I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Albert-Eden Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 November 2023

10.00am

Albert-Eden Local Board Office
114 Dominion Road
Mt Eden

 

Albert-Eden Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Margi Watson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kendyl Smith

 

Members

José Fowler

 

 

Julia Maskill

 

 

Christina Robertson

 

 

Liv Roe

 

 

Rex Smith

 

 

Jack Tan

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

 

16 November 2023

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21 809 149

Email: michael.mendoza@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Stacey Mowbray – Headway – Brain Injury Auckland               5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              6

11        Point Chevalier library and community service provision                                       9

12        Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024 grant allocations                25

13        Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                                         41

14        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024                                                                                                                      49

15        Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group                                             97

16        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                           105

17        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                115

18        Board Members' Reports                                                                                          123

19        Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records                                                        125

20        Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                   135

21        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

22        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public        141

11        Point Chevalier library and community service provision

c.      Attachment C                                                                                                    141


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 26 October 2023, including the confidential section, as true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Albert-Eden Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Stacey Mowbray – Headway – Brain Injury Auckland

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Stacey Mowbray – Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Headway – Brain Injury Auckland, to deliver a presentation during the Deputation segment of the business meeting.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Stacey Mowbray – Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Headway – Brain Injury Auckland, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation outlining an overview of Headway – Brain Injury Auckland and highlight some of the work that the group does, including the positive impacts brought about, in part thanks to the funding support provided by the Albert-Eden Local Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank Stacey Mowbray – Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Headway – Brain Injury Auckland, for her attendance and Deputation presentation highlighting some of the work that the group does, including the positive impacts brought about, in part thanks to the funding support provided by the Albert-Eden Local Board.

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Point Chevalier library and community service provision

File No.: CP2023/15855

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the four options recommended to improve the provision of library and community services in Point Chevalier as part of an Indicative Business Case.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       With the closing of the Point Chevalier Library in October 2023 as a result of water ingress issues and the Point Chevalier Community Centre not being fit-for-purpose to meet community needs, there is an opportunity to review the provision of library and community services in Point Chevalier.

3.       The Community Facilities Network Action Plan (2015) and Albert-Eden Local Board Plan (2017) had actions and objectives to improve the Point Chevalier Community Centre. The actions were to address fit-for-purpose issues and future population growth to encourage greater use of the facility by local groups.

4.       Based on this direction, a community needs assessment, focusing on community services in Point Chevalier, was received by the local board in September 2019 (resolution AE/2019/167).

5.       In line with Auckland Council’s strategic direction and consistent with the community needs assessment findings, it is recommended that the development of a community hub delivering integrated library and community services within a fit-for-purpose facility, be investigated as a long-term option.

6.       Funding a new community hub will be challenging in the current financial environment. Appropriate sources of funding will need to be investigated and confirmed. These include service property optimisation (using proceeds from the sale or redevelopment of assets, land or both towards the development of a community hub), a targeted rate and advocacy for inclusion in the long-term plan.

7.         Options for the provision of a community hub have been identified and assessed at a high level. These were workshopped with the local board in April, June and October 2023. The resulting short list of four options are centred around three locations:

·        Option 1 – remediate the existing Point Chevalier Library and Community Centre to the required standard to become fully operational and extend the asset life.

·        Option 2 – develop a community hub on the Point Chevalier Library site (1221 Great North Road). Investigate;

2a. redevelopment of the existing facility (including possible expansion)

2b. development of a new community hub as a standalone facility

2c. development of a new community hub within a mixed-use development.

·        Option 3 – develop a community hub on the Point Chevalier Community Centre/Learning at the Point site (18-20 Huia Road). Investigate

3a. development of a new community hub as a standalone facility

3b. development of a new community hub within a mixed-use development.

·        Option 4 - develop a community hub within a leased premises within Point Chevalier town centre.

8.       It is recommended that an Indicative Business Case be developed to investigate the four options and associated sources of funding. The results and recommendations will be presented to the local board in the first quarter of financial year 2024/25.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the development of an Indicative Business Case to investigate the feasibility of developing a community hub to deliver integrated library and community services in Point Chevalier.

b)      support the investigation of the following options:

i)        Option 1 - remediate the existing Point Chevalier Library and Point Chevalier Community Centre to the required standard to become fully operational and extend the asset life.

ii)       Option 2 (sub option 2a, 2b and 2c) - develop a community hub on the Point Chevalier Library site (1221 Great North Road) through redevelopment of the existing facility (including possible expansion), and development of a new community hub as a standalone facility and within a mixed-use development.

iii)      Option 3 (sub option 3a and 3b) - develop a community hub on the Point Chevalier Community Centre/Learning at the Point site (18-20 Huia Road) through development of a new community hub as a standalone facility and within a mixed-use development.

iv)      Option 4 - develop a community hub within leased premises within Point Chevalier town centre.

c)      support the investigation of suitable forms of funding including:

i)        service property optimisation

ii)       a targeted rate

iii)      inclusion in the Long-term Plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Community Facilities Network Action Plan (2015) and Albert-Eden Local Board Plan (2017) had actions and objectives to improve the Point Chevalier Community Centre. The actions were to address fit-for-purpose issues and future population growth to encourage greater use of the facility by local groups.

10.     The Community Facilities Network Plan provides strategic direction for the community facilities portfolio. Its key drivers are to:

·        ensure existing facilities are fit-for-purpose

·        address gaps or duplication in provision and needs for community facilities 

·        meet future demand arising from population growth and changing user expectations.

11.     Based on the actions and objectives of the above plans, a community needs assessment was undertaken by a consultant in 2018/2019. The assessment considered current service provision, local community service requirements and implications for the Point Chevalier Community Centre.

12.     A report presenting the outcome of the assessment was received by the local board at its business meeting in September 2019 (resolution AE/2019/167). The key findings of the needs assessment are as follows:

·        current community needs are being met by a range of council and non-council providers in the Point Chevalier area. This is likely to change as a result of anticipated population growth

·        the Point Chevalier Community Centre has additional capacity to accommodate an increase in demand. However, the size and configuration of the rooms constrain use

·        there are other community facilities available for use in Point Chevalier

·        there is no major gap in indoor youth needs in the Point Chevalier area

·        future service requirements are dependent on an understanding of population growth and third-party activity, which are not yet clear.

13.     The needs assessment concluded that confirmation of future service requirements for the Point Chevalier Community Centre should be deferred until the relevant information is available.

14.     This was endorsed by the local board at the September 2019 business meeting. It is reflected in an action (#150) in the updated CFNP action plan (2022);

 “Monitor third-party development and growth within Point Chevalier to identify opportunities for improved community service provision”

15.     In October 2022, the library was closed as a result of health and safety concerns relating to water ingress issues. A temporary service has been established in the annex of the Point Chevalier Community Centre. An investigation is necessary to consider the best return on investment given the significant cost to rectify the library.

16.     The library closure has created the requirement to review the future provision and delivery of library services in Point Chevalier. This coincides with updated population growth and demographic information and a greater understanding of third-party development proposals within the area, which means the library and community service provision can be considered together. 

Property information is used to inform options

17.     The facilities in scope for the review of future service provision are the:

·        Point Chevalier Library (Library) located at 1221 Great North Road

·        Point Chevalier Community Centre (Community Centre) and adjoining Learning at the Point located at 18-20 Huia Road.

The Library

18.     Built in 1987, the Library is approximately 700m2. In addition to library services, various programmes and activities are provided. The building also has a small space for hire. Prior to its closure the overall level of customer satisfaction was 96 per cent.

19.     The property is 759m2 and held in three titles. One of the titles has underlying Crown ownership. This means that should the property be sold, some or all of the sale proceeds may not be able to be retained by Auckland Council but instead returned to the Crown.

20.     The property is also subject to the Reserves Act 1977, which means that should it be sold, the reserve status will need to be revoked. It is zoned ‘Business – Town Centre’ in the Auckland Unitary Plan. This zone provides for a wide range of activities including commercial, leisure, residential, tourist, cultural, community and civic services and has a building height limit of 18 metres.

21.     Adjoining the Library is a 561m2 civic space (3 Point Chevalier Road). This is zoned ‘Open Space – Informal Recreation’. This zone provides for a variety of outdoor informal recreation activities and community uses. This space has been used to support services delivered through the Library and Community Centre.

The Community Centre and Learning at the Point

22.     The Community Centre is a 450 m2 circa 1959 converted house. The Community Centre has a mixed operating model, both as a venue for hire service and programming space through Auckland Council’s Connected Communities team. It is also used by Plunket. Use of this facility has been significantly impacted over the last four years by the loss of the downstairs area due to Health and Safety issues, COVID 19 and the subsequent occupation of the annex by the library.

23.     The entire site is approximately 1,300m2 in size. The Community Centre occupies approximately half of the site. The remainder of the site is occupied by Learning at the Point, a not-for-profit community kindergarten who holds a community lease. It includes a small parking area in front of the building. The site is held in two titles and is zoned ‘Open Space – Community’. This zone accommodates community buildings and activities with a building height limit of 8 metres.

24.     The Community Centre is located adjacent to an Auckland Transport parking area approximately 3,200m2 in size, which services the local shopping centre.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

25.     In line with Auckland Council’s strategic direction through the Community Facilities Network Plan and consistent with the community needs assessment findings, it is recommended that the development of a community hub in Point Chevalier be investigated as a long-term solution. A community hub would be designed to deliver integrated library and community services within a flexible, fit-for-purpose facility that can meet the needs of a growing and changing community.

26.   Recent community developments are providing evidence of the benefits of integrating services and designing facilities to meet the changing needs of the community. Examples include Te Manawa and Te Paataka Koorero O Takaanini.

27.   Funding the development of a new community hub will be challenging in the current financial environment. Sources of funding will need to be investigated and secured. This includes the assessment of service property optimisation (SPO) as a potential funding source by using proceeds from the sale or redevelopment of assets, land or both.

28.   A long list of 14 options were identified and assessed by staff against criteria with input from the local board (refer to Attachment A for the full criteria and Attachment B for the assessment results). The assessment criteria are as follows:

·        ability to deliver services that meet community need

·        ability to be adaptable/flexible to meet changing community needs

·        supports integrated services

·        services are easy to find and well placed to serve the community

·        facilitates connections across diverse communities

·        delivers services to communities of greatest need

·        minimises our carbon footprint

·        tautoko Māori outcomes

·        contributes to urban regeneration

·        it is affordable

·        represents value for money.

29.   The results were workshopped with the local board in June 2023. The five short listed options were supported by the local board for further investigation.

30.   At a subsequent workshop with the local board in October 2023, three additional options were discussed:

·        remediation of the existing Library and Community Centre – with water ingress issues affecting both facilities, this option involves works to bring the facilities to the required standard to become fully operational and extend the asset life

·        inclusion of the Western Springs Garden Community Hall site – whilst located away from the town centre, there are a number of on-site benefits including the size of the site and access to parking and open space. It is also in proximity to other community facilities and local schools

·        a potential lease opportunity (refer Attachment C for further information).

31.  Of the seven options, the local board considered that two were not suitable and the remaining five options were simplified around three locations.

32.  The table below outlines the four options.

Table 1: Short listed options

Options

Description

1. Remediate the existing Library and Community Centre

Undertake comprehensive remediation works to ensure the facilities are at an appropriate standard to return to full operation and extend the asset life.

2. Develop a community hub on the Library site

2a. Redevelop the Library building into a community hub to accommodate library and community services;

•     address water tightness issues (e.g. roof and joinery replacement, internal refurbishment)

•     internal reconfiguration and building expansion (potential to use some of the adjoining site at 3 Point Chevalier Road).

2b. Develop a new fit-for-purpose community hub delivering integrated library and community services as a standalone facility.

2c. Develop a new fit-for-purpose community hub delivering integrated library and community services within a mixed-use development.

3. Develop a community hub on the Community Centre/Learning at the Point site

3a. Develop a new fit-for-purpose community hub delivering integrated library and community services as a standalone facility.

3b. Develop a new fit-for-purpose community hub delivering integrated library and community services within a mixed-use development.

The whole site will be required so the Community Centre and Learning at the Point will not be retained.

4. Develop a community hub within leased premises 

•   Develop a new fit-for-purpose community hub delivering integrated library and community services within leased premises within Point Chevalier town centre.

NOTE: The mixed-use development options would result in the community hub being located on the bottom floors of the building. The completed community facility and associated land will be retained in council ownership, while the airspace development rights will transfer to a selected development partner.

33.     The assessment process was informed by the following inputs:

·        Point Chevalier Community Needs Assessment

·        strategic alignment

·        network provision analyses

·        building and site related information

·        demographic, growth and communities of greatest need information

·        asset and high-level financial information

·        staff technical advice

·        community and library service trends.

34.     The key assumptions that informed the identification and assessment of the options are:

·        library and community services should continue to be provided for the Point Chevalier and Waterview communities

·        provide integrated library and community services (community hub)

·        preference is not to duplicate key community services delivered by other council and non-council providers

·        preference is for services to be centrally located

·        community hub to be split over no more than 2 -3 levels 

·        capacity for some onsite parking to support the diversity of those who use the services

·        preference is to have access to an adjoining open space

·        delivery of some library and community services does not need to be asset based.

35.     A summary of the pros and cons for options 1 to 3 is provided in the table below. Option 4 pros and cons are contained in Attachment C.

Table 2: Pros and cons for the short listed options

Option 1:  Remediate the existing Library and Community Centre

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

·   None identified

Strategic alignment

·    Low strategic alignment

Facility outcome

·   Community keeps the library building

·   Facilities are operational and life of asset is extended

Facility outcome

·    Fit-for-purpose issues remain 

·    Aging facilities

·    Limited opportunity to accommodate changing community needs and growth 

Service outcome

·   No change to service provision

·   Services are in an accessible, central location

Service outcome

·    Library and community services remain separate

·    The performance of the assets may continue to impact on use and user satisfaction

·    Service levels could decrease as parts of the facility reach life end and cannot be renewed

Value for investment

·   The facilities become fully operational with less financial outlay than other options

Value for investment

·    As the facilities continue to age, increasing investment for renewals will deliver decreasing value

·    The Library might be deemed no longer viable to operate

Option 2 (sub options 2a, 2b and 2c):  Develop a community hub at the Library site

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

·  High strategic alignment

Strategic alignment

·    None identified

Facility outcome

·   Opportunity to provide a fit-for-purpose, flexible, fully integrated facility that can accommodate changing community need and growth

 

Facility outcome

·    Site limitations – size and vehicle access, particularly for a mixed-use development

·    Redevelopment may be limited by existing building design and structure and may not be feasible

·    Perception that a standalone facility is preferable to mixed-use development

·    Possible limitations in design outcomes from mixed-use development

·    Construction impact on the adjoining civic space and businesses

Service outcome

·   Opportunity to deliver integrated services and review service provision to meet community need

·   Services are in an accessible, central, prominent location and adjacent to open space

·   Ability to support communities of greatest need

·   No disruption to current services during construction

Service outcome

·    Redevelopment limitations may impact ability to deliver required services

·    Located next to a busy intersection and there is no direct vehicle access

·    Community perception of loss of the Community Centre and Learning at the Point should the Community Centre site be sold

Value for investment

·   Cost savings (operational and renewals) can be realised by reducing assets

·   Opportunity to create a community heart within the town centre

·   Opportunity to minimise carbon footprint

Value for investment

·    Ability to fund – SPO is not anticipated to meet the full cost and additional sources of funding will need to be secured

·    Redevelopment of an aging facility, increasing investment for renewals will deliver decreasing value

·    Land status – part of the site has underlying Crown ownership

Option 3 (sub options 3a and 3b):  Develop a community hub at the Community Centre/Learning at the Point site

36.     Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

· High strategic alignment

Strategic alignment

·    None identified

Facility outcome

·    Opportunity to provide a fit-for-purpose, flexible, fully integrated facility that can accommodate changing community need and growth

·    Potential to accommodate some parking and open space

Facility outcome

·    Perception that a standalone facility is preferable to mixed-use development

·    Possible limitations in design outcomes from mixed-use development

Service outcome

·   Opportunity to deliver integrated services and review service provision to meet community need

·   Services are in an accessible and central location and adjacent to a parking area

·   Ability to support communities of greatest need

Service outcome

·    Disruption to current services during construction

·    Site is currently on the fringe of the current town centre

·    Community perception of loss of the Library building should the site be sold

·    Removal of Learning at the Point

Value for investment

·   Cost savings (operational and renewals) can be realised by reducing assets

·   Opportunity to create a community heart for the town centre

·   Opportunity to minimise carbon footprint

Value for investment

·    Ability to fund - SPO is not anticipated to meet the full cost and additional sources of funding will need to be secured

·    If the Library site is sold, there may be limited ability to control what will be built

·    Would require a zone change for mixed-use development

An Indicative Business Case to consider the options is recommended

36.    It is recommended that an Indicative Business Case (IBC) be developed for all four options to understand the merits of the proposed investment, strategic alignment and costs, and benefits to ensure there is a robust case for change. This process will involve working with and receiving input from key stakeholders. The IBC will recommend a preferred option.

37.     The key findings and preferred option will be workshopped with the local board followed by a business report. Further analysis of the local board’s preferred option will then be undertaken through a Detailed Business Case.

38.     Initial investigations indicate that all options will be financially challenging. SPO can be used to divest service properties, with the proceeds being reinvested to deliver improved community outcomes. However, this will only fund a portion of the costs of an integrated library and community facility (refer to the Financial Implications section of the report). Other sources of funding will be essential to realising a new community hub in Point Chevalier.

39.     More detailed analysis is required to understand the costs of remediating the existing buildings or building a new facility, and the potential sale proceeds of divesting service properties. It is anticipated this will involve valuation, engineering, architectural and quantity surveying input. This will be explored through the IBC.

40.     It should be noted that the delivery timeframe for each option will vary. In particular where reserve revocation and zone changes are required, which could be a minimum of two years for each.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     The recommendations in this report have no direct climate impact. The climate impacts of each option are likely to vary and will be assessed during further investigations through the IBC process. Climate impacts will be measured and mitigated to align with council’s Climate Action Plan.

42.     Long-term options and recommendations will likely reduce assets used to support local library and community services, leading to an overall reduction in emissions.

43.     Striving to maintain library and community services in the Point Chevalier town centre enables localism; the ability for local people to accomplish all they need to do within a walkable distance of home, therefore minimizing car and/or public transport journeys.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     The review of library and community services in Point Chevalier has involved input and specialist advice from across the council family, including Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Connected Communities, Parks and Community Facilities, Local Board Services and Regional Services and Strategy.

45.     Representatives from the same departments will contribute to the development of an IBC. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     It is important to ensure library and community services meet the needs of growing and changing communities. The Point Chevalier study area is projected to experience significant population growth and changing demographics. The Carrington residential development (Te Auaunga) will have a substantial influence on both these aspects.

47.     The Point Chevalier Community Needs Assessment was received by the local board at the September 2019 business meeting (resolution number AE/2019/167). At the meeting a resolution was passed requesting staff to report back with the updated data for customer satisfaction and population growth in the wider surrounding area. The local board also wished to understand the impact of wider third-party developments within the Point Chevalier area.

48.     Staff have maintained a watching brief on population growth and third-party developments, maintaining dialogue with Te Tūāpapa Kura Kāinga - Ministry of Housing and Urban Development, Kāinga Ora and Auckland Transport. Connected Communities have continued operational effort to make best use of the Community Centre to increase usage and to build relationships with other providers.

49.     Workshops were held with the local board in April, June and October 2023 to discuss the identification and assessment of emerging options to help inform investment opportunities.

50.     The local board has allocated decision making on the number of new local community facilities and their specific location, design, build and fit out within budget parameters set by the Governing Body. 

51.     This work aligns with the following key initiatives in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan (2023): 

·        Review our portfolio of buildings and consider reducing our asset footprint, so we have fewer but better-quality buildings, that are fit-for-purpose, well used and easily shared

·        Re-establish long-term library services in Pt Chevalier as the current building is closed due to significant water issues and the pop-up library is only temporary

·        Implement low carbon practices through capital projects when upgrading or developing our assets, e.g. minimising construction waste, investing in renewable and efficient energy and investigation of alternative water sources.

52.     The purpose of this report is to confirm local board support to progress the investigation of four options to improve service provision, supported by fit-for-purpose facilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

54.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

55.     In the 2018 census, 9 per cent of people living in the study area identified as Māori, compared to 7 per cent in the Albert-Eden Local Board area and 11.5 per cent in the Auckland region.

56.     Engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka will commence as part of the IBC.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     Funding of each of the options will be considered through the IBC.

58.     SPO is proposed as a partial capital funding opportunity. It is recommended that identified underutilised service properties in the Albert-Eden Local Board area are divested through SPO, with the proceeds being allocated towards the development of the community hub, in addition to alternative funding sources.

59.     The local board has delegated decision making responsibilities for disposal of local service property and re-investment of sale proceeds in accordance with the SPO approach (as adopted by the Governing Body).

60.     Table 3 in Attachment C, sets out the estimated gross cost of construction for each option, the indicative capital receipts from potential site sales and the estimated additional funding required for each option. Whole of life costs, and climate impact costs have not been referenced within the initial assessments. Option 2a allows for the expansion of the existing library to 1500m2 and options 2 and 3 provide for either the construction of a standalone facility or mixed-use development. The costs for options 2 and 3 are based on a feasibility assessment allowing for a 1,500m2 facility.

61.     The table includes indicative desktop valuations for the properties should they be optimised. Indicative valuations were undertaken on the assumption that, where necessary, successful plan changes and reserve revocations had been completed.

62.     The capital costs contained in Table 3 are indicative only and will be further developed as part of the IBC. It is anticipated that cost escalations and the changing financial environment would result in increases to these costs.

63.     Table 3 shows that SPO will only partly fund options 2 and 3 and additional sources of funding will need to be secured. Examples may include identifying additional service properties that are suitable for SPO, a targeted rate and advocacy for inclusion in the long-term plan. These will be considered through the IBC, including timeframes. This will include reviewing long term cost reductions should a property be divested.

64.     Ongoing operational costs will be developed through the IBC and inform recommendations to the local board.

65.     Through further investigations of Option 1 and 2a, the Library building may be confirmed as being no longer economically viable. On the basis of the desktop assessment in Table 3 it appears to be the more affordable option at this stage. The IBC will help test these assumptions and should be noted that more detailed assessment could confirm Option 1 and 2a are not economically viable.

66.     Development of the IBC will be led by Regional Services and Strategy. Eke Panuku will provide input on development and sales opportunities relating to SPO. The local board have allocated $20k towards development of the IBC. The remaining funding requirements will be accommodated through internal operational budgets. Subject to a preferred option being identified through the IBC and approved, all further costs will be capitalised against the project. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.     Risks and mitigations have been identified in the table below.

Table 4   Risks and Mitigations

Risks

Mitigations

Community concern about any change in service delivery and/or perception of loss of service (understanding what an ‘integrated facility’ is)

Development of a communications and engagement plan with the local board to support stakeholder, mana whenua and community understanding and engagement

Ability to fund

Through the IBC, development and operational costs and potential funding sources will be explored

Escalating development costs

Evidence from other development projects has shown a significant increase in construction costs. A contingency to address cost inflation will be included in IBC investigations

SPO relies on viable market conditions

SPO scenarios will be fully tested and include market awareness and demand, and sensitivity testing

If population growth rates exceed projections, demand for additional or larger facilities may result

Design adaptable and flexible spaces aimed at serving a changing population

The timeframe to deliver the community hub may not meet expectations and may take longer than anticipated

Development of a communication plan to share project timeframes for delivering the confirmed option and progress updates

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

68.     Subject to local board approval of the recommendations of this report, an IBC will be developed by Regional Services and Strategy, with input and support from Eke Panuku and council departments.

69.     It is anticipated that the IBC will take approximately six to eight months to complete.

70.     The IBC key findings and preferred option will be workshopped with the local board in the first quarter of the 2024/25 financial year, followed by a business report. Should the local board approve the preferred option, the next step is to undertake a Detailed Business Case

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A

21

b

Attachment B

23

c

Attachment C - Confidential

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sophie Bell - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2023/17691

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 22 June 2023 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

3.       This report presents applications received for the Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024 (Attachment B).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $51,600 was allocated in the previous grant round. This leaves a total of $88,900 to be allocated to two quick response and one local grants round.

5.       Thirty applications were received for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024, requesting a total of $74,025.55.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)       agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2401-102

Auckland Central community of Schools (ACCoS)-Auckland Normal Intermediate

Arts and culture

Towards stage hire, sound, filming, food truck hire, kai, and koha to hold an "Across Schools Kapa haka" event on 4 April 2024.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-113

A U K. DOODY

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of creating a guide on "What to expect when you're expecting to die", including the typist, telecommunication, administration, marketing, and delivery costs.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-114

Kelly Gilbride

Arts and culture

Towards the rehearsals and performances venue hire costs to deliver a five-month play reading series from 22 February to 12 July 2024.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-118

Tardigrade World Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of delivering a series of six workshops at the Waiorea Community Recycling Centre in Western Springs from 1 February to 31 July 2024, including the costs of workshop delivery, development, research and preparation, technical support, social media boost, online promotion and engagement, reporting and impact measurement, materials, and tools.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-119

Friends of Oakley (Te Auaunga) Creek Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the artist fee and materials for the installation of a mural along the Waterview Shared Path.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR2401-131

Auckland City Osteopaths Limited-Dexnfx Iain Dexter

Arts and culture

Towards drum hire, dance tutor, purchase of coconuts to giveaway, advertising, and cost to hire and install an 8-meter-long dome, including the cost of staff, event permit, ground screws, and health and safety documentation for an African drumming workshop inside the dome in Owairaka/Rocket park.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-134

Sidharth Pagad

Arts and culture

Towards the venue hire cost for a weekend workshop in West African drumming and dancing from 20 to 21 January 2024.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-136

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the facilitator fees, travel, administration, equipment, and resources to deliver 12 workshops in the Albert-Eden area.

$3,000.00

Ineligible

QR2401-105

New Zealand Nejashi Trust Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of delivering a free "School Holiday Programme", including venue hire, transport, program coordinator's wages, and swimming activity costs.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-106

Shager Ethiopian Entertainment NZ (SEENZ) Incorporated

Community

Towards the weekly workshop venue hire cost for the Ethio-Kiwi Kids programme from 2 December 2023 to 15 February 2024 held at the Wesley Primary School.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-107

Mt Albert Presbyterian Church

Community

Towards the purchase of a hot water tank for the Mt Albert Presbyterian Church Hall.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-108

The Mt Eden Methodist Church Charitable Trust

Community

Towards children's workshops and activities, food for volunteers, magic show, petting zoo, musicians, stationery, postage stamps, ponies, nano girl, printing, wecompost bins, and event management costs for the "Little Day Out" at Mt Eden Village Centre on 6 April 2024.

$2,500.00

Eligible

QR2401-109

Amhara and Amharan Families of Ethiopian Association in Auckland Inc

Community

Towards the dance tutor's wages, venue hire for rehearsals, and the final "Ethiopian Cultural event" to be held on 15 February 2024.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-112

Binary Kitchen & Signora

Community

Towards the cost of running the New Zealand Sign Language course.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-116

Communicare CMA (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the weekly venue hire cost of the Communicare Friendship Centres at Jack Dickey Community House in Greenlane from 30 January to 15 December 2024 and the coordinator's wages.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-122

Elder Care Volunteers

Community

Towards the cost of running the "Summer Student Companionship for Seniors" program for care home residents and students in the Albert-Eden local board area, specifically, the cost of "Volunteering Auckland" membership fee and printing, venue hire, transport, and catering for training, resources, transport cost for 60 volunteer sessions, and volunteer appreciation greeting cards and food.

$2,208.76

Eligible

QR2401-124

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the costs of the clinical triage support of the volunteer counsellors from 1 December 2023 to 30 June 2024.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-126

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards the operational cost to deliver a health and well-being program to 2,734 students from eight schools, including the purchase of stationery items.

$1,543.66

Eligible

QR2401-127

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards the venue hire, and the facilitators' costs to deliver the “Road Safety” programme for 305 youths from the Dilworth School, Mt Albert Grammar School, and Diocesan School for Girls.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-128

Aotearoa Resettled Community Coalition Incorporated

Community

Towards the delivery of an end-of-the-year event "Summer Block Party" on 16 December 2023, including the costs of venue hire, performers koha, cultural food, beverages, social media marketing, printing, volunteers koha, trophies, and prizes.

$2,952.65

Eligible

QR2401-133

The Brain Injury Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the installation of a gifted Glasshouse, purchase of gardening tools and garden mix.

$1,958.18

Ineligible

QR2401-135

The Little Family Foundation

Community

Towards the cost of delivering a series of fortnightly workshops for the "Morningside Waiata Club" from 16 January to 31 March 2024, including the costs of venue, Waite Lead's fee, and catering.

$2,500.00

Eligible

QR2401-101

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards the purchase and delivery of 326 native plants. 40 classroom recycling bins, courier tickets, and administrative costs associated with running the Paper4Trees program for the schools and preschools within the Albert-Eden local board area.

$2,982.30

Eligible

QR2401-121

Save Chamberlain Park Incorporated

Environment

Towards the purchase and delivery of 500 native seedlings, skip, and miscellaneous costs including stakes, tree protectors, and volunteer refreshments for the "Chamberlain Park Rock Forest Restoration Project".

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-115

The Diocese Of Auckland-Parish of St Andrews Epsom

Historic Heritage

Towards St Andrew’s Church Restoration project, specifically the cost of repair and restoration of the roof.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-104

Jeysson Broncales

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of three boxing bags.

$880.00

Eligible

QR2401-123

Mount Albert Croquet Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase and installation of a permanent pergola.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-125

Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of 168 softballs, 8 softball bats, and 20 softball helmets

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-129

Pt Chevalier Tennis & Squash Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase and installation of security cameras (closed-circuit television cameras).

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-130

Point Chevalier Bowling Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the materials, labour, and building costs of relocating the smokers' area and weatherproofing the entranceway of the Point Chevalier Bowling Club.

$3,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$74,025.55

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 22 June 2023 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

11.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $51,600 was allocated in the previous grant round. This leaves a total of $88,900 to be allocated to two quick response and one local grants round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Albert-Eden Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024 (Attachment B) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Thirteen applicants applying to Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $51,600 was allocated in the previous grant round. This leaves a total of $88,900 to be allocated to two quick response and one local grants round.

23.     Thirty applications were received for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024, requesting a total of $74,025.55.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Albert-Eden Local Board allocating funding for round one of the quick response grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024

33

b

Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2023/2024 - grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2023/17212

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Albert-Eden Local Board of the reduction to its local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) for the 2022-2025 political term.

2.       Approve the allocation of funding to projects the local board will deliver with a reduced budget.

3.       Set a priority order for currently unfunded but authorised LBTCF projects, setting local board expectations should any further budget become available.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) manages the Local Board Transport Capital Fund on behalf of the Albert-Eden Local Board.  AT provides quality advice to support local board decision-making. A decision relating to the allocation of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund is being sought.

5.       Due to budget pressures, the amount available in the LBTCF is now $29 million across all the local boards. This has been confirmed as seven million in FY2023/2024 and indicatively 15 million in the following two years. Albert-Eden Local Board’s share of the LBTCF budget in FY2023/2024 is now $1,707,546. An additional approved budget of $35,961 to cover current contractual commitments has now been added, to bring the local board’s LBTCF total to $1,743,507. This replaces the indicative budget of $2,607,106 discussed in the July 2023 Auckland Transport report.

6.       The reduction in the LBTCF reflects the pressure AT and its funding partners are under due to flood recovery work following the severe weather events in early 2023, inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

7.       In this report, Auckland Transport recommends that the Albert-Eden Local Board allocate its funding to completing the Western Springs signalised crossing, Greenwoods Corner intersection improvement and Aberfoyle Link Pedestrian pathway.

8.       These projects have already had partial investment during design processes and support the local board plan objective that there are a range of options for moving around that are safe, reliable and easy to use.

9.       If other budget becomes available in the 2022-2025 political term, the local board is requested to arrange its projects in priority order.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2025 in priority order as follows:

i)        $260,000 to Western Springs signalised crossing

ii)       $547,546 to Greenwoods Corner Village intersection improvement

iii)      $900,000 to Aberfoyle Link pedestrian path.

b)      is requested to list its other preferred projects in priority order should further funds become available this term.

c)      note that $35,961 additional budget has been approved to cover current contractual commitments.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The LBTCF is an AT fund established in 2012 to allow local boards to deliver small projects in their local area that would not normally be prioritised by Auckland Transport. In 2014, the LBTCF budget was set at $20 million spread across all local boards and distributed based on Auckland Council’s Local Board Funding Policy.  Since 2020, when COVID-19 lockdowns impacted on Auckland Council’s revenue the LBTCF has been reduced.

11.     Due to further budget reductions, Albert-Eden Local Board’s new allocation of LBTCF for the 2022 – 2025 political term is $1,743,507 (including the approved budget of $35,961).

12.     Therefore, the local board must now review the programme of work that was discussed and match it to the new budget. The local board’s role is to review the programme supported by AT’s quality advice, consider options, and then decide which projects to support.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Auckland Transport held three workshops with the Albert-Eden Local Board in 2023 to discuss the LBTCF and its allocation.

·        LBTCF Workshop One on 16 February gathered suggestions from board members for allocating the LBTCF in the new term as well as give progress reports on projects from the last political term.

·        LBTCF Workshop Two on 18 May reported back on cost estimates for the proposed new projects along with the indicative budget for the new term. This was followed up by a decision report from AT in July 2023. At the July 2023 business meeting the local board resolutions requested further information on the recommended projects. These resolutions were responded to by a memo dated 14 August 2023, however the amount of deferral budget was not known at that time.

·        LBTCF Workshop Three on 14 September AT confirmed the local board LBTCF budget as $1,707,546, with the deferral budget figure of $35,961. This is considerably less than the figure anticipated in Workshop Two.  The reduction in budget also reflects the pressures on AT and our funding partners following the devastating floods of early 2023 and the roading repair bill, the reduction in AT’s overall budget as required by Auckland Council plus inflation and the rising cost of doing business.

14.     AT’s advice to the local board presented at Workshop Three was to continue to progress the Western Springs signalised crossing, the Greenwoods Corner Village intersection improvements and the Aberfoyle Link Pedestrian Path with the ramp option. These projects have already had investment during design processes and support the local board plan objective that there are a range of options for moving around that are safe, reliable and easy to use.

15.     There are two options for the Aberfoyle Link Pedestrian Path project – option one is a fully accessible walkway and ramps, whereas option two is stairs. Feedback was sought and received from both community lease groups currently occupying buildings in Aberfoyle Reserve.  The Epsom South Kindergarten and Maungawhau Scouts Group support option one - the fully accessible walkway and ramps.  Both groups support the need for accessibility through the reserve and understand the constraints of the site means that the walkway will take up space in the reserve to achieve this.

Projects recommended for LBTCF in 2022–2025 Political Term

Project

Description and amount already invested

Funding required to complete the projects

Western Springs Signalised Crossing

The project will provide a signalised crossing on Great North Road to provide access from the car parking area to the park area.

Amount already invested is $12,675

$260,000

Greenwoods Corner Village Intersection Upgrade

 

A combined Road Safety project involving installation of a raised signalised pedestrian crossing at 600 Manukau Rd and a Local Board project involving intersection safety improvements at Manukau/Pah Rds. The local board funded project includes installation of a new pedestrian crosswalk across Manukau Rd and re-alignment of the existing staggered crossing to a straight through crossing. There is some kerb re-alignment and build outs required.

Amount already invested is $83,098

$547,546

 

Aberfoyle Link Pedestrian Path

 

The proposal is to provide a new path from Balmoral Road to Aberfoyle Road via Aberfoyle Reserve (ramp option)

Concrete stair option is estimated at $539,179, which is not recommended.

 

Amount already invested is $23,998

$900,000

 

Total

 

$1,707,546

 

16.     AT is also requesting the local board prioritise the projects below in case further budget becomes available in this political term.

Table 2: Projects investigated for LBTCF in 2022–2025 Political Term, for prioritisation in case of any future funding becoming available

Project

Description

Funding required to complete the project

Signage for parking in Mt Albert, Mt Eden, and Pt Chevalier town centres

Signage to direct customers to the parking areas for Mt Eden, Mt Albert and Pt Chevalier as they are hidden and could be better utilised.

$5,000

St Lukes Road/Wagener Place active modes Improvements

Intersection of St Lukes Road / Wagener Place outside St Lukes Mall.

The project involves providing the missing pedestrian crossings on the eastern leg, cycling improvements, speed calming and other minor changes.

 

$1,000,000

 

McLean Road – Elim Christian College crossing

A new crossing facility in the vicinity of the school entrance.

$375,000

St Andrews Road / Balmoral Road Intersection improvements

Separating the pram crossings and upgrading them by installing tactile pavers at this intersection.

$200,000

Albert-Eden Bicycle Shelters

Bike and scooter parking alternatives including covered bike shelters in a variety of locations to be decided.

$300,000

Street Trees and rain gardens

To assist with shade for pedestrians and cyclists and with stormwater functions during rain events.

Selected locations as informed by the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere Action Plan 2021.

$100,000

Speed devices in streets which are targeted for slower speeds

Installation of speed devices on specific streets (locations to be confirmed) in addition to already lowered speed limits.

In terms of wider monitoring of speed limit changes, monitoring results are expected in a few months to determine if additional speed-calming measures are required. These results will be shared with the local board once available.

The local board could consider resolving some funding to provide driver feedback signs which can be installed at problematic locations where the operating speeds are still high.

The cost estimate for each sign is approximately $25,000.

 

$100,000.00

 

17.     AT does not recommend that the local board supports the projects below for the following reasons which were discussed in Workshop 2.

Table 3: Projects investigated for LBTCF in 2022–2025 Political Term which are not recommended

 

Project

Reasons Not Recommended

Pt Chevalier Road Improvements

The proposal is to provide a new cycle lane on Point Chevalier Road from north of Meola Road to Te Ra Road (including Te Ra Road) including a separated on-road cycle lane using separators, with a speed table on Te Ra Road and tightening the intersections of the side roads.

The aim of this project is to improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists.

Additional design investigation is required.

AT is proposing to upgrade the crossing outside Point Chevalier School. In addition, the loss of parking makes it a high-risk project.

The estimated cost of this project is $1,700,000 which is the total amount of the fund for the local board for 2022-2025.

Chamberlain Park shared path project

The proposal is to install a shared path from Rawalpindi Reserve to connect Rawalpindi Street to the North-western cycleway which starts at Novar Place.
Design completed by Community Facilities.

Enabling works, including realigning the golf holes is required to build the path.
Golf holes realignment cost: $2,396,199
Shared path cost: $1,260,000

This totals $3,656,199 and exceeds the total budget available.

Several sub-options for progressing work on the shared path connection through Chamberlain Park were discussed at a meeting attended by Auckland Council’s Park and Community Facilities on 9 June 2023. The discussion confirmed that there were no sub-options that could be achieved, therefore AT does not recommend that the local board supports this project.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency and has developed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

19.     AT therefore urges the Albert-Eden Local Board to consider prioritisation of projects that help reduce carbon emissions.

20.     The Western Springs signalised crossing, Greenwood Corner project and the Aberfoyle Link Pedestrian project all support safe walking and cycling and will make a contribution to reducing carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     It is noted that as the Aberfoyle Link project is located in a reserve and will be delivered by Auckland Council but funded through this programme.

22.     Any other engagement required with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual-project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Albert-Eden Local Board discussed this programme of work at three workshops with AT in 2023. This report reflects the recommendations of Auckland Transport as presented at Workshop 3, for the local board to decide on the allocation of their LBTCF.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The actions being consider do not have specific impacts on Māori.  Both AT and council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the AT website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about.

25.     Any AT project that requires consultation with iwi will include that activity within its project plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     This report requires consideration of a significant financial commitment of up to $1,707,546 by the Albert-Eden Local Board.

27.     The costs calculated above are based on estimates and it is possible that costs on some projects may be under or over the estimations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There is a risk that some new projects may cost more than is budgeted in this report, but equally some projects may reduce in scope after further investigation work is carried out. 

29.     As resources and budgets are constrained, delaying decision making means that there is less time for planning for the investigation, design, and subsequent delivery of the projects that the local board wishes to progress. Timely decision making will provide the best opportunity for these projects to be delivered in the current political term.

30.     Finally, future budgets are not confirmed meaning that there may be sudden changes to the programme next year after Auckland Council sets budgets through the Long-term Plan process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     AT will take note of the local board’s confirmed projects and continue to work towards public consultation and delivery.

32.     Throughout the process, AT will keep the local board updated and when a decision is required, a report will be made to a public meeting so the members can consider it and decide on next steps.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorna Stewart - Elected Member Relationship Partner

Authorisers

John Gillespie, Head of Stakeholder and Elected Member Relationships

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/17066

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Albert-Eden Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·   Albert-Eden Youth Board (AEYB) delivered multiple initiatives promoting young people’s informed participation in the General Election. AEYB organised a panel event attended by five candidates from major political parties, two Albert-Eden Local Board members, and forty-two high school students and parents. Candidates offered perspectives and analysis on key issues raised by young people including education, climate change, the economy and youth participation.

·   each environmental related activity has started and progressed well in the first quarter aiding achievement of the 2020 Albert-Eden Local Board Plan’s outcome three: High quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles.

·   the integrated town centre placemaking programme supported the Dominion Road Moon Festival held from 29 September to 1 October 2023.

·   both the Albert-Eden Ecological Restoration contracts and Albert-Eden Arboricultural contracts have had the back log of response works associated with the January and February 2023 storms completed.

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status.

5.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2023/2024 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note; Overall, the net operational financial performance of the local board is below the revised year to date budget (97 per cent). Revenue is slightly above budget for the year to date with higher than anticipated budget generated at Mt Eden War Memorial Hall. From the local board’s Locally-driven Initiatives (LDI) funding, the majority of projects are underway and on track to be completed by year end. Capital projects underway or completed include the building renewal at Windmill Park, coastal pathway renewal at Eric Armishaw Park, renewal of sports park equipment, and building renewal at 19 View Road in Mt Eden.

6.       The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

7.       Auckland Emergency Management has undertaken a change proposal process which has resulted in the Resilience team that formerly engaged with local boards being disestablished. Future work with Local Boards and communities will be delivered through a new planning team, which will eventually have seven Senior Planners, each working with three local boards.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Albert-Eden Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

·   Customer and Community Services

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·   Auckland Emergency Management

9.       The local board work programmes were not adopted until a month into the financial year due to uncertainty of local board funding in the development of the Annual Budget 2023/2024. Local board funding for 2023/2024 was agreed by the Governing Body at the end of May 2023 and required changes to planned work programmes, which were then approved in July 2023.

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph. [standard paragraph]

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

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Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     AEM Resilience staff members have continued to attend community meetings to provide feedback, subject matter expertise where required this quarter. This has included supporting community activities that is attached to the work of Community Brokers that arose following the emergency events this year.

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

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13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

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Key activity updates

Outcome 1: Resilient, connected and empowered communities who value diversity

14.     ID 71: Local Civic Events Albert-Eden - the Coyle Park opening was held on 29 July 2023 with an attendance of 150 guests from the community and stakeholders. Guests included local board members and the Māori Outcomes team from Auckland Council. This event was a carry-over from the previous financial year.

15.     ID 69: Youth: Youth voice and youth initiatives – Albert Eden Youth Board (AEYB) delivered multiple initiatives over the first quarter. Highlights include activities promoting young people’s informed participation in the General Election. AEYB organised a panel event (July) attended by five candidates from major political parties, two Albert-Eden Local Board members, and forty-two high school students and parents. Candidates offered perspectives and analysis on key issues raised by young people including education, climate change, the economy and youth participation. Throughout September 2023, a series of videos sharing candidates’ views on key issues were shared with wider audiences via AEYB’s social media platforms.

Outcome 3: High-quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles

16.     ID 527: Urban Ark Strategic Plan Implementation Albert Eden - a successful meeting was held connecting group leaders focused on Chamberlain Park and Waitītiko / Meola Creek. During the Auckland Climate Festival, Urban Ark led a walk at Withel Thomas Reserve.

17.     Each environmental related activity has started and progressed well in the first quarter aiding achievement of the 2020 Albert-Eden Local Board Plan’s outcome three: High quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles.

Outcome 4: A strong local economic with thriving town centres

18.     ID 61: Placemaking: Thriving town centre local placemaking - the integrated town centre placemaking programme supported Dominion Road Moon Festival held from 29 September to 1 October 2023. Representatives from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei delivered the Karanga and Karakia at the Opening Ceremony. The Balmoral Chinese Business Association worked with the China Cultural Centre, Chao Shan General Association, and several local groups to deliver a three-day programme of festival activities, including buskers, street performances, arts and craft activities. Through the placemaking coordinator, a total of 27 diverse community groups and organisations were engaged and participated in the festival from both within and neighbouring local board areas.

Outcome 5: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs

19.     ID 2027: Marievare Reserve – improvements – works completed that included: lighting of the memorial archway, installing interpretative signage, removal of a concrete pad (towards the rear of the park); improving planting in the rear of the park at the border with Ranfurly Care, and additional planting along the southern boundary, at the driveway off Manukau Road.

20.     ID 32011: Eric Armishaw Park – renew – coastal pathway – renewal of the coastal walking track at Eric Armishaw Park has been completed.

21.     ID 24014: Ferndale Community House – renew – heritage asset – interior refurbishment including the entrance signage renewal has been completed.

22.     ID 79: Service Improvement – Epsom Community Centre - Epsom Community centre staff hosted social activity Sip & Play, which is a weekly social community group run for the Epsom Chinese Association. The Association has indicated a desire to continue running their activities at the centre after their previous location was red stickered due to storm damage. Sip and play activities include fitness, games, art, and a cup of tea. Feedback from Sip & Play attendees, including new immigrants, indicates many find comfort attending weekly activities enjoying the chance to share challenges and joys of their experiences living in a new country. Themes include how basic tasks like navigating transport, food shopping or seeking medical advice can be challenging. These group meetings now have given them confidence and a purpose to their week.

23.     Both the scheduled maintenance and response works for ID: 941: Albert-Eden Ecological Restoration contracts and ID 937: Albert-Eden Arboricultural contracts have had the back log of response works associated with January and February 2023 storms completed. The Arboriculture Maintenance Contract has switched focus back to scheduled maintenance of street and park trees. Auckland Council Arborists have been working closely with contractors to reshape the forward works programme to have pruning delivered where it is most needed. Some parks with limited access will be programmed for later in the year. With regards to the Planting and Aftercare: This year's replacement planting programme has been delivered on time. All trees have been planted to a gold standard specification that should result in a much higher success rate for street tree plantings. Contractors will now move into an aftercare phase, during this time trees will be checked for stability and structure as well as have their surroundings weeded and if necessary, watered.

Outcome 6: Safe, easy and sustainable options for moving around

24.     ID 538: Bike Hub – Albert-Eden – Tumeke Cycle space bike hub had 106 visitors, 191 volunteer hours and fixed 75 bikes. Nine bikes were rescued from the waste stream and four bikes were sold to the community.

Activities on hold

25.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·   ID 17736: LDI minor upgrades – community facilities – this project is on hold due to the confirmation of the design being ongoing with stakeholders.

·   ID 3170: Community Lease – 18-20 Huia Road, Point Chevalier – this site is part of a wider scope of work being undertaken by the Service Investment and Planning team. No lease will be progressed until the future use of the site has been progressed.

·   ID 15403: Te Auaunga/Oakley Creek – renewals – pathways and connections – the pathway is currently closed due to the February/March 2023 storm events. Before this activity can progress, damage reports need to be received and assessments of what the next steps are.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

26.     These activities are deferred from the 2023/2024 work programme:

·   ID 20586: Morvern Reserve Concept Plan – progress delivery - This project is on hold and has been deferred to the 2025/2026 financial year.

·   ID 1303: Albert-Eden Local Parks Management Plan – this project has been deferred to the 2025/2026 financial year.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

27.     These activities have been merged with other activities for efficient delivery:

·   ID 3864: Events Unit Production and Civic staff costs for delivery Albert-Eden Local Board - this budget of $3940 will be reallocated and merged with the following work programme activity:

ID 72: Anzac Services Albert-Eden, $19,320.

Activities with changes

28.     The following work programmes activity has been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. These minor changes were made by staff under delegation.

Table 1: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

Reason for change

Budget Implications

3491

Local Governance

Review of the Albert-Eden Local Board Lease Policy 2017

Activity has been reallocated to the Local Governance department

This item sits within the policy team

Nil

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

30.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

31.     The local board is invested in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·   ID 534: Climate Action Programme Albert-Eden – this three-year community climate action programme will support implementation of impactful community-based climate change actions for the Albert-Eden local board area. This year’s activity will include ongoing support for a Local Climate Activator and investment to amplify community climate action.

·   ID 535: EcoNeighbourhoods - an EcoNeighbourhood comprises groups of six or more neighbours from different households within the local board area, with the objective of adopting sustainable, low carbon practices and increasing resilience within their homes, lifestyles and neighbourhoods.

·   ID 538: Bike Hub – Albert-Eden - this project will continue to support the operations of the Tumeke Cycle Space Bike Hub established at Gribblehirst Park in 2018/2019.

·   ID 68: Placemaking: Community-led placemaking in community gardens - a community organisation co-ordinates a network of community gardens, connects with eco-neighbourhoods, low carbon initiatives and ecological restoration projects, responds to new garden initiatives and provides seed funding to the network to share materials and expertise.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     This report informs the Albert-Eden Local Board of the performance for ending 30 September 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The local board’s work programme contains a number of projects which provide direct outcomes for Māori, such as:

·   ID 60: Local Māori Aspirations - increased connection with mana whenua and mataawaka highlights opportunities for collaboration on projects and programmes of interest and benefit to local Māori. This work includes ongoing partnerships to provide guided Hikoi on Maungawhau and connection to diverse communities to increase their understanding of Te Ao Māori and Tikanga.

·   ID 63: Local implementation of Ngā Hapori Momoho (Thriving Communities) councils social wellbeing strategy Albert-Eden Local Board - this activity will have a strong focus on supporting Māori-led initiatives, including empowering individuals, whānau and communities to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their communities.

·   ID 1078: Library services – Albert-Eden – libraries provide services and programmes to promote te reo Māori and access to information on Māori culture and history.

·   ID 15403: Te Auaunga/Oakley Creek – renewals – pathways and connections – all signage will include approved te reo Māori and Tohu brand symbol.

·   Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language. Champion and embed te reo Māori in everyday communication. Celebrate and promote Te Ao Māori through events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes: Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Te Wiki o te Reo Māori. Seek opportunities to engage with local iwi and mana whenua to collaborate on initiatives.

35.     The local board through its work programme responds and delivers upon council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework through the following actions:

·   fostering and building strong relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka by ensuing their views are considered prior to making decisions on local projects.

·   embedding mana whenua customary practices within the development of local projects (for example, blessings at sod-turnings).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This report is provided to enable the Albert-Eden Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

·   operating expenditure relating to Asset Based Services is below revised budget by $66,000 for the year to date, while the Locally Driven Initiatives operational projects are also slightly below budget. Projects will be monitored closely, and any delivery risks will be brought to the board as part of the next performance report.

·   capital spend of $568,000 represents investments in the building renewal at Windmill Park, coastal pathway renewal at Eric Armishaw Park, renewal of sports park equipment, and building renewal at 19 View Road in Mt Eden, as well as other projects across the local board area.

·   the complete Albert-Eden Local Board Financial Performance report can be found in Appendix B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

38.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

39.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board - 1 July - 30 September 2023 quarter 1 Work Programme update

57

b

Albert-Eden Local Board - Operating Performance Financial Summary

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group

File No.: CP2023/16561

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Play Leadership Group for elected members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have included play advocacy projects in their 2023/2024 work programmes and are seeking opportunities to increase play diversity within their parts of the region.

3.       The council’s play advocacy advisor has established a staff network of play champions to support the ongoing development and promotion of play opportunities. When the Play Advisory Group was promoted on the council’s Kotahi intranet in 2022, some elected members asked to participate.

4.       To further support local board play advocacy activities and to respond to the appetite for increased play participation from some elected members, a Play Leadership Group is proposed. This will be a version of the staff play network, except just for elected members.

5.       As the terms of reference in Attachment A confirm, the Play Leadership Group will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision of the group will be “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

6.       The Play Leadership Group will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about play in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for play within their local boards, and to provide informal guidance to relevant staff on play issues.

7.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

8.       Staff recommend a quarterly meeting schedule for the Play Leadership Group. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes from the meetings.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Play Leadership Group.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Auckland Council employed its first play advocacy advisor in September 2022. The role leads advocacy work in the area of play at Auckland Council and advocates for and influences the consideration, empowerment, enablement and equitable promotion of play.

10.     Play advocacy is an initiative in 17 local board work programmes for the 2023/2024 financial year. Three local boards do not have capacity to include play advocacy in their work programmes for 2023/2024 but have asked for ad-hoc advocacy support and will consider including play advocacy in their 2024/2025 work programmes.

11.     The play advocacy advisor has a responsibility to establish a network of play champions within council, to increase knowledge and awareness of play across the council group. The advisor established a Play Advisory Group in 2022 which has grown to include 45 play champions from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, and other organisations affiliated with the council, including Auckland Zoo, Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand Maritime Museum, and Stardome Observatory and Planetarium.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local boards have embraced the play advocacy approach and indicated interest to explore how they can increase play diversity for their communities and achieve play outcomes through different projects.

13.     After several local board workshops, elected members showed a strong personal interest in play. There are high levels of enthusiasm for play discussions and a keen interest in understanding more about how to promote play.

14.     In November 2022, the council’s Kotahi intranet published a story about play advocacy and publicised the staff Play Advisory Group. Some elected members contacted the play advocacy advisor and asked if they could join the group. However, the group’s terms of reference restrict membership to staff only.

15.     During workshops with local boards in 2023, the play advocacy advisor sought guidance from elected members regarding their appetite for participating in an equivalent special interest group for elected members with a strong interest in play.

16.     In response to local boards’ interest, the play advocacy advisor has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of a Play Leadership Group, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·        learn more about play

·        share relevant knowledge with other elected members

·        improve connections between participants at a governance level

·        encourage collaboration between local boards to support play outcomes

·        increase knowledge and understanding of play equity issues

·        provide informal guidance to staff as the play advocacy work area grows

·        share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

17.     The vision of the Play Leadership Group is “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

18.     Participation in the Play Leadership Group is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint elected members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes of the group’s meetings.

19.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

20.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Play Leadership Group and provides further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet four times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed by the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The formation and operation of the Play Leadership Group has no climate impact.

22.     The continued advocacy to support play as ‘an everywhere activity’ supports positive climate outcomes by encouraging the community to embrace local suburbs as sites for play. This approach will reduce the need to drive to reach playgrounds.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Play Leadership Group will be administered by staff from the council’s Active Communities team, with support from kaimahi in the Regional Services and Strategy and Parks and Community Facilities departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The play advocacy advisor has presented at 20 local boards between March and October 2023.

25.     Local boards have expressed interest in the formation of a governance-level group for elected members who are interested in play. One local board requested that the opportunity to participate was presented in a business report, to enable participation to be formally agreed by the board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Play Leadership Group will provide play leaders with opportunities to learn more about Māori values relevant to play, Sport New Zealand’s bicultural play plan and its relevance to the development of play activities nationwide, and current and potential Māori play opportunities. This includes opportunities to develop and install māra hūpara in local parks and reserves, and the potential for projects such as Te Kete Rukuruku to generate play outcomes.

27.     The play leaders could also provide a mechanism for regional iwi engagement regarding play on a relatively informal basis, enabling mana whenua to share their views about play on an ongoing basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The Play Leadership Group will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that elected members could become members of the Play Leadership Group with expectations that they will be able to influence broader play investment or make decisions affecting play at a regional level.

30.     The terms of reference are intended to mitigate the risk of misunderstandings by making clear the scope of the Play Leadership Group. This will ensure participants become involved with a realistic expectation of what can be achieved through their membership.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Play Leadership Group will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

32.     An initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Play Leadership Group

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacquelyn Collins - Activation Advisor - Young People

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Pippa Sommerville - Manager Sport & Recreation

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2023/17583

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillor Julie Fairey’s October 2023 Ward Councillor Report.

b)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillor Christine Fletcher’s update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillor Julie Fairey - October 2023 Ward Councillor Report

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2023/17585

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for the local board chairperson to provide a written and/or verbal update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chairperson will update board members by way of a report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Chairperson M Watson’s October 2023 report.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson M Watson - November 2023 Report

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2023/17586

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for local board members to provide a written update on projects and events attended since the previous month’s local board meeting and to discuss other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an information item and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

3.       Local board members are recommended to use a Notice of Motion, rather than a Board Member Report, should a member wish to propose a recommendation or request action to be undertaken by staff.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Board Member Reports for November 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2023/17587

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous month’s local board business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its workshops held since the previous month’s local board business meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records for the workshops held on 19 October 2023 and 2 and 9 November 2023

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 19 October 2023

127

b

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 2 November 2023

129

c

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 9 November 2023

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

File No.: CP2023/17848

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Albert-Eden Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Albert-Eden Local Board is appended to the report as Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly and reported to the local board’s business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward work programme calendar for November 2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar - November 2023

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

23 November 2023

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Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Albert-Eden Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

11        Point Chevalier library and community service provision - Attachment c - Attachment C

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains commercially sensitive information that may prejudice future negotiations..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains commercially sensitive information that may prejudice future negotiations.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.