I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Whau Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 22 November 2023

1.00pm

Whau Local Board Office
31 Totara Avenue
New Lynn

 

Whau Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kay Thomas

 

Deputy Chairperson

Fasitua Amosa

 

Members

Ross Clow

 

 

Catherine Farmer

 

 

Sarah Paterson-Hamlin

 

 

Warren Piper

 

 

Susan Zhu

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Claire Bews

Democracy Advisor

 

15 November 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 021 540 216

Email: claire.bews@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation: The Trusts                               5

8.2     Deputation: Kai West Collective                6

8.3     Deputation: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints working with community                                                   7

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Whau Ward Councillor's update                         9

12        Approval of the concept design and location for the installation of a pou whenua / landpost near Rata Street bridge, New Lynn                   11

13        Whau Local and Multiboard Grants Round One 2023/2024 grant allocations                               17

14        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Whau Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024 25

15        Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group                                                                   31

16        Tāmaki Makaurau Streets for People – Onewherowhero (Kelston) Trials                      35

17        Te Ara Hauāuru - Northwest Rapid Transit     41

18        Reporting back decisions made under delegation                                                            47

19        Chair's Report - Kay Thomas                            49

20        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Programme                                                          51

21        Whau Local Board Workshop Records            53

22        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

Specifically, members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

 

The following are declared interests of elected members of the Whau Local Board:

 

Member

Organisation

Position

Kay Thomas

·       New Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau

·       Western Quilters

·       Citizens Advice Bureau
Waitākere Board

·       Literacy Waitākere

·       West Auckland Heritage Conference

·       Whau Wildlink Network

Volunteer

 

Member

Chair

 

Board member

Committee member

 

Member

Fasitua Amosa

·       Equity NZ

·       Massive Theatre Company

·       Avondale Business Association

Vice President

Board member

A family member is the Chair

Ross Clow

 

 

 

 

·       Portage Licensing Trust

·       Te Whau Coastal Walkway  Environmental Trust

·       Bay Olympic Sports Club

·       Forest and Bird Society

·       Waitākere Ranges Protection Society

·       New Lynn Heritage Protection Society

·       Trust Community foundation Limited

·       Karekare Surf Lifesaving Club

·       Libraries

Trustee

Patron

Life Member

Member

Member


Member

 

Trustee

Member

A family member is a Librarian

Catherine Farmer

·       Avondale-Waterview Historical Society

·       Blockhouse Bay Historical Society

·       Blockhouse Bay Bowls

·       Forest and Bird organisation

·       Grey Power

Member


Member

Patron

Member

Member

Sarah Paterson-Hamlin

·       New Zealand Down Syndrome Association

Employee

Warren Piper

·       New Lynn RSA

·       New Lynn Business Association

Associate member

Member

Susan Zhu

·       Chinese Women Association of New Zealand

·       Chinese Medicine Council of New Zealand

Member / Legal Advisor

Member / Deputy Chair

 

External Organisations

Lead

Alternate

The Avondale Business Association

Kay Thomas

Ross Clow

The Blockhouse Bay Business Association

Warren Piper

Sarah Paterson-Hamlin

The New Lynn Business Association

Warren Piper

Kay Thomas

The Rosebank Business Association

Warren Piper

Fasitua Amosa

The Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust

Ross Clow

Sarah Paterson-Hamlin

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Whau Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 25 October 2023, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Whau Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: The Trusts

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Allan Pollard (CEO of The Trusts), and Lynette Adams (General Manager Community Engagement), on behalf of The Trusts.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To discuss new business and community funding strategies with the Whau Local Board and talk about our aspirations working in this community.

3.       The Portage and Waitākere Licensing Trusts were formed in 1972. Together, these trusts are known in West Auckland as “The Trusts” and they have been given a mandate by community vote to sell alcohol through licenced retail stores and taverns. Surplus profit from these sales can be returned to the community in the form of grants and other support, and throughout their history, The Trusts have contributed funding to a wide range of community organisations, projects, events and activities in West Auckland.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the presentation and thank Allan Pollard and Lynette Adams on behalf of The Trusts for their attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Kai West Collective

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Michelle Blau (Fair Food), and Michele Eickstaedt (Healthy Families Waitākere), on behalf of Kai West Collective.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To introduce the Kai West Collective and update board members on the activities they have delivered in the past years and showcase their successful collective action that has been supporting food sovereignty and resilience, (Kai West 5 years report - link).

3.       Share next steps as a collective and how it can support actions towards the priorities highlight in the draft Local Board Plan.

4.       Discuss which board members can be nominated as key contacts, who might attend some of their meetings and events in 2024.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the presentation and thank Michelle Blau (Fair Food), and Michele Eickstaedt (Healthy Families Waitākere), on behalf of Kai West Collective for their attendance.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints working with community

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Johnson Mckay and Jasmin Hansen-Mckay, board members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To introduce the Church, our purpose and explore how we can work together to help our community thrive.

3.       Our Church in this area is a diverse group of around 1200 largely Māori and Pasifika peoples. We can come together to achieve outcomes for the communities we unitedly serve in areas such as:

·    Social issues that negatively affect individuals and families (addictions, violence).

·    Increasing economic resilience and preparedness, especially for our rising generation.

·    Support refugees in transitioning into our community.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the presentation and thank Johnson Mckay and Jasmin Hansen-Mckay, board members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints for their attendance.

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

Whau Ward Councillor's update

File No.: CP2023/17193

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from Whau Ward Councillor, Kerrin Leoni.

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Whau Ward Councillor to have an opportunity to update the Whau Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the report and thank Whau Ward Councillor Kerrin Leoni, for her update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Ward Councillor Kerrin Leoni - November Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Bews - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

Approval of the concept design and location for the installation of a pou whenua / landpost near Rata Street bridge, New Lynn

File No.: CP2023/17553

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the concept design and location for the installation of a pou whenua / landpost near the Rata Street bridge in New Lynn before progressing the project to detailed design and construction.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Whau – design and install pou whenua / landpost near Rata Street bridge project was initiated by a project team comprised of Community Development Arts and Culture; Auckland Transport; Whau Local Board Services; City Transformation; and the New Lynn Business Improvement District (BID).

3.       Main arterial road entrances were seen as priority locations for potential gateway elements to the western area of Auckland. The Rata Street Bridge was selected as the key priority location, a key gateway into New Lynn. The Whau River being a key geographical feature and a Taonga of Te Kawerau A Maki.

4.       The Whau Local Board has allocated $160,000 from State Highway 16/20 General Restoration Funds received from the New Zealand Transport Association (NZTA), towards the design and installation of a pou whenua / landpost near the Rata Street bridge which will provide a statement piece at this major road entrance to New Lynn.

5.       The project will deliver on the Whau Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 2: Māori aspirations are advanced and prioritised, and Māori history and identity are valued and reflected in our community spaces and was approved by the local board as part of the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services Work Programme (WH/2023/81).

6.       Through mana whenua consultation it was identified that Te Kawerau ā Maki will be the lead iwi on this pou whenua project. Four site locations were considered near the Whau Bridge. Te Kawerau ā Maki supports the pou whenua location Option 1.

7.       The location options were presented to the Whau Local Board at a workshop on 9 August 2023.  The local board provided informal feedback that location Option 1 would be the preferred location for the pou whenua / landpost.

8.       Haumi (NZ) Ltd. has provided a concept design for the Te Whau Pou Maumahara and Te Kawerau ā Maki supports the chosen pou element. The concept design was presented to the local board at a workshop on the 8 November 2023.  Staff seek approval from the local board of the design concept and location of the pou whenua / landpost.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whakaee / approve the concept design for the pou whenua / landpost near the Rata Street bridge in New Lynn as detailed in Attachment A to this agenda report

b)      whakaae / approve the location (Option 1) of the pou whenua / landpost at the Rata Street bridge, New Lynn.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       As part of the Whau Local Board financial year 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Capex Work Programme, the local board approved a project to design and install a pou whenua / landpost near Rata Street bridge in New Lynn. 

10.     Pou whenua are carved wooden posts that mark territorial boundaries or places of significance.

11.     At a local board workshop on 9 August 2023, staff presented four location options to be considered for the pou whenua / landpost to be located near Rata Street bridge.

12.     The local board indicated that location Option 1 and location Option 4 would be the preferred location for the pou whenua / landpost to be investigated. This was put forward to Auckland Transport for feedback.

13.     Auckland Transport has confirmed that either Option 1 or Option 4 would be a suitable location for the pou whenua / landpost and advised that there is no maximum restriction on height of the structure.

14.     A memorandum was sent to the local board on the 3 October 2023 prior to the workshop on the 11 October 2023. At the workshop the local board provided informal feedback supporting location Option 1. Te Kawerau ā Maki also supports the pou whenua / landpost location Option 1.

15.     Haumi (NZ) Ltd submitted a concept design for the Te Whau Pou Maumahara on 10 October 2023. The concept design was presented to the local board at a workshop on 8 November 2023. The Whau Local Board’s informal feedback was very positive.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Auckland Transport (AT) has replied to Auckland Council confirming that Option 1 would be a suitable location for the pou and advised that there is no maximum restriction on height of the structure. However, AT advised that all structures will be looked at on a case-by-case basis to ensure there is no interference with other road function, safety, or utilities.

17.     Auckland Transport’s preference would be location Option 1 due to better visibility as well as less constraints regarding underground services. The Whau Local Board provided informal feedback at its October 2023 workshop with Parks and Community Facilities that location Option 1 would be the preferred location. Te Kawerau ā Maki supports location Option 1.

18.     Staff recommend the approval of the location Option 1 shown in the image below.

19.     Haumi (NZ) Ltd submitted a concept design for the Te Whau Pou Maumahara on the 10 October 2023.

20.     Te Kawerau ā Maki and Ngati Whatua Orakei have selected the carver Pāpā James Rickard under Haumi Ltd., an experienced Master Carver to carve their narrative story of the pou. Due to the unique technical skill set and the experience required to undertake a pou carving, staff recommend following iwi direction on the design concept provided.

21.     The leading Principal Māori Advisor attended a workshop on 8 November to present the proposed concept design and the narrative of the pou whenua / landpost to the local board prior to the November business meeting. The Whau Local Board provided positive informal feedback on the concept design.

22.     Staff recommend the approval of the concept design provided by Haumi (NZ) Ltd.

An aerial view of a road

Description automatically generated

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

24.     Construction activities, including emissions from contractors, will likely result in increased carbon emissions.

25.     Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as much as possible when delivering the project.

26.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options (including sourcing materials locally) and the use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Where appropriate, subject matter expert advice has been sought from other departments of council relating to this project.

28.     This project was initiated through the collaboration of staff from Community Development Arts and Culture; Auckland Transport; Whau Local Board Services; City Transformation and the New Lynn BID Manager assisted in this work.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Parks and Community Facilities provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

30.     The proposed location options were discussed with the Whau Local Board at workshops held in August and October 2023. The local board provided positive informal feedback and supported the location Option 1.

31.     The projects are aligned with the following Whau Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective:

Table 1: Whau Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective

Outcome

Objective / Initiative

Outcome 2: Māori aspirations are advanced and prioritised, and Māori history and identity are valued and reflected in our community spaces.

The Whau embraces and celebrates its Māori heritage, culture, and people, and supports its Māori communities to thrive and realise their aspirations.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

33.     The project facilitates Māori to exercise kaitiakitanga by engaging mana whenua in providing advice on Mātauranga Māori (knowledge and information that demonstrates a Māori worldview, an expression or outcomes that reflect Māori customs, values, and knowledge) which informs the project design and improved environmental outcomes.

34.     The project contributes to increased public awareness and engagement with the landscape of Wai Te Whau and the awa. It expresses Māori cultural values by acknowledging the relationship of mana whenua with the awa and the Te Rewarewa through the pou whenua / landpost.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     A total budget of $160,000 has been approved by the local board for this project in the following financial years:

Budget source

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Total ($)

NZTA State Highway 16/20 General Restoration Fund

$1,520

$12,285.87

$146,194.13

$160,000

 

36.     The NZTA State Highway 16/20 General Restoration Fund is a Specific Purpose Funding Allocation as mitigation for sale of land, occupation of land and inconvenience to residents.

37.     The costs for the design and installation of the pou whenua / landpost of either location option will remain within the local board’s budget envelopes for each year and will not substantially impact the approved project or the overall work programme.

38.     The estimated costs of design and carving of the pou whenua / landpost is $130,000, which is achievable within the currently allocated budget for the project, with some contingency.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     The following risks and mitigations have been identified.

 

Risks identified

Mitigation

Delays and redesign costs

 

Rejection or non-approval may necessitate significant design revisions, which can cause delays in the project timeline. This can increase project costs as the design process may need to be restarted or modified extensively.

Adapt to necessary design modifications to align with Whau Local Board regulations, Mana whenua input and community expectations.

Budget

 

Delays and redesigns can incur additional expenses, and the project may suffer from increased costs and reduced profitability. Investors and stakeholders may lose confidence in the project, leading to financial repercussions

Establish a contingency for potential delays, increased design costs, and financial consequences.

 

Flexibility in design can help avoid extensive delays and redesign costs.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The table below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. These estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step. Unforeseen delays in the required approvals and in the completion of the carving have the potential to delay completion of the project beyond the identified timeframe.  

Project phase

Planned completion timeframe

Once the concept design option is approved by the local board, the development of the detailed design can be progressed.

 

November – December 2023

Lodging of the Resource Consent Application and Encroachment Application

 

December 2023

Carving of the pou

 

January – March 2024

Installation of the pou

 

April – May 2024

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Concept design for a pou whenua / landpost (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Cynthia Delonge - Project Manager (Ops)

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

 

Whau Local and Multiboard Grants Round One 2023/2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2023/17367

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Whau Local Board with information on applications in 2023/2024 Whau Local Grants and Multiboard Grants Round One, and to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Whau Local Grants Round One 2023/2024 (Attachment A) and Multiboard Grants Round One 2023/2024 (Attachment B).

3.       The Whau Local Board adopted the Whau Local Grant Programme 2023/2024 on 26 July 2023. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board (Attachment C).

4.       The Whau Local Board originally set a total community grant budget of $82,500.00 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $10,014.84 was allocated to Quick Response Round One.

5.       This leaves a total of $72,485.16 to be allocated to two Local and two Multiboard grant rounds.

6.       Eighteen applications were received for the Local Grants Round One, requesting a total of $85,724.75. Fourteen applications were received for the Multiboard Grants Round One, requesting a total of $59,350.00.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in 2023/2024 Whau Local Grants Round One:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2421-101

Chinese Association of West Auckland

Community

Towards costumes, advertising, catering, and venue hire, and performers fee for the Celebration Christmas and New Year 2024 event at New Lynn Community Centre

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-102

Sargam School of Indian Music

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, sound and lighting, practice session venue hire, and workshop fees for the Music Extravaganza 2024 at Blockhouse Bay Community Centre

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-105

Gujarati Samaj New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire and cleaning, coach hire, and the costs of sports and cultural activities

$7,500.00

Ineligible

LG2421-109

Vaitupu Malietasi Congregation

Community

Towards the cost of catering

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-110

Auckland Table Tennis Association (Inc)

Sport and recreation

Towards tennis tables and salaries

$4,941.00

Eligible

LG2421-113

Afghan Family Services Charity NZ

Community

Towards stationary, venue hire, event costs, advertising, office expenses, and EB meeting and services

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-114

Auckland Refugee Council Inc

Community

Towards catering, transport, venue hire, gazebo, and garden supplies

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-115

The Kelston Visioning Project Trust

Community

Towards mentor salaries for the 'Ko au Ko Kerehana - I am Kelston' mentoring project

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-117

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards volunteer counsellor training and clinical supervision

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-118

Tread Lightly Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards contractor fees and towing costs

$4,800.00

Eligible

LG2421-120

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards facilitator fees and venue hire

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-121

Waitakere Brass Inc

Arts and culture

Towards utilities, affiliation fees, administrative costs, PA hire, truck hire, portaloos, photocopier, insurance, and rent

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-122

Mainly Music New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards wages, travel, and rental costs

$4,453.75

Eligible

LG2421-123

NZ Pan African Broadcasting Corporation

Community

Towards catering, advertising, event registration, and entertainment/wellbeing support costs (artist fee and instrument hire)

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-124

PIPANZ Trust

Arts and culture

Towards cover venue hire, advertising, facilitator, transport, and catering

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-126

The Helping Paws Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards the cost of desexing cats in the Whau local board area

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2421-127

Auckland Bonsai/Penjing Art Centre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, materials, and lecturer fee

$3,110.00

Eligible

LG2421-128

New Zealand Blue Light Ventures Inc

Community

Towards the cost of printing 1,120 StreetSmart handbooks

$3,920.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$85,724.75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in 2023/2024 Whau Multiboard Grants Round One:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-101

Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards uniforms for the Aotearoa Māori Rugby League inaugural tournament at Te Atatu South Park and Ngati Otara Park from 22 September 2024 to 27 October 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-111

Kila's Style Trust

Community

Towards venue hire of Nora Swann HQ in Burswood from (January 2024 - January 2025)

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-112

English Language Partners New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards stationery costs and petrol vouchers to run English lessons from 1 January 2024 to 31 December 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-123

Visionwest Community Trust

Community

Towards overall Christmas event costs in Glen Eden from 6 December 2023 to 23 December 2023

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-127

Seed 2 Harvest Trust

Community

Towards lease of 96 Swanson Road in Henderson (December 2023 - July 2023)

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-131

Disability Sport Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, MC, design costs, backdrop, banners, flags, flowers, trophies, and photographer for the Disability Sport Auckland 2023 Wards Dinner at Ellerslie Event Centre

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-135

Good Bitches Trust

Community

Towards cake boxes, flyers, staff cost, operational cost, promotional cost, volunteer training and recognition to deliver Baking It Better project in Auckland from 15 December 2023 to 30 November 2024

$2,100.00

Eligible

MB2324-136

Upside Youth Mentoring Aotearoa

Community

Toward a portion of wages of mentoring manager and three mentoring coordinators (December 2023 - November 2024)

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-139

Shine School of Confidence

Arts and culture

Towards speech and drama lessons including tuition fees, venue hire, and teaching resources at various community centers or local schools (January 2024 - December 2024)

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-146

Rainbow Youth Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of venue hire, marketing and promotion costs, food from countdown, tote bags, art supplies, koha for facilitators, Orange Sky annual subscription, and catering costs of meetings (November 2023 - December 2023)

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-151

Yoga Limited T/A Hot Yoga Works

Sport and recreation

Towards support due to hardship during COVID and Auckland rains (Auckland CBD August 2023 - December 2023)

$3,750.00

Ineligible

MB2324-154

We Are One

Community

Towards marquees for the stall and sound system for the Foods of the World event in Trust Arena (January 2024 - March 2024)

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-157

Te Pou Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards set build and design, lighting design, and actor fees for The Handlers production in Te Pou Theatre (May 2024 - July 2024)

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-159

Anxiety NZ Trust

Community

Towards wages to employ part time specialist community educator to work across Auckland (December 2023 - November 2024)

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$59,350.00

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       Auckland Council Community Grant Policy supports each local board to adopt a grant programme.

9.       The local board grant programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

10.     The Whau Local Board adopted its grant programme for 2023/2024 on 26 July 2023 (Attachment C) – resolution WH/2023/83. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the Council grant webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, Council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the Local Board Grant Programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grant Policy and the Local Board Grant Programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The Local Board Grant Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department provides input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grant programme has no identified impacts on Council-controlled Organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Whau Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the Whau Local Board Community Grant Programme.

17.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grant Policy states: “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

18.     A summary of each application received through Whau Local Grants Round One (refer Attachment A), and Multiboard Grants Round One 2023/2024 (refer Attachment B) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grant programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Ngā Mātārae has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

21.     The Whau Local Board originally set a total community grant budget of $82,500.00 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $10,014.84 was allocated to Quick Response Round One.

22.     This leaves a total of $72,485.16 to be allocated to two Local and two Multiboard grants rounds.

23.     Eighteen applications were received for the Local Grants Round One, requesting a total of $85,724.75. Fourteen applications were received for the Multiboard Grants Round One, requesting a total of $59,350.00.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grant Policy and the local board grant programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Whau Local Board allocation of funding, the grant staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2023/2024 Whau Local Grants Rounds One Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

2023/2024 Whau Multiboard Grants Round One Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

2023/2024 Whau Local Board Grants Programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Vincent Marshall - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report: Whau Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/16110

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Whau Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       Some key activity updates from this period are reflected in:

·        WP ID 666 – Community Nurseries (EcoMatters) Whau

·        WP ID 499 – Hub Services Whau

·        WP ID 1056 – Library Services Whau.

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery and form Attachment A of this report. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status.

5.        The financial performance report compared to budget 2023/2024 forms Attachment B of this report. Net operational financial performance of the local board is nine percent under budget for the three months ended September 2023. Operating expenditure of $4.3 million is under budget by nine percent and operating revenue of $73,000 is running at nine percent under planned budget levels to date. Capital expenditure is approximately 44 per cent below budget for the three months to September 2023 due to project delays mainly on Te Hono.

6.        The Whau Local Board has received Film Income of $3,261. At the 11 November workshop, the board provided informal direction that the fund be used for park openings.

7.        The Customer and Community Services capital expenditure budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

8.        Auckland Emergency Management (AEM) has undertaken a change proposal process which has resulted in the Resilience team that formerly engaged with Local Boards being disestablished. Future work with Local Boards and communities will be delivered through a new planning team, which will eventually have seven Senior Planners, each working with three local boards.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2023.

b)      allocate $3,261 Film Revenue to park openings in the 2023/2024 year.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Whau Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

10.     Customer and Community Services

11.     Infrastructure and Environmental Services

12.     The local board work programmes were not adopted until a month into the financial year due to uncertainty of local board funding in the development of the Annual Budget 2023/2024. Local board funding for 2023/2024 was agreed by the Governing Body at the end of May 2023 and required changes to planned work programmes, which were then approved in July 2023.

13.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

A graph with blue squares

Description automatically generated

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     AEM Resilience staff members have continued to attend community meetings to provide feedback, subject matter expertise where required this quarter. This has included supporting community activities that is attached to the work of Community Brokers that arose following the emergency events this year.

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green) and projects in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber).  There are no activities that have significant issues (red).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

A green circle with a yellow triangle

Description automatically generated 

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

A graph of a number of work

Description automatically generated

Key activity updates

14.     WP ID 666 – Community Nurseries (Eco Matters) Whau - In quarter one, 30 nursery sessions were conducted with 75 volunteers contributing a total of 200 volunteer hours to re-pot 5,500 plants. The nursery operations are being well-supported by both regular and one-off volunteers who learn native plant growing skills. A total of 2000 plants were delivered to community projects in the Whau local board area, including Friends of Bremmer Reserve and Holly Street Esplanade.

15.     WP ID 499 – Hub Services Whau - 800 people attended the Matariki market, and a Moon festival night market targeted to our local East Asian communities. Māori programming continues with weekly Kēmu and Korero extended to encompass the local Oaklynn school. Matariki programmes included a guided augmented-reality tour of the library following the nine whetū of the Matariki cluster. Children and youth programming remain extremely popular; IQRA local Muslim school had resumed fortnightly visits. Rangatahi poetry was celebrated with another published collection of local poems. The Really Really Free Shop runs monthly at the community centre where items can be gifted/exchanged, this event responds to a growing need to recycle and give life to unwanted items. This runs alongside a monthly repair shop. New Lynn Hub continues to support digital literacy with over 60 book a librarian sessions this quarter.

16.     WP ID 1056 – Library Services Whau - Libraries celebrated Matariki and treasure hunters during the July school holidays, with 530 attending programmes. Pre-school programme Wriggle and Rhyme sessions held at Avondale and Blockhouse Bay in this quarter had 554 attendees. At Avondale library, 15 adults attend the Textile Tuesday craft workshop every week. Science for everyone, a STEM workshop started recently for girls with 24 attendees attending this quarter. 34 Book a Librarian sessions were held covering topics ranging from using a smart phone, Google drive, Apps and Google photos. Art workshops and painting demonstrations were held at Blockhouse Bay including card making, introduction to Cricut machine, Zentangle drawing, and making a drawstring bag which attracted 60 learners.

17.     During the first quarter, there were highlights which, while not directly signalled in the work programme report, have a direct correlation to the Community Facilities and Connected Communities programmes.

·    The FIFA Women’s World Cup tournament, co-hosted by Australia and New Zealand, ran from 20 July to 20 August 2023 was a runaway success.  In Whau, Olympic Park served as base for the Women’s Philippines team, and as such, received FIFA funding toward upgrades.  The Philippines team was very complimentary of the facility.

·    Arthur Curry Reserve – the fence running along the play space received a boost of colour from the Tag Out Trust rendered mural depicting a tomato forest.  The design has embraced the sites history as one of the first commercial tomato growing locations in Auckland, this is also reflected in the play space design.

·    Eastdale Reserve Playground – renewal has been completed, all equipment installed, and planting undertaken. Safety surfacing allows for all abilities access to the basket swing and merry go round There is a new nature play trail and equipment that caters to a wider range of ages.

·    Kelston Community Hub- Thank you Appreciation Dinner on August 26 for community partners and volunteers in recognition of all the hard work that has gone into supporting the Kelston Community through the recent challenges.  New Lynn Memorial RSA generously provided the venue for the special night.

·    Tahurangi Crum Park playground was reopened with a celebratory family friendly sausage sizzle on 5 September.  The event was a collaboration between Whau Local Board and Programmed, the company that installed the project. The board enlisted the help of the Green Bay Community House to organize the afternoon.

·    We are Woven Avondale Street party delivered in collaboration with Eke Panuku, I Love Avondale and Auckland Transport on afternoon of Saturday, 29 September.  The free event culminated in cultures of dance, sound, food and soul.  Despite the weather was well received by the community.

Activities on hold  

18.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        WP ID 27863 - Whau - Te Tohu o Te Auaunga Implementation. The Māori-centred content to appear on signage is yet to be agreed upon

·        WP ID 17819 - Blockhouse Bay Community Centre - renew car park. A fire engineer to be engaged to progress the Watercare relocation work. Detailed design has been completed and the project is to progress in the financial year 2024/2025 as part of the revised work programme

·        WP ID 24210 - Miranda Reserve - renew playground and associated park furniture.  On hold while Watercare carries out work on Central interceptor project on the site

·        WP ID 24382 - Olympic Park - renew velodrome. On hold while action plan being developed

·        WP ID 31990 - Gardner Reserve - toilet exterior wrap. Detailed design and public consultation completed.  Funding has been put on hold and Auckland Transport currently working its way through the processes to allow the Parks & Community Facilities department to complete this project

·        WP ID 23906 - Tahurangi Crum Park - install footpath on eastern side of practise field. Investigation and design to be undertaken in financial year 2023/2024.  However, physical works to commence in future years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

20.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This report informs the Whau Local Board of the performance for quarter one ending 30 September 2023 and the performance for the 2022/2023 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The Whau Local Board’s work programme continues to achieve Māori outcomes set in its local board plan.  Some Māori impact activities in quarter one include:

·    Te Kete Rukuruku – iwi working on full narrative for Tiakina/Sister Rene Shadbolt Park

·    Build Capacity community Leadership - The collaborative West Auckland Together, and West Auckland Māori leadership forums continued to meet and discussed ways to improve services in West Auckland. Both forums promoted the West local board plans consultations, to encourage the community to give feedback and to have a voice

·    In August, members and staff attended a West Wide Hui at Hoani Waititi Marae to listen to receive feedback to inform the Local Board Plans

·    Blockhouse Bay Community Centre celebrated Matariki with free Whanau movie night and kai

·    The Hubs and Libraries across the Whau delivered well attended activations, for example Matariki markets, Kemu and Korero classes.

·    Staff met with the Kaiwhakaawe to progress the work programme plans for this business year and support towards finalising the citizenship ceremony at Hoani Waititi marae to be held in October.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report is provided to enable Whau Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

 

25.     Operating expenditure overall of $4.3 million is nine percent under budget. Asset Based Services operating expenditure is $282,000 under budget. This is primarily due to lower allocation of depreciation planned on assets. Locally Driven Initiatives operating expenditure is $129,000 under budget due a number of programmes behind anticipated schedule.

26.     Operating revenue of $73,000 is $7,000 below budget. The shortfall is mainly due to lower venue hire at New Lynn and Avondale Community centres and lower property lease rental than planned.

27.     Capital Expenditure of $527,000 is below budget by $412,000 (44 per cent) year to date. The underspend to date was mainly due to delays mainly on Te Hono in relation to funding issues.

28.     The financial report for the three months ended September 2023 for the Whau local board area is in Attachment B.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A. Whau Local Board Q1 Work Programme report (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Attachment B. Whau Local Board Q1 Financial Performance report (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Antonina Georgetti - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group

File No.: CP2023/16378

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Play Leadership Group for elected members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have included play advocacy projects in their 2023/2024 work programmes and are seeking opportunities to increase play diversity within their parts of the region.

3.       The council’s play advocacy advisor has established a staff network of play champions to support the ongoing development and promotion of play opportunities. When the Play Advisory Group was promoted on the council’s Kotahi intranet in 2022, some elected members asked to participate.

4.       To further support local board play advocacy activities and to respond to the appetite for increased play participation from some elected members, a Play Leadership Group is proposed. This will be a version of the staff play network, except just for elected members.

5.       As the terms of reference in Attachment A confirm, the Play Leadership Group will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision of the group will be “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

6.       The Play Leadership Group will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about play in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for play within their local boards, and to provide informal guidance to relevant staff on play issues.

7.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

8.       Staff recommend a quarterly meeting schedule for the Play Leadership Group. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes from the meetings.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Play Leadership Group.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Auckland Council employed its first play advocacy advisor in September 2022. The role leads advocacy work in the area of play at Auckland Council and advocates for and influences the consideration, empowerment, enablement and equitable promotion of play.

10.     Play advocacy is an initiative in 17 local board work programmes for the 2023/2024 financial year. Three local boards do not have capacity to include play advocacy in their work programmes for 2023/2024, but have asked for ad-hoc advocacy support and will consider including play advocacy in their 2024/2025 work programmes.

11.     The play advocacy advisor has a responsibility to establish a network of play champions within council, to increase knowledge and awareness of play across the council group. The advisor established a Play Advisory Group in 2022 which has grown to include 45 play champions from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, and other organisations affiliated with the council, including Auckland Zoo, Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand Maritime Museum, and Stardome Observatory and Planetarium.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local boards have embraced the play advocacy approach and indicated interest to explore how they can increase play diversity for their communities and achieve play outcomes through different projects.

13.     After several local board workshops, elected members showed a strong personal interest in play. There are high levels of enthusiasm for play discussions and a keen interest in understanding more about how to promote play.

14.     In November 2022 the council’s Kotahi intranet published a story about play advocacy and publicised the staff Play Advisory Group. Some elected members contacted the play advocacy advisor and asked if they could join the group. However, the group’s terms of reference restrict membership to staff only.

15.     During workshops with local boards in 2023, the play advocacy advisor sought guidance from elected members regarding their appetite for participating in an equivalent special interest group for elected members with a strong interest in play.

16.     In response to local boards’ interest, the play advocacy advisor has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of a Play Leadership Group, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·        learn more about play

·        share relevant knowledge with other elected members

·        improve connections between participants at a governance level

·        encourage collaboration between local boards to support play outcomes

·        increase knowledge and understanding of play equity issues

·        provide informal guidance to staff as the play advocacy work area grows

·        share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

17.     The vision of the Play Leadership Group is “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

18.     Participation in the Play Leadership Group is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint elected members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes of the group’s meetings.

19.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

20.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Play Leadership Group and provides further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet four times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed by the participating elected members.

 

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The formation and operation of the Play Leadership Group has no climate impact.

22.     The continued advocacy to support play as ‘an everywhere activity’ supports positive climate outcomes by encouraging the community to embrace local suburbs as sites for play. This approach will reduce the need to drive to reach playgrounds.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Play Leadership Group will be administered by staff from the council’s Active Communities team, with support from kaimahi in the Regional Services and Strategy and Parks and Community Facilities departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The play advocacy advisor has presented at 20 local boards between March and October 2023.

25.     Local boards have expressed interest in the formation of a governance-level group for elected members who are interested in play. One local board requested that the opportunity to participate was presented in a business report, to enable participation to be formally agreed by the board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Play Leadership Group will provide play leaders with opportunities to learn more about Māori values relevant to play, Sport New Zealand’s bicultural play plan and its relevance to the development of play activities nationwide, and current and potential Māori play opportunities. This includes opportunities to develop and install māra hūpara in local parks and reserves, and the potential for projects such as Te Kete Rukuruku to generate play outcomes.

27.     The play leaders could also provide a mechanism for regional iwi engagement regarding play on a relatively informal basis, enabling mana whenua to share their views about play on an ongoing basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The Play Leadership Group will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that elected members could become members of the Play Leadership Group with expectations that they will be able to influence broader play investment or make decisions affecting play at a regional level.

30.     The terms of reference are intended to mitigate the risk of misunderstandings by making clear the scope of the Play Leadership Group. This will ensure participants become involved with a realistic expectation of what can be achieved through their membership.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Play Leadership Group will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

32.     An initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Play Leadership Group (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacquelyn Collins – Play Advocacy Advisor, Active Communities

Authorisers

Pippa Sommerville - Manager Sport & Recreation

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

Tāmaki Makaurau Streets for People – Onewherowhero (Kelston) Trials

File No.: CP2023/17811

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks endorsement from the Whau Local Board to progress the Streets for People Onewherowhero (Kelston) projects to implementation, and monitoring and evaluation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport (AT) is progressing trial projects in Onewherowhero (Kelston) and Māngere through the Waka Kotahi ‘Streets for People’ programme. These projects aim to use new ways of working with local communities and stakeholders to inform, design, build, adapt, and activate infrastructure that get more people walking and cycling.

3.       In Onewherowhero (Kelston), AT has partnered with the schools in the Kelston cluster to investigate, design, communicate, deliver, and evaluate on-street trial changes, off-street infrastructure, events and programmes to improve the street environment and encourage behaviour change and mode shift.

4.       The project team has completed a series of collaborative design workshops with local students and staff to help design the trial street changes. We are working with schools and local organisations to gather data, create artwork, and encourage mode shift.

5.       Our ongoing partnerships with local people and project oversight by the local board and mana whenua is integral to the project’s success. AT is ready to move the trial project from the ‘collaborative design’ phase into ‘implementation’ and seek endorsement of the Streets for People process from the Whau Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the authentic approach to community collaboration and engagement taken by the Auckland Transport Streets for People team.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the trial timeline and commitment from Auckland Transport to report back to the local board on measures of success that will influence the decision to transition to a final solution – making the trial permanent with any required changes, or removing some, or all the project.

c)       ohia / endorse Auckland Transport moving to the next phase of the Streets for People trial project which includes implementation, adaptation, and monitoring and evaluation. Auckland Transport will continue to seek feedback to inform the project from local board, mana whenua, stakeholders and the community through this phase.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Through Streets for People, thirteen councils across Aotearoa are working on 19 projects that will make it safer, easier, and more attractive for people to walk, ride bikes or scooters and take public transport, and to improve road safety and routes to schools.

7.       The projects involve quick, low-cost, scalable improvements that help create safe, people-friendly spaces in their neighbourhoods. In Tāmaki Makaurau this is done through trial projects that inform permanent changes planned for the future. This approach to projects is called “adaptive urbanism”.

8.       These projects will contribute to safer and healthier communities where people have more options in how they travel, and where the transport system contributes to reducing emissions and our resilience to a changing climate. The projects also allow AT to use new ways of working with local people and stakeholders to influence the ‘business as usual’ approach going forward.

9.       Onewherowhero (Kelston) was selected as a location for Streets for People due to the significant investment proposed through the New Lynn Cycling Focus Area investment over the next six years. The Single Stage Business Case provides an opportunity to design and build permanent infrastructure for cycling based on relationships built and information gathered through the Streets for People trial.

10.     The Streets for People trial projects include intensive community collaboration and engagement; this opportunity to work together and collaborate on active mode outcomes in Onewherowhero (Kelston) achieves a key goal of the programme to collaborate with and empower local people to achieve positive change in their neighbourhoods.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Streets for People project chose to focus on the Kelston cluster of schools at the suggestion of community organisations in the area.  The project has provided an opportunity for Auckland Transport to build working relationships with the Kelston Schools cluster and community organisations including the Kelston Community Hub and Te Whau Pathway. These organisations will be critical to the success of longer-term cycling infrastructure and long-term behaviour change in the area.

12.     School students and leaders have been involved in a series of three collaborative design sessions, one-on-one or one-on-few meetings, artwork creation for the installation and baseline data collection.

13.     The St Leonards Road shops have been consulted about the installation of the “pop-up hub”.

14.     Mana whenua and the local board have had their own briefings at multiple stages of the project.

15.     This resolution seeks support from the local board to progress to the “Installation and refinement” phase of the project, but the opportunity for the board to be informed, contribute, guide, and shape the project continues right through to the decision on retention or removal at the end of June 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities. This project supports those outcomes.

17.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     This project is led by Auckland Transport, but the project areas – Onewherowhero (Kelston) and Māngere – and benefits were developed with input from Auckland Council and Eke Panuku.

19.     Local boards are key stakeholders and collaboration partners for the projects and Auckland Transport looks to use learnings from these projects to influence how we work with local boards on other transport projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The Project team has met with school leaders from the very start of the project to understand the challenges and opportunities from their points of view, and we have updated schools at concept design stage. Schools are very keen to support and promote active modes and safe travel outside their schools and supportive of the trial enabling students to take part in that process.

21.     In September, 4000 Kelston homes and businesses received postcards introducing the project.  We will ensure that we have directly communicated with any properties adjacent to the trial before distributing the next postcard announcing installation of the trial.

22.     We have spoken with the shop owners at St Leonards’ Road and provided sketches of the planned pop-up hub. They were in support of providing seating and shelter at this location.

23.     We have engaged closely with the local board throughout the project and the local board has expressed appreciation for the way we have involved stakeholders in the project design. 

24.     Several stakeholders have expressed concern about potential anti-social behaviour at the pop-up shelter, and we are working on our communication and engagement plans to address these concerns.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     We are working closely with Te Kawerau ā Maki on this project. There is an aligned kaupapa between the project and iwi by working with local people to guide the projects, but to also show how locals can be involved more widely and influence future strategy and investment in their community.

26.     The project team has also met with the AT North-West Hui where other mana whenua representatives agreed with Te Kawerau ā Maki taking a lead on mana whenua engagement for the project.  Mana whenua representatives endorsed the new project name gifted by Te Kawerau ā Maki:  Streets for People Onewherowhero (Kelston).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     These projects, including the activations, pump tracks, cycle parking and events are 90% funded by Waka Kotahi. Auckland Transport contributes the other 10% from active mode project budgets in the area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There are no risks identified with the local board endorsing this project.

29.     Any future risks and mitigations in planning and delivery of the project will be notified to the local board through regular meeting updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The projects are in the Pre-install phase where approvals are sought. With approvals provided, the project will move into the ‘Installation and refinement’ stage.

31.     Monitoring and evaluation will continue through the delivery of the project. The trial will officially end at the end of June 2024 where the evaluation report will recommend retention, changes, or removal of the trials.

32.     Local board will be involved in each of the stages going forward and have an opportunity to contribute to shaping the project on site, evaluation and the retention decision.

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Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Streets for People Onewherowhero (Kelston) Trial process & measures of success (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kit McLean, Technical Lead Streets for People Programme

Authorisers

Allyn Sims, Programme Manager, People-Powered Streets Programmes, Auckland Transport

 

 

 

 

 

Te Ara Hauāuru - Northwest Rapid Transit

File No.: CP2023/15176

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek views into rapid transit corridor investigations from Brigham Creek to the city centre alongside the Northwestern Motorway, State Highway 16.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and partners have re-commenced work on Northwest Rapid Transit (NWRT) with a Detailed Business Case (DBC).

3.       The purpose of the Northwest Rapid Transit project is to provide a fast, frequent and efficient rapid transport option to the northwest of Auckland, from Brigham Creek to the City Centre, alongside State Highway 16 (SH16).

a.  Note, Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth has developed a long-term Strategic Plan for the Northwest which includes a rapid transit corridor from Kumeū to a new interchange at Brigham Creek on SH16 which would connect to the Northwest Rapid Transit project.

A map with a blue line

Description automatically generated

4.       This mahi is being led by Waka Kotahi in partnership with Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua and other iwi partners, and in close collaboration with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport who, along with iwi representatives, have members on the project steering committee.

 

5.       The project area covers from Brigham Creek to the city centre along SH16 and includes providing:

a.   Rapid transit on a dedicated corridor – investigations will determine the best mode (bus or rail) and location for the corridor which could be along, or either side of, SH16

b.   Station locations, and facilities – such as seating, passenger information displays, CCTV, lighting and bike racks

c.   Access and connections to local bus services – we’re working with Auckland Transport to look at improvements to the supporting transport network (including feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling).

6.       The DBC process will confirm a recommended way forward for the project. The DBC will:

a.   confirm recommended mode and route for the NWRT, for an integrated rail, or independent bus solution

b.   confirm staging (and any triggers) of recommended options

c.   ensure affordable and stageable solutions are at the heart of what we are doing

d.   provide clarity on how this corridor interfaces with the wider rapid transit network and urban aspirations for the region

e.   provide a compelling investment case for the recommended option. 

7.       It’s important that we undertake a robust analysis of all the potential bus and rail rapid transit options in order to deliver the best outcome for the Northwest.

8.       We have made progress on establishing and assessing a long list of potential rapid transit modes and alignments along the Northwestern Motorway (State Highway 16).

9.       We are currently carrying out more detailed investigations as we work to confirm an emerging short list of options. 

10.     We look forward to discussing the potential rapid transit options with you at local board workshops in the coming months, prior to the second phase of engagement early next year which will involve public consultation on the shortlisted options.

11.     The second phase of public engagement was initially planned to be in November-December this year. However, more time is needed to further our detailed investigations. Therefore, the second phase of engagement has been moved to early 2024, which will put us in a better position to have more informed discussions with stakeholders and communities.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on their position for the need for rapid transit in the Northwest

b)      whakarite / provide feedback on what Waka Kotahi and partners should consider as part of our investigations, including views on:

i)       access and connections on locals roads – i.e. feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling connections

ii)       issues on local roads that you feel need to be addressed for rapid transit on SH16 to work well

iii)      facilities or design features you would like to see at rapid transit stations (the ones along the motorway).

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     This project will be an important part of Auckland’s public transport infrastructure to facilitate growth in the Northwest, provide attractive and equitable transport choice, and encourage mode shift. This project will help to reduce reliance on private vehicles, thus helping to build more resilience in the network while contributing to a healthier transport system that protects the climate.

13.     The investment objectives of the project are:

a.   providing an attractive, equitable rapid transit service that improves access to social, cultural and economic opportunities and is well integrated with the current and future transport system

b.   a transport intervention that reduces Auckland’s carbon footprint

c.   supporting a compact urban form and enabling quality integrated communities.

14.     Te Kawerau ā Maki have gifted the name ‘Te Ara Hauāuru’ to the project. This name references the wind that blows from the west, a powerful force and story for the iwi. The west wind carries the voice and vision of the community of the west, and the path of connection between these communities and Tāmaki Makaurau.   

15.     Waka Kotahi is incredibly grateful to Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua and other iwi partners for sharing their knowledge (mātauranga) of the land, waters and its peoples. We acknowledge their role as kaitiaki (guardians) with responsibility for the protection of te taiao (environment) and taonga tuku iho (heritage).

Why improvements are needed

16.     The Northwest is growing with more houses, more jobs, and more people needing to travel. It’s anticipated that by 2051, the Northwest will have more than:

a.    100,000 extra people living in the Northwest

b.    40,000 new households

c.    increased congestion

d.    increased pressure on our public transport network.

17.     People living in the Northwest currently have limited public transport options and many rely heavily on their car:

a.    over 60 per cent of people living in the Northwest commute out of the area

b.    more travel to work by car than in any other region in Auckland.

Improving transport equity and wellbeing

18.     Improving transport equity in the Northwest is a key focus for this project.

19.     The Northwest is an area that’s long lacked viable public transport options. This has resulted in people relying on their cars – causing increasing congestion and carbon emissions. For many people, the lack of public transport choice has stopped them from accessing key essential services and participating in everyday activities.

20.     Providing a faster and more reliable public transport choices will transform the daily lives of many people in the Northwest for generations to come and help provide for a more vibrant and better-connected community.

More sustainable transport choice

21.     More transport choice and reducing reliance on private vehicles can help build more resilience in our networks, contribute towards a healthier, safer transport system and reliably get everyone where they need to go in a way that also helps to protect the climate.

22.     The contributions we make today towards a more sustainable future will add up to help form a healthier and safer future for us all.

23.     Better transport options will also help the Government and Aotearoa New Zealand’s commitment to reaching net zero emissions by 2050.

24.     This project will align with the Government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP), which describes how we are going to meet emissions budgets and make progress towards meeting the 2050 target. This includes reduced carbon emissions, reduced embodied carbon emissions and ways to build resilience in the transport network.

Scope

Mode and route 

25.     Confirmation of the final mode (bus or rail) is required for the Detailed Business Case, and this must consider any potential future development and potential mode switch as continued growth occurs along the corridor. Transport demand for various scenarios of the wider rapid transit network will also be assessed, including a NWRT-only scenario.

26.     It’s important that we undertake a robust analysis of all the potential bus and rail rapid transit options in order to deliver the best outcome for the Northwest.

27.     A previous investigation, as part of the Indicative Business Case, looked at the Westgate to Newton Road section of the Northwestern Motorway and recommended bus as the preferred mode.

28.     However, those investigations didn’t include the city centre components of the journey, from Newton Road to downtown, where the most critical constraints are. Previous work was also undertaken five years ago, so it is important to reflect any changes that have occurred since then such as further development of other rapid transit projects in Auckland as well as more recent city centre planning by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

29.     This means we need to undertake some further technical work to confirm the best mode for the corridor, as part of developing a Detailed Business Case for the project.

30.     The recommended mode will be determined based on a number of factors, including consideration of:

a.   demand

b.   capacity

c.   journey times

d.   how long the solution will continue to operate effectively, and potential for it to be upgraded

e.   engineering factors

f.    cost and value for money

g.   land acquisition

h.   integration and staging the delivery of the wider rapid transit network

i.    as well as other detailed analysis (e.g. environmental impacts).

31.     The overall route alignment and station placements along the NWRT corridor will be assessed with consideration to respective urban hubs and business developments, as well as key local feeder bus routes that will need to be established to support the project outcomes. 

32.     We will share the outcomes of our investigations into mode and route as the Detailed Business Case progresses.

Integration with the local network

33.     The success of a rapid transit solution along SH16 will be dependent on reliable walking, cycling and bus journeys on local roads connecting to stations along the motorway.

34.     The scope of this project includes access and connections to local bus services – we’re working with Auckland Transport to look at improvements to the supporting transport network (including feeder bus services and facilities, walking and cycling).

Integration with the wider rapid transit network

35.     This project will provide connections to the growing rapid transit network and make Tāmaki Makaurau a better place to live, while at the same time moving us towards a healthier transport network.

36.     As part of this project, we’re taking a whole of network approach and working closely with the Wāitemata Harbour Connections, Auckland Light Rail and Te Tupu Ngātahi – Supporting Growth.

37.     Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth has developed a long-term Strategic Plan for the Northwest which includes a rapid transit corridor from Kumeū to a new interchange at Brigham Creek on SH16 which would connect to the Northwest Rapid Transit project.

38.     Further planning work on NWRT will integrate wider strategic planning including the Auckland Plan 2050 and the Auckland Rapid Transit Plan.

Community engagement

39.     The first phase of community engagement ran from 24 August to 24 September 2023 and nearly 4000 people completed our engagement survey.

40.     We are currently analysing what we’ve heard from communities. When a report is ready, we will send you a high-level summary of the community feedback with some local board specific findings.  We are aiming to share this with you in November 2023.

41.     The aim of the first phase was to let people know about the project and ask some high-level questions about their experiences and what they think we should consider as part of our investigations.

42.     The second phase of community engagement is scheduled for early 2024 (March TBC) and will involve consultation on the emerging shortlist.

43.     The first phase of engagement involved workshops with 11 local boards (presentation available Attachment B). We are very grateful for your time and inputs, some of the key things we heard in workshops with you included:

a.   support of the need for rapid transit to the Northwest and better public transport options to support urban growth

b.   the importance of improvements to local roads feeding into rapid transit stations on the motorway, and making it easy for people to transfer between services

c.   integration with the rapid transit network

d.   support for active modes and the ability to take bikes/scooters on public transport

e.   the importance of consulting widely and selling the vision for the project and its benefits

f.    the need for better public transport options further north to Kumeu and Huapai

g.   the need for better public transport connections to the North Shore along SH18

h.   the need to find ways to speed up delivery timeframes and consideration of staging options

i.    the ability to retrofit a bus solution to light-rail in the future

j.    park and ride facilities at Brigham Creek.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     We have made progress on establishing and assessing a long list of potential rapid transit modes and alignments along the Northwestern Motorway (State Highway 16).

45.     We are currently carrying out more detailed investigations as we work to confirm an emerging short list of options. 

46.     Any feedback you provide now will feed into the investigation work currently underway. Your formal submission will be considered alongside the stakeholder and community views heard through the first phase of engagement which saw nearly 4000 people complete our survey.

47.     We intend to publish a public feedback report (which will include local board feedback) before the end of the year.

48.     We look forward to discussing the potential rapid transit options with you at local board workshops in the coming months, prior to the second phase of engagement early next year which will involve public consultation on the shortlisted options.

49.     The second phase of public engagement was initially planned to be in November-December this year. However, more time is needed to further our detailed investigations. Therefore, the second phase of engagement has been moved to early 2024, which will put us in a better position to have more informed discussions with stakeholders and communities.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo to local boards 26 July 2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Local board workshop presentation (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

Reporting back decisions made under delegation

File No.: CP2023/16665

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report back decisions of the Whau Local Board made under delegation to provide feedback to inform Auckland Council submissions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 7 December 2022, the Whau Local Board resolved (resolution number WH/2022/128) as follows:

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to the Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils.

b)      note that the local board can continue to use its urgent decision process to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, if the Chair chooses not to exercise the delegation sought in recommendation (a).

c)      note that this delegation will only be exercised where the timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting.

d)      note all local input approved and submitted for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission is to be included on the next local board meeting agenda for the public record.

3.       On 26 October 2023, the Chairperson signed off under delegation feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on Managing the use and development of highly productive land.

4.       This feedback is appended as Attachment A. More information is available regarding this central government consultation on the Ministry for the Environment website.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the decision made under delegation on 26 October 2023 providing feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on Managing the use and development of highly productive land.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board feedback of 26 October on Managing the use and development of highly productive land (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda Tang - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

Chair's Report - Kay Thomas

 

File No.: CP2023/15887

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings, and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive Chair Kay Thomas’ November 2023 report.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair Kay Thomas - November 2023 Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Claire Bews - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Programme

 

File No.: CP2023/15888

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Whau Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Whau Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly and reported to business meetings.

3.       The calendar is part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Programme for November 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Work Programme - November 2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Claire Bews - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

22 November 2023

 

 

Whau Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2023/15889

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops held by the Whau Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshops were as follows:

11 October 2023

1.      Parks and Community Facilities Update

2.      Whau Arts Brokers - Reporting

3.      Auckland Transport Monthly Update

4.      Auckland Transport - Maioro – Tiverton T2 Lane  

5.      Auckland Transport - Local Board Transport Capital Fund

6.      Auckland Transport - Rail Network Rebuild Stage 3

7.      Regional Crime Prevention Fund

8.      Local Board Plan Finalised.

 

18 October 2023

1.      EcoMatters work program update

2.      Whau Quick Response Grants - Round One

3.      Local Board Feedback - regional matters / central government submissions

4.      LB Annual Planning workshop 2 - LBWP and LBA consultation direction setting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)   tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the records of the workshops held on 11 and 18 October 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board workshop records for 11 and 18 October 2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Bews - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager