I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 28 November 2023

9.30am

The Leslie Comrie Board Room
Level One Franklin: The Centre
12 Massey Ave
Pukekohe

and via Microsoft Teams videoconference

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Deputy Chairperson

Alan Cole

 

Members

Malcolm Bell JP

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Amanda Hopkins

 

 

Andrew Kay

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise Gunn

Democracy Advisor

 

22 November 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 021 981 028

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                5

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     6

11        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Franklin Local Board Quarter One                     7

12        Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report                                                                  19

13        Unlock Pukekohe: Endorsement of Pukekohe Market Precinct Concept Plan                           25

14        Local Board views on Notice of Requirement for a Wastewater Treatment Plant at 372 Glenbrook Beach Road, Glenbrook                 59

15        Local Board Views on eight Notices of Requirement from Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi for the Pukekohe Transport Network                                                                69

16        Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group                                                                   79

17        Governance Forward Work calendar / Hōtaka Kaupapa for November 2023                             87

18        Franklin Local Board workshop records         93

19        Establishment of the Pukekohe Cemetery Committee                                                         105

20        10-year Budget 2024-2034 - local consultation content                                                               113

21        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

22        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                             127

C1       10-year Budget 2024-2034 – Local Board input on regional consultation content                    127

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The meeting will open with karakia and the Chair will welcome everyone present.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 24 October 2023, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 


 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report: Franklin Local Board Quarter One

File No.: CP2023/16575

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Franklin Local Board with an integrated performance report for Quarter One, 1 July – 30 September 2023

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·    Local crime prevention fund, safety initiatives investment – Staff presented a range of options for the Crime Prevention fund to the Local Board in September with the board resolving to allocate additional funds to support the implementation Franklin Youth Voice model.

·    Youth Empowerment support services – work has progressed to establish a new delivery model of three voice groups in Wairoa, Pukekohe and Waiuku for youth participation in decision making processes. Community Delivery will develop this work further in Quarter 3.

·    Te Kete Rukuruku – a minor change has been included as discussed by the local board to include Belmont Sports Park to the list of parks names for consideration by Mana whenua.

 

·    Franklin paths targeted rate investigation: Work on a business case for a Franklin Paths Programme Targeted Rate has been completed.

·    Pukekohe Cemetery unmarked graves redress: the Local Board and staff met with representatives of the Pukekohe Māori community to discuss the approach to delivering a Pukekohe Cemetery memorial project.

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        WP 20699 Te Puru Park - renew skate park.

·        WP 20637 Pukekohe War Memorial Town Hall - renew heritage assets.

·        WP 1287 Wider southern local settlements planning scoping study. This has been given the wrong RAG status and should be red.

5    The financial performance report compared to budget 2023/2024 is attached. Net financial operating performance for Franklin Local Board is almost on budget for the quarter ended 30 September 2023. Operating expenditure is one point two percent below budget mostly in Asset Based Services (ABS) facility contracts with continuing wet weather conditions making it difficult to access and maintain all facilities. Operating revenue is on budget. Capital expenditure is 80 percent ahead of revised budget for the quarter, largely in the local asset renewal programmes advancing well.

5.        The Customer and Community Services (C&CS) capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

6.        A number of corrections to the work programme are required to better reflect the Franklin Local Board’s resolved direction at its July 25 Business meeting and to reflect a number of Auckland Council organisational changes.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for Quarter One ending 30 September 2023.

b)      approve the addition of Belmont Sports Park in the list of names of parks to be considered by Mana whenua as part of the Franklin Local Board – Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche two WP ID 2841.

c)       approve changing the lead department for ID 1339 Youth Economy connections from Community and Social innovation to Community Delivery to C&CS: Community Delivery to enable delivery of the Te Ara Rangatahi delivered youth skills development programme, with a budget allocation of $60,000.

d)      approve reallocation of $200,000 budget from WP ID 4053 in the Local Governance work programme to the C&CS work programme to enable Parks and Community Facilities led delivery of a Pukekohe Cemetery memorial project.

e)      approve a correction to the lead department on WP ID 3893 Youth Empowerment support services from C&CS: Community and Social Innovation to C&CS: Community Delivery to reflect organisational changes since the time of work programme adoption.

f)       approve the following corrections to the work programme to reflect Local Board direction as per the resolution FR/2023/106:

i)       addition of a new activity Full Facilities Contracts Park Bins top up and review with an allocated budget of $90,000 from LDI Opex

ii)       allocation of responsibility for the delivery of the Local Economic Development Broker programme to C&CS: Community Delivery

iii)      removal of WP ID 1261, C&CS. Young Enterprise Scheme

iv)      allocation of $80,000 WP ID 3519 to C&CS: Community Delivery for the Clevedon Business Development Initiative

v)      allocation of $160,000 to WP ID 3107 C&CS: Community Delivery for the Franklin Local Economic Development Broker programme.


 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Franklin Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

 ·       Auckland Emergency Management

8.       The local board work programmes were not adopted until a month into the financial year due to uncertainty of local board funding in the development of the Annual Budget 2023/2024. Local board funding for 2023/2024 was agreed by the Governing Body at the end of May 2023 and required changes to planned work programmes, which were then approved in July 2023.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

A graph with blue rectangles

Description automatically generated

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have


 

been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

 

11.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

A graph of a company's work

Description automatically generated

Key activity updates

12.     The following work programme activities have been identified as key activity updates by operating departments:

·    Franklin Hub Services - Storylines Trust made their way to Franklin this quarter, delivering a session in each of our sites – one in Pukekohe and another in Waiuku. Local schools were in attendance to meet and listen to Tessa Duder CNZM OBE, one of New Zealand’s authors of novels for young people. Attendees at the Pukekohe session also had the opportunity to meet and hear from Amy Harrop, another New Zealand Children’s author. This quarter staff have contracted a local individual skilled and knowledgeable in delivering regular Bollywood Bhangra Dance classes. Targeting families with young children, the first give-it-a-go session was a hit and the commitment thereafter has seen the group perform at a local event. The regular classes continue until Diwali in Quarter Two.

·    Youth: Franklin youth participation - Staff presented the Franklin Youth Voice report to the board at a workshop in September. The Franklin Local Board has resolved the Franklin Youth Voice approach as the future model for youth engagement in Franklin and approved additional budget for delivery of the programme at their September business meeting. This approach consists of three youth voice groups in Wairoa, Pukekohe and Waiuku for active youth participation in decision-making process. Funding agreements and implementation are commencing in Q2, in coordination with key support organisations.

Activities with significant issues

15. The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as

status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        Te Puru Park - renew skate park: project on hold while Parks and Community Facilities department await further direction from iwi on relocation of skate park as part of the Master Plan

·        The wider southern local settlements planning scoping study is on hold waiting on the outcome from Plan Change 78 and the refreshed Future Development Strategy

·        Pukekohe War Memorial Town Hall - renew heritage assets: Awaiting building consent to be granted. Discussion on budget shortfall to deliver full Seismic and Renewal package of works with local board.

Activities on hold

13.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        Beachlands Domain - renew playground and furniture: is no longer a priority due to relatively good condition of the playground and furniture. This project was presented to the local board and through the business report approval process funding has been deferred to FY24 and FY25.

·        Kingseat Recreation Reserve- renew playground and associated park furniture: This project was presented to the local board for prioritization and decision was made to defer this project to future years.

·        Karioitahi Reserve - renew park assets: Project is on hold due to the budget being deferred to the financial year 2024 due to the current work programme reprioritization.

·        Glenbrook Beach Beachfront Esplanade Reserve - renew playground and park furniture: investigation and design will begin in FY23/24 to dovetail into the completion of the seawall renewal works. Next steps: Establish seawall project timing, then plan the design work for the playground.

·        Clevedon Scenic Reserve - Renew Play Items: During work programme session advice from the local board this is a low priority project and suggested to delay and reduce scope of works. Nikau pathway project take priority over this project.

·        Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew roof, building exterior and interior: Awaiting direction from local board on the future of the hall as divestment is being considered.

·        Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew carpark: Awaiting direction from local board on the future of the hall as divestment is being considered.

·        Orere Point - stormwater upgrade slip prevention: Project is deferred to financial year 2024/2025 with investigation to commence once funding has become available.

·        Whitford-Maraetai Road, Maraetai: Beachlands Maraetai Pony Club: Application on hold, land may be sold and club relocated.

·        Hamilton Estate Recreation Reserve: Marama Hou Ministries Charitable Trust: Site visit done, application on hold while landowner approval of additional structures is being processed by land advisory.

·        McNicol Homestead Reserve, 12R McNicol Road; Clevedon and Districts Historical Society Incorporated Franklin Local Board: Application on hold awaiting landowner approval for additional land at 80R McNicol Road

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

14.     These activities are cancelled:

·        WP ID 1261, Customer and Community Services. Young Enterprise Scheme: The local board have not funded this item this Financial year and should be removed from the work programme.

15.     The following work programmes activities have been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and they were made by staff under delegation.

 

Table 2: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

Reason for change

Budget Implications

2841

Customer and Community Services

Franklin local board- Te Kete Rukuruku Māori naming of parks and places Tranche Two

Belmont sports park to be included in the list for suggested sole naming in tranche 2

Local board want to include the name for consideration by mana whenua to promote dual or sole Māori naming

nil

1339

Customer and Community Services

Youth Economy (Youth Connections) - Franklin

CCS: Connected Communities – Community Delivery department to lead this item

Negotiated that this will now be delivered by CC&S – Community development 

nil

3519

Customer and Community Services

Clevedon Business Development Initiative

Change from CCS: Grants to CCS: Community Delivery

Change from the Grants team to community delivery within CC&S

 

nil

4053

Local Governance

Pukekohe Cemetery unmarked graves redress

Change from GOV: Local Board services to CC&S: PCF for delivery

Scoping, detailed design, consenting and physical delivery of work to be undertaken by PCF

No change in funding amount

3893

Customer and Community Services

Youth Empowerment Support Services

Change lead department from & C&CS: CSI to C&CS: Community Delivery

C&CS: Community Delivery to manage this work programme line

nil

3107

Customer and Community Services

Franklin Local Economic Development broker programme

Work programme budget line is 150k

Error in the work programme budget line it should be increased to $160k

Increase budget to $160K

New

Customer and Community Services

Parks and Community Facilities

New activity: FFC Park Bins Top up

request that this activity added to CCS: Parks and Community Facilities – Project Delivery to correct an omission

$90,000

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

17.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

18.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        Predator Free Franklin Te Ara Hikoi: Additional funding for this programme has been set up through the Natural Environment Targeted Rate, with an additional $30,000 from the Tools and Resources budget for additional pest control materials, $2000 from the Outreach and Advocacy budget for the production of pest plant education video and $2000 from the Biodiversity Focus Area Management and Restoration budget for pest animal tree ring barriers for Pekapeka protection. A funding agreement to the value of $79,000 for Te Ara Hīkoi has been signed by both parties. In the agreement, Te Ara Hīkoi have agreed to reporting the number of community events and hub days; number of attendees that are engaged with at each hub day as either new or existing landowners; photos of participants and activities at these hub days where applicable; the number of bait stations, bait, and traps delivered to the community; and the quantity of herbicide delivered to the community.


 

·        C.R.E.S.T Programme: Additional funding of $10,700 from the Natural Environment Targeted Rate has been secured to cover traps, bait stations, materials, and advertising. The project also has $12,200 of funding from a Community Coordination and Facilitation grant to expand the pest control network through the western end of the project. A workshop was held with 150 students from Waiau Pā School on the Taihiki Stream. This included a cultural induction from Ngaati Tamaoho, a pest trapping demonstration, and a track building exercise. A community tree planting event was held on the banks of the Mauku Stream to restore an īnanga spawning area and improve water quality. An event was held with the Kea Scouts to engage the young learners in pest animal control and conservation. ITM have donated a large quantity of fence palings to be used to build trap boxes which will allow our materials budget to stretch further.

·        Manukau Harbour Forum: The brochure from last year’s communication plan has been completed, printed, and is being distributed across the Manukau Harbour rohe. Sophia Olo-Whaanga has been confirmed and hired as the new coordinator. A contract has been created in the system. The coordinator has met with all relevant individuals in the council and a work plan is being created for her.

·        Waterways Protection Fund: The Franklin Waterway Protection Fund work this financial year is limited to a single project at 100 Lees Gully Road. The project encompasses waterway and cultural heritage area protection and planting, and inanga spawning habitat restoration. The project is progressing well with all fencing complete for project area. In quarter one initial planting was completed. More planting and planting maintenance will be undertaken across the financial year.

·        Finding Franklin Bats: Te rapu nga pekapeka o Franklin: In addition to the $5000 of Franklin Local Board funding, Environmental Services has contributed a further $30,000 from the Natural Environment Targeted Rate. EcoQuest has now signed the funding agreement and is awaiting release of the funding. The planning phase of the project is underway to catch and tag bats for a radio-tracking study in order to see how they use the habitat. This will inform stakeholders on where they could focus their conservation efforts. This includes community training of roost location identification, and radio-tracking training so more people can help with the bat study. Te Ara Hīkoi are assisting with providing advertising and contacts for the training amongst their network of landowners. Tentative dates for the bat catching and radio-tracking study are for the last two weeks of November.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     This report informs the Franklin Local Board of the performance for ending 30 September 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     This report includes activities that have a direct impact on Māori outcomes:

·    Franklin Hub Services - Programming and Outreach: A combined total of 142 programme sessions were delivered across library and arts in Waiuku, Pukekohe and some outreach, of which 14 programmes met Māori outcomes. A combined total of 5,510 participants and attendees this quarter. Highlights include: Ko Ahau Te Whenua, an audio and interactive visual installation highlighting wāhi tapu – sacred places around Franklin which was exhibited in the NZ Steel Gallery. Included in this exhibition was an exhibit of artworks by local rangatahi in the Community Gallery. The Uku series is a rangatahi focussed school holiday programme that started this quarter. Delivered in partnership with Tuwhera Trust and Nga Atua Hou. This programme saw local rangatahi register to participate in a series of workshops to learn about the Waiuku area, the history of the area and bringing the learnings inhouse to create a mural inside the Waiuku Community Space. A successful programme that engaged rangatahi of all ages from Waiuku. In addition and as part of the school holiday programme, staff continued its outreach offer into Āwhitu, Clevedon, and Beachlands this quarter. A collection of heritage photos was exhibited in the Community Gallery. I ō tātou hapori exhibition was popular among locals. Opening with representatives from Ngā Hau e Whā marae present who shared their local stories. Local individuals whose stories had been recorded and shared as part of the exhibition also attended to share their memories of the local areas within Franklin they knew growing up.

·    Local Māori responsiveness: Staff refreshed the expression of interest (EOI) application document in Q1, with applications closing in Q2. The EOI has been shared with previously interested parties and local networks. Staff continue to work with Te Kopu Incorporated to identify funding opportunities for their Matariki 2024 event.

·    Achieving Māori Outcomes Ara Kōtui: A hui was held on 15th August 2023, focussed on the draft Local Board Plans. This hui was attended by representatives from Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngaati Whanaunga, and Franklin, Papakura and Manurewa Local Boards. Another hui held on 5th September 2023 focussed on the draft Māori wards proposal, with representatives from Ngaati Whanaunga, Ngāti Te Ata, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaterā and Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust sharing their views on the proposal with representatives from Franklin, Papakura, Manurewa, Māngere-Otāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards.

 

·    Achieving Māori Outcomes Tuia rangatahi mentoring programme: The rangatahi and mentor attended the M9: He Toi Whakairo, He Mana Tangata (Without Maori Art, who are we?) event on 6 July at the Aotea Centre which featured the experiences of nine voices presenting unique perspectives designed to inspire, empower and entertain. Two previous Franklin Tuia programme rangatahi also attended.

 

·    Wai-O-Manu: A refreshed draft Co-management agreement underway, mana whenua and local board members are being engaged during the reset process to input to the refreshed agreement.  An operational plan has drafted for Te Wai o Maru and a financial plan underway to resource part of the plan.  There are no risks foreseeable in this refresh project.

 

·    Franklin Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two: Iwi have advised that names will be provided to Te Kete Rukuruku in Q2.

 

·    Te Korowai o Papatuuaanuku: Ngaati Te Ata contractors are currently carrying out maintenance of the existing plantings to ensure a high rate of survival. The Harris family on Lees Gully Road on Āwhitu are hosted a third and final school planting day on 15 September with Āwhitu District School. Planning is underway with Ngāti Te Ata and Āwhitu Landcare for the 2024 planting season. Staff are looking to carry out planting and pest plant control at seven sites of cultural significance. This will include new planting sites at Lake Whatihua and Rangiriri. These will receive significant additional funding from targeted rates from Healthy Waters and Natural Environment Delivery. This will cover labour, additional plants, and fencing to protect the planting areas.

 

·    Pukekohe Cemetery unmarked graves redress: the board worked with the Pukekohe Māori community through Nga Hau E wha marae committee members on co-design response for the unmarked tāmariki Māori in the Pukekohe cemetery.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     This report is provided to enable the Franklin Local Board to monitor the organisations progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report as any changes are within allocated budget.

Financial Performance

23.     Operating expenditure of $4.45 million is $56,000 below budget, with most of this underspend in Asset Based Services.  With continuing wet weather conditions making it difficult to access and maintain all facilities the results are mostly from less parks facility maintenance for weeds and grass.

24.     Operating revenue of $110,000 is on budget.

25.     Capital expenditure is $1.14 million ahead of revised budget achieving spend of $2.47 million year to date primarily for local asset renewal projects in sports assets, amenity blocks, building renewals and parks fixtures and furniture.

26.     The financial report for the three months ended 30 September 2023 for Franklin Local Board area is in Appendix B attached.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

28.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

29.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of Quarter Two, December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Work Programme Q1 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Franklin Local Board Financial Report to September 2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Orrin Kapua - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager Franklin, Papakura, Manurewa

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report

File No.: CP2023/17715

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report s

1.       To make decisions on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) for the 2022-2025 political term as outlined in Attachment A.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund report is provided as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the allocation of $1,647,252 from the Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2023 for delivery of the Whangapouri-Jutland Road Bridge project

b)      note Auckland Transport’s allocation of $32,958 to cover costs of contractually committed work on the Whangapouri-Jutland Road Bridge project started before the recent budget reduction.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund allocation 2022-2025

21

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager Franklin, Papakura, Manurewa

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Unlock Pukekohe: Endorsement of Pukekohe Market Precinct Concept Plan

File No.: CP2023/17912

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the proposed Pukekohe Market Precinct Concept Plan, located in the Pukekohe town centre.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Unlock Pukekohe High Level Project Plan (HLPP) was endorsed by the Franklin Local Board in April 2019 and approved by the Planning Committee in May 2019.  The Finance and Performance Committee subsequently approved the divestment of properties located within the Unlock Pukekohe HLPP boundary in June 2019 for urban renewal purposes.

3.       The Unlock Pukekohe Supporting Masterplan was endorsed by the Franklin Local Board in June 2023. Pukekohe Market Precinct is the flagship public realm project within the masterplan which includes upgrading Roulston Street, Devon Lane, and some improvements to the town square

4.       In August 2022, Eke Panuku undertook a robust community engagement process about the Masterplan and its key objectives and projects. The community indicated strong support in creating the market precinct at the town square and extending the market to Roulston Street.

5.       In the past 12 months, Eke Panuku has worked closely with stakeholders to progress the concept design of the precinct. The early concept designs were first shared with the community at the Saturday morning market on 25th March 2023. The information boards were on display in the town square for one month following this date.

6.       Since the inception of the project. Eke Panuku has also been working with mana whenua, Waiohua iwi of Te Ākitai, Ngaati Tamaoho, and Ngaati Te Ata. This has included regular updates through Unlock Pukekohe programme meetings, and project specific workshop and site tour where mana whenua shared their support, interests, and guidance on design principles regarding culture and identity, and prospective implementation and economic opportunities of the market precinct and activities.

7.       The concept plan in this report has incorporated the feedback received from the Masterplan consultation and the Market Precinct consultation. The key interventions proposed to create the Market Precinct are:

a)   to reconfigure and upgrade Roulston Street to provide more flexible space for events and markets

b)   reconfigure Devon Lane to one-way to enable a pedestrian-orientated street frontage to the flagship Edinburgh Street superblock development.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      endorse the Pukekohe Market Precinct Concept Plan provided in Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Pukekohe town centre has been identified as a regeneration and intensification opportunity for Auckland. It is one of the ‘Unlock’ priority locations to be delivered by Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku). The town centre enjoys established transport infrastructure, business services, and community facilities; and has a concentration of council landholdings that are development ready. The detail of the Pukekohe HLPP was first presented to the local board at a workshop in 2018.

9.       The Market Precinct project is made up of two projects within the Unlock Pukekohe Masterplan:

i)    Market Street – Upgrade Roulston Street and the Town Square to accommodate pedestrian orientated use and activities, and to host weekly markets and events for the community. Roulston Street to remain its transport function but also an attractive public realm with new planting and amenities in its non-market/event mode.

ii)   Devon Lane – Create a new pedestrian-orientated street frontage to the flagship Edinburgh Street superblock development on Devon Lane. Reconfiguring Devon Lane to one way vehicle movement while retaining its parking and servicing functions for the existing businesses.

10.     During the masterplan consultation, the two projects received community support, which enabled Eke Panuku to commence concept design and technical investigation works in August 2022. Attachment B: A summary of community feedback in relation to the Market Precinct Project has further details.

11.     Acknowledging the interdependent functions and close spatial relationships between each project, Eke Panuku combined the two projects to progress as the Market Precinct project. An external design consultant was engaged to lead the concept design work.

12.     Internal and external stakeholders, including Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, mana whenua, Tataki Auckland Unlimited, and Pukekohe Business Association, have been involved in the design process through workshops, site visits and regular hui. The shortlisted design options were presented to the Franklin Local Board and stakeholders in February 2023. Key feedback and design responses are summarised in the later section of this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The project area is situated to the immediate south of King Street, the primary shopping street in Pukekohe. An existing town square forms the northern extent of the site with Devon Lane providing a service connection across to Edinburgh St to the west. Roulston Street connects from the town square and Devon Lane to Massey Ave and currently occupied by a mixture of small commercial, light industrial and residential development. The notable tree (#2670 Natural Heritage Golden Elms) on Roulston Street is to be retained.

14.     Based on a mixture and variation of street and parking layout, traffic movement, market stall configuration of Roulston Street and Devon Lane, around 20 precinct layout options were tested. After preliminary assessment from the design and transport specialists, the following three options were shortlisted to be investigated and further feedback from stakeholders was sought.

(1)  Option 1: Change Devon Lane to be one way and to insert a new footpath on the southern side; and retains two-way vehicle movements on Roulston Street and reconfigures angled parking on the eastern side of the street to parallel parking


 

 

(2)  Option 2: Change Devon Lane to be one way and to insert a new footpath on the southern side; propose a one-way south bound street with parallel parking on the eastern side for Roulston Street. This option has the largest pedestrian / activation zone on the west side of Roulston Street.

(3)  Option 3: same as Option 2 however includes a bi-directional cycle path on the western side.

15.     The relevant feedback from stakeholders is summarised in the table below (Table 1):

Stakeholders

Feedback received

Proposed response

Franklin Local Board

·    Enquired about the proposed street layout (travel directions/one-way vs two ways) on Roulston Street. If two-way traffic option is to proceed, future proofing to turn the road into space for market should be considered.

·    Enquired about the proposed street layout (travel directions/one-way vs two ways) on Devon Lane. The future density on Edinburgh block should be considered.

·    Expressed concern around the commercial reality for the proposed use (i.e. community stalls/market) for 1 Roulston Street.

·    Enquired whether the proposed landscaped areas on Roulston Street are rain gardens

·    Both one-way and two-way options were considered. The two-way option was selected as it has the best balance of space for amenity and movement; has the least impact on access for existing properties on Roulston Street, particularly in the case when the market is to operate more frequently. One-way option would also result in a footpath that would be hard to activate on non-market or events days. The concept design does not preclude converting Roulston Street to one-way in the future to enable a larger pedestrian / market / events zone on the western side.

·    Both one-way and two-way options were considered. The one-way option was selected as it will allow for a new continuous footpath on the south side of the laneway to create a safe pedestrian zone and improve connectivity. This new footpath will connect with the future north-south laneway within the Edinburgh Street Superblock site connecting to Franklin: the Centre. New streetlights, a new raised table and two new planted areas are also proposed along the lane to increase attractiveness and encourage pedestrians to use the space. Vehicle access is retained for existing businesses on the north side of the lane.

·    The focus of this concept design is the public realm works. Eke Panuku will prepare the essential outcome and design guideline documents for 1 Roulston Street site.

·    No rain gardens are currently proposed but new garden beds and street trees will be included in the design.

 

Auckland Transport

·    Mobility parking should be integrated into the design concept.

·    ​Safe pedestrian crossing on Massey Ave is key.

·    ​One-way options on Roulston Street create loading and unloading problem particularly if the market stores operate more frequently/permanently. 

·    ​Including a short section of cycle lane that doesn’t connect to any wider cycle network, and even be led into conflict zone with vehicular traffic, is not supported. Cycling is not a priority on Roulston Street, and it is not part of the strategic cycling network.

·    Mobility parking space is retained on Roulston Street.

·    Massey Ave ped crossing – not in scope of this project but will be investigated as part of the “Centre to Station Connections” project led by Andrew Moore in the future.

·    A two-way option for Roulston Street was selected.

·    No separate cycle facilities are located on Roulston Street.

 

Pukekohe Business Association

•     Two-way option for Roulston Street preferred.

•     Question if Roulston Street could have bollards to close it off on weekends.

•     Supported removing the ‘Pukekohe’ sign currently in the square.

•     A two-way option for Roulston Street was selected.

•     A Traffic Management Plan would be required to close any streets for events. This would be worked through on an event-by-event basis, but it was advised that the cost would be prohibitive for the current market.

•     Pukekohe Sign – also not in scope of this project, however this could be investigated as part of Small T Pukekohe and with guidance and direction from the Franklin Local Board.

 

Mana Whenua

Safety and wellbeing are key to mana whenua. Providing safe and accessible pathways to the square from outside of the precinct is important.

​Ensure Te Waiohua Design Principles are clearly integrated such as:

•     ​Wayfinding and signage that acknowledges the cultural history of place, utilises Waiohua reo etc.

•     ​Landscaping, i.e. native trees, regenerative solutions to stormwater 

•     ​Cultural design, Waiohua design, mahi toi and re/naming opportunities

•     Safe and accessible pathways to connect the town centre are key project objectives. Roulston Street and Devon Lane will have large, accessible footpaths. New raised table crossings are proposed at Massey Ave and Edinburgh Street.

•     Work will continue with Te Waiohua on the developed design phase to incorporative design principles.

 

 

 

16.     In summary, the feedback indicated a strong preference for Option 1 as it achieves the well-balanced outcomes for following reasons:

·    Best balance of space between amenity upgrades and movement. The width of the western pedestrian zone can accommodate pedestrians, market stalls and new landscaping.

·    Least impact on access for existing businesses on Roulston Street as the street remains two-way. Some concerns were raised that making Roulston Street one-way will negatively impact traffic movements by increasing travel times.

·    Avoids create a loading / servicing problem (vehicles blocking the street) that potentially the one-way options may create, particularly if the market is to operate more frequently or permanently.

17.     Option 1 has then been further developed as the Market Precinct Concept Plan; a comprehensive design report that encompasses the concept design process begin with site and context analysis, design principle and approaches, reference images and preliminary landscape specification has been produced. Refer to attachment C for the summary of concept design report. The key project outcomes are summarised by the street/area as follows:

i)    Roulston Street

·    To be developed as a green street that contributes to the urban ngahere of Pukekohe Town Centre with new street trees and low planting.

·    Retain two-way vehicle traffic movement; with consideration to allow for one-way in the future if the demand for market/event users require.

·    Provides seven parallel parking spaces on the eastern side of Roulston Street. This includes an accessible parking, and taxi / loading zone.

·    A 3m wide pedestrian footpath on the eastern side of the street with 2m wide planting beds for new street trees and low-level planting. A 9.6m wide pedestrian, market and events zone on the western side of the street with 2.5m wide planting beds for new street trees and low-level planting.

·    Opportunities for new bench seating, cycle racks, rubbish bins and drinking fountains. Specification, locations, and quantities to be confirmed during the developed design stage.

·    The increased footpath environments would enable market activities (up to 20 market stalls) and events to be undertaken on the weekend/as programmed.

ii)   Town Square

·    The existing ’Pukekohe’ screen will be removed to create a better visual connection between the Town Square and Devon Lane. The existing planting area to the south of the playground will be reconfigured with opportunities for integrated seating along the low wall.


 

·    The container for the water feature equipment behind the screen will be relocated as it physical and visually obstructs connection between the town square and Devon Lane and future Edinburgh Street superblock development. Location to be confirmed during the developed design stage.

·    New bollards (as per existing arrangement on the square) to the south of the town square to the raised table crossing for pedestrian safety.

·    Opportunity to provide a canopy over the playground for shade/shelter.

·    Capacity for up to 35 market stalls on Roulston Street

iii)  Devon Lane

·    Devon lane will be reconfigured for one-way vehicle traffic. The concept plan is showing the vehicle traffic direction as right to left movement (entering from Edinburgh Street only) however this will be confirmed with traffic engineers and Auckland Transport during the developed design stage.

·    A new continuous footpath is proposed on the south side of the laneway to create a safe pedestrian zone and to improve pedestrian connectivity within the town centre. This new footpath will connect with the future north-south laneway within the Edinburgh Street Superblock site connecting to Franklin: The Centre.

·    A raised table is located midway along the lane to create a slower-speed environment.

·    Access to existing properties and parking areas on the north side of the lane is retained.

·    Six streetlights are proposed along the lane and two new planted areas to increase the attractiveness of the laneway.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Operational greenhouse gas emissions are likely to be neutral or reduced through creation of safer walking and cycling connections and through upgrades to lighting in the public realm. Construction activity will increase emissions, and these will be addressed through design (e.g. materials choices) and procurement.

19.     Pukekohe will be subjected to increasing flood risk and higher temperatures in the coming years. These impacts can be addressed with blue-green infrastructure. The project currently plans to reduce impermeable areas, and to increase tree planting and canopy cover to provide shade, shelter, and evapotranspiration to mitigate the urban heat island effect. These interventions will be further explored through subsequent design phases.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Eke Panuku also held multiple workshops with Auckland Transport, Auckland Council and Tataki Auckland Unlimited to discuss the project and receive feedback and guidance as the design develops.

21.     AT has provided input and design guidance on traffic related issues by attending the project working group discussion regularly as well as a preliminary assessment memo. AT has expressed a preliminary approval of the project in principle and acknowledged that further procedures and approval coordinating process will continue throughout the next phase of project. Eke Panuku will use the Auckland Transport Design Review Panel (DRP) for street upgrade projects and submit the final designs for review and feedback.

22.     AT also support the road stopping and vesting requirement of the project which needs to go through a formal procedure; AT is of the view the point to be stopped (within the existing town square) should be resulting from a continuation of the adjoining property boundaries.

23.     Auckland Council Parks and Community Facilities has also attended the project workshop regularly and expressed support from the proposed change and intervention to the town square. There are opportunities to co-ordinate maintenance and renewal programme and budget on the work/provision proposed for the canopy at the playground and screening of the existing toilet block.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Eke Panuku have worked with the Franklin Local Board since inception of the Unlock Pukekohe programme and have provided regular updates to ensure the views of the local board are considered and consistent with the strategic vision outlined in the High-Level Project Plan (HLPP) and Framework Plan.

25.     At a workshop held in February 2023, the proposed masterplan for Pukekohe was presented to the local board.  Local board feedback and design response has been included in Table 1.

26.     A follow up workshop held on 7 November provided further project updates including the high-level project cost estimates, delivery programme and timeframes; and presented the Te Pukekohe Market Precinct Concept Plan in more detail. Local Board members expressed general support of the proposed design and commented on provision of bollards, rubbish bins, power and the general look and feel of the street furniture which with be further investigated through the developed design.

27.     The Local Board has also expressed that the road stopping process for the town square should be investigated to allow a more streamlined process for the use of markets and events in the town square. Preliminary discussion between Eke Panuku, AT and AC has taken place, and it is expected the statutory process will continue to progress and be completed during the developed design and delivery phase.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The Combined Cultural Values Assessment was completed in November 2022 outlining Te Waiohua priorities to be included meaningfully within the programme of works for Kia Puawai a Pukekohe. Four pou are particularly relevant and should be embedded in the project through planning, design and delivery; as well as social and procurement/commerce process/outcome:

i)    Manaakitanga – Care, host, acceptance

ii)   Taautuutu – reciprocity, taking and giving back.

iii)  Whanaungatanga – relationships, proximity

iv)  Kaitiakitanga – Stewardship, protection.

29.     The project has been presented to mana whenua – Te Waiohua in late 2022 and early 2023 including a hikoi/site walk. The project received strong support to progress in partnership, with the key feedback outlined in Table 1.

30.     Mana whenua acknowledged that the whenua represented a gateway/entrance between Waikato and Taamaki Makaurau. Mana whenua also emphasised the whenua is significant and unique as it generates food not only for the region but beyond Aotearoa and internationally.

31.     Eke Panuku will continue working with Te Waiohua and seek feedback and input as the project progresses, including a project update workshop on concept plan in November and follow by a cultural induction with the project delivery team early next year.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

 

32.     A high-level project estimate report indicates the cost for the Pukekohe Market Precinct project is approximately $10 million, as of September 2023. The cost includes professional services required through the design and consenting processes, and construction and delivery of the physical works for the street and public realm upgrade.

33.     Eke Panuku has approved an indicative business case to invest CAPEX funding in FY24 and FY25 to progress with developed design and consenting works to progress with the Market Precinct Concept Plan. A detailed business case will be prepared in 2025 to seek further funding approval for the delivery of physical works.

34.     Subject to consenting and approvals, the physical work is scheduled to commence in early 2026, with completion anticipated in early 2027.

35.     The asset owners, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council (Parks and Community Facilities), support the concept plan in principle; and will continue to provide input throughout the developed and detailed design stage.  Upon projection completion, the associated consequential operation costs (opex) for the upgraded street and town square will be incorporated into respective future programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     The Pukekohe Market Precinct project has a close spatial relationship with the Edinburgh Street superblock site sale/redevelopment project (another flagship project in the heart of the Pukekohe Town Centre under the Unlock Pukekohe Programme). The superblock is scheduled to go to market early next year. Effective coordination between these two projects is essential to carefully address the proposed design development and construction timeline, prevent prolonged disruptions or damages to ongoing works. Eke Panuku will append the approved concept plan to the development agreement for the superblock to ensure compliance from the future development/s.

37.     The project faces moderate risks from the delay in obtaining stakeholder and consenting authority approvals. The project team will seek proactive engagement, open communication, and feedback incorporation.

38.     The project might face cost escalation due to the lack of detailed underground infrastructure and service study. To address this, a 30% contingency has been factored in the project estimate; and an early detailed survey should be undertaken in the developed design phase to inform more accurate assessment.

39.     During construction, adjoining shop and property owners may face challenges such as noise, dust, vibrations, and limited accessibility. To address these challenges, clear communication and proactive engagement will be undertaken in advance of disruptions to mitigate concerns.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Upon receiving approval for the concept plan, Eke Panuku will progress with the developed design and consenting in the beginning of 2024.

41.     The Franklin Local Board will continue to be updated regularly on project progress through the developed design into the construction and delivery phase of the project.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pukekohe Market Precinct Concept Plan

35

b

Summary of community feedback from the 2022 Masterplan Consultation and proposed responses in the Market Precinct Concept Plan

37

c

Pukekohe Market Precinct_ Summary Design Report

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carlos Rahman - Principal Governance and Engagement Advisor

Yu-Ning Liu - Senior Strategic Project Manager

Authorisers

Richard Davison - Priority Location Director, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Manoj Rajupathy – Local Area Manager Franklin, Papakura, Manurewa

 

 



Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 



Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Local Board views on Notice of Requirement for a Wastewater Treatment Plant at 372 Glenbrook Beach Road, Glenbrook

File No.: CP2023/17332

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite the Franklin Local Board’s views on a Notice of Requirement (‘NoR’) lodged by Watercare Services Limited (‘Watercare’) for a new Wastewater Treatment Plant (‘WWTP’) at 372 Glenbrook Beach Road, Glenbrook (‘the site’).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a NoR to the Auckland Unitary Plan (‘AUP’) must consider local boards’ views on the NoR if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including NoRs. A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board.[1]

4.       Watercare, as the Requiring Authority, has served a NoR on Auckland Council for a designation for a new WWTP at 372 Glenbrook Beach Road, Glenbrook. The site is 56.06 ha in size and has a split zoning, with the majority of the site being zoned Rural – Mixed Rural Zone and the remainder at the coastal edge being the Rural – Mixed Coast Zone and the Coastal – General Coastal Marine Zone.

5.       The purpose of the designation is for the “construction, operation and maintenance of infrastructure for wastewater treatment purposes, including a wastewater treatment plant, and the provision of an odour buffer area around the wastewater treatment plant”.

6.       The NoR was publicly notified on 13 October 2023 and submissions closed on 13 November 2023.

7.       A total of 275 submissions were received on the NoR.

8.       The key themes arising from submissions include:

·    General opposition to the WWTP;

·    Alternative site/s for the WWTP;

·    Extent of land subject to the NoR;

·    Additional mitigation to maintain amenity values;

·    Risks of odour discharge and the effects on people and produce; and

·    Managing the effects of construction.

9.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on the NoR. Staff do not recommend a view the local board should convey.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on the Notice of Requirement for a new wastewater treatment plant at 372 Glenbrook Beach Road, Glenbrook

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing (if one is held) on the Notice of Requirement

c)       delegate authority to the chairperson of Franklin Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the Notice of Requirement hearing.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents. Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.[2]

11.     The NoR is intended to add a new designation to the AUP. Local boards must have the opportunity to provide their views where any process proposes a change to the AUP.

12.     If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the section 42a hearing report (‘the hearing report’). Local board views are included in the analysis of the NoR, along with all submissions.

13.     If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who will make a recommendation on the NoR.

14.     Following receipt of the recommendation, the Requiring Authority would be required to advise the council, within 30 working days, whether they accept or reject the recommendation in whole or in part.

15.     Once the council has received a decision from the Requiring Authority, submitters will be advised and are then given an opportunity to lodge an appeal with the Environment Court if they are not satisfied with the outcome. Auckland Council will also have the opportunity at this stage to appeal the decision.

16.     This report provides an overview of the NoR and a summary of the key themes in submissions.

17.     The report does not recommend what views the local board should convey. Staff cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Watercare served Auckland Council with the NoR on 1 September 2023 to designate 372 Glenbrook Beach Road, Glenbrook. The purpose of the NoR is for the “construction, operation and maintenance of infrastructure for wastewater treatment purposes, including a wastewater treatment plant, and the provision of an odour buffer area around the wastewater treatment plant”.

19.     Watercare has indicated the need for a sub-regional WWTP to manage future growth in the ‘southwest’ area (including Waiuku, Clarks Beach, Glenbrook Beach and Kingseat) given the capacity constraints of the three existing small wastewater treatment plants at Clarks Beach, Waiuku and Kingseat.

20.     The proposed WWTP is expected to service a long-term population equivalent of 60,000 in Southwest Auckland. The development of the WWTP will be staged to provide capacity in line with population growth.

21.     Within the site, the land subject to the NoR (approximately 54.68 ha) is predominately zoned Rural – Mixed Rural with a smaller part of the land adjoining the coast being zoned Rural – Rural Coast Zone. Outside of the area subject to the NoR is the Coastal – General Coastal Marine Zone.

22.     Figure 1 shows the location of the proposed NoR and the AUP zonings in the vicinity.

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Figure 1: Location of proposed NoR and AUP zonings

23.     The detailed design of the WWTP will be determined at a later stage through an Outline Plan of Works. Watercare has provided a concept plan to show a possible layout of the facilities and the overall site plan (Figure 2).

A map of a land

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Figure 2: Concept plan for proposed WWTP

24.     Watercare has provided a description of the subject site in the Assessment of Environmental Effects (‘AEE’). Having undertaken a site visit on 10 August 2023, I concur with the description of the site and note that:

·        The bulk of the site is currently used for market gardening. There are two large farming sheds at the end of an unsealed access path, near the middle of the site. Two constructed ponds are also located onsite for the purposes of irrigation. The pond closest to the road is fed from a bore on the site, and in turn feeds the second pond which straddles the northern boundary of the site.

·        Natural features on the site include two watercourses, three natural inland wetlands and areas of salt marsh adjacent to the Coastal Marine Area.

·        The site has a gently undulating topography with the highest point of the site being situated near its centre. The site slopes downward in a northeast direction towards the Taihiki River.

·        Land uses immediately around the site include horticulture, farming and rural lifestyle blocks. Dwellings are present in adjoining sites and in adjacent sites across Glenbrook Beach Road.

·        The surrounding environment is rural in nature, and are predominately zoned Rural – Mixed Rural with the Rural – Coastal zone aligning the eastern coast of the peninusla. At the northern end of the peninsula contains an urban node consisting of sites zoned Residential – Single House Zone, Business – Neighbourhood Centre Zone and the Future Urban Zone. At 80 McLarin Road, Glenbrook, proposed Private Plan Change 91 aims to rezone the site from Future Urban zone to Residential – Mixed Housing Suburban zone.

Section 92 further information request

 

25.     A section 92 request for further information was sent to Watercare on 15 September 2023. Watercare’s response was received on 4 October 2023.

26.     The section 92 request asked for further information in relation to various matters including adverse effects, potential mitigation measures including conditions. In summary the section 92 relates to the following matters:

·        Conditions

·        Planning matters (including background to the buffer and future expansion)

·        Mana Whenua engagement 

·        Landscape and visual amenity

·        Natural hazards

·        Transport (including access, transport modelling and conditions)

·        Acoustics

·        Heritage and archaeology

27.     The NoR was publicly notified once it was determined that the response to the s92 was sufficient.

Themes from submissions received

28.     A total of 275 submissions were received on the NoR. Six submitters were in support of the NoR, one submitter was neutral and 268 submitters were opposed to the NoR.

29.     Individual submissions can be made available to the local board upon request.

30.     Key submission themes are discussed below.

General opposition to the WWTP

31.     The most common theme arising from the submissions was general opposition to the establishment of a WWTP in Glenbrook Beach.

32.     Submitters oppose the WWTP for the following reasons:

·        Pollution and degradation of the Manukau Harbour from wastewater discharge

·        Health and safety concerns for recreational users of the Manukau Harbour

·        Effects on visual amenity and landscape character

·        Impacts on the attractiveness of the local environment and rural lifestyle

·        Effects of odour on people and produce

·        Effects of construction, particularly in terms of construction traffic and effects on Glenbrook Beach Road

·        Effects on property values

·        There are more appropriate locations to locate the WWTP

·        The AEE has not sufficiently determined the scale and significance of effects

·        The WWTP should not be located on land with productive soils

·        The community has not been adequately consulted

33.     The most common reason for opposing the WWTP relates to concerns around the discharge of treated wastewater from the consented discharge point at Clarks Beach into the Manukau Harbour.

34.     Submitters are concerned about the potential impacts of discharge on the recreational uses in the harbour including fishing, swimming and other water activities. The health of the marine environment and the water quality of the Manukau Harbour was also raised.

35.     Submitters have requested that the discharge point be extended out into the Tasman Sea or that alternate methods of wastewater discharge be explored.

Alternative site/s for the WWTP

36.     Submitters oppose the location of the proposed WWTP at 372 Glenbrook Beach Road. Submitters consider that there are more appropriate ‘industrial’ locations for the WWTP.

37.     Submitters have suggested that the proposed WWTP be relocated next to the steel mill or the existing Waiuku plant is extended/upgraded.

Extent of land subject to NoR

38.     Submitters have requested that the extent of the NoR be reduced to cover only the area required to accommodate the plant facilities (i.e. down to approximately 6 ha).

Additional mitigation to maintain amenity values

39.     Concerns were raised by submitters about the effectiveness of the mitigation plantings proposed.

40.     To reduce effects on visual amenity, some submitters are seeking additional or enhanced mitigation measures such as bunds with planting atop to hide the WWTP from view.

Risks of odour discharge and the effects on people and produce

41.     Several submitters are concerned about odour being detectable outside of the site which is expected to adversely affect the amenity of residential properties and ‘taint’ produce from nearby orchards.

42.     Submitters have sought mitigation measures such as air quality monitoring and installation of air conditioning at their property.

43.     The majority of submitters consider that the proposed odour buffer (200m from the primary plant facilities to the site boundary) is insufficient.

Managing the effects of construction

44.     Submitters are concerned that the construction of the WWTP will put increased pressure on Glenbrook Beach Road, which is said to have a poor safety record. Submitters have also expressed concern with regards to other construction effects including vibration, dust, noise and reduced overall amenity for the local area.

45.     Submitters are concerned with the construction effects of the conveyance pipeline associated with the WWTP but which does not form part of the NoR. Submitters request that Glenbrook Beach Road is not excavated to install the pipeline in order to minimise effects on the users of Glenbrook Beach Road.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

46.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to adapt to the impacts of climate change by planning for the changes we will face (climate adaptation)

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050 (climate mitigation)

47.     As part of the site selection process, Watercare has considered the relative impact of greenhouse gas emissions that may result from its selection of a preferred site from the alternatives available. Watercare has identified considerable potential whole of life carbon savings if the proposed WWTP is located in close proximity to the consented discharge point at Clarks Beach as this will reduce the length of the conveyance infrastructure, and pumping requirements.

48.     Generally, longer conveyance pipelines and higher pumping requirements equates to greater climate impacts as greenhouse gas emissions will be generated from the construction of the conveyance infrastructure, and from the energy required to pump wastewater.

49.     The potential effects of climate change on an operational WWTP have also been considered in the AEE and accompanying specialist reports:

·    The calculated stormwater runoff rates will take into account the potential impacts of climate change; 

·    Assets will be located away from flood plains and overland flow paths where possible; and

·    The AEE also notes that the works are located above the areas where coastal inundation is modelled to occur.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     Watercare has sought Auckland Transport (‘AT’) advice in regard to any future upgrades of Glenbrook Beach Road in front of the site. Watercare has expressed an intention to consult with AT post the NoR process on the Construction Traffic Management Plan, potential widening of the existing vehicle crossing and potential upgrades to the road along its site frontage.

51.     AT was directly notified of the NoR at the time of notification. AT did not submit on the NoR. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The NoR falls within the Franklin Local Board area.

53.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view include:

·    local board documents, such as local board plan, local board agreement

·    responsibilities and operation of the local board

·    interests and preferences of people in local board area

·    well-being of communities within the local board area.

54.     Watercare advised that it presented updates on the WWTP and the lodgement timeframe at a meeting with the Franklin Local Board on 4 July 2023.

55.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the NoR.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on the NoR, this includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori world view).

57.     Watercare has stated that it has an established process for iwi engagement which applies to all its projects which affect the strategic interests of mana whenua in the region. This process is known as the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.

58.     It is understood that the following mana whenua groups indicated an interest in the project when it was added to the Kaitiaki List in 2021:

·    Ngāti Te Ata;

·    Ngāti Tamaoho;

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua;

·    Ngāti Maru; and

·    Te Kawerau a Maki

59.     The key issues raised by Mana Whenua to date are as follows:

·    Cultural Significance of the whole area – including, Clarks Beach, Glenbrook Beach and Taihiki River;

·    Assets should be designed to maintain a sufficient distance from the coastal boundary;

·    Avoid draining wetlands around the site; and

·    Planting of native vegetation on the site.

60.     At the time of notification, all 19 iwi authorities in Tamaki Makaurau, Auckland were directly notified of the NoR. Submissions were received from Ngāti Te Ata and Ngāti Tamaoho opposing the NoR in its current form.

61.     Ngāti Te Ata raise concerns around the lack of conditions attached to the NoR which manage the quality of treated wastewater discharged from the plant. Ngāti Te Ata also request conditions that acknowledge the cultural importance of the area, such as the requirement to appoint a cultural advisor for the project and site.

62.     Ngāti Tamaoho requests assurances that mana whenua will be consulted in the construction and design of the WWTP.

63.     The hearing report will consider and make recommendations in response to these submissions. The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the RMA which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     There are no financial implications with the local board providing its views.

65.     The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views.

66.     The cost associated with processing the NoR requests is recoverable from Watercare.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of an NoR cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s). To avoid the procedural risk of an individual local board member expressing the views of the local board, this report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

68.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jimmy Zhang - Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Manoj Rajupathy – Local Area Manager Franklin, Papakura, Manurewa

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Local Board Views on eight Notices of Requirement from Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi for the Pukekohe Transport Network

File No.: CP2023/17428

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite the Franklin Local Board’s views on eight Notices of Requirement (NoRs) lodged by Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi for the Pukekohe Transport Network. The NoRs seek to designate land for route protection.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a Notice of Requirement to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local board views on the Notices of Requirement if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including NoRs. A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board.  

4.       Under the Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth Programme, Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi, have served eight Notices of Requirement (NoRs) on Auckland Council for the Pukekohe Transport Network. These NoRs include provision for improved walking and cycling, public transport, and general traffic connections in the area around Pukekohe. This includes a new state highway, four new transport corridors and associated upgrades, the upgrade of intersections in Pukekohe, and the upgrade of Helvetia Road, Mill Road (Bombay) and Pukekohe East Road.

5.       The NoRs were publicly notified on 13 October 2023 and submissions closed on 13 November 2023. 125 submissions were received across the eight NoRs, including from landowners, utility operators, and central government entities.  The key themes arising from submissions include the NoRs timeframe for implementation, the NoRs’ extent, location and design, and construction effects, traffic, construction and property acquisition.

6.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on the NoRs.  Staff do not recommend a view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on eight Notices of Requirement (NoRs) for the Pukekohe Transport Network.

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on the Notices of Requirement.

c)       delegate authority to the chairperson of Franklin Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the NoRs hearing.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents. [3]

8.       The Notices of Requirement are intended to add eight new designations (sought by Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi) to the Auckland Unitary Plan. Local boards must have the opportunity to provide their views where any process proposes a change to the Auckland Unitary Plan.

9.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planners include those views in the s42a hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the NoR, along with all submissions.

10.     If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who will make a recommendation on the NoRs.

11.     Following receipt of the recommendation, the Requiring Authorities would be required to advise the council, within 30 working days, whether they accept or reject the recommendation in whole or in part. Once the council has received a decision from the Requiring Authorities, submitters will be advised and are then given an opportunity to lodge an appeal with the Environment Court if they are not satisfied with the outcomes. Auckland Council will also have the opportunity at this stage to appeal the decisions.

12.     This report provides an overview of the eight NoRs and a summary of the key themes in submissions.

13.     The report does not recommend what views the local board should convey. Staff cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Notice of Requirement overview

14.     The Pukekohe Transport Network NORs are a package of eight Notices of Requirement (NoRs) lodged by Te Tupu Ngatahi Supporting Growth Alliance (SGA), on behalf of Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi. The eight NoRs seek to provide transport improvements to respond to the planned future growth of Pukekohe, Paerata and Drury.

15.     A summary of the NoRs is provided in Table 1 below.

 


 

Table 1: Description of Pukekohe Transport Network Package of NoRs

NoR

Project Name

Description

Requiring Authority

NoR 1

Drury West Arterial

A new transport corridor with active mode facilities in Drury West, extending south from the intersection of State Highway 22 and Jesmond Road to the edge of the Future Urban Zone near Runciman Road, Drury.

Auckland Transport

NoR 2

Drury – Pukekohe Link

A new state highway including a shared path from Great South Road, Drury in the north east, connecting State Highway 22 in the west, and the area in the vicinity of Sim Road/Cape Hill Road, Pukekohe in the south.

Waka Kotahi

NoR 3

Paerata Connections

Two new transport corridors including active mode facilities. One between the two extents of Sim Road, Paerata across the North Island Main Trunk Rail Line. The second between Paerata Rail Station and Sim Road, Paerata.

Auckland Transport

NoR 4

Pukekohe North-East Arterial

A new transport corridor including active mode facilities between State Highway 22, Paerata on the north west and Pukekohe East Road, Pukekohe in the south east

Auckland Transport

NoR 5

Pukekohe South-East Arterial

Upgrade of part of Pukekohe East Road and Golding Road, and a new connection from Golding Road to Svendsen Road, Pukekohe across Station Road and the North Island Main Trunk Rail Line - including active mode facilities.

Auckland Transport

NoR 6

Pukekohe South-West Upgrade

The upgrade of specific intersections and the regrade of specific driveways on Nelson Street, Ward Street, West Street and Helvetia Road for active mode facilities.

Auckland Transport

NoR 7

Pukekohe North-West Upgrade

The upgrade of Helvetia Road, Pukekohe in the south-west and a new corridor from Helvetia Road to SH22 Paerata in the north-east including active mode facilities.

Auckland Transport

NoR 8

Mill Road and Pukekohe East Road Upgrade

An upgrade of Mill Road (Bombay) in the east for additional vehicle lanes and a shared path and an upgrade of Pukekohe East Road, Pukekohe in the west for a shared path.

Waka Kotahi

 

16.     It should be noted that NoR 8 (Mill Road and Pukekohe East Road Upgrade) is located within both Auckland and Waikato, so a Notice of Requirement has also been lodged with the Waikato District Council.

17.     The location of each of the eight NoRs are shown on Figure 1 below:

A map of a city

Description automatically generated

18.     The indicative construction timeframes reported by the Requiring Authorities for each project are outlined below[4]. The projects are expected to be constructed in a generally staged method along the corridor with a lapse date of 20 years.

Notice

Project

Approximate duration of construction

NoR 1

Drury West Arterial

3 to 4 years

NoR 2

Drury – Pukekohe Link

3 to 4 years

NoR 3

Paerata Connections

1 to 2 years

 

NoR 4

Pukekohe North-East Arterial

3 to 4 years

 

NoR 5

Pukekohe South-East Arterial

3 to 4 years

 

NoR 6

Pukekohe South-West Upgrade

3 to 4 years

NoR 7

Pukekohe North-West Upgrade

2 to 3 years

 

NoR 8

Mill Road and Pukekohe East Road Upgrade

3 to 4 years

 

19.     The NoRs include technical reports that evaluate:

·    Landscape and visual effects

·    Urban design

·    Construction noise and vibration

·    Operational traffic noise and vibration

·    Transport effects

·    Flooding effects

·    Archaeological and heritage effects

·    Arboricultural effects

·    Ecological effects

20.     The reports and other application details are available from council’s website at https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/notices-of-requirement-to-designate-land/Pages/default.aspx

21.     Council’s planners, and other experts, have evaluated and will report on:

·    technical reports supplied by the applicant

·    submissions

·    views and preferences of the local board, if the local board passes a resolution.

22.     The Requiring Authorities requested that the NoRs be publicly notified. The NoRs were publicly notified on 13 October 2023 and submissions closed on 13 November 2023.

Themes from submissions received

23.     A total of 125 submissions were received as shown in Table 2 below. At the time of writing this includes no late submissions.

 

Table 2: Submissions received on NoRs

Notice

Project

Number of Submissions

NoR 1

Drury West Arterial

8

NoR 2

Drury – Pukekohe Link

30

NoR 3

Paerata Connections

8

NoR 4

Pukekohe North-East Arterial

12

NoR 5

Pukekohe South-East Arterial

22

NoR 6

Pukekohe South-West Upgrade

14

NoR 7

Pukekohe North-West Upgrade

15

NoR 8

Mill Road and Pukekohe East Road Upgrade

16

TOTAL

 

125

 

24.     Table 3 provides an overview of the support or opposition registered for each of the NORs and overall.

Table 3. Overview of the support and opposition to each of the NORs

NoR

Number of Submissions

Support / Support in part or with amendments

Neutral / Unclear

Oppose / Oppose in part

NoR 1 Drury West Arterial

8

3

3

2

NoR 2 Drury – Pukekohe Link

30

3

4

23

NoR 3 Paerata Connections

8

3

3

2

NoR 4 Pukekohe North-East Arterial

12

5

6

1

NoR 5 Pukekohe South-East Arterial

22

2

5

15

NoR 6 Pukekohe South-West Upgrade

14

2

4

8

NoR 7 Pukekohe North-West Upgrade

15

3

3

9

NoR 8 Mill Road and Pukekohe East Road Upgrade

16

4

7

5

TOTAL

125

25

35

65

 

25.     Key submission themes across all eight NoRs are listed below.

·    Impact on agriculturally productive land;

·    Stormwater and flooding impacts;

·    Construction effects (dust, noise, vibration);

·    Operational effects (visual dominance, lighting, air pollution, noise, traffic congestion etc.)

·    Consideration of alternative routes;

·    Support for the route protection

·    Alignment with other infrastructure (e.g. telecommunications)

·    The proposed lapse period and the number of years until the proposed designations are likely to be given effect to, and the resulting impacts on potential future property development and property sale;

·    Questions over traffic modelling used; and

·    Concerns about how properties will be accessed.

26.     Information on individual submissions and the summary of all decisions requested by submitters will be reported in the hearing report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

28.     The local board could consider if the NoRs:

·    will reduce, increase, or have no effect on Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (e.g., does it encourage car dependency, enhance connections to public transit, walking and cycling or support quality compact urban form)

·    prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.  That is, do the NoRs elevate or alleviate climate risks (e.g., flooding, coastal and storm inundation, urban heat effect, stress on infrastructure).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi are the requiring authorities that have lodged the NoRs.

30.     Watercare have submitted on the NoRs.  Watercare neither supports or opposes these NoRs (ie it is neutral as to whether the NoRs are confirmed or not). Watercare seeks to ensure that any decisions made avoids, remedies or mitigates potential adverse effects on Watercare’s ability to provide water and wastewater services now and in the future. Watercare seeks continued engagement with the Requiring Authorities on the NORs planning and supports a collaborative approach to delivery of assets in the shared utility corridors.

31.     The council’s Healthy Waters department have specialists who will contribute to the reporting planners’ hearing report.

32.     The council’s Plans and Places department have specialists and consultants within the project team for arboriculture, archaeology, built heritage, landscape, urban design, ecology, noise, and transportation who will contribute to the reporting planners’ hearing report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     The Notices of Requirement fall within the Franklin Local Board area.

34.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view include:

·    interests and preferences of people in local board area

·    well-being of communities within the local board area

·    local board documents, such as local board plan, local board agreement

·    responsibilities and operation of the local board.

35.     The SGA have advised that they have provided regular updates, presentations and attendance at meetings with the Franklin Local Board. They have also advised that feedback was received from the Franklin Local Board on 27 June 2023.

36.     Feedback at that stage is informal.  Restrictions on delegations prevent that informal feedback from being the views of the local board[5].

37.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views.  The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the NoRs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on the NoRs, it includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori world view).  In the 2018 census results, there were 74,838 people usually resident in the local board area with 15% identifying as being of Māori ethnicity and 18% being of Māori descent.

39.     The SGA have advised the project team engaged with Mana Whenua on the Pukekohe Transport Network throughout the development of the Project, primarily through the Te Tupu Ngātahi Mana whenua forum.


 

40.     They also advised that they met with Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua individually at the request of their representative. Additionally, Waikato Tainui advised SGA for NoR 8 Mill Road-Pukekohe East Road Upgrade that they defer to Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaoho and Te Ākitai Waiohua.

41.     The SGA advised that all Mana Whenua groups were invited to prepare to prepare CIAs for the project in December 2021. The team received the below responses following on from the invitation:

·    The Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua informed the options assessment and a CIA to inform the concept design and AEE.

42.     The SGA have advised that the upgraded and new transport corridors do not directly affect any identified properties or land currently being negotiated under Treaty settlements, land returned under a Treaty settlement, marae, Māori freehold lands, Tupuna Maunga Affected Areas, Tangata Whenua Management Areas, or Sites of Significance under the Auckland Unitary Plan.

43.     No mana whenua groups have submitted on the NoRs.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views.

46.     The cost associated with processing the NoR requests is recoverable from Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of Notices of Requirement cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).  To avoid the procedural risk of an individual local board member expressing the views of the local board, this report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     The reporting planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing report.  The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Joe McDougall - Planner

Authorisers

Craig Cairncross – Team Leader - Planning

John Duguid  - General Manager Plans and Places

Manoj Rajupathy, Local Area Manager Franklin Papakura and Manurewa

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group

File No.: CP2023/16308

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Play Leadership Group for elected members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have included play advocacy projects in their 2023/2024 work programmes and are seeking opportunities to increase play diversity within their parts of the region.

3.       The council’s play advocacy advisor has established a staff network of play champions to support the ongoing development and promotion of play opportunities. When the Play Advisory Group was promoted on the council’s Kotahi intranet in 2022, some elected members asked to participate.

4.       To further support local board play advocacy activities and to respond to the appetite for increased play participation from some elected members, a Play Leadership Group is proposed. This will be a version of the staff play network, except just for elected members.

5.       As the terms of reference in Attachment A confirm, the Play Leadership Group will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision of the group will be “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

6.       The Play Leadership Group will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about play in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for play within their local boards, and to provide informal guidance to relevant staff on play issues.

7.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

8.       Staff recommend a quarterly meeting schedule for the Play Leadership Group. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes from the meetings.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Play Leadership Group.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Auckland Council employed its first play advocacy advisor in September 2022. The role leads advocacy work in the area of play at Auckland Council and advocates for and influences the consideration, empowerment, enablement and equitable promotion of play.

10.     Play advocacy is an initiative in 17 local board work programmes for the 2023/2024 financial year. Three local boards do not have capacity to include play advocacy in their work programmes for 2023/2024, but have asked for ad-hoc advocacy support and will consider including play advocacy in their 2024/2025 work programmes.

11.     The play advocacy advisor has a responsibility to establish a network of play champions within council, to increase knowledge and awareness of play across the council group. The advisor established a Play Advisory Group in 2022 which has grown to include 45 play champions from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, and other organisations affiliated with the council, including Auckland Zoo, Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand Maritime Museum, and Stardome Observatory and Planetarium.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local boards have embraced the play advocacy approach and indicated interest to explore how they can increase play diversity for their communities and achieve play outcomes through different projects.

13.     After several local board workshops, elected members showed a strong personal interest in play. There are high levels of enthusiasm for play discussions and a keen interest in understanding more about how to promote play.

14.     In November 2022 the council’s Kotahi intranet published a story about play advocacy and publicised the staff Play Advisory Group. Some elected members contacted the play advocacy advisor and asked if they could join the group. However, the group’s terms of reference restrict membership to staff only.

15.     During workshops with local boards in 2023, the play advocacy advisor sought guidance from elected members regarding their appetite for participating in an equivalent special interest group for elected members with a strong interest in play.

16.     In response to local boards’ interest, the play advocacy advisor has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of a Play Leadership Group, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·        learn more about play

·        share relevant knowledge with other elected members

·        improve connections between participants at a governance level

·        encourage collaboration between local boards to support play outcomes

·        increase knowledge and understanding of play equity issues

·        provide informal guidance to staff as the play advocacy work area grows

·        share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

17.     The vision of the Play Leadership Group is “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

18.     Participation in the Play Leadership Group is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint elected members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes of the group’s meetings.

19.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

20.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Play Leadership Group and provides further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet four times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed by the participating elected members.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The formation and operation of the Play Leadership Group has no climate impact.

22.     The continued advocacy to support play as ‘an everywhere activity’ supports positive climate outcomes by encouraging the community to embrace local suburbs as sites for play. This approach will reduce the need to drive to reach playgrounds.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Play Leadership Group will be administered by staff from the council’s Active Communities team, with support from kaimahi in the Regional Services and Strategy and Parks and Community Facilities departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The play advocacy advisor has presented at 20 local boards between March and October 2023.

25.     Local boards have expressed interest in the formation of a governance-level group for elected members who are interested in play. One local board requested that the opportunity to participate was presented in a business report, to enable participation to be formally agreed by the board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Play Leadership Group will provide play leaders with opportunities to learn more about Māori values relevant to play, Sport New Zealand’s bicultural play plan and its relevance to the development of play activities nationwide, and current and potential Māori play opportunities. This includes opportunities to develop and install māra hūpara in local parks and reserves, and the potential for projects such as Te Kete Rukuruku to generate play outcomes.

27.     The play leaders could also provide a mechanism for regional iwi engagement regarding play on a relatively informal basis, enabling mana whenua to share their views about play on an ongoing basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The Play Leadership Group will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that elected members could become members of the Play Leadership Group with expectations that they will be able to influence broader play investment or make decisions affecting play at a regional level.

30.     The terms of reference are intended to mitigate the risk of misunderstandings by making clear the scope of the Play Leadership Group. This will ensure participants become involved with a realistic expectation of what can be achieved through their membership.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Play Leadership Group will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

32.     An initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023

 

.Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Play Leadership Group

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacquelyn Collins – Play Advocacy Advisor – Active Communities

Authorisers

Pippa Sommerville - Manager Sport & Recreation

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Governance Forward Work calendar / Hōtaka Kaupapa for November 2023

File No.: CP2023/12581

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Franklin Local Board with a governance forward work calendar (Hōtaka Kaupapa).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work programme, a schedule of items that will come before the Franklin Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work programme for the local board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed.

5.       Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar (Hōtaka Kaupapa) dated November 2023 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa November 2023

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2023/12578

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31 October 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board holds weekly workshops to facilitate oversight of projects in their work programme or on matters that have significant local implications.

3.       The local board does not make decisions at these workshops. Workshops are not open to the public, but records are reported retrospectively.

4.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for on 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31 October 2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for on 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31 October 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board workshop record 3 October 2023

95

b

Franklin Local Board workshop record 10 October 2023

97

c

Franklin Local Board workshop record 17 October 2023

99

d

Franklin Local Board workshop record 24 October 2023

101

e

Franklin Local Board workshop record 31 October 2023

103

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 



Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Establishment of the Pukekohe Cemetery Committee

File No.: CP2023/16495

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To establish a committee of the Franklin Local Board, to be known as the Pukekohe Cemetery Committee.

2.       To delegate to the committee the local board’s powers and responsibilities to provide guidance for the memorial project in the Pukekohe Cemetery, including decision-making responsibility in relation to the allocation of Māori Outcomes funding for the project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       In early 2023, Māori community members requested a meeting with Auckland Council to discuss the history of racism towards Māori in Pukekohe.

4.       Representatives of the Māori community requested a memorial of some kind for the unmarked graves of tamariki and other Māori in the Pukekohe Cemetery.

5.       Pukekohe Cemetery is not an active cemetery and is managed as a local park under the delegations of the Franklin Local Board.

6.       Franklin Local Board wishes to support the Pukekohe Māori community to develop a memorial to the unmarked graves in the Pukekohe Cemetery and has determined, in consultation with representatives from Nga Hau e Wha Marae, that a committee of the Franklin Local Board is the preferred mechanism to help achieve this.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      Establishes a committee, to be known as the Pukekohe Cemetery Committee to provide guidance for the memorial project in the Pukekohe Cemetery, including decision-making responsibility in relation to the allocation of Māori Outcomes funding for the project.

b)      Agrees that the committee will comprise two members from the Franklin Local Board, and seven representatives from the Pukekohe Māori Community.

c)       Agrees the draft Terms of Reference set out in Attachment A to this report.

Appoint the Chair, one other member and an alternative to the committee as representatives of the Franklin Local Board.

d)      Delegate to the Chair, Angela Fulljames, power to confirm appointments to the committee put forward by a resolution of Ngā Hau E Wha Marae Trust.

Horopaki

Context

 

7.       In early 2023, Māori community members requested a meeting with Auckland Council to discuss the history of racism towards Māori in Pukekohe.


 

8.       Representatives of the Māori community requested that three factors be addressed:

a)      An acknowledgement and apology for racist treatment

b)      A memorial of some kind for the unmarked graves of tamariki and other Māori in the Pukeohe Cemetery.

c)      Support to record and share oral histories of kaumatua and kuia in Pukekohe, including the development of educational material for schools.

9.       The proposal outlined in this report, addresses element b), being a memorial for the unmarked graves of tamariki Māori in the Pukekohe Cemetery.

10.     Funding for this project has been confirmed through the Māori Outcomes fund, with $200,000 allocated for 2024/2025 to deliver governance arrangements, community engagement, concept design and detailed design.  A further $500,000 has been earmarked for 2025/2026 for physical delivery of the memorial.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Pukekohe Cemetery is not an active cemetery and is managed as a local park under the delegations of the Franklin Local Board.

12.     Franklin Local Board wishes to support the Pukekohe Māori community to develop a memorial to the unmarked graves in the Pukekohe Cemetery and has determined, in consultation with representatives from Nga Hau e Wha Marae, that a committee of the Franklin Local Board is the preferred mechanism to help achieve this.

13.     The draft Terms of Reference (Attachment A) for the committee were developed through collaboration between the Franklin Local Board and representatives of Nga Hau E Wha Marae on behalf of the Pukekohe Māori community.

14.     The purpose of the committee is to provide governance and guidance for the memorial project in the Pukekohe Cemetery, including decision-making responsibility in relation to the allocation of Māori Outcomes funding for the project.  Key responsibilities are detailed in the draft Terms of Reference.

15.     The membership of the committee is proposed to comprise up to seven (7) representatives from the Pukekohe Māori Community, and two (2) representatives from the Franklin Local Board.

16.     Representatives of the Pukekohe Māori community have been selected by Nga Hau E Wha Marae Trust through a process determined by the Trust in October 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency and has developed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

18.     Establishing this committee has neutral climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Initial conversations with the Pukekohe Māori Community were led by council staff from Ngā Mātārae and Governance, with political support from elected members.

20.     Parks and Community Facilities is the Auckland Council department responsible for ongoing maintenance of the Pukekohe Cemetery, and can assist the committee on the project, including with community engagement, developing concept and detailed design, and delivery of the final design.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority.

22.     This proposal responds to the Franklin Local Board Plan 2023, ‘Our People’ outcome, objective ‘Partner with the community to recognise and commemorate local history’, key initiative: “Collaborate with the Pukekohe Māori community to acknowledge historical racism and respond to the unmarked graves in the Pukekohe Cemetery”.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The draft Terms of Reference was jointly developed by the Franklin Local Board and representatives from the Pukekohe Māori Community, with the support of representatives from Nga Hau e Wha Marae.

24.     Co-designing the memorial with Māori allows Council to deliver on our Te Tiriti partnership obligations and delivers to the following Māori Outcomes from Kia ora Tamaki Makaurau:

·    Kia ora Te Whanau (wellbeing for local Māori through restorative process, addressing hurt); 

·    Kia ora Te Ahurea (co-design of memorial with Māori will result in a memorial that reflects Māori culture and identity)

·    Kia ora Te Hononga (co-design with Māori as partnership).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     Funding for this project has been confirmed through the Māori Outcomes fund. The Māori Outcomes fund allocates $150 million over ten years for activities that directly contribute to the Māori identity and wellbeing outcome and other sections of the Auckland Plan 2050.

26.     $200,000 was allocated by the Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Enablement Board on 13th June 2023 for 2024/2025 to deliver governance arrangements, community engagement, concept design and detailed design. 

27.     A further $500,000 from the Māori Outcomes fund has been earmarked for 2025/2026 for physical delivery of the memorial.

28.     Given the Council’s wider financial constraints, there is a risk that funding allocated may be lost through the 10-year budget process.

29.     To mitigate against this, the project should progress to complete detailed design by June 2024.

30.     The Franklin Local Board will have the opportunity to advocate through the 10-year budget process for the earmarked $500,000 funding for delivery to be retained.

31.     The public, including the Māori Community in Pukekohe, will have the opportunity to support the retention of Māori Outcomes Funding  in the 10-year budget through the consultation process in February – March 2024.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Given the Council’s wider financial constraints, there is a risk that funding allocated may be lost through the 10-year budget process.

33.     To mitigate against this, the project should progress to complete detailed design by June 2024.

34.     Submissions from the community in support of retaining Māori Outcomes funding will also mitigate this risk.

35.     The Franklin Local Board will need to advocate through the 10-year budget process for the earmarked $500,000 funding for delivery to be retained.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Following establishment of the committee, the committee will meet to confirm the scope of the project, and the approach to wider community engagement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pukekohe Cemetery Committee Terms of Reference

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lucy Stallworthy - Senior Māori Outcomes and Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

10-year Budget 2024-2034 - local consultation content

File No.: CP2023/18247

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve local consultation content and supporting information as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 process, along with a local engagement event.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement that is agreed between the Governing Body and the local board in each local board area. These agreements set out local board priorities and the local activities to be provided for the year. The 21 local board agreements for 2024/2025 will be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

3.       Consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024. Content relating to each local board agreement must be included as part of that consultation.

4.       This report seeks approval from the local board for local consultation content. It also seeks approval of a Have Your Say event to be held in the local board area to give Aucklanders an opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback during the consultation period.

5.       The Governing Body will approve regional items for consultation on 6 December 2023. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation document and supporting information, which is also planned to be adopted by the Governing Body in February 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve local consultation document content (Attachment A) and local supporting information content (Attachment B) for inclusion in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation material.

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the local board Chair Angela Fulljames to approve any changes required to finalise the local consultation document and supporting information content for the Franklin Local Board for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034. 

c)       whakaae / approve the following Have Your Say event in the local board area during the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation period:

i)       Hearing, Tuesday 26 March, 5pm at the Leslie Comrie Board Room, L1, 12 Massey Avenue, Pukekohe with attendance available via MS Teams video-conference.

d)      tautapa / delegate authority to the local board Chair to approve any changes required to the Have Your Say event.

e)      tautapa / delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events during the consultation period for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034:

i)       local board members and Chair

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Area Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Group Chief Financial Officer.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Council is required to adopt a 10-year budget (Long-Term Plan or LTP) every three years. The LTP sets out the priorities and funding for council activities that are planned over a 10-year period. It includes financial and non-financial information for the whole Auckland Council group.  The Governing Body is responsible for adopting the 10-year budget, and will be adopting the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 in June 2024.

7.       Auckland Council is required to consult on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 using the special consultative procedure set out in the Local Government Act 2002. The Budget Committee will be deciding on items for consultation for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 on 6 December 2023. Local Boards have the opportunity to provide input into the regional topics for consultation for consideration by the Budget Committee.

8.       For each financial year, Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board) for each local board area. These local board agreements are included in each year’s annual budget, or the 10-year budget (every three years).

9.       Local board agreements set out how the council will reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board’s plan through the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

10.     Content relating to each local board agreement must be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation document and supporting information.

11.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

12.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation period through a variety of channels, which include face-to-face (for spoken and New Zealand sign language interaction), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Local boards held workshops during November 2023 to determine their proposed priorities for their 2024/2025 local board agreement. Each local board is now requested to approve its local consultation document and supporting information content for inclusion in the consultation material for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (Attachments A and B respectively).

14.     Should changes be required to the local consultation content during the document production, they will be provided to the local board chair for approval.

15.     The Council is required to use the special consultative procedure set out in the Local Government Act 2002 when consulting on the 10-year Budget (LTP).  The special consultative procedure requires, among other things, the council to provide an opportunity for people to present their views to the council in a manner that enables ‘spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction’ between the person and the council’s decision-makers or their official delegates.

16.     Further, people who wish to have their views on the proposed content of the local board agreement 2024/2025 and 10-year Budget 2024-2034 considered by Auckland Council should be provided a reasonable opportunity to present those views in a manner and format that is appropriate to their preferences and needs.

17.     The recommended Have Your Say events, along with the recommended delegation to elected members and staff to hear from the public ensures that the Council is meeting its obligations relating to consultation

18.     The Have Your Say event recommended to be held in the Franklin Local Board area is:

·        Hearing, Tuesday 26 March, 5pm at the Leslie Comrie Board Room, L1, 12 Massey Avenue, Pukekohe with attendance available via MS Teams video-conference.

19.     Other Have Your Say events will also take place across the region along with a range of ways for people to engage with the council during the consultation period.  There will also be online information available and the opportunity to submit written or digital feedback. Note that the proposed date for the Have Your Say event will be checked with Ward Councillor/s to ensure they are able to attend.

20.     The consultation period does not begin for a couple of months. If circumstances change between now and the consultation period requiring any changes to the approved Have Your Say event, these will be provided to the local board chair for approval in line with the recommended delegation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The decision to consult is procedural in nature and the small scale of the Have Your Say events means any climate change impacts will be negligible. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

22.     However, where practicable, events proposed will be in locations accessible by public transport, to reduce private vehicle travel and increase opportunities for attendance.  

23.     Some of the proposed initiatives or projects included in the consultation content may have climate change impacts. The impacts of any initiatives or projects Auckland Council chooses to progress as a result of this consultation will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is an Auckland Council group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level.

25.     Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group. This will be reflected in the report on regional consultation items going to the Budget Committee on 6 December 2023.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Local board chairs have been invited to be involved in the development of the regional topics for consultation by attending Budget Committee workshops. Local board members were invited to attend eleven separate 10-year Budget 2024-2034 briefings summarising topics discussed at Budget Committee workshops.

27.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 process.


 

28.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals through the public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034. All feedback received from submitters that indicate that they reside in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. The local board agreement and 10-year Budget 2024-2034 are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. The local board plan adopted in November 2023 forms the basis for local priorities.

30.     The approach to Māori engagement for 10-year Budget 2024-2034 will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials.

31.     There is a need to continue to build local board relationships with iwi and the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist the local board and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and challenges.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     There may be marginal costs associated for Have-Your-Say events including venue hire (where council premises cannot be utilised).

33.     After consultation local boards will make decisions on local spending in the local board agreement with financial impacts that affect local communities. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires content relating to each local board agreement to be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation document. Under the Local Government Act 2002, the consultation document for the 10-year Budget must be audited.  The draft consultation document (including local consultation content) will be prepared by staff and audited in December 2023 and January 2024 ahead of adoption by the Budget Committee in mid-February 2024.  Therefore, local boards need to approve their local consultation content for inclusion in the draft consultation document by the end of November 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The Budget Committee will agree items for consultation and approve the consultation approach for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 on 6 December 2023.

36.     Following the decisions of the local board to approve local consultation content, and the decisions of the Budget Committee on regional items for consultation, staff will prepare the consultation document and supporting information for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.  These will be adopted by the Budget Committee in mid-February 2024.

37.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and the local board will make decisions on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and local board agreements respectively in June 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board consultation document

119

b

Franklin Local Board supporting information

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Phoebe Peguero – Senior Advisor Operations and Policy, Local Board Services

Renee Burgers – Lead Advisor Plans and Programme

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

28 November 2023

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Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Franklin Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       10-year Budget 2024-2034 – Local Board input on regional consultation content

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the report contains information from confidential Budget Committee workshops that has not yet been released. This information will become public when the Mayoral Proposal is released (planned to be release on 4 December 2023).

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c).

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

[3] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

[4] Assessment of Effects on the Environment s 8.2.3 Approximate activities duration and construction programme

[5] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, Part 1A, clause 36D