I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 November 2023

3.00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Sarah Powrie

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Angus McPhee

 

 

Penny Tucker

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Monique Rousseau

Democracy Advisor

 

13 November 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 027 203 2107

Email: monique.rousseau@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - New Zealand Multihull Yacht Club - The Landing                                      5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

9.1     Public Forum - Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron - The Landing                             6

9.2     Public Forum - Raynor Haagh, Yachting New Zealand - The Landing                       6

9.3     Public Forum - Tom Schnackenberg - The Landing                                                         7

9.4     Public Forum - Toby Batchelor, University of Auckland Waka Ama Club - The Landing                                                 7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     8

11        Ngā Pānui mō ngā Mōtini | Notices of Motion   8

12        Notice of Motion - Member Voyce - Artwork in the Ōrākei Local Board Area                             11

13        The Landing Concept Plan Refresh                 13

14        Classification of 140c Bassett Road, Remuera esplanade reserve                                              27

15        Lease for additional land to Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated at Michaels Avenue Reserve, 46 Michaels Avenue, Ellerslie           31

16        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024                                                                              39

17        Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones                                                           45

18        Governance Forward Work Calendar and Resolutions Pending Action Report                 51

19        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Records          53

20        Chairperson and Board Members' Report - Cover Report                                                       55

21        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

Chairperson S Milne will welcome those present with a karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 19 October 2023 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 2 November 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - New Zealand Multihull Yacht Club - The Landing

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for individuals and groups to deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Adrian Percival and Mike Leyland will be in attendance on behalf of New Zealand Multihull Yacht Club, presenting on a proposal of developing a memorandum of understanding between users and stakeholders of The Landing to allow for seasonal shared use of the Hardstand Space.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on a proposal for seasonal shared use of The Landing Hardstand space and thank Adrian Percival and Mike Leyland for their attendance on behalf of New Zealand Multihull Yacht Club.

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron - The Landing

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Marguerite Delbet and Peter Nicolas will be in attendance on behalf of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, presenting on The Landing at Ōkahu Bay and the retention of the haul out facility.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on The Landing at Ōkahu Bay and the retention of the haul out facility and thank Marguerite Delbet and Peter Nicolas representing the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron for their attendance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Raynor Haagh, Yachting New Zealand - The Landing

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Raynor Haagh will be in attendance on behalf of Yachting New Zealand, presenting on The Landing at Ōkahu Bay and the need for haul out facilities in Auckland. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on The Landing at Ōkahu Bay and the need for haul out facilities in Auckland and thank Raynor Haagh representing Yachting New Zealand for her attendance.

 

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Tom Schnackenberg - The Landing

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Tom Schnackenberg will be in attendance presenting on The Landing at Ōkahu Bay and the future use and management of the area known as “The Hardstand”.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on The Landing at Ōkahu Bay and the future use and management of the area known as “The Hardstand” and thank Tom Schnackenberg for his attendance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.4       Public Forum - Toby Batchelor, University of Auckland Waka Ama Club - The Landing

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Toby Batchelor will be in attendance presenting on University of Auckland student and community use of The Landing at Ōkahu Bay for marine sport activity.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on University of Auckland student and community use of The Landing at Ōkahu Bay from Toby Batchelor representing the University of Auckland Waka Ama Club and thank him for his attendance.

 

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

11        Ngā Pānui mō ngā Mōtini | Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) or Standing Order 1.9.1 (LBS 3.10.17) (revoke or alter a previous resolution) a Notice of Motion has been received from Member Voyce for consideration under item 12.

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

Notice of Motion - Member Voyce - Artwork in the Ōrākei Local Board Area

File No.: CP2023/17511

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/executive-summary-reports.aspx

1.       Member Voyce has given a notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member Voyce and Member Churton as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

The Genoa Artwork

3.       The artwork Genoa, by New Zealand artist Peter Nicholls, is part of the Auckland Council Public Art Collection. One other similar sculpture, Strata, by the same artist, is also in the Public Art Collection and is installed at the Orakei Basin.

4.       Genoa, created in 1988, is made of stacked Indonesian Jara hardwood sleepers with a wood base. It was previously sited on a reserve at Stonefields on a concrete foundation with a metal plaque recording the history of the gift.

5.       In 2012, a former Director of the Auckland City Art Gallery, and art collector, the late Dr Rodney Wilson and his wife Maureen Wilson gifted the artwork to Auckland, and it was installed at Stonefields. It then became part of the council’s public art collection and the responsibility of the council’s public art team.

6.       Unfortunately, Genoa was extensively vandalised in 2016 and following reconstruction by the artist was re-located by the public art team to an island in the Te Puia o Maungarei Springs Reserve in Stonefields and is not as visible as it was on its original site. A new plaque was installed on a viewing platform opposite the island. The concrete foundation and the original metal plaque were left behind in their original site.

7.       In 2021 the metal plaque was declared redundant, with no heritage value, by the public art team, although the plaque had been associated with the art piece and had been part of the heritage that belongs with the artwork. In February 2021 the metal plaque was gifted to Maureen Wilson with the approval of the Orakei Local Board and was presented to her by former Board Member Colin Davis. The concrete foundation remained in place.

8.       Regrettably, the artwork has suffered major weather damage in its new home.

9.       It is understood that the public art team is considering deaccessioning the artwork, which would not only be the loss of a significant artwork in the Board’s area, but likely also to give offence to the donor, who with her late husband gifted the work to Auckland, not the council.  

Crimean War Trophy Gun

10.     The 205-year-old heritage gun was stolen from temporary storage at The Landing, Okahu Bay, just hours before it was due to be relocated to another temporary off-site location. The gun, which had been situated at The Landing in Okahu Bay for the last 71 years was due to be moved by council contractor on June 1, 2023. The theft has attracted local, national, and international media interest.

11.     The gun was gifted to Auckland in 1857, and arrived at Auckland in 1859, and was initially installed at Fort Britomart. It has been situated at The Landing for the last 71 years.

12.     In July 2019, the Orakei Local Board authorised the relocation of the gun from The Landing to a nearby permanent site in Okahu Bay.

13.     Despite CCTV footage showing the gun being uplifted by a crane at 3.15am on June 1 onto a distinctive blue flatbed truck and tracked, it has not been found.

 

 Motion

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      notes with concern the possible deaccessioning of the Genoa public artwork, and requests that it remain within the Ōrākei Local Board area; but if the artwork is deaccessioned, the Board recommends that it be offered back to the original donor, Mrs Maureen Wilson.

b)      notes with concern the apparent lack of positive action to locate the irreplaceable heritage Crimean War Trophy Gun, which is a significant loss to Auckland and future generations, and asks Auckland Council staff to assure the Board that the police and staff are taking all possible action to recover the gun.

c)       advise the Auckland Council public art team that given its concerns about its art and heritage items, the Board has little confidence that due care and maintenance is being carried out and seeks assurance that present and any future art in the Board’s area will be treated and maintained regularly.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Member Voyce - Artwork in the Ōrākei Local Board area

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monique Rousseau - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

The Landing Concept Plan Refresh

File No.: CP2023/14927

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present feedback received through the second phase of public consultation on The Landing (8-12 Tamaki Drive) concept plan refresh and to seek approval of a refreshed concept plan (draft provided in Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A refresh of the Pathways to the Sea concept plan, the guiding document for future development at The Landing, formed part of the Ōrākei Local Board’s 2020-2021 work programme (resolution OR/2020/76).

3.       The aim for refreshing the concept plan is to ensure the site is effectively utilised and meets growing community needs in terms of providing for club requirements, access to the water, events, and passive recreation spaces.

4.       As part of the concept plan refresh process, stakeholder engagement was undertaken in May 2021. Three draft concepts that delivered degrees of change (status quo, rationalisation and transformation) when measured against the 2013 Pathways to the Sea concept plan, were then consulted on in February 2022.

5.       Informed by consultation feedback and staff advice on planning and biosecurity matters, the local board refined draft concept plan three which delivers ‘transformation’ at the site. This revised plan (Attachment A) has recently been consulted on as part of a second phase of public consultation.  

6.       The feedback from this consultation process is detailed in Attachment B along with analyses of the feedback.

7.       With 1600 individual submissions and 56 submissions from organisations generated through the second phase of public consultation, there is both significant support for, and opposition to, the plan. The majority of universal (city-wide) respondents have submitted against the plan, but a majority of Ōrākei residents submitted in favour of the plan.

8.       The provision of hardstand infrastructure and services at the site and whether they can, or should, be accommodated in the plan refresh without compromising the key recreation outcomes sought and without significant local board investment has been a point of focus and contention throughout the plan refresh process. 

9.       Some submitters have expressed concerns that there is insufficient infrastructure in the region for boat owners to keep their hulls free of biofouling and comply with Regional Pest Management Plan and other requirements.

10.     Auckland Council’s marine biosecurity staff have recommended that the local board consider maintaining a limited area of facilities at the Landing for short stay cleaning and antifoul application.

11.     Staff from the Parks and Community Facilities Department note the biosecurity benefits of a hardstand but also that this comes as a tradeoff to use of the site by the wider community and fully realising the local board’s identified refresh plan objectives. Wash down and antifouling infrastructure and services is not an activity the council is required to undertake. Other hardstands in Auckland are provided by commercial operators and clubs.

12.     The local board now need to consider what combination of design elements they think will most effectively and meaningfully deliver outcomes for the community.    

13.     The retention of hardstand infrastructure and associated services benefits boat owners who have in the past, or may in the future, utilise the hardstand. The development of park-like shared activity space with building facilities allows access for more informal use by the general public, club growth and a presence on site sought by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

14.     Combining both outcomes is an option involving development of a short stay, quick turnaround hardstand facility operating on a reduced footprint. This option would provide for continued biosecurity outcomes and address issues raised by the boating community but is likely to require investment and ongoing subsidy if it is to generate a higher boat turnover than historically achieved. It will also reduce the area available for shared open space and additional buildings that could provide for club growth and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei’s aspiration to build a whare for their Waka Taua (ceremonial waka).   

15.     The local board now has opportunity to review feedback received from the latest consultation to help inform their decision making on the final concept plan option to be endorsed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive feedback generated by the second phase of public consultation on The Landing concept plan refresh as provided in Attachment B

b)      whakaae / approve the draft plan presented in Attachment A

or

c)       tono / request staff to make changes to the draft plan; and

d)      tono / request staff report back with an updated draft plan for approval in 2024.

 

Horopaki

Context

16.     The Landing is a busy park on the seaward side of Tāmaki Drive in Ōkahu Bay that offers a variety of marine-related sport and recreation activities on the Waitematā Harbour.

17.     The Ōrākei Local Board initiated a refresh of the guiding document for The Landing (Pathways to the Sea Concept Plan 2013) as a project line in their 2020/2021 work programme (resolution OR/2020/76):

Refresh The Landing Concept Plan (2013) to ensure the site is effectively utilised and meets the growing community needs in terms of providing for club requirements, access to the water, events, gathering and passive recreation spaces, plus optimal linkages between the park and Tāmaki Drive.

18.     The local board supported the following objectives to guide development of the refreshed plan at their April 2021 business meeting (resolution OR/2021/45):

a)      Support opportunities to increase participation in water-based sport and recreation activities by maximising accessibility and public boat launching facilities.

b)      Develop quality multipurpose park-like open space that can accommodate events and passive recreation outcomes in order to increase the public’s enjoyment of The Landing.

c)      Accommodate the various clubs and users of the site in an efficient way that supports their future development and growth.

d)      Enhance The Landing as a destination for marine-related activities such as sailing, paddling and waka culture.

e)      Improve visual and physical connections into and through the site and create a clear connection eastward through to Ōkahu Bay beach.

f)       Incorporate mana whenua outcomes.  

 

19.     Stakeholder consultation was carried out in May 2021 and public consultation was carried out in February 2022. The public consultation process sought feedback on three draft concepts that delivered options for change (status quo, rationalisation and transformation) compared to the 2013 Pathways to the Sea Concept Plan. Engagement levels were high with 856 survey responses received through the consultation process.

20.     In June 2022 the local board supported the four following key design elements for inclusion in the plan refresh (OR/2022/74):

·        a central park-like space for leisure activities and marine events

·        multi-purpose buildings for clubs and marine based recreation

·        storage space for boats and equipment

·        all abilities and safe harbour access. 

 

21.     These design elements were most meaningfully realised in concept three (as presented in February 2022) and the following revisions were made to concept three in response to feedback and prior to a second phase of public consultation being carried out in August/September 2023:

·        removal of the raised tree top boardwalk

·        reduction in the extent of deck spaces

·        applying the 2013 multi-sport paddling centre design layout on an enlarged footprint

·        removing the most eastern of the three Tāmaki Drive multi-purpose building blocks and shifting the eastern car park into this vacated space

·        illustrating intent / desire to create a boardwalk connection through to Ōkahu Bay.

 

22.     The second phase of consultation was based on the above changes having been made and to allow feedback on the design elements supported by the local board for inclusion in the refreshed concept plan.

23.     The draft concept plan (Attachment A) does not include haul out and hardstand (boatyard) infrastructure. Submitters emphasised through both phases of consultation the regional importance of boatyard services at The Landing, particularly with regard to biosecurity (hull cleaning and anti-fouling) outcomes.

24.     A hardstand for boat washdown and antifouling has not, to date, been one of the design features supported by the board for inclusion in a refreshed plan. Based on the objectives of making the site more accessible to those seeking both active and passive recreation experiences and enabling club delivered outcomes, a hardstand facility:

a)      compromises and restricts delivery of wider community-based recreation outcomes

b)      limits public access to and through the site

c)      is likely to require both infrastructure investment (wharf and travel lift) and ongoing subsidy if it is to operate effectively and productively as a short stay quick turnaround facility

d)      involves hull sanding and the application of anti-fouling paint, which are activities which could be more safely and effectively delivered within commercially controlled environments. 

 

25.     Advice from staff on the key issues have been presented in previous memos and reports to the local board. The advice given regarding these matters is summarised below as background information and to give further context to the local board’s past and future decision making.

Local Board governance

26.     Decision making responsibility in relation to The Landing as local park land, has been allocated to the Ōrākei Local Board by the Governing Body. This is in accordance with section 17(2) of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 which sets out the principles for allocation of non-regulatory decisions between the Governing Body and local boards.

Resource Management considerations

27.     The Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) is made pursuant to the Resource Management Act (RMA) and guides the use of Auckland's natural and physical resources, including land development.

28.     The AUP and other relevant regulatory and guiding documents, such as the New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement (NZCPS), set out rules, policies and objectives that need to be considered for planning purposes in the Coastal Marine Area (CMA) and adjacent land.

29.     Within the AUP there is a precinct plan (Ōkahu Marine Precinct Plan) for The Landing which covers the site and adjoining areas. Its purpose is to provide for marina, marine-related and recreation activities in an integrated manner across land and sea. Objectives of the Precinct Plan include:

a)      The Ōkahu Marine Precinct is managed in an integrated way that supports the precinct’s multi-use functions and maintains the recreation, visual amenity, landscape and ecological values of Ōkahu Bay.

b)      The ongoing use and development of Ōkahu Landing hardstand is provided for.

 

30.     The underlying zone objectives also apply to The Landing. The Landing is zoned Open Space – Sports and Active Recreation. Objectives of this zoning include:

a)   Recreational needs are met through the provision of a range of quality open space areas that provide for both passive and active activities.

b)   The adverse effects of use and development of open space areas on residents, communities and the environment are avoided, remedied or mitigated.

c)   Indoor and outdoor sport and active recreation opportunities are provided for efficiently, while avoiding or mitigating any significant adverse effects on nearby residents, communities and the surrounding areas.

d)   Activities accessory to active sport and recreation activities are provided for in appropriate locations and enhance the use and enjoyment of areas for active sport and recreation.

e)   Larger scale, or clusters of land-based marine-related recreation facilities, are recognised and provided for while maintaining and enhancing public access to and along the coast. 

 

31.     Information relating to recreational, environmental and cultural considerations that link the AUP and other policy documents and Acts, such as the NZ Coastal Policy Statement and Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Act 2000, have been set before the local board in a number of workshops and reports presented at local board business meetings.

32.     The Unitary Plan provides the resource management framework and its objectives, policies and rules guide development and provide for what can occur with and without resource consent on the site. However, the Unitary Plan as a regulatory document under the RMA does not require the local board in its non-regulatory landowner capacity to provide for any particular use of the site in a concept plan.

Biosecurity and provision of hardstand infrastructure and services

33.     As a Unitary Authority, Auckland Council has the duties of a Regional Council under the Biosecurity Act 1993 relating to pest management. The council is required to provide leadership in activities that prevent, reduce, or eliminate adverse effects from harmful organisms present in Aotearoa New Zealand.

34.     The Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030, created under the Biosecurity Act 1993, requires that all owners or persons in charge of any craft in the Auckland region ensure that the level of fouling on the hull and in niches of craft does not exceed ‘light fouling’. A national ‘Clean Hull Plan’ is being developed, which will create consistent rules for hull cleaning across the upper North Island, also under the Biosecurity Act 1993.

35.     The activities council undertakes in relation to marine pest control and biosecurity include:

a)    Setting policy in relation to discharges and activities in the marine area under the Auckland Unitary Plan.

b)    Providing regulatory settings under the Regional Pest Management Plan.

c)    Undertaking education, monitoring and research in accordance with Auckland Council’s roles under the Biosecurity Act 1993.

36.     The provision of wash down and antifouling infrastructure and services are not activities that the council is required to deliver.

37.     The hardstand at The Landing has historically serviced approximately 200 to 250 boats per year which constitutes approximately 2.5% of Auckland boats (under 20m in length) that are moored or docked within marinas. The level of hull cleaning and antifouling historically carried out by boats hauled out at The Landing is unknown.

38.     The likely impacts of permanent cessation of hardstand operations at The Landing for those that used the site are higher costs and further travel distances (for some) using alternative facilities. There is also likely to be additional pressure on peak period haul out and maintenance (September to December), with maintenance potentially having to be scheduled at less favoured times during the year.

39.     There will be service level impacts on those that have used the hardstand at The Landing if the operation is not reinstated. However, due to relatively small numbers of boats impacted, the ability of other hardstand operators to pick up displaced demand and the fact that anti-fouling services are most effectively delivered by skilled and trained commercial operators in controlled environments, the impacts are considered to be on the low end of the significance scale.

40.     There are approximately 20 hardstands in the Auckland region. Those within, or close to, the Waitematā Harbour include Orams Marine at Westhaven, Hobsonville Marina, Tamaki Marine Park, Half Moon Bay Marina, Gulf Harbour and Pine Harbour Marina. Commercial operators provide the majority of services with clubs making up the remainder. With the closure of the hardstand at The Landing in February 2023, Auckland Council does not operate or fund any hardstands.

41.     Two hardstand provision assessments have been produced by external consultants in 2021 and 2022 respectively (provided as part of Attachment C) and have been presented to the local board. Both reports noted restraints on capacity for antifouling within the Auckland region under the current situation, where most anti-fouling takes place in spring in preparation for summer boating. Auckland Council’s marine biosecurity staff have recommended that the local board consider maintaining a limited area of facilities at the Landing for short stay cleaning and antifoul application. They have noted that capacity in Auckland is stretched at key times.

42.     Some commercial facility operators have indicated an ability to expand services and capacity can be further realised if the sector shifts to spreading maintenance activities throughout the year. Some commercial facilities have already increased capacity in recent years and market forces and demand may see further increases in capacity. 

43.     While the Landing has provided an affordable option for boat cleaning, revenue from the services have not met the costs of providing it or provided any income from the use of the site. The shortfall in revenue has been met from the local board’s budget.

44.     Biosecurity impacts have been considered by the local board, as well as the Governing Body via a memo tabled at the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee held in March 2023 (Attachment C). A second phase of public consultation has also allowed for further consideration of all these issues.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Consultation and Engagement

45.     ​A large number of individual submissions (1600) were received for the second phase of public consultation, with 39% of submitters residing in the Ōrākei Local Board area. Universal (city-wide) feedback has been presented alongside feedback from Ōrākei residents only.  

46.     ​Individual submitters’ overall opinion of the plan is summarised as follows:  

Table 1: Consultation question 1

​Q1: Overall, what is your opinion of the draft concept plan? 

 

Support plan

Do not support plan

​All residents (No. 1549)

​43% 

​49% 

​Ōrākei residents only (No. 613)

​58% 

​34% 

​ * Does not include ‘Other’ and ‘I don’t know’ categories

 

47.     There was more support than opposition for all four of the key design features. Support for each of these key design features was higher in every instance when the results were considered from Ōrākei residents only. 

 

48.     ​Individual submitter responses to the question on retention of a short stay haul out and hardstand facility, when combining ‘strongly support’ and ‘support’ outputs, are as follows:  

Table 2: Consultation question 8

Q8: Do you support retention of a short stay haul out and hardstand facility for boat cleaning and/or anti-foul application? 

 

​Support retention

​Do not support retention

​All residents (No.1545)

​64% 

​30% 

​Ōrākei residents only (No. 613)

​46% 

​44% 

* Combines ‘strongly support’ / ‘support’ and ‘strongly do not support’ / ‘do not support’ categories. Does not    include ‘Neutral’ category.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49.     There were 56 submissions from organisations with survey responses to question one and eight provided below:

Table 3: Consultation question 1 – organisation responses

Q1: Overall, what is your opinion of the draft concept plan? 

 

​Support plan

​Do not support plan

​City wide orgs. (No. 55)

​38% 

​47% 

​Ōrākei based orgs. (No.23)

​57% 

​35% 

          ​ * Does not include ‘Other’ and ‘I don’t know’ categories.

 

Table 4: Consultation question 8 – organisation responses

Q8: Do you support retention of a short stay haul out and hardstand facility for boat cleaning and/or anti-foul application? 

​ 

​Support retention

​Do not support retention

​City wide orgs (No. 50)

​60% 

​34% 

​Ōrākei based orgs (No. 22)

​41% 

​50% 

* Combines ‘strongly support’ / ‘support’ and ‘strongly do not support’ / ‘do not support’ categories. Does not    include ‘Neutral’ category.

 

50.     A report providing consultation insights is provided in Attachment B.

51.     Staff are satisfied that the level of consultation undertaken to date meets the requirements of Auckland Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. With 856 survey responses received in February 2022 and 1656 responses received in September 2023, a full range of views and opinions from those who use, or have an interest in the site, has been gathered and presented. Engagement has occurred with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, key stakeholders (clubs / lessee holders as identified by the local board in April 2021) and the public (including boat owners who use the haul-out and hard stand at The Landing).

52.     This is a high level of engagement for one local park site and put into context by levels of engagement received in 2020 on the Regional Parks Management Plan (750 responses) and for the Ōrākei Omnibus Parks Management Plan in 2022 (51 responses). 

Themes from engagement

53.     High levels of support are evident for the multisport paddling centre and safe harbour with relatively low levels of opposition to both of these design features.

54.     The main contention, which has been evident throughout the plan refresh process, is around the footprint of the hardstand area and the best use of this space. The draft plan has the hardstand area replaced with a park-like space and two buildings potentially providing for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei aspirations and club growth.

55.     Reasons provided by 665 individual respondents, and 21 organisations, for supporting the draft concept plan in relation to removal of the hardstand and creation of a park like space, included:

·     creates a shared space

·     improves recreation outcomes

·     is more beneficial to the wider community

·     removes light industrial activity that is inappropriate on public open space

·     removes a poorly run hardstand facility

·     better supports club outcomes.

 

56.     Reasons provided by 758 respondents and 26 organisations for not supporting the draft plan in relation to removal of the hardstand and creation of a park-like space included:

·     loss of a well-run facility

·     loss of hardstand in proximity to demand

·     reduced number of hardstands that will be unable to pick up displaced demand

·     increased costs for boat owners

·     negative environmental impacts

·     boat owners being unable to meet council imposed clean hull requirements

·     the hardstand supports the rich sailing heritage of this city – The City of Sails.

 

57.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, the local board’s relationship partners, in their submission (Attachment D) unequivocally support the draft concept plan presented and in no way regard this support and associated cessation of hardstand operations at The Landing as being incompatible with their objective of achieving environmental outcomes at Ōkahu Bay. 

58.     The following site stakeholders (as determined by the local board in April 2021 business report), by means of submissions, have also articulated support for the draft concept plan option presented:

·    Waka Ama New Zealand

·    Auckland Canoe Club

·    Royal Akarana Yacht Club

·    Akarana Marine Sports Charitable Trust and affiliated organisations

·    Fergs Kyaks.

59.     The two site stakeholders that submitted against the plan were Ōrākei Water Sports Inc. and Yachting NZ.

60.     The Ōrākei Marina Management Trust (also an identified stakeholder), who are based immediately adjacent to The Landing, and hold easements across The Landing, provided a submission but did not articulate a preferred plan outcome, nor commentary on the best use of the hardstand area. Matters raised by the trust related to extension of the sea wall and need for a dinghy launching platform for mooring holders.

61.     The trust has generously agreed to allow yacht mooring holders access to launch dinghies from pier A (identified as #7 on draft plan). The gate to pier A is open during daylight hours and nighttime access can be gained either by an onsite request to security staff or by applying to the Ōrākei Marina Management Trust for an access card (small administration fee applies and allocated for a year).  

62.     Written submissions from stakeholders and other organisations are provided in Attachment D.

63.     The plan consulted on in August / September 2023 was a modified version of concept plan 3 consulted on in February 2022, along with two other plans.

Table 5: February 2022 consultation feedback

Survey results for concepts 1, 2 and 3

Supported

Concept 1 – 2013 concept plan with minor changes

238

Concept 2 – Rationalisation

102

Concept 3 – Transformation

469

None of the above

35

 

64.     While the plan version consulted in 2023 varied a little from concept three presented in 2022 (see paragraph 21 for differences between the two), the four key design features presented were similar across the two plans. Arguments made for and against these two plan versions did not vary significantly between 2022 and 2023.

65.     The prioritisation preferences attributed to the four key design features varied slightly between the two years, with the 2023 preferences presented as follows, with one being the highest priority and four the lowest priority outcome:

1.  safe harbour

2.  central park like space

3.  multi-sport paddling centre

4.  multi-purpose buildings adjacent to Tāmaki Drive.

 

66.     Since some design elements are likely to be funded by third parties, or require contributions through external grant applications, these preferences will not necessarily be the sole determinant of delivery times on the ground. 

67.     Several submitters questioned some of the design detail in the plan, particularly around the sea wall (length and orientation) and safe harbour accessibility. It should be noted that the concept is essentially a high-level spatial plan and the design detail will be developed as and when funding is allocated for the build of each of the key design outcomes. Relevant groups will also be consulted with at the initial design stages. 

68.     The local board is advised to consider the consultation feedback alongside the following factors:

·   the board’s plan refresh objectives established in April 2021

·   project costs and possible requirement for ongoing subsidies

·   the council’s approach to biosecurity issues

·   the provision of hardstand services

·   how community outcomes can be optimised for the benefit of the greatest number of users.

69.     It is a matter for the local board to determine which objectives it wants to focus on through a refreshed concept plan, noting that because of limited space, favouring some objectives will be at the cost, partly or fully, of others.

70.     For highly valued and cherished public open space, there will often be trade-offs when working to optimise community outcomes, and the local board need to be aware of the consequences of these trade-offs.

Options assessment

71.     After the second phase of consultation, the options for the local board are:

a)    approve the draft plan presented in Attachment A which does not include a hardstand; or

b)    undertake further work on the plan refresh in relation to incorporating a hardstand facility alongside those design elements supported by the board in June 2022.

 

Approve the draft plan as presented

72.     The tabled plan is considered by Parks and Community Facilities staff as the optimal outcome for the delivery of recreational opportunities for the greatest number of people within the limited open space available at The Landing,   

73.     This is with consideration to all factors, views and preferences submitted through the process and with no particular weighting given to any one of the key factors listed in paragraph 68.

74.     In developing this advice, biosecurity outcomes have been given careful consideration by staff from Parks and Community Facilities alongside other significant factors. This includes the wider provision of hard stand services by commercial operators and clubs, their ability to meet displaced demand, the significant investment required to enable a productive hardstand service to operate on a reduced footprint and the implications that running such a service would have on wider community and recreation outcomes.

Revise the refresh plan draft to incorporate a hardstand facility

75.     While noting that The Landing concept plan refresh has become linked to a wider debate about the council’s role in providing hardstand infrastructure and services, a large number of respondents have requested retention of a hardstand facility with a focus on short stays and delivery of hull cleaning and anti-fouling outcomes.

76.     Combining a park like open space with adjacent multipurpose buildings and a smaller hardstand facility is an option that would provide for continued biosecurity outcomes and address issues raised by the boating community. However, increasing the productivity levels of a hardstand operation is likely to require significant investment and ongoing subsidy.

77.     There is also the potential that having a park like space and retaining a hardstand may compromise both outcomes and result in a worse overall outcome than focusing on one or the other use. This is because a hardstand requires large boats being moved by heavy machinery and involves activities such as hull sanding and antifouling which have the potential to undermine the amenity and recreation benefits being sought through the build of a shared park like space. The converse of this also applies whereby creating a usable park like space limits the potential for running a high functioning and viable hardstand operation that delivers improved biosecurity outcomes.

78.     Prior to the end of the Physical Services Agreement that facilitated hardstand operations at The Landing, the costs incurred by the council were over $500,000 per annum. These costs were somewhat offset by revenue from the site, however during the term of the Services Agreement the revenue never exceeded the payment made to the operator. There has been a pattern of revenue received from yacht owners paying for services at The Landing being less than the cost to council of delivering the services under the services agreement. That shortfall has been met from the local board’s budget:

·     In FY2021/22 the net deficit between revenue and expenditure was $80K

·     In FY2020/21 the net deficit was $50K

·     In FY2019/20 the net deficit was $258K

·     In FY2018/19 the net deficit was $49K

·     In FY2017/18 the net deficit was $150K.

79.     Due to the tidal restrictions which have historically limited boat lifting to two hours either side of high tide, significantly raising productivity and the commercial viability of the hardstand operation, particularly on a reduced footprint, requires development of a wharf and travel lift.  

80.     The 2013 Pathways to the Sea Concept plan identified the operational challenge as follows:

The concept plan proposes that the infrastructure is installed to support a Travelift operation, which will refocus the hardstand on short-term maintenance as a priority and will dramatically enhance The Landing’s value proposition. 

81.     Reducing the footprint of the hardstand to provide for the refresh plan outcomes sought will further diminish the revenue generating potential of the service. This could be countered to some degree by increasing hardstand charge rates so they are closer to, or on a par with, market rates.

82.     As an alternative to a commercial operation, a club could be offered a lease or licence to operate over a reduced hardstand footprint. Such an operation is likely to deliver low boat turn over and require a reduced market rate or a peppercorn rent.

83.     The Young 88 Owners Association made a deputation to the local board suggesting approximately 40% of the hardstand (see Attachment E) be set aside for a short stay boat wash down and antifouling activity on a seasonal basis (May to Dec). The majority of this space could then be used as a shared area catering for events and club activities for the other four months of the year. 

84.     An option is to only retain the wash down pad (shaded yellow in Attachment E) for boat cleaning purposes. Since the haul out of larger boats would require a tractor and trolley, or hydraulic trailer with associated tight health and safety practices, it would best be limited to use by owners of small boats that can be lifted from the water by car and trailer. However, enabling access to organisations/clubs who are able to bring in the necessary lifting equipment for their own needs could be considered.   

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

85.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

86.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emissions from construction associated with the build of plan design elements. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as much as possible when delivering the project and increases in sea level rise will be taken into account when detailed planning is undertaken, with structures and buildings being future proofed in this regard. 

87.     Changes to the Pathways to the Sea Concept Plan for The Landing (2013) may also increase greenhouse gas emissions through more vehicle visitation to the site but this is not thought to be to any significant extent and there is no increase in parking provision.

88.     Under the Auckland Unitary Plan, an assessment of coastal hazards will be required to support any application for development on areas of The Landing which may be subject to a coastal storm inundation 1% annual exceedance probability event plus 1m sea level rise.

89.     Climate change is expected to exacerbate the spread and impact of marine invasive species. This is a relevant factor in considering the benefit of retaining a hardstand for yacht cleaning and antifouling.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

90.     Parks and Community Facilities staff are working together to ensure that service agreements, leases, licences and maintenance contracts at The Landing align with any approved plan changes.

91.     Staff have also engaged with Auckland Transport, Healthy Waters and Environmental Services on the plan refresh.

92.     As a Unitary Authority, Auckland Council has the duties of a Regional Council under the Biosecurity Act 1993 relating to pest management. The council is required to provide leadership in activities that prevent, reduce, or eliminate adverse effects from harmful organisms present in Aotearoa New Zealand. Auckland Council does so by (among other things):

·         Promoting alignment of pest management in a region.

·         Facilitating the development and alignment of regional pest management plans and regional pathway management plans.

·         Promoting public support for pest management.

·         Facilitating communication and co-operation among those involved in pest management.

 

93.     Auckland Council’s regional focus for the control of marine pests will continue to be on education, advice, enforcement, monitoring and operational research.

94.     Environmental Services staff have expressed a preference for the retention of short-stay hull cleaning facilities, to help boat owners comply with Biosecurity Act requirements under the Regional Pest Management Plan and forthcoming National Clean Hull Plan.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

95.     Retention of the hardstand enables and helps yacht and launch owners (approximately 200 to 250 who utilise the hardstand per year) to access the harbour and meet environmental compliance standards.

96.     Adoption of the plan presented is more enabling of grass roots club-based recreation outcomes, makes the site more accessible to a wider range of users and, with local board approval, allows for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei to develop a meaningful presence at the site.

97.     624 submissions were made by Ōrākei residents (individual respondents), with 613 responding specifically to the question, What is your opinion of the draft concept plan? Of these, 58% support the plan as presented and 34% do not support the plan. 

98.     Auckland residents (1549) were less supportive of the draft concept plan with 43% in support and 49% opposed. This feedback allows the local board to consider both local views and preferences and the views and preferences of those from other local board areas.

99.     The Ōrākei Local Board has also received notice of resolution HW/2023/24 from the Howick Local Board’s February 2023 meeting raising concerns about regional maritime biosecurity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

100.   Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei has maintained its customary rights over its lands, waters and treasures on the central Tāmaki Isthmus and surrounding areas since the arrival of Tupēriri in 1740. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, whose rohe extends over the central Tamaki Isthmus and surrounding areas, are descendents of Tuperiri and have established Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei mana since the 1740s on the basis of take tūpuna (ancestral rights and obligations), take raupatu (the taking of land through traditional warfare), tuku whenua (traditional gifting of land) which demonstrates mana i tē whenua; and ahi kā (continuous and unbroken occupation and use of land and sea).

101.   The Ōrākei Local Board, in partnership with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, are working to develop a vision for a more accessible, exciting community space at The Landing on a plan that will deliver cultural and environmental outcomes reflecting ancestral rights and occupation of land at what is now referred to as ‘The Landing’ precinct. As part of this, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei tikanga will determine the gifting of a new name for the area currently referred to as ‘The Landing’, as well as provide cultural support to the entire process.

102.   Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei’s (NWO) submission, written on behalf of more than 500 NWO Ōrākei based residents, as well as other hapu members who live outside of the board area, includes the following statement:

We are thrilled that the proposal includes a permanent space for our Waka Ama clubs and a whare for our Waka Taua. Both represent a recognition of our hapū/iwi connection to the area historically and now, in the 21st century as well. The proposed redevelopment also allows for the continuation of our work to replenish and restore Ōkahu Bay, after decades of degradation, so that future generations can enjoy it. Further, we fully support the creation of a new ‘green’ space, and better and safer access to the waters of Ōkahu Bay and the wider Waitematā for marine users and sports clubs. We understand that incorporating all of these elements will not satisfy some people, who wish to see the reinstatement of the hardstand. However, we want to have on the record that Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei continues to unequivocally back the full implementation of the shared vision for the site as designed, and all that it promises for our community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

103.   Budget has yet to be allocated to progress a ‘refreshed’ plan noting there will be opportunities for facility partnerships and / or securing third party funding.  

104.   Funding options include:

·         Identifying or establishing a trust to design, build and manage the multi-sport paddling centre (#11 on the plan) using the facility partnership template or seed funding from the council as per other facility developments in Auckland (including the Hyundai Marine Sports Centre).

·         The buildings adjacent to Tāmaki Drive (#8 on the plan) are delivered by outside organisations that seek community outcomes linked to marine based recreation - Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei have been discussing with the board opportunities to site a Whare Waka at The Landing in this location.

·         The park like space (#17 on the plan) is funded through the allocation of budgets available to the Ōrākei Local Board.

·         Council and external funding, through entities such as the Lottery Grants Board and charitable trusts, is sought for the safe harbour (#3).

  

105.   The board has opportunity to utilise revenue generated from leases, easements, parking and asset optimisation.

106.   Not providing hardstand services would mean that the local board does not need to meet any shortfall in revenue from this service from its budget. However, there will be some increased costs in maintenance activities at the site that have previously been undertaken by the hardstand service provider.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

107.   There is a reputational risk involved should some, or all, outcomes identified through the concept plan refresh fail to be funded and delivered.

 

108.   Decisions in relation to The Landing have already been subject to legal challenge and there is risk of further judicial review challenge to decision making. This risk is mitigated by the thorough consultation process undertaken and the local board carefully reviewing all submissions and relevant planning information provided to date and considering any new information that has come to light since their June 2022 decision on the plan refresh.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

109.   Subject to board approval, work with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, incumbent clubs, third parties and external funders to deliver the different components of the approved refreshed concept plan or to undertake the further work envisaged by recommendations (c) and (d).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The Landing plan refresh (draft)

 

b

Summary of consultation feedback

 

c

PEP Committee memo with hardstand provision reports

 

d

Written Submissions from Organisations

 

e

Young 88 Users Association Plan

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Barker - Parks & Places Team Leader

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

Classification of 140c Bassett Road, Remuera esplanade reserve

File No.: CP2023/16081

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To classify reserve land, situated at 140c Bassett Road, Remuera as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The land located at 140c Bassett Road, Remuera is legally described as Lot 4 Deposited Plan 501093 and contained in Record of Title 750193.

3.       The 140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve is owned by Auckland Council as an unclassified local purpose (esplanade) reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

4.       Local boards hold delegated authority under Section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 to classify council-owned reserves.

5.       Iwi representatives were consulted regarding any issues of cultural significance associated with the reserve in February 2022 and proposed classification in October 2023. Staff did not receive any feedback on or objections through the engagement undertaken.

6.       The proposed classification was not publicly notified because it is the same purpose for which the reserve has been held.

7.       Staff recommend that the local board classify the unnamed reserve, situated at 140c Bassett Road, Remuera as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      resolves to classify, pursuant to Section 16 (1) of the Reserves Act 1977, Lot 4 Deposited Plan 501093 comprised in Record of Title 750193 as local purpose (esplanade) reserve.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Auckland Council is required by law to classify all unclassified reserves which it holds. Classification is undertaken under Section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977. Auckland Council is not meeting its statutory obligations if classification is incomplete.

9.       Classification of reserves under the Reserves Act identifies the principal or primary purpose of a reserve. The classification helps direct the reserve’s management, use, and development. Classification is necessary to enable the administering body to grant rights to third parties over reserves such as leases, licenses, easements.

10.     Local boards hold delegated authority under Sections 16 (1) and (2A) of the Reserves Act to approve the classification of reserves held by Auckland Council within the local board’s area, subject to all statutory processes having been satisfied.

11.     As part of a standard land status report exercise and drafting of a rationalisation report, staff discovered that the land was still unclassified. This report seeks that the Ōrākei Local Board resolves to classify the unnamed reserve as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve to rectify its unclassified status.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     As the reserve is held by Auckland Council under the Reserves Act 1977, it is a statutory requirement to classify it according to its primary or principal purpose.

13.     The reserve comprises one parcel: Lot 4 Deposited Plan 501093 located at 140c Bassett Road, Remuera (see Figure 1).

A aerial view of a neighborhood

Description automatically generated

Figure 1 - An aerial view of 140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve. Site outline in blue.

14.     140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve was vested upon subdivision with the council in 2017 in accordance with section 230 of the Resource Management Act 1991.

15.     No legal access exists from Bassett Road and no formed access to the reserve from either Newmarket Park or Bassett Reserve exists due to the stream and topography. Part of 140c Bassett Road is in a flood prone area.

16.     As 140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve was vested in the council upon subdivision, Auckland Council must classify it pursuant to section 16(1) of the Reserves Act.

17.     Classification under section 16 of the Reserves Act involves assigning the appropriate class (or classes) to a reserve. The class determines the principal or primary purpose of the reserve. When proposing to classify a reserve, its present values are considered as well as its potential values and the possible future uses and activities on the reserve.

18.     140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve is currently used for esplanade purposes, which is the purpose that was intended when it was vested in the council in 2017.

19.     The reserve is zoned “Open Space – Informal Recreation Zone” under the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part).

Proposed classification – local purpose (esplanade) reserve

20.     Staff consider that classification of 140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve is most appropriate as:

·      140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve was vested in the council as a reserve for esplanade purposes, and 

·      this recommendation aligns with current and intended future use of the reserve.

 

Consultation

21.     Engagement with iwi is required for the proposed classification in terms of Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

22.     In February 2022 an email was circulated to all iwi groups identified as having an interest in land within the Ōrākei Local Board area inviting feedback on any issues of cultural significance. Further engagement regarding the proposed reserve classification was undertaken in October 2023. Staff did not receive any feedback nor objections regarding the proposed reserve classification from the notified iwi groups.

23.     Public notification of the council’s intention to classify the reserve is not required as the proposed classification is the same as the purposes for which 140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve was vested in Auckland Council as well as is currently held and administered.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     The proposal outlined in this report does not include any change in the current use of or activity on 140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve and does not introduce any new source of greenhouse gas emission.

25.     The proposed classification is the formalisation of a statutory requirement under the Reserves Act which is an administrative process and therefore will have no impact on climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     The views of departments and council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The Ōrākei Local Board holds the delegated authority under Section 16 of the Reserves Act to resolve to classify 140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve.

28.     Through this report, staff seek a decision from the local board to resolve to classify 140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve for the recommended recreation purpose.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     There is no express requirement to consult mana whenua under the Reserves Act. However, Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 states:

Act to give effect to the Treaty of Waitangi

This Act shall be so interpreted and administered as to give effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi.

30.     Mana whenua identified as having an interest in the land were consulted regarding any issues of cultural significance associated with the reserve in February 2022.

31.     The proposal to classify 140c Bassett Road esplanade reserve was undertaken in October 2023. Staff did not receive any feedback or objections in response to both consultation exercises.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The proposed classification is an administrative exercise and will not result in any costs to the local board. All costs (if any) relating to the publication of a notice of classification in the New Zealand Gazette will be met by Auckland Council’s Parks and Community Facilities Department.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The proposed classification will fulfil the council’s statutory requirement under the Reserves Act to classify all unclassified reserves which are either held or managed by the council.

34.     If the reserve remains unclassified, the council will be in breach of this statutory requirement.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     If approved, the resolution will take effect following publication of the resolution in the New Zealand Gazette in accordance with section 16(1) of the Reserves Act.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Anthony Lewis - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

Lease for additional land to Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated at Michaels Avenue Reserve, 46 Michaels Avenue, Ellerslie

File No.: CP2023/17308

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a lease for additional land to Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated for the premises located at Michaels Avenue Reserve, 46 Michaels Avenue, Ellerslie.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated currently holds a community lease following the completion of the club’s new sports hub building on Michaels Avenue Reserve.

3.       Two associated pathways and a stormwater detention tank that service the building are located on adjacent council-owned land and fall outside the existing lease footprint. The path, located to the west of the building, provides an accessible route to the ground floor clubrooms and toilet facilities. The path to the east of the building, provides pedestrian access from the upper fields and facilities to the lower fields.

4.       The provision of an accessible path is required under the building consent conditions and to meet the current building code. Without the accessible path legally tied to the club’s occupancy of its building, the club cannot obtain the necessary Code of Compliance Certificate to enable the continued public use of the new building.

5.       Staff are seeking to regularise the occupancy of the accessible and pedestrian pathways, and the stormwater detention tank under a lease for additional premises. This will enable the additional area to be incorporated into the original grant of lease which was approved by the local board on 18 June 2020.

6.       In addition, incorporating the additional area within the lease will ensure that maintenance, reinstatement and related obligations associated with these assets are appropriately allocated to the club. The requirement for the club to maintain, renew and insure its assets within the leased area is consistent with the terms and conditions under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. 

7.       This report recommends that a lease for additional premises be granted to Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated in accordance with the terms and conditions of the community lease approved by the local board on 18 June 2020 (resolution number OR/2020/68).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      whakaae / grant, a lease for additional premises to Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated for an area comprising 163m2 (more or less) located at Michaels Avenue Reserve on part of Lot 1 DP 42511, contained in NA1390/35 and held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002 shown outlined in red on Attachment A and subject to the following conditions: 

i)    term – to run concurrently with the term granted under the community lease dated 18 June 2020, being 10 years with one 10 year right of renewal

ii)   Maintenance – the tenant will maintain all its improvements within the additional area including pathways, accessible ramps, detention tanks and related assets.

b)      whakaae / approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the community lease granted on 18 June 2020 (resolution number OR/2020/68 – Attachment B) and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Ōrākei Local Board has the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

9.       The progression of this lease for additional premises to Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated seeks to regularise the occupancy of the remaining areas for completion of the development of the new clubrooms and amenity building on Michaels Avenue Reserve.

Land, buildings and lease

10.     Michaels Avenue Reserve is located at 46 Michaels Avenue, Ellerslie. The underlying land forming part of the additional leased area at Michaels Avenue Reserves is legally described as Lot 1 DP 42511, comprising 8450m², and contained in Record of Title NA1390/35, Lot 1 is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

11.     Michaels Avenue Reserve is a strategic park supporting both organised sport and informal recreation. The park caters for cricket and soccer codes and is home to the Ellerslie Recreation Centre.

Ellerslie Sports Club

12.     Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated was established in 1979 through the merger of Ellerslie Cricket Club Incorporated and the Ellerslie Association Football Club Incorporated. The primary purpose of the sports club is to provide a sports hub for Ellerslie Cricket and Ellerslie Association Football, its member organisations. In addition, it seeks to encourage the sporting and related activities of each member club and the use of the hub facilities for other recreational and cultural activities.

13.     The club has 1,910 registered members with the majority of its members (over 1,000) in the 5-13-year age group. Ellerslie Cricket and Ellerslie Association Football has produced first class New Zealand representative players.

14.     In June 2018, the club expressed a desire to develop a new sporting hub at Michaels Avenue Reserve. The club initially occupied the top floor of the Ellerslie Recreation Centre with the lease expiring on 30 June 2022.

15.     At the Ōrākei Local Board business meeting of 18 June 2020, the local board granted approval for an agreement to lease and subsequent community lease to facilitate the development of the new hub (resolution number OR/2020/68 - Attachment B). The agreement to lease was conditional on the club obtaining all necessary funding and completing the construction of the sports hub. On satisfaction of the conditions, the club were automatically granted a lease for a term of 10 years with one right of renewal of 10 years. The term accords with the term stipulated in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 for group owned buildings. 

16.     Auckland Council has been progressively developing the Michaels Avenue Reserve. Since 2014 the council has installed artificial turfs and floodlighting as well as upgrading grass playing surfaces. Most recently, the council has contributed over $3.4 million to the development of a sports club facility at the Reserve in partnership with the Ellerslie Sports Club. The club received partial funding of $350,000 from the council via the Sports Facilities Investment Fund (resolution number PAC/2022/84) to support the development of the sports hub facility.

17.     The club completed a substantial part of the development in April 2023. The new sports hub facility is a two-storey building featuring a community function space and administration rooms on the upper level and gender-neutral changing rooms, terraces overlooking the playing fields and first aid facilities on the ground floor. Public toilets have been provided for on both levels.

18.     The facility was used during the FIFA Women’s World Cup in June and July 2023, housing the Argentine women’s soccer team. It was officially opened to the community on Saturday, 2 September 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     Public use of a building is permitted when a Certificate of Code of Compliance (CCC) is issued following the completion of works and when all conditions of the building consent have been met. Alternatively, where a building is substantially completed, a Certificate of Public Use (CPU) can be issued for a limited time when a building is deemed safe for public use but where remaining construction work is yet to be completed.

20.     A CPU for the Ellerslie Sports Club was issued on 17 May 2023. The CPU was issued to enable the public (and FIFA’s) use of the facility while works to fully meet the building consent conditions could be completed.

21.     The CPU expires on 9 April 2024, at which time, the club is expected to have met all the conditions of the building consent.

22.     The building consent required Ellerslie Sports Club to make provision for an accessible route to the changing rooms and public toilets on the ground floor.

23.     The new sports hub facility has been constructed on the northern embankment adjacent to the sports fields. The embankment has a steep gradient, and the building was designed to fit into the slope, hence the two levels (refer to Image 1).

A building with a balcony and a football field

Description automatically generated

Image 1

Accessible path

24.     The design of the new sports hub facility did not provide for an accessible route within the building. An accessible path was constructed adjacent to the building providing an accessible route to the changing rooms and public toilets on the ground floor.

25.     Additionally, a second pedestrian path was constructed on the eastern side of the building to facilitate better access down the embankment and to the fields. The path improves access within this area of the reserve and from the neighbouring facilities i.e. Ellerslie Recreation Centre and artificial fields located on the higher northern area of the park.

26.     The accessible and pedestrian paths are located on council-owned land and outside of the existing lease footprint.

Detention tank

27.     The purpose of the detention tank is to temporarily store water which is then released in a controlled manner into the stormwater system.

28.     Stormwater detention tanks are important in new developments to alleviate the impact to broader infrastructure by taking the load off drainage facilities, particularly during downpours. This is especially important, given the significant rainfall experience across Auckland in the past year and the impact that this has had on existing stormwater infrastructure.

29.     The stormwater detention tank has been installed in an area adjacent to the building and accessible path.

Occupancy

30.     The standard terms and conditions for community occupancy under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, require tenants to maintain any buildings and improvements within the leased area owned by the tenant. The obligations for tenant-owned improvements extend to any structural maintenance, and costs associated with any asset renewal, compliance and insurance cover. 

31.     The accessible and pedestrian paths, and the detention tank are improvements of the Ellerslie Sports Club. Consequently, the club is responsible for the ongoing maintenance of these assets.

32.     However, as these are outside of the existing lease area, it is not within the lease provisions and it may be difficult to enforce the club to maintain these assets.

33.     The recommendation in this report for the additional leased area seeks to regularise the accessible and pedestrian paths, and the detention tank and bring this area within the scope of the existing agreement. This will ensure that the ownership and maintenance responsibilities are allocated to the club in accordance with the lease and Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

34.     The additional area to be leased comprises approximately 163m2 of land which reflects the actual areas where the paths have been constructed and where the detention tank is located. These areas will remain generally accessible to the public.  

35.     Staff recommend that a lease for additional land be granted to Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated for a term that runs concurrently with the term of lease granted to the club in June 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out council’s climate goal. This includes:

·    reducing greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    preparing the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

37.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new sources of emissions.

38.     The lease area sits adjacent to the southern playing fields. The playing fields are a low-lying area where several overland flow paths converge. This area is identified as a flood plain particularly during periods of heavy rain where capacity of the stormwater network is exceeded (refer to Image 2).

A map of a neighborhood

Description automatically generated

Image 2

39.     The stormwater detention tank supports environmental sustainability by reducing the load on existing infrastructure and the creation of polluted storm water. This also reduces the environmental impacts on lakes, streams, rivers and other water bodies. Additionally, the stormwater detention tanks provide an effective storm water management solution which reduces the risk of urban flooding and erosion.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The proposed lease for additional land has been consulted with several specialists across the Customer and Community Services Directorate. This includes the Parks and Places Specialist, Sports and Recreation Lead and Area Operations staff.

41.     The proposal is supported by council officers and there have been no objections to the proposed lease.

42.     The proposed lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     The development of the sports hub facility accords with the local board’s aspirations which are reflected in the Michaels Avenue Reserve Concept Plan of South Section.

44.     The proposed lease for the additional land will benefit the community by enabling accessibility and thereby encouraging initiatives that promote participation in sport and general recreation for the Ōrākei Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

45.     The activities promoted by the club align with the following Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

Outcome

 

Outcome three:

All parks and open space areas are attractive and well-used places for both active and passive recreation”

Outcome one:

Our communities are connected, engaged and resilient”

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

47.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

48.     Iwi engagement of the council’s intention to grant a community lease was undertaken on 27 November 2019 at the South-Central Mana Whenua Forum. The representatives at the forum supported the development of the sports hub facility and subsequent lease.

49.     Given that the lease for an additional area is a procedural matter, no further engagement was undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     The nature of the lease agreement allocates the maintenance responsibilities of the buildings and associated improvements to the club. This reduces the financial burden for rate payers and is consistent with the council’s empowered community objectives.

51.     There are no other financial implications arising from the recommendations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed lease for the additional land, the club will have no legal basis on which to use and occupy the land for the purposes of the accessibility path and detention tank.

53.     The accessibility path is fundamental to the building consent conditions. While the club has a Certificate of Public Use (CPU), this is temporary and expires on 9 April 2024. Failure to secure the occupancy of the additional land, will mean that the club is unable to meet the consent conditions by the CPU expiry date and will be unable to obtain a Code of Compliance Certificate.

54.     This will compromise the public use of the facility as the building will be non-compliant. In addition, the club’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be adversely affected and an important community asset will be brought out of service.

55.     Moreover, should the lease of the additional land not be regularised within the existing lease, it may be difficult to enforce the maintenance obligations. As such, there is a risk that council may be liable for the maintenance of the paths and the detention tank. This maintenance is not contemplated in existing operational budgets.

56.     The lease of the additional area will secure the occupancy of the accessibility and pedestrian paths, and the detention tank as services ancillary to the building an existing lease. In addition, it will enable the club to undertake scheduled maintenance of these improvements and obtain a Code of Compliance Certificate.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     If the local board resolves to grant the lease for additional land, staff will work with the Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated to formalise the agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan.pdf

 

b

Attachment B - Resolution OR-2020-68.pdf

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Yusuf Khan - Manager Leasing

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/16815

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·        ID 18299: St Heliers Library – interior and exterior renewals – the project was completed in July 2023

·        ID 303: Diverse Participation Ōrākei – the new incorporated society Auckland East Community Network launched in August 2023

·        ID 1319: Ōrākei Local Parks Management Plan – hearings panel on public submissions held in September 2023

·        ID 649: Ōrākei Ecological and environmental programme FY24 – 570 volunteer hours at more than 12 locations

·        ID 2774: The Landing Concept Plan (2013) refresh – A second phase of public consultation on the concept plan refresh

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status.

5.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2023/2024 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note; Net operating performance overall for Ōrākei Local Board area is 10 per cent below budget for the quarter ended 30 September 2023. Operating revenue is 22 per cent below budget, offset by operating expenditure of 11 per cent below budget. Capital expenditure is 53 per cent below budget for the quarter.     

6.        The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

7.        Auckland Emergency Management (AEM) has undertaken a change proposal process which has resulted in the Resilience team that formerly engaged with Local Boards being disestablished. Future work with Local Boards and communities will be delivered through a new planning team, which will eventually have seven Senior Planners, each working with three local boards.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Ōrākei Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Auckland Emergency Management

9.       The local board work programmes were not adopted until a month into the financial year due to uncertainty of local board funding in the development of the Annual Budget 2023/2024. Local board funding for 2023/2024 was agreed by the Governing Body at the end of May 2023 and required changes to planned work programmes, which were then approved in July 2023.

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

A graph with blue squares

Description automatically generated

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     AEM Resilience staff members have continued to attend community meetings to provide feedback, subject matter expertise where required this quarter. This has included supporting community activities that is attached to the work of Community Brokers that arose following the emergency events this year.

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

A green circle with a number of percentages

Description automatically generated

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

A graph with blue and green squares

Description automatically generated

Key activity updates

·        ID 18299: St Heliers Library – interior and exterior renewals – the project was completed on 21 July 2023 with the library relocation occurring on 24 July and successful re-opening ceremony held on 15 August 2023.

·        ID 303: Diverse Participation Ōrākei – the new incorporated society Auckland East Community Network launched in August 2023 with an event at College Rifles Rugby club and the launch of the new website at the event.

·        ID 1319: Ōrākei Local Parks Management Plan – approximately 50 submissions were received and a hearings panel on the public submissions was held on 28 September 2023 at the local board office.

·        ID 649: Ōrākei Ecological and environmental programme FY24 – 570 volunteer hours at more than 12 locations with 1823 trees and plants planted. A corporate clean up event was supported by the newly formed Friends of Ōrākei Basin group.

·        ID 2774: The Landing Concept Plan (2013) refresh – A second phase of public consultation on the concept plan refresh occurred in August and September 2023 resulting in 1673 submissions.

Activities on hold

14.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        ID 24279: Meadowbank Community Centre – Re-develop community centre – the development partner advised that construction cost escalation has made the project commercially unviable at this time. The project has been deferred by 12 months while the partner looks into alternative methodologies but believes pressures will ease and the project can be resumed

·        ID 15435: Kupe Reserve – renew parking and structures – the project is proposed to continue in 2024/2025 as the nearby Kāinga Ora development progresses

Changes to the local board work programme

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

15.     These activities have been merged with other activities for efficient delivery:

·        ID 2774: The Landing Concept Plan (2013) – refresh

16.     At the July 2023 business meeting, Ōrākei Local Board approved a budget of $160,000 for a project line called The Landing activation, site management and maintenance coordination’  (resolution number OR/2023/67).

17.     Different council teams deliver on activation, site management and maintenance. Staff are working together to confirm budgets required for the activity each team delivers. 

18.     This will enable allocatIon of the funding to each stream of work with the aim of not having to create a new project activity or reallocate money in order to continue progressing the activation and site works needed in time for summer and early autumn. 

19.     Staff are also working together to report on what will be delivered and how the $160,000 is allocated

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

21.     Work programmes were approved in July 2023 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     This report informs the Ōrākei Local Board of the performance for the first quarter of the financial year ending 30 September 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     ID 307: Māori Responsiveness Ōrākei - plans are underway to schedule a business meeting for the local board at Ōrākei Marae. In Q2, a tour with local board members, organised by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei is set to occur

25.     ID 302 – Orakei Community Arts Programmes – Māori arts and cultures - Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei partnered with the Ōrākei Local Board to lead Matariki events and activities within the Ōrākei community

26.     ID 1171 – Library Services Ōrākei - Both libraries celebrated Matariki and Māori Language Week by providing a variety of activities. Staff shared Matariki, Māori stories, and waiata during Rhymetimes, Wriggle and Rhyme sessions held at both local preschools and in the libraries, creating a Māori-themed story time experience

27.     ID 3690 - Local crime prevention fund, safety initiatives investment – Ōrākei – the board allocated money to fund safety programmes organized by Māori wardens at Mission Bay

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     This report is provided to enable the Ōrākei Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the local board’s 2023/2024 work programmes.

29.     There is one financial implication associated with this report whereby a reserve easement access fee of $190,000 excluding GST is available to the local board.

Financial Performance

30.     Operating expenditure of $4.1 million is $512,000 below budget for the first quarter. The Asset Based Services (ABS) is $317,000 below budget and the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) is $195,000 below budget. A film revenue of $4,000 and LDI opex carry forward totalling $35,800 were added into this financial year.

31.     Operating revenue of $383,000 is $111,000 below budget mainly due to the top up of $87,000 to cover foregone revenue for The Landing operations which was budgeted but not yet journalled.

32.     Capital expenditure of $762,000 is five per cent or $34,000 above budget this quarter mainly in sports development and special projects capex.

33.     The financial report for the first quarter ended 30 September 2023 for the Ōrākei Local Board area is in Appendix B attached.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

35.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

36.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, which ends 31 December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board 2023/2024 Q1 Financial Report

 

b

Ōrākei Local Board 2023/2024 Q1 Work Programme Update

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ali Keiller - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

Update on Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plans, work programme items (Jul-Sep 2023) and expected milestones

File No.: CP2023/17528

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with an update on the Joint Council-controlled Organisation (CCO) Engagement Plans, CCO work programme (Jul-Sep 2023), and expected milestones in its area for Quarter Two. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were adopted in June 2022. These plans record CCO responsibilities and local board commitments with Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare.

3.       CCOs provide local boards with the CCO work programme in their area. Each work programme item lists the engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

4.       The engagement plans expired in June 2023 and have not been updated since June 2022. Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts on CCOs delayed a review starting in the first half of 2023.

5.       A current review of the plans is not recommended due to disruptions and unknowns from:

·    Water Services Reform Programme

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer having dedicated staff to support local boards

·    Auckland Transport rolling out a new local board relationship programme

·    reviewing the CCO Accountability Policy through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

6.       This report does not include work programme updates from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited or Auckland Transport.

7.       Auckland Transport will provide their work programme updates through Forward Work Programme briefing packs in local board workshops.

8.       This report provides an update on Eke Panuku and Watercare work programme items from July to September 2023 and the engagement approach and anticipated milestones for Quarter Two. 

9.       The next CCO quarterly report will be provided in February 2024.  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the council-controlled organisation update on engagement plans, the work programme (Jul-Sep 2023) and anticipated milestones and engagement approaches for Quarter Two.

 

Horopaki

Context

What are CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans?

10.     The 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations recommended that CCOs and local boards adopt an engagement plan to:

·    help cement CCO and local board relationships

·    agree on a common understanding of accountability between CCOs and local boards

·    coordinate CCO actions better at the local level.

11.     These plans record the commitment between Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Watercare and the local boards to work together.

12.     Each local board adopted their 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans in June 2022. These plans include CCO responsibilities and local board commitments.

CCO work programme items

13.     CCOs provide local boards with a work programme that lists the different CCO projects happening in the local board area.

14.     The work programme is not a full list of projects in the local board area. It includes work programme items for engagement purposes.

15.     Each work programme item records an engagement approach with the local board, activity status, updates and milestones anticipated for the next quarter.

16.     The engagement approach is based on the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) standards which are provided in Table 1 below. Note that the “involve” and “empower” categories are not included in the CCO reporting as decided when the joint engagement plans were adopted.

Table 1: International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Engagement Approach Levels

CCO engagement approach

Commitment to local boards

Inform

CCOs will keep local boards informed.

Consult

CCOs will keep local boards informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and aspirations, and provide feedback on how local board input influenced decisions. CCOs will seek local board feedback on drafts and proposals.

Collaborate

CCOs will work together with local boards to formulate solutions and incorporate their advice and recommendations into the decisions to the maximum extent possible.

 

CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans have expired

17.     The CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans expired in June 2023. The plans have not been updated since June 2022.

18.     The plans were not updated in the first half of 2023 due to disruptions to CCOs caused by the Annual Budget 2023/2024.  

19.     A current review of the Joint CCO Engagement Plans is not recommended since:

·    the Water Services Reform Programme may replace Watercare with a new water entity

·    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited no longer has dedicated support staff to support local board engagement and liaison following Annual Budget 2023/2024 impacts

·    Auckland Transport is currently rolling out work which future engagement plans would need to consider, such as:

Forward Works Programme (full list of Auckland Transport projects in the local board area)

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

Regional Land Transport Plan

Local Board Transport Plans

·    the CCO Accountability Policy will be updated as part of the next Long-term Plan with which the CCO engagement plans would need to align. 

What are the next steps?

20.     The CCO quarterly reporting will continue to provide work programme updates from Watercare and Eke Panuku.

21.     Local board staff will:

·    work with Auckland Transport on providing clarity on local transport plans and how the transport plans would either replace or integrate with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    liaise with Tātaki Auckland Unlimited on what engagement and reporting resource they are able to provide to local boards following their restructure

·    investigate what engagement requirements and role the new water entity will have with the Joint CCO Engagement Plans

·    provide support to local boards on advocating for any desired changes to the CCO Accountability Policy through developing the next Long-term Plan. 

22.     Auckland Transport will provide updates on their work programme through the Forward Works Programme workshops starting in November 2023. 

23.     Local boards received the last update to the CCO work programme and engagement approach in July 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     The following sections provide an update on work programme items for Eke Panuku and Watercare. 

25.     More detailed updates to the CCO work programme are provided in Attachments A and B.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

26.     Eke Panuku’s work programme items are provided in Attachment A.

·    84a Morrin Road: This was sold unconditionally for housing. A resource consent for the first stage has been lodged with council.

·    Clonbern carpark: Eke Panuku is currently exploring development options that will secure car parking, value and urban design outcomes with this property.

Watercare

27.     Watercare’s work programme items are provided in Attachment B.

·    Newmarket Gully storage project: The project has commenced its feasibility study.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     This report does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

29.     Each CCO must work within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework. Information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Local boards advise CCOs of issues or projects of significance, communicate the interests and preferences of their communities and allow for flexibility in terms of engagement, recognising differing levels of interest.

31.     The work programme items are shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     This report on the CCO work programme items communicates up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     This report does not have a direct impact on Māori, however the projects it refers to will.

34.     Local boards and CCOs provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to their decision-making processes. These opportunities will be available on a project or programme basis. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     This report does not have financial impacts on local boards.

36.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     Some local boards expressed concern over the quality of CCO work programme reporting in April and July 2023, in particular with Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport is currently working on a relationship project which aims to deliver:

·    an enhanced process to develop transport plans that reflect local board input and priorities

·    more consistent and timely reporting, updates and analysis on local projects and issues

·    improved support for communication and engagement with local communities.

38.     Auckland Transport will be presenting Forward Work Programme briefing packs to local boards at November 2023 workshops which will address their CCO quarterly updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     The local board will receive the next CCO work programme report in February 2024 which will include an update on projects from Quarter Two (Oct-Dec 2023) and expected milestones for work in Quarter Three (Jan-Mar 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Eke Panuku Development Auckland work programme update

 

b

Watercare work programme update

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar and Resolutions Pending Action Report

File No.: CP2023/16520

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōrākei Local Board with its governance forward work calendar as at 16 November 2023.

2.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from staff via the Resolutions Pending Action report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Ōrākei Local Board at business meetings over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

4.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

a)  ensuring advice on agendas is driven by local board priorities

b)  clarifying what advice is required and when

c)  clarifying the rationale for reports.

5.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the draft governance forward work calendar as at 16 November 2023.

b)      note the Ōrākei Local Board Resolutions Pending Action report as at 16 November 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - November/December 2023

 

b

Resolutions Pending Action report

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monique Rousseau - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2023/16515

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

·    5 October 2023

·    12 October 2023

·    26 October 2023

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Board workshops are an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

3.       Attached are copies of the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held on 5, 12 and 26 October 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)   note the records for the workshops held on  5, 12 and 26 October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Record - 5 October 2023

 

b

Workshop Record - 12 October 2023

 

c

Workshop Record - 26 October 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monique Rousseau - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 November 2023

 

 

Chairperson and Board Members' Report - Cover Report

File No.: CP2023/16519

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board chairperson and board members with the opportunity to provide an update on projects, activities, and issues in the local board area.

2.       The Chairperson and Board Members' Report was not available at time of publishing and will be circulated to members when available, and either published as an addendum agenda item or tabled as a minutes attachment.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Ōrākei Local Board Chairperson and Board Members’ Report for October 2023. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monique Rousseau - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager