I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 21 November 2023

5.00pm

Woodside Room
Level 1, Manukau Civic Building
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

Deputy Chairperson

Dr Dr Ofa Dewes, MNZM

Members

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

Topou Folau

 

Vi Hausia

 

Li'amanaia Lorenzo Kaisara

 

Albert Lim

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

Darshita Shah

Democracy Advisor

 

16 November 2023

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21 106 2942

Email: darshita.shah@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                               5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                       5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                                   5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence   5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements            5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                    5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                         5

8.1    Deputation - For the event "Unleash the Fighter Within"   5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum              6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                              6

11        Governing Body member Update     9

12        Board Members' Report                  11

13        Chairperson's Announcements      13

14        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Deferred Application LG2413-107 and Quick Reponse Grants Round One 2023/2024 grant allocations            15

15        Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group                            23

16        Landowner approval and additional lease term for the Indian Association Manukau New Zealand Incorporated at Hillside Park, Papatoetoe                                        27

17        Adopting the Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan implementation plan   35

18        Implementation of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2023/2024                                                            43

19        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024    53

20        Local board resolution responses, feedback and information report    61

21        Record of Workshop Notes             63

22        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar                   65

23        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

Mr Smith will lead the meeting in prayer – or whatever set text we decide will appear here.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 17 October 2023 including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.1       Deputation - For the event "Unleash the Fighter Within"

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.    Daniel Cork, Community Consultant from Mauri Tu Consulting team, has requested an opportunity to address the local board. They would like to present to the board regarding the event called “Unleash the Fighter Within” which is the culmination of months of hard work by the tamariki and rangatahi who are on a journey that requires strength and commitment.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / will thank Daniel Cork, Community Consultant from Mauri Tu Consulting team for their attendance.

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)       The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Governing Body member Update

File No.: CP2023/17580

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / will receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Board Members' Report

File No.: CP2023/17579

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide board members with an opportunity to update the local board on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / will receive the board members’ written and verbal reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

File No.: CP2023/17799

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / will receive the chairperson’s verbal update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Deferred Application LG2413-107 and Quick Reponse Grants Round One 2023/2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2023/17372

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To part-fund deferred application LG2413-107 Parallel Group Limited, Project Title: Disability Activity Day Centre

2.      To part-fund or decline applications received for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grants Round One 2023/2024

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      This report presents deferred application LG2413-107 Parallel Group Limited, Project Title: Disability Activity Day Centre (Attachment B) and applications received in Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grants Round One 2023/2024 (Attachment C).

4.      Application LG2413-107 was deferred on 24 October 2023 due to a change of scope to the project. This application is requesting a total of $2,000.00.

5.      The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted its grants programme for 2023/2024, which sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board (Attachment A).

6.      The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $340,020 for the 2023/2024 financial year.
Since then, $4,000 has been allocated to the August Excellence Awards, $2,000 to the September Excellence Awards, and $59,488 to Local Grant Round One; leaving $274,532 to be allocated to subsequent grant rounds in 2023/2024.

7.      $40,000 was allocated in an urgent grant decision to two grants in October 2023 (OP/2022/1), leaving $234,532 remaining for subsequent rounds.

8.      Quick Response Round One received a total of 23 applications requesting a total of $43,568.41.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

a)   That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board agree to part-fund Application LG2413-107

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2413-107

Parallel group Limited

Community

Towards assorted equipment for a disability daycare centre from 3 June 2023 to 3 June 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$2,000.00

 

 

b)   That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received as follows:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2413-101

Voice ministries

Sport and recreation

Towards referees, judges and a timekeeper for boxing showcase at Manukau Tennis centre on 16 December 2023

$3,200.00

Eligible

QR2413-102

The Life Centre Trust Auckland

Community

Towards activity hire, food and gifts at 20 Newbury Lane on 11 December 2023

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-103

Auckland Seniors Support And Caring Group

Arts and culture

Towards catering, costuming and tutor fees on 15 December 2023

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-104

Anointed Indian Church Trust

Community

Towards food purchase as part of the Christmas Parade on 17 December 2023

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-107

Disability Sports Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards furniture purchase at 30 Bairds Road from 1 December 2023 to 30 December 2023

$516.52

Eligible

QR2413-108

Brain Play Limited

Community

Towards equipment hire from 1 December 2023 to 30 April 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-113

Kila's Style Trust

Community

Towards Dressed In Confidence school programme overall costs from 12 February 2024 to 25 March 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-116

Kolmar Charitable Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards building insurance for 295R Great South Road 1 December 2023 to 31 March 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-117

Otara Scorpions Volleyball Club

Sport and recreation

Towards training equipment and uniforms for the Otara Scorpion Volleyball Club

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-118

Papatoetoe Chess Club

Community

Towards printer purchase, trophies and medals

$906.30

Eligible

QR2413-119

Papatoetoe Hunters Cnr Bowling Club inc

Sport and recreation

Towards overhead fees at Papatoetoe Hunters Corner Bowling Club from 1 December 2023 to 1 December 2024

$1,492.00

Eligible

QR2413-120

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards telecommunication costs from 1 December 2023 to 30 June 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-122

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards venue hire, transport and wages at Bruce Pulman Park from 1 February 2024 to 30 June 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-123

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards workbooks and take home packs

$1,997.50

Eligible

QR2413-125

Damoni Senior Citizens Association

Community

Towards venue hire, catering and sound system hire at Decor of Elegance from 1 December 2023 to 31 December 2023

$1,900.00

Eligible

QR2413-126

Woman Care Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards Aquacise class entry fees at Papatoetoe Centennial Pool and Leisure Centre from 6 December 2023 to 31 July 2024

$1,980.00

Eligible

QR2413-128

New Zealand Blue Light Ventures Inc

Community

Towards Street Smart handbooks

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-129

East Tamaki Rugby Football Club Incorporated

Community

Towards face painters, games, bouncy castle hire, popcorn and candy floss at East Tamaki Reserve on 10 February 2024

$1,576.09

Eligible

QR2413-130

Te Whakaora Tangata Trust

Community

Towards printing, catering and venue hire at for the Family Restoration Programme from 10 January 2024 to 31 March 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-131

XLR8 Sports Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards participation fees at 244R East Tamaki Road from 5 December 2023 to 31 January 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-132

Warriors Community Foundation

Community

Towards wages at Otara Papatoetoe Schools from 1 February 2024 to 30 April 2024

$2,000.00

Ineligible

QR2413-133

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards event costs at Kolmar Trust and Ngati Ōtara Multisports Complex from 1 January 2024 to 31 October 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2413-134

Action Education Inc

Arts and culture

Towards purpose at Aorere College, Tangaroa College, Papatoetoe High School from 11 December 2023 to 31 May 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$43,568.41

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.      The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

10.    The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

11.    The local board grants programme sets out:

·             local board priorities

·             lower priorities for funding

·             exclusions

·             grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·             any additional accountability requirements.

12.    The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks and workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.    The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.    The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way.

15.    Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction, decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation, local tree planting and streamside revegetation, and education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.    Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

17.    The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.    Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

19.    Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applications so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.    The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Ngā Mātārae has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.    This report presents deferred application LG2413-107 Parallel Group Limited, Project Title: Disability Activity Day Centre (Attachment B) and applications received in Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grants Round One 2023/2024 (Attachment C).

22.    Application LG2413-107 was deferred on 24 October 2023 due to a change of scope to the project. This application is requesting a total of $2,000.00.

23.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted its grants programme for 2023/2024, which sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board (Attachment A).

24.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $340,020 for the 2023/2024 financial year.
Since then, $4,000 has been allocated to the August Excellence Awards, $2,000 to the September Excellence Awards, and $59,488 to Local Grant Round One; leaving $274,532 to be allocated to subsequent grant rounds in 2023/2024.

25.    $40,000 was allocated in an urgent grant decision to two grants in October 2023 (OP/2022/1), leaving $234,532 remaining for subsequent rounds.

26.    Quick Response Round One received a total of 23 applications requesting a total of $43,568.41.

27.      Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes including information in this report and have not identified any further financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.    The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board’s programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.    Following the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board allocation of funding for this round, staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision and facilitate payment of the grant.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara - Papatoetoe local board grants programme 2023 2024

 

b

LG2413-107 deferred application summary

 

c

Ōtara - Papatoetoe 2023 2024 quick response round one application summary

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

James Boyd - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group

File No.: CP2023/17887

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To make appointments for participation in a Play Leadership Group for elected members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Local boards have included play advocacy projects in their 2023/2024 work programmes and are seeking opportunities to increase play diversity within their parts of the region.

3.      The council’s play advocacy advisor has established a staff network of play champions to support the ongoing development and promotion of play opportunities. When the Play Advisory Group was promoted on the council’s Kotahi intranet in 2022, some elected members asked to participate.

4.      To further support local board play advocacy activities and to respond to the appetite for increased play participation from some elected members, a Play Leadership Group is proposed. This will be a version of the staff play network, except just for elected members.

5.      As the terms of reference in Attachment A confirm, the Play Leadership Group will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision of the group will be “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

6.      The Play Leadership Group will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about play in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for play within their local boards, and to provide informal guidance to relevant staff on play issues.

7.      After local boards make their appointments, an initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

8.      Staff recommend a quarterly meeting schedule for the Play Leadership Group. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes from the meetings.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Play Leadership Group.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.      Auckland Council employed its first play advocacy advisor in September 2022. The role leads advocacy work in the area of play at Auckland Council and advocates for and influences the consideration, empowerment, enablement and equitable promotion of play.

10.    Play advocacy is an initiative in 17 local board work programmes for the 2023/2024 financial year. Three local boards do not have capacity to include play advocacy in their work programmes for 2023/2024 but have asked for ad-hoc advocacy support and will consider including play advocacy in their 2024/2025 work programmes.

11.    The play advocacy advisor has a responsibility to establish a network of play champions within council, to increase knowledge and awareness of play across the council group. The advisor established a Play Advisory Group in 2022 which has grown to include 45 play champions from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, and other organisations affiliated with the council, including Auckland Zoo, Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand Maritime Museum, and Stardome Observatory and Planetarium.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.    Local boards have embraced the play advocacy approach and indicated interest to explore how they can increase play diversity for their communities and achieve play outcomes through different projects.

13.    After several local board workshops, elected members showed a strong personal interest in play. There are high levels of enthusiasm for play discussions and a keen interest in understanding more about how to promote play.

14.    In November 2022 the council’s Kotahi intranet published a story about play advocacy and publicised the staff Play Advisory Group. Some elected members contacted the play advocacy advisor and asked if they could join the group. However, the group’s terms of reference restrict membership to staff only.

15.    During workshops with local boards in 2023, the play advocacy advisor sought guidance from elected members regarding their appetite for participating in an equivalent special interest group for elected members with a strong interest in play.

16.    In response to local boards’ interest, the play advocacy advisor has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of a Play Leadership Group, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·        learn more about play

·        share relevant knowledge with other elected members

·        improve connections between participants at a governance level

·        encourage collaboration between local boards to support play outcomes

·        increase knowledge and understanding of play equity issues

·        provide informal guidance to staff as the play advocacy work area grows

·        share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

17.    The vision of the Play Leadership Group is “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

18.    Participation in the Play Leadership Group is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint elected members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes of the group’s meetings.

19.    The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

20.    The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Play Leadership Group and provides further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet four times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed by the participating elected members.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.    The formation and operation of the Play Leadership Group has no climate impact.

22.    The continued advocacy to support play as ‘an everywhere activity’ supports positive climate outcomes by encouraging the community to embrace local suburbs as sites for play. This approach will reduce the need to drive to reach playgrounds.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.    The Play Leadership Group will be administered by staff from the council’s Active Communities team, with support from kaimahi in the Regional Services and Strategy and Parks and Community Facilities departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.    The play advocacy advisor has presented at 20 local boards between March and October 2023.

25.    Local boards have expressed interest in the formation of a governance-level group for elected members who are interested in play. One local board requested that the opportunity to participate was presented in a business report, to enable participation to be formally agreed by the board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.    The Play Leadership Group will provide play leaders with opportunities to learn more about Māori values relevant to play, Sport New Zealand’s bicultural play plan and its relevance to the development of play activities nationwide, and current and potential Māori play opportunities. This includes opportunities to develop and install māra hūpara in local parks and reserves, and the potential for projects such as Te Kete Rukuruku to generate play outcomes.

27.    The play leaders could also provide a mechanism for regional iwi engagement regarding play on a relatively informal basis, enabling mana whenua to share their views about play on an ongoing basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.    The Play Leadership Group will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.    There is a risk that elected members could become members of the Play Leadership Group with expectations that they will be able to influence broader play investment or make decisions affecting play at a regional level.

30.    The terms of reference are intended to mitigate the risk of misunderstandings by making clear the scope of the Play Leadership Group. This will ensure participants become involved with a realistic expectation of what can be achieved through their membership.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.    Local boards that wish to participate in the Play Leadership Group will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

32.    An initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Play Leadership Group

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacquelyn Collins - Activation Advisor - Young People

Authorisers

Pippa Sommerville - Manager Sport & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Landowner approval and additional lease term for the Indian Association Manukau New Zealand Incorporated at Hillside Park, Papatoetoe

File No.: CP2023/17027

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval to grant landowner application to the Indian Association Manukau New Zealand Incorporated (the association) to build a new community centre predominantly within the footprint of their existing community centre on Hillside Park, Papatoetoe.

2.      To seek approval for a variation to the existing lease term to the Indian Association Manukau New Zealand Incorporated.  Their current lease expires 13 May 2031 and they are seeking a grant of a further 10 year right of renewal term to enable security of tenure for their proposed new community centre on Hillside Park, Papatoetoe. The variation will see their tenure through to the 13 May 2041.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      The association is seeking landowner approval to build a new community centre predominantly within the footprint of their existing community centre at Hillside Park, Papatoetoe.

4.      The association have an existing lease which fully expires on 13 May 2031 and they are seeking variation to allow for an additional 10 year renewal term to this existing lease. 

5.      The current building has structural issues and is no longer fit for purpose.

6.      The construction of the new building will provide increased amenity and passive surveillance over the park.

7.      The Hillside Park carpark is currently being renewed by council. This involves removing the carparks alongside the driveway and the fencing that runs alongside the carparks being removed to provide an improved frontage and additional usable space for the community.

8.      The community centre and remainder of the carpark is currently fenced with a tall chain mesh and barbed wire fence.

9.      Staff recommend that removal of the remainder of the fencing occurs and its replacement with bollards to provide increased amenity and an overall enhancement to the park.

10.    Staff recommend that the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board support the landowner application, and variation to the lease to enable a further 10 year right of renewal extension. The proposal supports and enhances the association’s ability to provide valuable services to the local community, whilst maintaining access to and use of Hillside Park.

11.    If the board supports the recommendation, staff will formalise the landowner approval with associated conditions and an extension to the current lease, thereby providing the applicant with approval to proceed with the development. 

12.    If the board does not support the recommendation, the applicant will be advised of the decision.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whakaae / grant landowner approval to the Indian Association Manukau New Zealand Incorporated to build a new community centre on Hillside Park, Papatoetoe.

b)      whakaae / approve removal of the entire fence around the carpark and its replacement with bollards.

c)      whakaae / grant a variation to the existing term of the lease to allow for a further 10 year right of renewal to the Indian Association Manukau New Zealand Incorporated for their proposed new community centre on Hillside Park, Papatoetoe which will enable a new final expiry date of 13 May 2041

i)       Rent $1,300 per annum, commencing the date of the business meeting resolution.

d)      whakaae / accept all other terms and conditions to be as per the original lease dated 14 May 2011 in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Local Government Act.

 

Horopaki

Context

Hillside Park background

13.    The association’s community centre is located on Lot 3 DP 21314, which is held by Auckland Council in fee simple under the Local Government Act.

14.    The property was acquired by the Manukau City Council in 2010 as an addition to Hillside Park.

15.    The association purchased the building from Auckland Council in 2011 and subsequently entered into a ground lease with Auckland Council.

16.    The ground lease was for an initial term of ten years with one ten year right of renewal, final expiry 13 May 2031.

17.    The remainder of the park is held in two titles, Pt Allotment 44 Parish of Manurewa is road reserve and Lot 15 DP 21314 is held by the council in fee simple as recreation reserve (unclassified).

Current Community Centre

18.    The current community centre is old and no longer fit for purpose. The association has recently had the building inspected by a structural engineer who has advised that the building should not be used by groups larger than 25 people.

19.    This has meant that the use of the centre has had to be scaled back significantly.

20.    The association advises that the centre is used regularly throughout the week for a variety of community uses but due to the condition of the building this has been reduced in recent times.

21.    The association prefer to demolish and rebuild rather than attempt to repair the existing building.

Proposal

22.    The association proposes to demolish the current building and rebuild predominantly on the same footprint, with only an additional 70m² beyond the existing footprint proposed. 

23.    Plans for the new building are attached as Attachment A.

24.    The design of the proposed building would provide improved passive surveillance through the inclusion of windows overlooking the park. It will also enhance the overall appearance of the park as the current building is unattractive and tired and a new modern building will be an improvement.

25.    The association will be required to obtain all necessary regulatory consents for the development.

26.    The association will be storing building materials on site during construction. The storage area is shown in Attachment B.

Current lease

27.    The building was originally owned by Auckland Council but sold to the association on 14 May 2011 on condition that the council concurrently granted a ground lease for the footprint of the building.

28.    The lease was for a 10+10 year period with final expiry 13 May 2031.

29.    The proposal to rebuild the centre will require considerable capital expenditure by the group. It is prudent for the group to have a longer security of tenure when undertaking both fundraising for the project and the actual build.

30.    Under the current lease once the project is complete the association would likely have only 6 years left on their lease. An additional term of 10 years has been requested to align with the association’s proposed investment in the site.

Carpark Renewal and Entrance Upgrade

31.    The carpark is currently being renewed by the council. This involves removing the carparks alongside the driveway and the fencing that runs alongside the carparks being removed to provide an improved frontage and additional usable space for the community.

Removal of fencing

32.    The community centre and remainder of the carpark is currently fenced with a tall chain mesh and barbed wire fence. The existing fencing is shown in Attachment C.

33.    This fence was in place when the property was purchased.

34.    The fence is detrimental to the look and feel of the park and staff recommend that it should be removed and replaced with bollards.

35.    Removing the fence will create a greater feeling of safety for park users and the community centre site will become part of the overall park rather than being separate and exclusive.

36.    The area operations team have renewals budget available under the adopted work programme for this work and can undertake removal of the fence as part of the works currently underway in the park.

Timeframe

37.    The association intend to proceed with construction as soon as all required consents and approvals have been obtained.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

38.    The association has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the additional lease term request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver its services.

39.    The association has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

40.    The following council specialists have reviewed and support the proposal:

·   principal landscape architect

·   parks and places specialist

·   principal community lease advisor

·   area operations manager

·   facilities manager

·   programme manager.

41.    The area of Hillside Park where development is proposed is indicated in Attachment A. Further design detail will need to be submitted by the applicant through the regulatory stages. Further detail includes architectural design drawings of the proposed development and infrastructure servicing plans.

42.    The options for the local board are to approve or decline the landowner application and lease term extension.

43.    If the local board approve the application, the association will be able to undertake the proposed development subject to the specified conditions for landowner approval.

44.    If the local board decline the application, the association will not be able to undertake the proposed development.

45.    It is recommended that the local board support landowner approval being granted for the proposal for the following reasons:

·   council specialists have been consulted and support the proposal

·   the proposal will not adversely affect long-term public access to, or use of, Hillside Park

·   the proposal will allow the association to continue to provide valuable services to the community and enhance the services currently provided

·   any adverse effects of the proposal can be mitigated by conditions placed on any landowner approval issued, e.g. the requirement to establish silt and sediment controls and to undertake the reinstatement of any damaged land

·   the proposal supports key areas of the Auckland Plan as they relate to the council’s commitment to contributing to community belonging and participation.

·   the proposal aligns with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan by contributing to a thriving, inclusive and safe community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

46.    To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lessee:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

·        include any other outcomes that will improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts.

47.    All measures taken are aimed at meeting the council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

48.    The new building will require minimal earthworks as it mostly matches the footprint of the current building, with only a small portion of the proposed building outside the existing footprint.

49.    Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.    The application and its effects have been assessed by a number of technical experts on behalf of the council. These areas of expertise include landscape architecture, parks strategy and community leasing.

51.    No other council groups are affected by the proposal beyond those consulted with.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.    The proposal aligns with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020 outcome ‘A thriving, inclusive and safe community’, by allowing the association to continue to provide its existing and future services to the Papatoetoe community.

53.    The proposal aligns with the Auckland Plan 2050 by promoting community belonging and participation through supporting the association to provide a range of community activities and a place to meet.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

55.    These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

56.    Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

57.    Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests, and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.    The construction and ongoing maintenance costs of the proposed development will be borne by the association. There will be no financial cost to the local board for the proposal and associated infrastructure. The association’s ongoing viability, finances and governance is strong and any resourcing from the council is likely to be operational and of a nature that provides general amenity to all park users.

59.    The council’s renewals budget approved as part of the adopted work programme will cover the cost of the recommended fence removal and bollard installation.

60.    There are no financial costs to the council for this lease term addition to the association at Hillside Park, Papatoetoe.

61.    On the 8 June 2023 the annual budget was approved by the Governing Body which included changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines and the rent fee for a community ground lease has been changed from $1 per annum to $1,300 plus GST per annum effective from 1 July 2023.

62.    The additional lease term is under the terms and conditions of the original lease. The lease states that the rent may be reviewed on the extension of the lease or in the event of a change of policy.

63.    If the local board chooses to retain the level of rent at $1, there will be no requirement for the local board to top up the community lease revenue budget. However, the local board will not have the benefit of the additional revenue of $1,299 per annum over the additional renewal term.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.    There are no significant risks to the council associated with the proposal and the proposal strategically meets the council’s direction.

65.    If the status quo was to be maintained (i.e., the board declines the proposal), then the association’s ability to continue to provide for community activity will be negatively impacted as their current building is no longer fit for purpose and can only accommodate 25 users at a time due to structural concerns.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.    If the local board resolves to grant landowner approval and a lease extension, staff will work with the applicant to formalise the agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

67.    If the local board declines the application, the applicant will not be able to proceed with the proposed development.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Building and site plans

 

b

Construction material area

 

c

Fencing plan

 

     

 

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Genevieve McGirr - Land Use Advisor

Phillipa Carroll - Principal Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Adopting the Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan implementation plan

File No.: CP2023/17131

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To adopt the Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan - Implementation Plan dated November 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         The Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan was adopted by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board in February 2023, subject to an amendment to incorporate provision of a synthetic athletics track as an immediate short-term project for implementation. (OP/2023/15).

3.         The master plan aims to guide development of the Manukau Sports Bowl (the Sports Bowl) over the next thirty years. The vision for the Sports Bowl is to be ‘an inviting and inclusive destination park for everyone in our community.

4.         A draft implementation plan has been developed. As part of engagement with the community, local board, and mana whenua on the projects for the master plan, input was also sought on the priorities for implementing the projects. The draft implementation plan is based on this information and the recommendations of council specialists. It includes the synthetic athletics track as a short-term project.

5.         The master plan and draft implementation plan provide direction for planning, business case development and identification of funding for projects that meet community, sport and recreation needs. They provide the local board with a framework for future decision making and investment in the site and can be used to inform the Parks and Community Facilities work programme.

6.         The draft implementation plan has a staged approach for development. This will ensure ongoing development at the site that provides for the long-term outcome and as funding becomes available.

7.         The draft implementation plan was workshopped with the local board in September 2023 and minor changes were made. The athletics track was reconfirmed as the priority project for short-term implementation.

8.         Concurrently, Eke Panuku are developing an Indicative Business Case for funding to support the development of the synthetic athletics track. The proposed location for the athletics track is the current location of the greyhound track. Council’s Parks and Community Facilities leasing team are in consultation with Auckland Greyhound Racing Club regarding the transition of the greyhound racing activity away from Manukau Sports Bowl to facilitate the future development of the athletics track.

Additional funding for implementation of the wider master plan can be sought through Eke Panuku Transform Manukau programme funding, service property optimisation, and through partnerships with clubs, organisations and external funders. No other specific funding for the implementation of the master plan is available at this time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      adopt the Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan implementation plan, dated November 2023 (Attachment A).

 

Horopaki

Context

9.         Manukau Sports Bowl (the Sports Bowl) is a 21 hectare park located adjacent to State Highway One and east of the Manukau Metropolitan Centre. It is located within the Eke Panuku Transform Manukau programme area.

10.       The Sports Bowl is a local park under the local board’s governance. The park provides for a mix of passive and active recreation activities. Key user groups with current leases at the site are the Auckland Central Cycling Club at the Manukau Velodrome, Tennis Auckland, The Roots Collective (a creative entrepreneurs community group) and the Auckland Greyhound Racing Club.

11.       In September 2020 the local board approved the development of a master plan for the site, including the investigation of service property optimisation as a potential funding source for implementation of the plan (OP/2020/134).

12.       A needs analysis was prepared to understand the priority sport and recreation needs of the community. These were included in a draft master plan that the local board approved for community engagement in February 2022 (OP/2022/23).

13.       The public consultation on the draft master plan identified an athletics track and field facility was a priority for the community. Staff undertook further needs analysis for athletics. The draft master plan was updated to recognise that provision for a synthetic athletics track and field facility at the site reflected the changing needs of the community.  

14.       Consequently, long term provision for greyhound racing at the Sports Bowl was removed from the draft master plan.

15.       The local board approved the updated master plan for further community engagement in August 2022 (OP/2022/117). Public consultation on the updated draft master plan confirmed wider community support. The feedback reflected the community’s preference for indoor courts, increased community cycling opportunities, and an athletics track and field facility at the site over a greyhound racing facility.

16.       The updated master plan was adopted by the local board in February 2023, subject to an amendment to incorporate provision of the athletics track as an immediate short-term need for the community (OP/2023/15). The resolution also requested that the council and Eke Panuku progress planning for the implementation of the master plan, in particular, the design and funding options for a synthetic athletics track.

17.       As part of the urban regeneration programme ‘Transform Manukau’, Eke Panuku are preparing an Indicative Business Case for the Eke Panuku board to consider allocation of programme funding to support the development and delivery of the synthetic athletics track.    

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.       The purpose of the master plan is to guide development of the Sports Bowl over the next thirty years. The vision is for the Sports Bowl to be ‘an inviting and inclusive destination park for everyone in our community’. 

19.       The adopted master plan includes design principles and key moves to improve the sports facilities, biodiversity and ecology, amenity and connectivity and usability of the Sports Bowl.

20.       Key projects identified in the master plan include:

·     improvements to the existing velodrome and sports field

·     new indoor court provision

·     sports field and athletics track development

·     informal recreation and play space improvements

·     ecological and biodiversity improvements and amenity planting

·     road and parking upgrades, and

·     improved pedestrian and cycling connectivity.

21.       As part of engagement undertaken with the community, mana whenua, and stakeholders during development of the master plan, input was also sought on the priorities for implementation of the identified projects. Council staff have also provided their views on the project staging. 

22.       In response to the priorities identified, the projects in the master plan have been grouped into four key categories. These are formal sports, informal recreation and play, environmental actions, and access and movement. There are over 30 projects in total.

23.       The draft implementation plan identifies whether proposed staging of projects is in the short term (1-5 year), medium term (5-15 years), or long term (15+ years). Staging is based on consultation feedback, specialist input, and community and local board priorities.

24.       The implementation of projects needs to co-ordinate with requirements of other projects in the implementation plan and the wider vicinity. This includes future development of the designated Airport to Botany Rapid Transport route. The notice of requirement for this extends over part of the Sports Bowl site to the south and west.[1]

25.       Understanding how the different projects are connected will ensure the projects are delivered in a practical order and in reference to each other.

26.       The draft implementation plan identifies indicative costs and potential funding sources for each project. The costs are high-level estimates, current as of September 2023, and are not based on concept or detailed design. No funding has been allocated apart from where stated in the plan and in Table 1 – Current projects, below.

27.       The draft implementation plan is a guide for recommended staging of projects to achieve the vision of the master plan. It proposes to balance the improvements of the usability and amenity of the park overall with the larger, transformational projects.

28.       There are significant funding implications that each project will need to address before proceeding. Individual projects will be subject to approval of a business case before proceeding and funding sources will need to be confirmed.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.       The implementation plan includes projects that provide for ecological restoration, increased tree coverage, and improved stormwater quality, especially in the wetland in the north of the park. This will improve biodiversity, fauna habitat and help offset carbon emissions.

30.       As part of the implementation of the master plan, the development and design of individual projects will include environmental considerations such as water sensitive design, use of sustainable and ethical products, recycling, and waste minimisation. Community assets over $10 million will be expected to achieve a minimum 5-star Green Star or equivalent rating that provides independent verification of sustainability.

31.       Climate impacts will be further assessed when implementing the individual projects in the master plan and be aligned with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.       Input and recommendations were received from council’s Active Communities and Parks and Community Facilities staff throughout the development of the draft implementation plan.

33.       Staff continue to work closely with Eke Panuku to support the development of the Indicative Business case for the proposed synthetic athletics track that will provide funding.

34.       As part of the Airport to Botany Rapid Transport (A2B) Notice of Requirement, Auckland Transport have placed a designation on parts of the Manukau Sports Bowl site[2]. This has had legal effect since November 2022. Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have worked together to minimise the impacts of the designation on achieving the vision of the master plan.   

35.       Providing for the spatial requirements of the designation and any future identified optimisation opportunities has influenced the proposed staging in the implementation plan, particularly in the south and southeast of the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.       Staff worked closely with stakeholders and the local board throughout the development of the master plan.

37.       The staging of projects in the draft implementation plan reflects the comments received from the community and the local board throughout the engagement processes for the master plan. It also reflects the local board resolution at the master plan’s adoption for prioritisation of the synthetic athletics track project.  

38.       Local board members were presented with the draft implementation plan at a workshop in September 2023 where general support for the plan was expressed and no issues were raised.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.       Thirteen mana whenua were invited to participate in the development of the master plan. A summary of mana whenua engagement and feedback on the draft master plan was reported to the local board in March 2022 business meeting (CP2022/02492).

40.       Mana whenua provided feedback on the updated draft master plan following a workshop in August 2022. Key feedback from mana whenua was that the master plan should reflect the local community, provide activities for the whole family, and provide for a welcoming space for all.

41.       Specific feedback was received from mana whenua that they:

·     don’t want to use artificial safety surfaces in play areas which shed and enter the stormwater system and have a desire to see natural or recycled materials such as ‘Nike Grind’ recycled surfacing material used instead

·     don’t support greyhound racing remaining on the park because of the negative impacts of gambling on the community

·     want to see a balance of formal and informal recreation activities on the park which encourage the participation of the local community in recreation

·     support a staged approach to the delivery of the master plan so assets can be delivered as funding becomes available.

42.       The implementation plan responds to this feedback in prioritising the development of the athletics track as a short-term project.

43.       Mana whenua will continue to be involved as the projects in the master plan are progressed to implementation. As part of this, specific design and development concerns such as materials used will be addressed as part of detailed design.

44.       The Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board area is young and ethnically diverse. The median age of the Māori population is five years younger than the local board median, meaning there is a particular need to focus on tamariki, rangatahi and whanau, and provide relevant and welcoming facilities and services that serve their needs.

45.       The draft implementation plan seeks a balance of formal sport and informal recreation and play projects and provides for appropriate staging of development to create local benefits and opportunities for many communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.       The draft implementation plan includes estimated costs for each project, current as of September 2023. Detailed design and further consultation on project elements will be required to further refine the project requirements and costings. This will be undertaken on a project by project basis.

47.       The implementation plan proposes a range of funding options to deliver elements of the masterplan. These include locally driven initiatives capital funding (LDI Capex), asset renewal budget, and some to be delivered by others (e.g. Eke Panuku).

48.       The projects at the Sports Bowl already included in the local boards’ forward work programme are shown in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Current projects

FY23/FY24 (approved)

FY24/FY25 (in principle)

FY25/FY26 (in principle)

$536,186 ABS[3]: Capex (local renewal)

Upgrade sports field lighting, carpark and accessway lights and automatic gates

$552,170 ABS: Capex (local renewal)

Comprehensive renewal of the velodrome, grandstand and toilet and changing room

$552,170 ABS: Capex (local renewal)

Comprehensive renewal of the velodrome, grandstand and toilet and changing room

 

 

$380,000 ABS: Capex (local renewal)

Renew velodrome track surface 

 

 

$325,000 ABS: Capex (local renewal)

Replace velodrome lighting

 

49.       Eke Panuku are preparing an indicative business case to secure funding for the design and development of a synthetic athletics track. This project's delivery is expected to be done in stages, subject to funding availability.  

50.       There is no other capital budget allocated to the implementation of the Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan at this stage. Alternative funding sources will need to be identified to deliver all the projects in the implementation plan.   

51.       Implementation of the project for development of the synthetic athletics track requires the termination of the commercial ground lease with Auckland Greyhound Racing Club, and a subsequent loss of rental revenue for the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.       The main risks and mitigations of the master plan implementation plan are outlined in Table 2 below:

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.       Following the local board’s adoption of the Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan Implementation Plan it will be handed over to the relevant council teams for planning and delivery.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manukau Sports Bowl Implementation plan

 

     

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Anna Papaconstantinou - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Richard Davison - Priority Location Director, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services & Strategy

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Implementation of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/17185

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To whakaae / seek approval of grant funding allocation towards priority projects identified within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan was adopted in July 2023 to provide strategic guidance on the provision of the local sporting facilities network [ŌP/2023/89].

3.      On 25 July 2023 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024 including item 3888; Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan implementation [ŌP/2023/116].

4.      The board allocated $50,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget towards implementation of the plan by way of grants to community led projects.

5.      New projects can be considered for inclusion in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan following an independent evaluation of project merits aligned to the assessment criteria found in Attachment A, Section 8.

6.      Staff have identified court lighting renewals at Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds as the one new priority project for inclusion in an updated 2023/2024 projects list.

7.      Following the analysis of live and eligible priority projects, the recommended community-led project grants are summarised below.

Table 3: Grant recommendations 2023/2024

Recipient / Project reference

Purpose

Recommendation

East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club

#21

To support tennis court lighting renewals for East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club

$22,860

 

Papatoetoe Rangers Netball Club & Papatoetoe Tennis Club (Kolmar Charitable Trust)

#33

To support netball court and tennis court renewals for Papatoetoe Rangers Netball Club and Papatoetoe Tennis Club

$27,140

8.      Should the board resolve to allocate the grants, staff will work with the grant recipients to set in place a funding agreement and project plan to achieve the desired outcomes. The funding agreement template that will be used has been approved by council’s legal team.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the amended priority projects list including the addition of netball court and tennis court lighting renewals at Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds

b)      whakaae / approve funding up to $22,860 to East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated to support tennis court lighting renewals

c)      whakaae / approve funding up to $27,140 to Kolmar Charitable Trust to support netball court and tennis court lighting renewals.

 

Horopaki

Context

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board - Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024

9.      On 25 July 2023, the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024 including item 3888; Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan implementation [ŌP/2023/116].

10.    The approved activity description is to support priority projects identified within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan, and to assess implementation options for funding and allocation of grants based on criteria in the plan.

11.    This item has $50,000 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget allocated for 2023/2024 with a further $100,000 approved in principle for 2024/2025 and 2025/2026.

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2023

12.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan was adopted in July 2023 to provide strategic guidance on the provision of the local sporting facilities network [ŌP/2023/89].

13.    The plan outlines the current network of sport and active recreation facilities across Ōtara-Papatoetoe (irrespective of ownership) and identifies existing and future provision challenges and needs.

14.    Key outputs of the plan include:

·    consolidated inventory of sport and active recreation facilities

·    themes and trends of local facility needs and issues

·    assessment of potential impacts of demographic and infrastructure changes

·    identification of gaps in facility provision against current and future needs

·    framework for prioritising projects/potential opportunities for further analysis and assessment

·    prioritised list of projects/opportunities to provide clear direction to support advocacy, resource allocation, and leasing decisions.

Overview of findings within the plan

15.    Ōtara-Papatoetoe is well resourced with a comprehensive and unique network of parks, open spaces, water access and bespoke sport facilities, although, there is a high rate of inactivity (31 per cent).

16.    The local board area has high deprivation, is extremely diverse with the second highest Pasifika population in Tāmaki Makaurau and relatively young compared to the wider Auckland region. Therefore, the right mix of facilities (in terms of type, function, condition, access, and location) is critical to meet the diverse community need.

17.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe sport and active recreation facility network faces multiple challenges and opportunities – those that are common across the sector and wider Auckland region, and those uniquely associated with Ōtara-Papatoetoe.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Priority projects and general key moves

18.    The plan identifies a full range of capital developments, repair and maintenance, and spatial/master planning projects. In total, 46 projects were independently assessed and categorised by priority.

19.    Priority projects identified in the plan were assessed using guiding principles derived from Auckland Council’s Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 and supported by a series of components from The New Zealand Sporting Facilities Framework.

20.    The project assessment criteria including principles of investment and sub-criteria weightings can be found in Attachment A, Section 8.

21.    The priority projects list is supported by eight general facility considerations which may also inform specific projects for consideration.

New project for inclusion in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

22.    The priority projects list offers an independent evaluation of prioritised local need at a single moment in time.

23.    New projects can be considered for inclusion in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan following an independent evaluation of project merits aligned to the assessment criteria found in Attachment A, Section 8.

24.    Staff have identified court lighting renewals at Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds as the one new priority project for inclusion in an updated 2023/2024 projects list.

Table 1: Proposed priority project for inclusion in the projects list

Reference

#33 – Local sport

Project

Netball court and tennis court lighting renewal

Priority

High

Rationale

• Key multisport hub, lighting supports significant provision for winter codes

• Only netball court provision in Papatoetoe outside of school facilities, existing capacity does not meet demand

• Upgrade of lighting to LED will provide energy efficiencies

Actions

Seek funding to renew lights

Cost

$80,000

Lead

Kolmar Charitable Trust on behalf of Papatoetoe Rangers Netball Club and Papatoetoe Tennis Club

Community grant recommendations

25.    The board allocated $50,000 LDI operational budget towards implementation of the plan by way of grants to community led projects.

26.    Of the 46 projects within the plan, there was a spread of asset ownership or project lead, as categorised below:

·    fourteen community projects, typically clubs, trusts, or schools

·    five mixed in nature including groups seeking relocation, access to facilities or proposing new infrastructure

·    twenty-seven council projects ranging from planning to $5 million + construction.

27.    Ten projects were deemed eligible for this type of funding, of which, five priority projects were considered live projects that could feasibly utilise funding over the next 12-18 months.

28.    An analysis of grant options and the level of recommended support can be found in the table below.

Table 2: Assessment and recommended funding for live community led priority projects

Project

Analysis

Recommendation

Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds

#1

Renewal of changing room block

On 7 September 2023 the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee approved funding of $2,000,000 to support the renewal of the changing room block at Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds [PEPCC/2023/125].

The total project cost is $2.6 million with Papatoetoe Rugby Club contributing $46,000 to date with further fundraising to be led by Kolmar Charitable Trust.

Servicing rugby, cricket, and football the asset will support significant participation outcomes and enable greater female uptake with more fit-for-purpose amenities.

The local board has recently funded renewals of the hard courts at Kolmar and with a large balance of funding for this project further fundraising is required before this is considered again.

Lease with Kolmar Charitable Trust expires 30 November 2030.

Not recommended for funding in this financial year

High

 

East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club

#21

Court, lighting & clubrooms upgrades

This project has multiple facets as illustrated in the plan.

Court resurfacing has been quoted at $113,120, the lighting renewal is priced at $47,860 and the scope of works for the clubroom has not yet been determined.

In recent years the club gained qualification into the Premier Men’s Grade meaning they now compete in the Caro Bowl competition. Unfortunately, due to the standard of lighting the club is not permitted to play night games and at times is forced to default their home advantage due to court conditions.

Tennis Auckland are supportive of any investment to support infrastructure at the club commenting “there is no doubt the facility is tired and needs an upgrade...the state of the facility is not ideal for tennis of this standard”.

The club have gained $25,000 to date to support the lighting renewal leaving a balance of $22,860.

Lease expires 31 March 2040.

$22,860 to support lighting renewals

 

Medium

 

Tangaroa College

#24

Construction of court canopy

Part two of a court canopy project which the school has staged in order to deliver what was possible with the funding available at the time.

Part one was completed in June 2022 and with the inclusion of lights is an asset open for community use in evenings and weekends.

This stage has been quoted at $1.1 million which would complete coverage of the remaining three courts including lighting, speakers and drainage over an area which would be 34m x 93m in total.

Although there would be significant participation outcomes and community benefit, the level of funding required does not align with the available grant budget.

The land is owned by the Ministry of Education.

Not recommended for funding in this financial year

Medium

 

Manukau Taniwha BMX Club

#7

Construction of pump track

They are the recipients of a contestable council grant for $139,000 to support the development of a new pump track at Colin Dale Park.

Unfortunately, lengthy delays with the consenting process has led to cost escalation leaving the project with a balance of $108,000 to have the track developed this summer.

The club is planning on applications to at least two gaming trusts in November. This would achieve strong participation outcomes as an asset that would cater for entry level riders up to official competition level. It is a popular form of activity for the rangatahi cohort and with strong attraction for local and sub-regional riders as a free asset open to informal community use.

Lease expires 17 November 2024.

Not recommended for funding in this financial year

 

Medium

 

Papatoetoe Rangers Netball Club & Papatoetoe Tennis Club

#33 New Project

Court lighting renewals

Based at Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds, the tennis club utilise three artificial turf courts and the netball club utilise two hard courts dual-marked as three tennis courts.

The courts and lights owned by Kolmar Charitable Trust are heavily utilised by a range of club, school, and community groups. The court surface is of high value to the local community, particularly in the winter months as playing fields struggle to drain meaning trainings can continue on the courts.

Lighting provision is critical for netball as a winter code but also supports the multiuse from other codes such as football who have a shortfall in field lighting provision and often use the hard courts for junior trainings and games.

The lighting also allows for tennis to have competition play however there are currently a number of lamps no longer working meaning vision is of poor quality for game play.

Lease with Kolmar Charitable Trust expires 30 November 2030.

$27,140 to support lighting renewals

High

New project

Community grant recommendations

29.    Following the analysis of live and eligible priority projects, the recommended community-led projects grants are summarised in the table below.

Table 3: Grant recommendations 2023/2024

Recipient / Project reference

Purpose

Recommendation

East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club

#21

To support tennis court lighting renewals for East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club

$22,860

 

Papatoetoe Rangers Netball Club & Papatoetoe Tennis Club (Kolmar Charitable Trust)

#33

To support netball court and tennis court renewals for Papatoetoe Rangers Netball Club and Papatoetoe Tennis Club

$27,140

East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated

30.    Investment to renew the lighting would provide a significant provision addition allowing for night games which are currently not able to be hosted at the club.

31.    The club serves a large geographic catchment with Tennis Auckland identifying the facility as having potential for growth if supported by fit-for-purpose infrastructure.

32.    The recommended investment provides good leverage outcomes with external funding already committed making the percentage of council investment 48 per cent.

33.    As a renewals project, all core infrastructure is already in place meaning the project can be delivered in a relatively short timeframe with no preparatory work or consenting required.

Papatoetoe Rangers Netball Club & Papatoetoe Tennis Club

34.    The existing lights are operating at around 50 per cent, with a number of bulbs no longer functional.

35.    The tennis club are now operating all year round and are also therefore restricted to play in daylight hours only meaning uptake is limited given the space available.

36.    There are eight existing poles with the cabling infrastructure which can be reused in the upgrade from the existing lights to LED lighting.

37.    The conversion to LED lighting means a sizeable reduction in energy use, around 75 per cent less than traditional metal halide lights. LED lighting is widely considered to be the best type of lighting for tennis courts due to advancements in technology meaning brighter, more efficient and uniform lighting of courts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.    The purpose of funding for both projects is to renew court lighting utilising existing poles and cabling.

39.    The conversion of halogen lamps to LED lamps will provide a greater quality of lighting as well as being more energy efficient.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.    The grant recipients have existing community ground leases with council which contain responsibilities and annual reporting requirements which will remain in place irrespective of funding agreements.

41.    The lights and associated infrastructure are owned by the community groups and as such council has no obligations for the maintenance or future renewals of the assets.

42.    The improvements remain inside the leased area and as such there are no impacts on the wider council group in undertaking this renewals work.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.    On 3 October 2023, grant recommendations were workshopped with the local board where elected members provided direction in support of the proposed grants.

44.    The projects recommended for support provide significant local participation and social outcomes across a broad range of ages and ability levels.

45.    Investment in these projects supports outcome four of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020-2023: Parks and facilities that meet our people's needs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.    Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board have the fourth largest Māori population when compared to all other Auckland local board areas, with 13,392 people identifying as Māori.

47.    Neither Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds or East Tāmaki Reserve are identified as sites of cultural significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.    This item has $50,000 LDI operational budget allocated for 2023/2024 as approved in the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme [ŌP/2023/116].

49.    The grant recommendations total $50,000 utilising the full budget allocation and as such there are no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.    The uncontestable nature of the funding coupled with the type of project recommended provides risks as outlined below.

Table 4: Risks and mitigations

Risks

Mitigations

Community groups who do not receive funding may feel aggrieved

The recommendations support priority projects identified within the plan. The projects have been independently assessed in alignment with council’s investment priorities for community sport.

Fundraising for the balance is not successful and the project does not proceed

Kolmar Charitable Trust are an established and widely respected community sport entity with a successful history in fundraising for projects in excess of a million dollars. The local board funding will not be able to be drawn down on until 110 per cent of the total project cost is secured. The balance of funding will be $52,860 plus a ten per cent/$8000 contingency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.    Should the board resolve to allocate the grants, staff will work with the grant recipients to set in place a funding agreement and project plan to achieve the desired outcomes. The funding agreement template that will be used has been approved by council’s legal team.

52.    A progress update will be provided within the process for implementation of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan in 2024/2025.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Sport & Active Recreation Facilities Plan.pdf

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kieran Nevey - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Pippa Sommerville - Manager Sport & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/14759

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.      All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed), grey (cancelled, deferred or merged) or a red status (behind delivery, significant risk).

4.      Of the 145 work lines within the agreed work programme, 139 are green, six activities are amber, and there are no projects with a grey or red status.

5.      The key activity updates from this period are:

·        Fresh Gallery hosted the opening of Āhua: Kōanga Rau Collective Exhibition (Operational expenditure for Fresh Gallery Ōtara (#321).

·        Funding will be allocated to address safety concerns in Hunters Corner, Ōtara Town Centre and Papatoetoe Town Centre (Safe and resilient communities (#328).

·        Two groups are being supported to assist diverse communities accessing funding resources (Capacity Building for Diverse Community Groups (#1235).

·        The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Volunteer celebration was held on 27 July 2023 (Volunteer recognition (#1252).

·        Twenty-two names have been received as part of the Te Kete Rukuruku programme and a hui tuku ingoa is being organsied (Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two (#700).

6.      The financial performance report compared to budget 2023/2024 is attached (Attachment B).

7.      Net operating performance for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is 7.4 per cent below budget for the year to date ended 30 September 2023. This is shown in operating expenditure being 7.6 per cent below budget, and operating revenue being 5 per cent below budget. Capital expenditure has achieved 27 per cent of budget spend for the quarter.

8.        The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

9.        Auckland Emergency Management has undertaken a change proposal process which has resulted in the Resilience team that formerly engaged with local boards being disestablished. Future work with local boards and communities will be delivered through a new planning team, which will eventually have seven Senior Planners, each working with three local boards.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2023.

b)      whakaae / approve the allocation of $54,758 within the Parks and Community Facilities work programme as outlined in Attachment C:

i.     Milton Park drainage (#43704) - $3,000

ii.    Omana Park accessway (#43706) - $12,300

iii.   Rangitoto playground pathway (#43707) - $9,300

iv.   Christchurch tree memorials (#43708) - $30,158.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        Local Governance

·        Auckland Emergency Management.

11.    The local board work programmes were not adopted until a month into the financial year due to uncertainty of local board funding in the development of the Annual Budget 2023/2024. Local board funding for 2023/2024 was agreed by the Governing Body at the end of May 2023 and required changes to planned work programmes, which were then approved in July 2023 (OP/2023/114, OP/2023/115 and OP/2023/116).

12.    The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.    Auckland Emergency Management Resilience staff members have continued to attend community meetings to provide feedback, subject matter expertise where required this quarter.

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

14.    The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

15.    The graph below shows the activity status of programmes in each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

16.    The majority of the work programme is 'in progress' since the adoption of the work programme in July 2023; the 'approved' status of these projects is a data entry error that will be addressed for the quarter two update. The update on the work that has taken places during this period for all programmes is included in the work programme update attachment (Attachment A).

Key activity updates

17.    Operational expenditure for Ōtara Music Arts Centre (#319): OMAC assisted and delivered 41 programmes across 199 sessions. There were a total of 13,230 participants and attendees.

18.    Operational expenditure for Fresh Gallery Ōtara (#321): Fresh hosted the opening of Āhua: Kōanga Rau Collective Exhibition. This collective group defines themselves as OTBIPOC (Queer, Trans, Black, Indigenous People of Colour) in Aotearoa, showcasing the work of queer and indigenous artists.

19.    Safe and resilient communities (#328): Funding will be allocated to Hunters Corner Business Association to address anti-social behaviour and alcohol and drug abuse within the town centre. Funding has also been allocated to Ōtara Action Network Committee to run up to 11 safety network meetings for Ōtara town centre and community, and to Level Up to deliver up to 11 safety network meetings for the Papatoetoe town centre and community.

20.    Capacity Building for Diverse Community Groups (#1235): Funds have gone to two groups (South East Auckland Senior Citizens Association (SEASCA) and Elei Community Trust) to assist diverse communities access funding resources. Both groups will have one session in English and will be open to everyone.

21.    Youth Economy (Youth Connections) (#1341): Ask Q has faced some challenges in recruiting for the live streaming/production programme. If this continues, staff will contact the local board in early 2024 to present an option to fund Brown Pride to deliver a youth enterprise programme for eight young people. Brown Pride is delivering this 10-week programme in other southern local board areas and has had interest from young people from Ōtara-Papatoetoe.

22.    Ecological and environmental volunteer programme (#660): 941 volunteer hours were recorded this quarter and 7928 plants were planted. A large planting event was run on 8 July with FIFA world cup at Puhinui Reserve where 5,100 plants were planted by 170 volunteers.

23.    Volunteer recognition (#1252): The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Volunteer celebration was held on 27 July 2023 with an attendance of 80 guests from the community and stakeholders.

24.    Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two (#700): Twenty-two names have been received. A hui tuku ingoa is scheduled for Tuesday 14 November when iwi will share their names with the local board.

Activities on hold

25.    The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        Papatoetoe Recreation Ground (Kingswood Reserve) - build an outdoor fitness station (#36406)

·        11R Birmingham Place - investigate options for the development of a new walkway (31557)

·        Kohuora Park - renew toilet and changing rooms (#26407).

26.    The programme: Kohuora Park - renew toilet and changing rooms (#26407) is noted as on hold, however the budget is for financial year 2025/2026, therefore there is not currently a risk to delivery.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is investing in a number of sustainability and environmental projects, particularly aimed at building awareness around individual carbon emissions and changing behaviour at a local level.

28.    Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

29.    Work programmes were approved in July 2023 and delivery is underway. Should any significant changes to projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.    When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.    This report informs the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board of the performance ending 30 September 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.    Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is committed to integrating and supporting work that contributes to outcomes for Māori. This includes seeking opportunities for collaboration and early engagement with mana whenua.

33.    The board collaborate with mana whenua on projects such as the Puhinui Reserve Plan, Manukau Sports Bowl development, Ngāti Ōtara Marae re-development, Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places), the Manukau Harbour Forum, Tāmaki Estuary Forum, and Matariki celebrations.

34.    The board fund several work programme items that have a significant Māori focus or outcome, including the Tuia programme and other Māori youth initiatives, Māori-led social and governance initiatives, and library programmes that celebrate te ao Māori.

35.    This year the board chose to fund a dedicated mana whenua engagement line to enable better and more effective engagement with mana whenua. In addition, the board is also funding an additional engagement budget to ensure better civic engagement from diverse communities, including youth and Māori.

36.    Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is also part of Ara Kōtui, a joint mana whenua and southern local boards initiative that explores and supports opportunities that enable mana whenua involvement in local board decision-making. Currently up to 12 mana whenua are involved in this initiative.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.    This report is provided to enable the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

 

Financial Performance

38.    Operating expenditure of $6.1 million is $461,000 (7 per cent) below budget.

39.    For ABS (Asset Based Services) operating expenditure underspend of $554,000, mostly from less parks facility maintenance for weeds and grass this quarter with continuing wet weather conditions making it difficult to access and maintain all facilities. 

40.    For LDI (Locally Driven Initiatives) operating expenditure, exceeding the budget by $102,000. This increase was primarily due to early funding of $87,000 for the Ōtara Waterways and Lakes Trust.

41.    Operating revenue of $891,000 is $48,000 lower than the budget, primarily due to reduced funding from the Ministry of Education, leading to a decrease in Early Childhood Education (ECE) revenue.

42.    Capital Expenditure of $2.33 million is 27 per cent of budget for the quarter.

43.    The financial report for the three months ended 30 September 2023 for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is attached (Attachment B).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.    The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

45.    While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

46.    Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.    The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two (December 2023).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board - 1 July – 30 September 2023 Work Programme Update

 

b

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board - Operating Performance Financial Summary Q1

 

c

LDI underspend and options for allocation memo

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Abbot - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Local board resolution responses, feedback and information report

File No.: CP2023/17797

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

Information reports for the local board

2.      The urgent decision for two applications for Local Community Grants discussed at the board business meeting on 17 October 2023 was made under the delegation of the Chair and Deputy Chair. The report is provided as Attachment A.

3.      The Pursuit of Excellence Awards Panel decision was made under the delegation of the Chair and Deputy Chair on 30 September 2023. The report is provided as Attachment B.

4.      The board provided feedback on the council submission on National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision Making, under the delegation of the Chair and Deputy Chair. The feedback is provided as Attachment C.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the urgent decision request for two applications for Local Community Grants, in Attachment A

i)          Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated (application no. LG2413-101) - $15,000

ii)         Papatoetoe Main Street Society Incorporated (application no. LG2413-135) - $30,000.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Pursuit of Excellence Awards Panel, in Attachment B

i)          Hans Thomas Aiono (application id. 2324OPEA07) - $1,000

ii)         Charles Miriau (application id. 2324OPEA07) - $1,000.

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the feedback into council submission on National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision Making, in Attachment C.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Local Community Grants, Urgent Decision

 

b

Memo - Pursuit of Excellence Awards Panel

 

c

Feedback into council submission on National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Record of Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2023/17582

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board record for the 24 October, 31 October, 7 November and 14 November 2023 workshops.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.      Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the workshop records for: 24 October, 31 October, 7 November and 14 November 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Notes - 24 October 2023

 

b

Workshop Notes - 31 October 2023

 

c

Workshop Notes - 7 November 2023

 

d

Workshop Notes - 14 November 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

21 November 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2023/17581

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.      To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.      The Hōtaka Kaupapa for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.      The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.      The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Hōtaka Kaupapa.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 



[1]The Airport to Botany Rapid Transport route is for future development of a fast, frequent, high capacity public transport a between Auckland Airport, Manukau and Botany. The project is part of the Southwest Gateway programme. The planning process through ‘notice of requirement’ are underway to protect the land which extends over part of the Sports Bowl site to the south and west.

[2] A designation under the Resource Management Act allows for land to be used for a particular public infrastructure project – in this case a transport route and associated stormwater uses.

[3] Asset Based Service