across the neighbourhood.

24.     The number of impervious surfaces (rooftops, driveways, parking lots and roads) increases as development intensifies across the neighbourhood, resulting in a higher percentage of rainwater becoming runoff. The proposed lawn areas throughout the park will assist in stormwater management, slowing the overflow and absorbing it into the soil.

25.     As a dedicated thoroughfare through the neighbourhood, the attractive pathway and māra hūpara create and encourage walking and cycling as an alternative option for short trips. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Council staff have worked with Kāinga Ora on the development of the concept plan to ensure the elements and design align with the local board’s Play Assessment (2021) and the council’s open space provision policy.

27.     The draft concept plan has been reviewed by staff from Parks and Community Facilities. Staff support the draft concept plan and the changes to the plan following the local board workshop (13 September 2023).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     Quality open space is a critical component of attractive and liveable neighbourhoods, particularly in high density areas. The implementation of the concept plan will provide social, physical, and mental health benefits for the community, where access to private open space is minimal or non-existent.

29.     This report highlights how the process and design elements within the concept plan are consistent with the board’s plan objectives.

Table 2: Local board objectives

Local board objective

Process / outcomes of the concept plan

Achieving Māori aspirations through partnership, project delivery, and increased co-governance across our projects

Working with Te Ākitai Waiohua, Kāinga Ora were able to incorporate the Māori ancient narrative, ‘Te Riri a Mataaho’– ‘the extreme anger of Mataaho’ into the design and layout of the concept plan.

Increased tree coverage and greenspace

Additional tree planting is proposed in the concept plan, contributing to the board’s vision to achieve a 5 per cent increase of tree canopy cover within the local board area boundaries by 2030.

Provision of high-quality community facilities for easy access and use

Implementation of the concept plan will result in a well-designed pocket park, that will provide an outdoor respite for those living in the surrounding dwellings. 

Well used and maintained local parks and playgrounds where we meet, play, and keep healthy

Auckland Council and Kāinga Ora staff have worked together to create a park that is accessible to those living in the surrounding dwellings.

Discussions with Auckland Transport have resulted in a network of footpaths providing safe, off-road connections to the park.

 

30.     The local board acknowledged the community’s desire to have additional play elements but took the advice of Parks and Community Facilities staff, to not include the elements in the Aorere Park upgrade.

31.     There are ongoing concerns regarding the lack of parking around the Kāinga Ora developments. Kāinga Ora staff advised that they would investigate ways to protect the park from unauthorised vehicle access.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Kāinga Ora requested engagement with mana whenua on 29 September 2020. It was agreed that Kāinga Ora would work with Te Ākitai Waiohua on the new park design.

33.     Te Ākitai Waiohua choose the ancient tradition of Te Riri a Mataaho and his creation of Ngaa Maunga in Taamaki to guide the narrative of the concept plan (appendix B).

34.     The three grassed mounds in the plan represent key sites of significance, known as Nga Tapuwae a Mataoho or the sacred footprints of Mataaho:

a)      Pūkaki Crater (Te Pūkakitapu o Poutukeka)

b)      Crater Hill (Nga Kapua Kohuora)

c)       Kohuora Park (Kohuora)

35.     The main pathway through the plan represents the Pūkaki Portage/Waka Portage, a transport route significant to Te Ākitai Waiohua for carrying waka over land.

36.     Kia Ora Te Ao Turoa is represented through the māra hūpara where kowhatu, linked with Mataaho and the surrounding area, are integrated into the design.

37.     Te Ākitai Waiohua have expressed a desire to be involved in the implementation of the concept plan, having already sourced 34 kowhatu (rocks) for the park.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     Following the adoption of the concept plan, council staff will develop an infrastructure funding agreement Kāinga Ora.  

39.     As per resolution number MO/2020/174, Kāinga Ora originally agreed to provide capital investment up to $290,000 (excluding GST) in the development of Aorere Pocket Park.

40.     However, the current development cost estimates for delivery of the concept plan have exceeded the agreed investment amount of $290,000. Due to Council’s limited ability to contribute financially to the development of new parks outside the work programme, Kāinga Ora has agreed to financially cover the whole cost of the park’s development as per the concept plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     Community and stakeholder expectations that were discussed throughout the consultation stage may not be met. However, as Aorere and Walter Massey Parks are upgraded and become more accessible, residents will have a variety of recreational opportunities within a one-kilometre radius.

42.     Residential density and its corresponding effects on the surrounding open space network are currently not addressed in the council’s open space and provision policy. The additional 471 dwellings in the Aorere neighbourhood will place pressure on the park to provide the service previously met by one’s private backyard. However, the greening of Paneke Street and the proposed walkway between Mayflower and Hadden Streets will provide a safe, off-road connection to Aorere Park. Once the upgrades are completed, Aorere Park will provide a variety of recreational experiences. 

43.     There are ongoing concerns regarding the lack of parking around all the Kāinga Ora developments. Kāinga Ora staff advised that they would investigate ways to protect the park from unauthorised vehicle access. This will be discussed with the operations team at the detailed design stage of the project. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Following the local board’s adoption of the concept plan, an infrastructure funding agreement will be drawn-up between Auckland Council and Kāinga Ora.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aorere Pocket Park concept design

 

b

Aorere Pocket Park design narrative

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emily Wagon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Tāmaki Makaurau Streets for People – Māngere Trials

File No.: CP2023/17386

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks endorsement from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to progress the Māngere Streets for People projects to implementation and monitoring and evaluation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) is progressing trial projects in Onewherowhero (Kelston) and Māngere through the Waka Kotahi ‘Streets for People’ programme. These projects aim to use new ways of working with local communities and stakeholders to inform, design, build, adapt, and activate infrastructure that get more people walking and cycling.

3.       In Māngere, AT has partnered with Māngere community groups (Time To Thrive trust, and IAMMĀNGERE) to investigate, design, communicate, and deliver two cycleway projects; Coronation Road from Nga Hau Māngere to Māngere Bridge Village, and Robertson Road in front of Māngere Centre Park.

4.       Each project has now completed three collaborative forum, facilitated by our community partners, that brought together local people, community groups, and Mana Whenua and Local Board representation to help design the infrastructure and guide the team on ways to promote and active the projects. This included opportunities to locate portable pump tracks and cycle parking.

5.       Our ongoing partnerships with local people and project oversight by the Local Board and Mana Whenua is integral to the project’s success. AT are ready to move the two trial projects from the ‘collaborative design’ phase into ‘implementation’ and seek endorsement of the Streets for People process from the Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the authentic approach to community collaboration and engagement taken by the Auckland Transport Streets for People team

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the trial timeline and commitment from Auckland Transport to report back to the Local Board on measures of success that will influence the decision to transition to a final solution – making the trial permanent with any required changes, or removing some, or all the project

c)       ohia / endorse Auckland Transport moving to the next phase of the Streets for People trial projects which includes implementation, adaptation, and monitoring and evaluation. Auckland Transport will continue to seek feedback to inform the project from Local Board, Mana Whenua, stakeholders and the community through this phase.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Through Streets for People, thirteen councils across Aotearoa are working on 19 projects that will make it safer, easier, and more attractive for people to walk, ride bikes or scooters and take public transport, and to improve road safety and routes to schools.

7.       The projects involve quick, low-cost, scalable improvements that help create safe, people-friendly spaces in their neighbourhoods. In Tamaki Makaurau this is done through trial projects that inform permanent changes planned for the future. This approach to projects is called “adaptive urbanism”.

8.       These projects will contribute to safer and healthier communities where people have more options in how they travel, and where the transport system contributes to reducing emissions and our resilience to a changing climate. The projects also allow AT to use new ways of working with local people and stakeholders to influence the ‘business as usual’ approach going forward.

9.       Māngere was selected as a location for Streets for People due to the significant investment proposed through the Māngere West Cycling Improvements and Māngere East Cycling Investment over the next six years. Collectively these projects link the isolated pieces of cycling infrastructure, such as Te Ara Mua future streets in Māngere. The proposed network is shown in the map below.

10.     The Streets for People trial projects include intensive community collaboration and engagement, this opportunity to work together and collaborate on active mode outcomes in Māngere achieves a key goal of the programme to collaborate with and empower local people to achieve positive change in their neighbourhoods.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Streets for People trial cycleway projects in Māngere have provided an opportunity for Auckland Transport to develop direct working relationships with community partners Time to Thrive trust and IAMMĀNGERE. These partners are vital to our process for these projects and through them we are showing the value of that local voice for other projects.

12.     Three Collaboration Forum sessions for each of the two trial sites have been completed. These have involved local residents, business owners, Business Associations, Mana Whenua, and Elected Members. The sessions for the Robertson Road trial have taken place at a marae and sports facility adjacent to the proposed trial cycleway, while the Coronation Road project used the Māngere Bridge Library.

13.     Leading up to these sessions were one-on-one or one-on-few meetings with many local stakeholders to help identify Collaboration Forum participants and circulate project concepts for early feedback. We have also undertaken multiple door-knocking rounds for face-to-face conversations with residents along the proposed routes, with project postcards left at those properties where we have yet to make contact.

14.     Mana Whenua and the Local Board have had their own briefings at multiple stages of the project.

15.     Because the trials are part of a much larger cycling network in Māngere, communication and engagement activity for the wider network also introduces the trials. So far, this has involved targeted stakeholder communication and a trial public event in October.

16.     This resolution seeks support from the Local Board to progress to the “Installation and refinement” phase of the project, however the opportunity for the Board to be informed, contribute, guide, and shape the project continues right through to the decision on retention or removal at the end of June 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities. This project supports those outcomes.

18.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     This project is led by Auckland Transport, but the project areas – Onewherowhero (Kelston) and Māngere – and benefits were developed with input from Auckland Council and Eke Panuku.

20.     Local Boards are key stakeholders and collaboration partners for the projects and Auckland Transport looks to use learnings from these projects to influence how we work with Local Boards on other transport projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     For the Coronation Road site the project had a diverse set of perspectives as part of the Collaboration Forum process, including Residents & Ratepayers, Business Association, and Neighbourhood Support. There is support for the trial amongst this group.

22.     Our door-knocking of properties adjacent to the trial has found broad support, with two residents concerned about the proposed changes. We will continue engaging with these two properties throughout the trial.

23.     For the Robertson Road site the project again had a diverse set of perspectives in the Collaboration Forum. This included organisations/businesses adjacent to the proposed trial: Papatūānuku Kōkiri Marae, Centre Park Sports, Robertson Road dairy. Each had concerns at the start of the process, but we have worked through those over the sessions and now have broad support - at their request, we continue to engage with the marae on strategies to mitigate the impact of change on their community.

24.     We have had one very vocal resident family attend who, at the outset, opposed many aspects of the project. By the final session, they supported the trial, saying, “We’re happy. It’s clear the team has listened and responded to our concerns.” It has been difficult to get more residents to the Collaboration Forum sessions. However, we repeated door-knocking activity. We’ve had many face-to-face conversations with residents along the trial area, but there is little concern - because the trial is located along Centre Park (over the road from their properties).

25.     We have engaged closely with the Local Board, around half of whom have attended at least one Collaboration Forum session. At the outset, some members had concerns about trialling cycleways in their community. We have continued to work with the Local Board to address concerns and build trust in the process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     We are working closely with Kathleen Wilson from Te Ākitai Waiohua on these two cycleway projects. There is an aligned kaupapa between the project and Iwi by working with local people to guide the projects, but to also show how locals can be involved more widely and influence future strategy and investment in their community.

27.     The project team also provides regular updates to the AT Southern Hui where other Mana Whenua are able to contribute or comment.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     These projects, including the activations, pump tracks, cycle parking and events are 90% funded by Waka Kotahi. Auckland Transport contributes the other 10% from active mode project budgets in the area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no risks identified with the local board endorsing this project.

30.     Any future risks and mitigations in planning and delivery of the project will be notified to the local board through regular meeting updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     The projects are in the Pre-install phase where approvals are sought. With approvals provided, the project will move into the ‘Installation and refinement’ stage.

32.     Monitoring and evaluation will continue through the delivery of the project. The trial will officially end at the end of June 2024 where the evaluation report will recommend retention, changes, or removal of the trials.

33.     Local Board will be involved in each of the stages going forward and have an opportunity to contribute to shaping the project on site, evaluation and the retention decision.

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Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Streets for People Maangere - Trial process and measures of success

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

 

Author

Kit McLean, Technical Lead Streets for People programme.  

Authorisers

Allyn Sims, Programme Manager, People-Powered Streets Programmes, Auckland Transport

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group

File No.: CP2023/16310

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Play Leadership Group for elected members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have included play advocacy projects in their 2023/2024 work programmes and are seeking opportunities to increase play diversity within their parts of the region.

3.       The council’s play advocacy advisor has established a staff network of play champions to support the ongoing development and promotion of play opportunities. When the Play Advisory Group was promoted on the council’s Kotahi intranet in 2022, some elected members asked to participate.

4.       To further support local board play advocacy activities and to respond to the appetite for increased play participation from some elected members, a Play Leadership Group is proposed. This will be a version of the staff play network, except just for elected members.

5.       As the terms of reference in Attachment A confirm, the Play Leadership Group will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision of the group will be “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

6.       The Play Leadership Group will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about play in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for play within their local boards, and to provide informal guidance to relevant staff on play issues.

7.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

8.       Staff recommend a quarterly meeting schedule for the Play Leadership Group. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes from the meetings.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Play Leadership Group.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Auckland Council employed its first play advocacy advisor in September 2022. The role leads advocacy work in the area of play at Auckland Council and advocates for and influences the consideration, empowerment, enablement and equitable promotion of play.

10.     Play advocacy is an initiative in 17 local board work programmes for the 2023/2024 financial year. Three local boards do not have capacity to include play advocacy in their work programmes for 2023/2024 but have asked for ad-hoc advocacy support and will consider including play advocacy in their 2024/2025 work programmes.

11.     The play advocacy advisor has a responsibility to establish a network of play champions within council, to increase knowledge and awareness of play across the council group. The advisor established a Play Advisory Group in 2022 which has grown to include 45 play champions from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, and other organisations affiliated with the council, including Auckland Zoo, Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand Maritime Museum, and Stardome Observatory and Planetarium.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local boards have embraced the play advocacy approach and indicated interest to explore how they can increase play diversity for their communities and achieve play outcomes through different projects.

13.     After several local board workshops, elected members showed a strong personal interest in play. There are high levels of enthusiasm for play discussions and a keen interest in understanding more about how to promote play.

14.     In November 2022 the council’s Kotahi intranet published a story about play advocacy and publicised the staff Play Advisory Group. Some elected members contacted the play advocacy advisor and asked if they could join the group. However, the group’s terms of reference restrict membership to staff only.

15.     During workshops with local boards in 2023, the play advocacy advisor sought guidance from elected members regarding their appetite for participating in an equivalent special interest group for elected members with a strong interest in play.

16.     In response to local boards’ interest, the play advocacy advisor has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of a Play Leadership Group, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·        learn more about play

·        share relevant knowledge with other elected members

·        improve connections between participants at a governance level

·        encourage collaboration between local boards to support play outcomes

·        increase knowledge and understanding of play equity issues

·        provide informal guidance to staff as the play advocacy work area grows

·        share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

17.     The vision of the Play Leadership Group is “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

18.     Participation in the Play Leadership Group is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint elected members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes of the group’s meetings.

19.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

20.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Play Leadership Group and provides further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet four times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed by the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The formation and operation of the Play Leadership Group has no climate impact.

22.     The continued advocacy to support play as ‘an everywhere activity’ supports positive climate outcomes by encouraging the community to embrace local suburbs as sites for play. This approach will reduce the need to drive to reach playgrounds.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Play Leadership Group will be administered by staff from the council’s Active Communities team, with support from kaimahi in the Regional Services and Strategy and Parks and Community Facilities departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The play advocacy advisor has presented at 20 local boards between March and October 2023.

25.     Local boards have expressed interest in the formation of a governance-level group for elected members who are interested in play. One local board requested that the opportunity to participate was presented in a business report, to enable participation to be formally agreed by the board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Play Leadership Group will provide play leaders with opportunities to learn more about Māori values relevant to play, Sport New Zealand’s bicultural play plan and its relevance to the development of play activities nationwide, and current and potential Māori play opportunities. This includes opportunities to develop and install māra hūpara in local parks and reserves, and the potential for projects such as Te Kete Rukuruku to generate play outcomes.

27.     The play leaders could also provide a mechanism for regional iwi engagement regarding play on a relatively informal basis, enabling mana whenua to share their views about play on an ongoing basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The Play Leadership Group will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that elected members could become members of the Play Leadership Group with expectations that they will be able to influence broader play investment or make decisions affecting play at a regional level.

30.     The terms of reference are intended to mitigate the risk of misunderstandings by making clear the scope of the Play Leadership Group. This will ensure participants become involved with a realistic expectation of what can be achieved through their membership.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Play Leadership Group will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

32.     An initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Play Leadership Group

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacquelyn Collins - Play Advocacy Advisor, Active Communities

Authorisers

Pippa Sommerville - Manager Sport & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quarter One report

File No.: CP2023/17360

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk).

4.       Of the 149 work lines within the agreed work programme, 146 are green, 3 activities are amber and there are no projects with a grey or red status.

5.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·        Ōtāhuhu Pool and Leisure Centre (Toia), Active Communities – Leisure: ID# 29: Ōtāhuhu Pool and Leisure Centre has had a 24 percent increase in visitor numbers when measured against the same period last year.

·        Moana-Nui-a-Kiwi Pool and Leisure Centre operations, Active Communities – Leisure: ID# 32: Moana-Nui-a-Kiwa has seen an increase in visits in the first quarter of FY2024, against the same period last year (July – September). Membership has increased by 6 percent to 1081 members, pool visits have increased by 20 percent and visits overall have grown by 12 percent to 20,470 for the quarter.

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Economic Broker, Connected Communities – Community Delivery: ID# 3045: Management of the Economic Broker role has moved from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited to Community Delivery team. The Economic Broker delivered on the local board’s economic objective by establishing the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund 2023. A total of $59,950 has been allocated to 31 successful applicants.

·        Access to community places Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Connected Communities – Community Delivery: ID# 248: Q1 booking hours have decreased by 25 percent and participant numbers have decreased by 17 percent compared to the same period last year.

·        Youth Economy (Youth Connections) - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, The Southern Initiative: ID# 1340: Digital Technology: Ask Q was funded $10,000 to support four young people from Māngere-Ōtāhuhu to participate in a live streaming/production programme.

·        Community grants Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Grants: ID# 263: The Board has set a total budget of 252,068 for the 2023/2024 financial year. This is for two Local Grant Rounds, two Quick Response Rounds and two Multiboard Grant Rounds.

·        Ōtāhuhu Community Centre (former Library) - renew community centre, Parks and Community Facilities – Project Delivery: ID# 20608: Current status: The accessible toilet has been installed. Next steps: Finalise scope and costs for the interior refurbishment work to be completed at the Community Centre.

·        David Lange Park - develop destination playground and renew park assets, Parks and Community Facilities – Project Delivery: ID# 26137: Current status: This line is part of a wider project relating to the stage one works for David Lange Park - destination playground. Stage one includes, renewed playground, toilet block, basketball courts and skatepark. Stage one works in currently in delivery and expected to be completed, October 2023.

·        Pūkaki Crater Co-Management Committee, Parks and Community Facilities –Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua: ID# 1042: A refreshed draft joint management agreement is currently underway, mana whenua and local board members have been engaged during the refresh process to input to the agreement.

·        Citizenship ceremonies Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Events: ID# 252: The Civic Events team delivered two citizenship ceremonies in Q1 with 239 people from the local board area becoming new citizens.

·        A review of parts of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area plan, Plans and Places: ID# 1290: Confirmation on the use of cultural landscape maps in the area plan is being sought from Mana Whenua.

·        Pest Free South Auckland - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Environmental Services – Natural Environment Delivery: ID# 664: The funding agreement for 2023/2024 has been signed.

·        Climate action programme - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Environmental Services – Sustainability Initiatives: ID# 654: Funding agreements have been set up for local climate action projects supported by the local board 2022/2023 climate action programme.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2023/2024 is attached (Attachment B).

7.       Overall, the net operational financial performance of the local board is below the revised year to date budget (90 percent). Revenue is slightly above budget for the year to date with volumes for aquatic and fitness activities bouncing back faster than anticipated. From the local boards’ Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) funding, the majority of projects are underway and on track to be completed by year end. Capital projects underway or completed include the destination playground at David Lange Park, carpark renewal at Seaside Park, toilet block renewal at Kiwi Esplanade, and refurbishment of Thomas Clements Senior Citizens Hall.

8.        The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

9.        Auckland Emergency Management has undertaken a change proposal process which has resulted in the Resilience team that formerly engaged with Local Boards being disestablished. Future work with Local Boards and communities will be delivered through a new planning team, which will eventually have seven Senior Planners, each working with three local boards.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Auckland Emergency Management

·        Local Governance

11.     The local board work programmes were not adopted until a month into the financial year due to uncertainty of local board funding in the development of the Annual Budget 2023/2024. Local board funding for 2023/2024 was agreed by the Governing Body at the end of May 2023 and required changes to planned work programmes, which were then approved in July 2023.

12.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

13.     AEM Resilience staff members have continued to attend community meetings to provide feedback, subject matter expertise where required this quarter. This has included supporting community activities that is attached to the work of Community Brokers that arose following the emergency events this year.

14.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

15.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates

16.     Ōtāhuhu Pool and Leisure Centre (Toia), Active Communities – Leisure: ID# 29: Ōtāhuhu Pool and Leisure Centre has had a 24 percent increase in visitor numbers when measured against the same period last year. The NPS Score at the end of Sept 2023 was 33.5 which was an increase from 28.4 from the previous rolling 12 months. Pool visitation increased by 13 percent when measured against the same time last year. The facility has been nominated in the Exercise New Zealand awards for 'facility of the year'. The facility has been working closely with council and our sustainability team to achieve better usage with power, water, and waste. Staff are continuing to investigate ways to improve our carbon footprint and overall environmental usage at the facility.

17.     Moana-Nui-a-Kiwi Pool and Leisure Centre operations, Active Communities – Leisure: ID# 32: Moana-Nui-a-Kiwa has seen an increase in visits in the first quarter of FY2024, against the same period last year (July – September). Membership has increased by 6 percent to 1081 members, pool visits have increased by 20 percent and visits overall have grown by 12 percent to 20,470 for the quarter. Fitness visitation has increased by 15 percent and fitness memberships numbers increased 6 percent from 568 to 602. Group fitness occupancy has a 34 percent decline overall, because the Recreation Hall is still closed due to the damage from the anniversary floods. Repairs are now underway and will be completed within the next two months. The outdoor pools are due to open on 9 December 2023, we are currently recruiting for the summer season.

18.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Economic Broker, Connected Communities – Community Delivery: ID# 3045: Management of the Economic Broker role has moved from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited to Community Delivery team. The Economic Broker delivered on the local board’s economic objective by establishing the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund 2023. A total of $59,950 has been allocated to 31 successful applicants. The Broker is currently promoting the MSD Pacific Employment Action Plan Fund, which closes 30 October 2023. This fund aims to build prosperous Pacific communities.

19.     Access to community places Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Connected Communities – Community Delivery: ID# 248: Q1 booking hours have decreased by 25 percent and participant numbers have decreased by 17 percent compared to the same period last year. The top two activities for Q1 were meetings and religious events.

20.     Youth Economy (Youth Connections) - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, The Southern Initiative: ID# 1340: Digital Technology: Ask Q was funded $10,000 to support four young people from Māngere-Ōtāhuhu to participate in a live streaming/production programme. Brown Pride has been funded $20,000 to support eight young people from Māngere-Ōtāhuhu to achieve sustainable employment or start their own enterprise. This 10-week programme has just commenced.

21.     Community grants Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Grants: ID# 263: The Board has set a total budget of 252,068 for the 2023/2024 financial year. This is for two Local Grant Rounds, two Quick Response Rounds and two Multiboard Grant Rounds.

22.     Ōtāhuhu Community Centre (former Library) - renew community centre, Parks and Community Facilities – Project Delivery: ID# 20608: Current status: The accessible toilet has been installed. Next steps: Finalise scope and costs for the interior refurbishment work to be completed at the Community Centre.

23.     David Lange Park - develop destination playground and renew park assets, Parks and Community Facilities – Project Delivery: ID# 26137: Current status: This line is part of a wider project relating to the stage one works for David Lange Park - destination playground. Stage one includes, renewed playground, toilet block, basketball courts and skatepark. The project team updated the local board in a workshop July 2023. Next steps: Stage one works in currently in delivery and expected to be completed, October 2023.

24.     Citizenship ceremonies Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Events: ID# 252: The Civic Events team delivered two citizenship ceremonies in Q1 with 239 people from the local board area becoming new citizens.

25.     A review of parts of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area plan, Plans and Places: ID# 1290: Confirmation on the use of cultural landscape maps in the area plan is being sought from Mana Whenua. The process to achieve this is currently underway and once the outcome has been confirmed, the production of the online document will be undertaken.

26.     Pest Free South Auckland - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Environmental Services – Natural Environment Delivery: ID# 664: The funding agreement for 2023/2024 has been signed. A committee meeting has been held focusing on strategic planning for this financial year. Time has been spent progressing and building relationships with key groups and agencies. A number of hui have been attended which has increased the profile and awareness of Pest Free South Auckland.

27.     Climate action programme - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Environmental Services – Sustainability Initiatives: ID# 654: Funding agreements have been set up for local climate action projects supported by the local board 2022/2023 climate action programme. These projects included support for community workshops on climate action priorities run by Māngere East Family Services and Te Ahiwaru.

Activities on hold

28.     Māngere Bridge Library - comprehensive renewal, Parks and Community Facilities – Project Delivery: ID# 20552: Project on-hold, as this project is funded in 2024/2025, this project has been approved as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme which means this project can progress earlier than anticipated should resource allow.

29.     Walter Massey Park - develop new walkway and upgrade playground, Parks and Community Facilities – Project Delivery: ID# 15706: The resource consent has been achieved for the pathways works which has been placed on HOLD until funding becomes available in future years.

30.     Climate action programme - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Environmental Services – Sustainability Initiatives: ID# 654: Funding agreements have been set up for local climate action projects supported by the local board 2022/2023 climate action programme. These projects included support for community workshops on climate action priorities run by Māngere East Family Services and Te Ahiwaru.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

32.     Work programmes were approved in July 2023 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     This report informs the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of the performance for quarter one ending 30 September 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Pūkaki Crater Co-Management Committee, Parks and Community Facilities –Te Waka Tai-ranga-whenua: ID# 1042: A refreshed draft joint management agreement is currently underway, mana whenua and local board members have been engaged during the refresh process to input to the agreement.

36.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two, Māori Outcomes: ID# 2831: Waiting for full narrative for Te Taahuhu / Criterion Reserve from iwi. Expected in Q2. Awaiting update on development of reserve area from Auckland Transport. Once received a whakarewatanga can be planned.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     This report is provided to enable the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

38.     Operating expenditure relating to Asset Based Services is below revised budget by $446,000 for the year to date, while the Locally Driven Initiatives operational projects are also slightly below budget. Projects will be monitored closely, and any delivery risks will be brought to the board as part of the next performance report.

39.     Capital spend of $845,000 represents investments in the destination playground at David Lange Park, carpark renewal at Seaside Park, toilet block renewal at Kiwi Esplanade, and refurbishment of Thomas Clements Senior Citizens Hall, as well as other projects across the local board area.

40.     The complete Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Financial Performance report can be found in Attachment B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

42.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

43.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Work Programme 2023/2024 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quarterly Performance Report September 2023 - Financial Appendix

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nicole Braganza - Advisor Plans & Programmes

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Change of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Extraordinary Business Meeting time

File No.: CP2023/17589

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To change the start time of the Extraordinary business meeting scheduled for Wednesday 29 November 2023, from 5.00pm to 4.00pm.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its ordinary business meeting on Wednesday 18 October 2023, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board resolved to add an Extraordinary business meeting to the 2022-2025 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meeting schedule (resolution number MO/2023/153).

3.       The date and time for this Extraordinary meeting was resolved to be held on Wednesday 29 November 2023 at 5.00pm.

4.       The purpose of this Extraordinary meeting was to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (the Long-term Plan) and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 (Annual Plan) timeframes.

5.       At its workshop held on Wednesday 8 November 2023, Chairperson Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich proposed a change to the start time for this Extraordinary business meeting from 5.00pm to 4.00pm.

6.       The reason for this change was to allow Board Members to attend a previously unscheduled meeting, in standard business hours. The proposed earlier start time will not impact on the Boards ability to consider and determine the business required.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakaae / agree to change the start time for the Extraordinary business meeting scheduled for Wednesday 29 November 2023 from 5.00pm to 4.00pm, to be held at the Māngere- Ōtāhuhu office, Shop 17B/93 Bader Drive, Māngere.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Urgent Decision - National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback

File No.: CP2023/17470

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To notify the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of a decision made on 10 November 2023 under the local board’s urgent decision-making process to provide feedback on the National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       At its meeting on 7 December 2022 the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board resolved (MO/2022/172) the following in relation to urgent decision-making:

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any

person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local

board, if the local board is unable to meet

b)      whakaū / confirm that the Local Area Manager, chairperson, and deputy

chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the use of the

local board’s urgent decision mechanism by approving the request for an

urgent decision in writing

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that all urgent decisions made, including written advice

which supported these decisions, will be included on the agenda of the next

         ordinary meeting of the local board.

2.       Local boards had the opportunity to provide feedback on the Draft NPS for Natural Hazard Decision-Making.

3.       An urgent decision was required as the deadline for feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission was 10 November 2023. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s next scheduled business meeting is on 15 November 2023.

4.       This decision is included in the Agenda Report as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the urgent decision made on 10 November 2023 under the local board’s urgent decision-making process (MO/2022/172), to provide feedback on the National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making, as outlined in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision - National Policy Statement - Natural Hazard Decision-making - Feedback

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendars

File No.: CP2023/17258

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa for November 2023 for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is provided in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Hōtaka Kaupapa.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Work Calendar

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 November 2023

 

 

Record of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2023/17259

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 4 October 2023, 11 October 2023 and 25 October 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 4 October 2023, 11 October 2023 and 25 October 2023.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Notes 4 October 2023

 

b

Workshop Notes 11 October 2023

 

c

Workshop Notes 25 October 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager