I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 28 November 2023

1.00pm

Puketāpapa Local Board Office
560 Mt Albert Road
Three Kings

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Maria Meredith

Deputy Chairperson

Debbie Burrows

Members

Don Allan

 

Nerissa Henry

 

Chris Makoare

 

Peter McGlashan

 

Tony Woodcock

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jessica Prasad

Democracy Advisor

 

23 November 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 027 228 0253

Email: Jessica.prasad@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation: Hato Hone St John                 5

8.2     Deputation: Warriors Community Foundation                                                   6

8.3     Deputation: Panmure Historical Society  6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                7

9.1     Public Forum - Tara Moala and Michael Harrison                                                        7

9.2     Public Forum - David Riley                        7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     8

11        Governing Body Member's Update                    9

12        Chairperson's Report                                         11

13        Board Member's Reports                                   13

14        Proposed Onehunga Business Association BID Expansion Project                                       15

15        Waiapu Precinct Public Realm Concept Design                                                                              21

16        Delegation of approval for input into the 2024 letter of expectation to the Tāmaki Regeneration Company                                     29

17        Adoption of the scope for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan                                                                       33

18        Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group                                                                   41

19        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024                                                     45

20        Amendment to the 2024 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule                         55

21        Urgent Decision - Local Board Feedback on the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making (NPS-NHD)                59

22        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                               61

23        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                                          63

24        10-year Budget 2024-2034 - local consultation content                                                                 65

25        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                               73

C1       10-year Budget 2024-2034 – Local Board input on regional consultation content                      73

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 24 October 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.


 

 

8.1       Deputation: Hato Hone St John

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Hato Hone St John to deliver a presentation to the local board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

2.   Wayne Leech - Chairperson, Hato Hone St John Central Auckland Area Committee, will be in attendance to present on how their health and wellbeing initiatives can benefit the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki community.

3.   As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Hato Hone St John.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Thank Wayne Leech for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Warriors Community Foundation

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To enable an opportunity for the Warriors Community Foundation to deliver a presentation to the local board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   Lincoln Jefferson - Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Warriors Community Foundation, will be in attendance to present an overview of their programmes and how they can support the Local Board priorities and outcomes.

3.   As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from the Warriors Community Foundation

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Thank Lincoln Jefferson for his attendance and presentation.

 

 


 

 

8.3       Deputation: Panmure Historical Society

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for the Panmure Historical Society to deliver a presentation to the local board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

2.   Patrick O'Meara and Terri Marchant from the Panmure Historical Society will be in attendance to present an overview of activities from the Panmure Historical Society.

3.   As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from the Panmure Historical Society.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Thank Patrick O'Meara and Terri Marchant for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Tara Moala and Michael Harrison

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Tara Moala from Tāmaki Outrigger Canoe Club and Michael Harrison from St Georges Rowing Club to deliver a presentation during the Public Forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Tara Moala (Tāmaki Outrigger Canoe Club) and Michael Harrison (St Georges Rowing Club) will be in attendance to deliver a presentation regarding the joint development of the facilities on the Panmure Wharf Domain.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Tara Moala and Michael Harrison for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - David Riley

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for David Riley to deliver a presentation during the Public Forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       David Riley will be in attendance to deliver a presentation on the celebration of the streets of Mount Wellington book project.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank David Riley for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2023/17526

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 November 2023 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Business Meeting: Item 11 - Governing Body Members report

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2023/17527

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 November 2023 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Business Meeting: Item - Chairperson's report

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2023/17532

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)   receive the board member’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Proposed Onehunga Business Association BID Expansion Project

File No.: CP2023/10409

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the proposed Onehunga Business Improvement District (BID) programme expansion boundary map.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Business Improvement District Policy (2022) requires local board approval of new, or expanding, Business Improvement District programme boundaries and recommendation to the Governing Body to strike the targeted rate.

3.       The Business Improvement District programme provides sustainable funding to business associations. The funding is raised by applying a targeted rate to commercial properties within a defined geographic area.

4.       Under the council’s Business Improvement District Policy (2022), the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki  Local Board must approve the proposed Business Improvement District expansion map before the Onehunga Business Association Inc (OBA) carries out the required BID expansion ballot.

5.       OBA have engaged with businesses located within the proposed BID expansion area since early 2022.

6.       They plan to undertake the BID expansion project and ballot before 30 March 2024.The ballot of commercial property ratepayers and businesses within the proposed expansion area is a requirement of the BID Policy. The ballot determines the level of support for the proposed expansion of the BID programme. The four-week ballot period is due to commence on 26 February 2024.

7.       If the ballot is successful, the OBA Business Improvement District programme will represent approximately 1,550 (up from 447) business ratepayers and owners, with a proposed Business Improvement District targeted rate of $1,000,000, as of 1 July 2024.

8.       At the OBA Annual General Meeting on 19 October 2023 the proposed Business Improvement District expansion map (Attachment A) was presented and approved by the Onehunga Business Association membership.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the proposed boundary map expanding the Onehunga Business Improvement District programme, as shown in the map (Attachment A).

Horopaki

Context

9.       Onehunga Business Association Inc (OBA), a registered incorporated business association since 1937, began investigating a BID expansion in 2015. Resource and pandemic constraints meant this project did not gain real momentum until 2022.

10.     In July 2023 OBA met with the council’s BID team to discuss the BID expansion proposal and their plan towards a ballot before 30 March 2024.

11.     The OBA commenced engagement with businesses located within the proposed BID expansion area by way of an information gathering survey, communications, promotion of associate memberships and networking events.

12.     OBA received approval from their membership at the 2023 OBA Annual General Meeting (AGM) held on 19 October 2023. This step satisfies the need for existing members to approve the OBA commencing an expansion project into another area outside of the current BID boundary.

13.     The BID policy (section 4.3) notes that local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes including:

a)   Approval of the establishment of a new BID programme and boundary area.

b)   Approval of any changes or amendments to an existing BID programme boundary area.

c)   Annually recommending BID programme targeted rate grant amounts to the Governing Body.

d)   Recommending to the Governing Body proposed changes to a BID targeted rate mechanism.

14.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board must approve the proposed BID expansion map (as per a) above) identifying the expanded Onehunga BID programme before the OBA commences their ballot of the expansion area.

15.     If the ballot is successful, local board approval of the BID expansion project will also be required. This ensures the local board has the opportunity to see the final outcome of the establishment project, review the ballot results and are satisfied the criteria for a BID establishment has been completed against the BID policy.

16.     Council staff is seeking Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approval for the proposed Onehunga BID programme expansion map (Attachment A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     The proposed BID programme expansion will mean all business-rated properties within the BID expansion area will be subject to an Onehunga BID targeted rate.

18.     The successful BID expansion will increase to BID membership of the Onehunga BID programme to approximately 1,550. The BID targeted rate grant will be $1,000,000 as of 1 July 2024. This will be funded by the BID targeted rated members.

19.     Council staff support this BID expansion project and recommend the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki  Local Board approve the proposed Onehunga BID expansion map (Attachment A). There is no reason under the BID policy not to support the proposed Onehunga expansion map.

Campaign, consultation, and voter engagement

20.     The OBA will implement a communication plan to all eligible BID voters from the period December 2023 to the last voting date in March 2024. This is to ensure that all eligible voters receive a one-on-one visit or contact, are provided with detailed information on the proposal, and have the opportunity to find out more about the BID programme and ballot process.

21.     The BID policy requires OBA to host a minimum of three public meetings, inviting eligible voters to an information briefing and question and answer session. This policy requirement will be completed during the BID campaign process.

22.     Election Services Ltd has been commissioned by the OBA to provide an independent polling service for the Onehunga BID expansion ballot.

23.     Each eligible voter will receive a ballot pack. OBA anticipates that 75% of eligible voters will receive their voting documents electronically and the remaining 25% (predominantly property owners) will receive their voting documents via post. The ballot period must be no less than four weeks with the last day for voting must be before 31 March 2024.

24.     The ballot must achieve a return of at least 25% of votes, and, at least 51% of those returned need to be in support of the BID boundary expansion proposal for the ballot to be successful.

Penrose Business Association

25.     OBA confirms that they have engaged with the Chairperson and committee of the Penrose Business Association regarding the proposed BID expansion map. Penrose Business Association has communicated that they are comfortable with the proposed OBA expansion boundary map.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     There are no implications for council as the Onehunga BID programme expansion has no specific impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The OBA engages across council and council groups and the Onehunga BID programme provides a platform for the wider business community to be involved.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     Following approval of the proposed expansion map by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, staff will include the Onehunga BID expansion information in the 2023/2024 annual budget consultation and the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Agreement.

29.     The results of the OBA BID expansion ballot will determine if there is a sufficient level of support for the BID programme expansion and associated BID targeted rate.

30.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has supported the BID approach in the past, as it brings together local businesses to invest collectively in improvements that enhance the local business environment such as better security for business centres. A BID can also advocate and collaborate with the council on behalf of local businesses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     All businesses within the Onehunga BID expansion boundary will be included in the ballot process and BID policy requirements. The expanded BID programme may identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in the area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The Onehunga BID targeted rate levied on business-zoned property owners. It will raise a BID targeted rate grant of $1,000,000 and fund the Onehunga BID programme. The programme will be cost neutral to the council and local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Council staff are satisfied all requirements of the BID policy have been completed up to this point by the OBA in relation to the proposed BID expansion map and project.

34.     There is a risk to OBA should the BID expansion ballot fail to reach the required mandate. If the BID ballot fails, the BID policy requires a two-year stand-down before any subsequent ballot can be held.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The table below shows the reporting path for a BID expansion project and indicates where this project currently sits in that process.

36.     Council staff will advise the OBA of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board decision regarding the proposed Onehunga BID boundary expansion map.

37.     Following a successful outcome in the ballot, the results will be brought to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for consideration and recommendation to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed Onehunga BID Expansion Area

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Waiapu Precinct Public Realm Concept Design

File No.: CP2023/18393

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s endorsement for Eke Panuku to engage with key stakeholders and the community to seek their views on the proposed design of the public realm in the Waiapu Precinct of Onehunga.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiapu Precinct is identified in the Onehunga High-Level Project Plan (2017) as being a key council owned development block to be redeveloped in the Onehunga town centre. The precinct is bordered by Onehunga Mall, Arthur Street, Selwyn Street and Church Street.

3.       The Waiapu Precinct masterplan was endorsed by the Maungakiekie- Tāmaki Local Board on 24 November 2020.

4.       The Waiapu Precinct masterplan sets out the plan to develop this block into a high-quality mixed-use development, aligning with the strategic objectives of the Onehunga Programme. It will:

·        make better use of council property through the creation of a mixed-use development – which will support existing uses within Onehunga.

·        improve walking connections around Onehunga.

·        upgrade and improve streetscapes.

·        create new public spaces to be enjoyed by the Onehunga community.

5.       The endorsement of the Waiapu Precinct masterplan enabled the design of the public realm to commence.

6.       The concept design of the public realm will:

·        strengthen the east-west walking link that connects the Waiapu Precinct across Onehunga Mall to Paynes Lane.

·        create a north-south walking and cycling green link across the block connecting Onehunga Primary to the north and the library to the south. More broadly the link strives to establish a north-south green link through Onehunga connecting Maungakiekie to the north and Te Hopua A Rangi and Onehunga Wharf to the south.

·        create a community pavilion, a canopy providing a place to meet, rest, or take shelter, near the intersection of the north-south green link and the east-west link. 

·        create a new family play space to increase the opportunity for play within Onehunga and replace the current play space.

7.       Feedback from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has been received during the development of the Waiapu Precinct public realm concept design and most recently at a workshop in October 2023.

8.       Consultation on the design will be undertaken to seek feedback from key stakeholders and the community, and then reported back to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for approval of the final design of the Waiapu Precinct public realm.

9.       Workshops will be held with key stakeholders and a form will be provided for public feedback.

10.     Early engagement with key stakeholders will be held prior to the end of 2023, followed by a community consultation scheduled for February 2024. The feedback will be presented along with the finalised public realm concept design to the local board by June 2024.

11.     Subject to consenting and budget prioritisation this project will be started to be delivered from September 2024.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)   endorse the concept design for the Waiapu Precinct public realm design for community engagement.   

b)   approve the community engagement approach as outlined in this report to seek community feedback on the Waiapu public realm concept design.

Horopaki

Context

12.     The Waiapu Precinct was identified in the Eke Panuku 2017 Onehunga High-Level Project Plan (HLPP) as a key redevelopment precinct in Onehunga town centre.

13.     The HLPP outlines the plans for future-proofing Onehunga, building upon its existing character to accommodate increased growth through infrastructure investments, enabling new homes, the addition of public spaces and walking/cycling connections whilst enhancing and restoring the natural environment. 

14.     Onehunga will continue to evolve into a thriving neighbourhood, with more homes located close to the town centre, which means more customers with easy access for businesses. With more public space and a new play space located centrally, and safer walking connections through the precinct, more people, especially families, will be drawn to the area and have more reasons to spend time there.

15.     Significant private investment, for example improvements to Dress Smart and a new proposed supermarket, will complement public investment, leading to greater options for locals.

16.     The Waiapu Precinct is currently made up of road, car parking, and a tenant operated mini golf course. The area consists of under-utilised council property in its current form and would achieve better urban regeneration outcomes if redesigned for future differently.

17.     In 2020, Eke Panuku undertook a public consultation to gather community ideas and views to contribute to the masterplanning of the Waiapu Precinct.  Key themes that emerged included the need for improved safety, better connectivity around the town centre, more green space, parking, quality housing and buildings, and an improved supermarket. 

18.     The focus on Waiapu Precinct is to facilitate a new supermarket, create residential development sites, and make public realm improvements. Relocating the existing supermarket will act as a catalyst for further redevelopment in the southern part of the precinct. Supporting residential-led mixed use development blocks that builds on the existing character of Onehunga and supports Onehunga Mall as the town centre spine.

19.     The redevelopment of the site is intended to assist in the regeneration of other privately owned sites within the block, primarily the existing supermarket site on Church Street and other adjacent commercial properties on Selwyn Street.

20.     The Waiapu Precinct masterplan was endorsed by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on 24 November 2020. The masterplan includes the following components and is shown in the figure below:

·        A public realm space – as discussed in this report.

·        A proposed new supermarket. Under negotiation with design involving mana whenua input.

·        Development sites A-D surrounding the public realm. The timing and strategy for these sites going to market is being prepared.

Figure 1: Waiapu Concept Design Plan

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Design principles

21.     Onehunga has a rich history and strong community identity. The design references the connection through the public realm concept design. Eke Panuku and Resilio have been working with mana whenua to establish a set of guiding principles to inform the planning and design including:

·        Partnership and tikanga to be given effect throughout the Waiapu Precinct

·        Provide safe movement throughout the Waiapu Precinct

·        Visually celebrate mana whenua kōrero and history in Onehunga

·        Design process to be informed by mātauranga Māori

·        A coherent mana whenua cultural footprint to be established

22.     The design of the Waiapu public realm concept design has been undertaken by Resilio Studio in partnership with mana whenua appointed artist, Graham Tipene.

Concept Design

23.     The Waiapu Precinct public realm concept design addresses the themes from the 2020 community engagement as follows:

·        Improved north-south walking / cycling connection with additional planting through the Waiapu Precinct public realm to encourage active modes of transport between Onehunga Primary School and Onehunga Library.

·        Improved accessibility through the east-west link from Waiapu Precinct through Onehunga Mall to the expanded Dress Smart development at Paynes Lane, to make it safer and easy to navigate for all abilities.

·        Creation of a public play space that strengthens a sense of community, identity, and local character. The new 530m2 play space will include Māra Hūpara, physical movement, problem solving and imaginative space play as well as catering to all ages, abilities and preferences. 

·        Creation of seating and gathering spaces including a sheltered pavilion which provides a place to meet, rest or shelter between the proposed new supermarket and play space.

·        Realign the existing street network to reduce rat-running and improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists.

Figure 2: Waiapu Precinct public realm proposed concept design – East-West

Figure 3: Waiapu Precinct public realm proposed concept design – North-South

A map of a city

Description automatically generated

 

24.     The degree of optionality around the spatial arrangement of the public realm and residential development sites is very low due to the position of existing mature native trees, the site topography and the Auckland Council open space policy which defines the upper limit of space that can be created as new public realm in this location.

25.     The existing planting will be complemented by additional native planting more appropriate for the location, requiring minimal maintenance and providing shading for the public realm spaces including the future play space.

Proposed community engagement and consultation process

26.     The engagement approach is primarily to seek feedback from the community on the Waiapu Precinct public realm concept design.

27.     As part of our engagement approach we will also be creating an awareness of Eke Panuku and our role in Onehunga, sharing the wider Waiapu Precinct plans, including the proposed supermarket and future development sites, and outlining how delivery could take place such as car park changes, wayfinding and construction disruption plans. 

28.     Community feedback will be sought on whether the Waiapu public realm concept design meets the objectives.

29.     Consultation on the Waiapu Precinct public realm concept design will seek feedback from the community on the:

·        proposed new 530sqm family play space catering for all ages, abilities and preferences

·        proposed new sheltered pavilion

·        proposed planting to offer adequate shade in summer and visual “softening” of the space

·        improved walking connections between Waiapu Precinct and Paynes Lane to Dress Smart

·        sense of place through incorporating Onehunga’s key features and history

30.     Proposed engagement is with a mix of:

·        targeted stakeholder sessions – in particular with surrounding businesses and property owners, Onehunga Primary School and the business association

·        print media advertising including a flyer drop to the residents and businesses in the neighbourhood

·        drop-in sessions

·        online ‘Have Your Say’ consultation form.

31.     The feedback received through this engagement will be presented, along with the finalised public realm concept design, to the local board by June 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     Eke Panuku programmes support regeneration of existing town centres by developing council under-utilised sites within urban areas close to transport links. A key element of this is ensuring improved access to public transport and enabling low carbon lifestyles. This project contributes to that by preparing under-utilised council sites for future residential development whilst improving connections to the town centre. 

33.     Climate change is likely to subject the Onehunga area to hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought. We are seeking to future-proof our communities by accounting for climate change, factoring adaptation and resilience into the creation of buildings and space. Our infrastructure and developments will be designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events. This includes use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design for increased flood resilience, ecological and biodiversity benefits and provisions of increased shade and shelter of storm events and hotter days. A significant number of existing trees will be retained to maintain canopy cover and proposed new plantings will contribute to the urban ngahere.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     This project is being developed with Auckland Transport input using workshops to ensure the design of streets and transport network changes meets their requirements, for those assets being vested to Auckland Transport.

35.     Community Facilities has been engaged from the beginning and have had input to the design outcomes for the public realm, including the play space, which will be vested with council.

36.     Eke Panuku has used the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to ensure that the design achieves the outcomes sought by the HLPP and the role of the Waiapu precinct development in supporting the transformation of the Onehunga Town Centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     Feedback on the Waiapu Precinct concept design has been provided by the local board at workshops in March and November 2020, November 2021, March 2022 and October 2023. The local board expressed support for the project at these workshops.

38.     In the early engagement, the Local Board identified the need to address:

·        provision for public carparking.

·        a development that supports existing uses along Onehunga Mall and existing businesses within the area.

·        maintain the vehicle connection between Gerrard Beeson Place and Waiapu Lane.

·        relocate the play space closer to public gathering spaces.

·        provide a visual connection to the Te Pūmanawa o Onehunga Precinct (surrounding the library) that will form the “heart” of the Onehunga Town Centre.

·        accessibility for people with disabilities.

39.     The Onehunga Business Association is supportive of the Transform Onehunga programme and the proposed improvements in Waiapu Precinct and have advocated for delivery to get underway. Eke Panuku regularly engages with the business association.

40.     Eke Panuku has engaged directly with affected property owners/tenants around the precinct, including St Peters Anglican Church, the mini golf operator and other local businesses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     From the outset, Eke Panuku has worked with mana whenua to develop Māori design principles for this precinct. A cultural narrative was prepared and presented as well as a hikoi around Onehunga to give a wider historical context to the Waiapu Precinct. Workshops were also held with mana whenua to receive feedback.

42.     Extensive investigations of the site including the use of ground penetrating radar was utilised to ensure no significant artifacts or remains are likely to be disturbed.

43.     Mana whenua were involved in the appointment of mana whenua artist Graham Tipene (Ngati Whatua Orakei) to join the design team to allow local cultural narratives to be woven into the design detail. Eke Panuku will continue to ensure that cultural narratives and identity are reflected in public realm spaces. The natural environment has been captured in the design narratives with references to nearby lava caves and natural springs being worked into the design.

44.     Mana whenua have a keen interest in storytelling and are very supportive of the use of Kohatu Markers, sourced from within the site, for wayfinding.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     Project funding is being provided by Eke Panuku as part of the Onehunga programme.

46.     Subject to consenting approval, construction is programmed to start in September 2024.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     There are no known risks in consulting on the proposed design of the Waiapu public realm. Due to the more online format for consultation and engagement further measures and additional time has been included in the approach so that these stakeholders and community members can be heard.

48.     We understand that the community will be eager to understand some of the wider implications in delivering the masterplan, such as:

·        changes to car parking

·        any changes to mature trees

·        continuous supermarket offering

·        mini-golf operation

49.     Car parking will change over time. Through staging the delivery of the proposed supermarket, roading, public realm and development sites, car parking will be available throughout construction. Negotiations with a supermarket operator also includes the provision of basement car parking. Permanent car parking will be provided in the precinct for shoppers to use.

50.     A minimal loss of some mature trees may be required for construction. Additional planting with native trees will be done to mitigate any loss.

51.     The proposed supermarket delivery programme is being prepared to ensure a continuous supermarket offering.

52.     The existing mini-golf business is a privately run commercial business that sits within the precinct. The tenant is aware that the site is earmarked for future development. We have kept the tenant fully informed of the proposed timing of the future redevelopment of the site and are committed to continue to keep the tenant informed. Due to being informed, the tenant has had a long-lead in time to prepare for any relocation required in the future.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     Eke Panuku will actively engage property owners/tenants within the Waiapu Precinct and key stakeholders to discuss the overall plans for the Waiapu Precinct over the next few months.

54.     Eke Panuku will undertake public consultation with the wider community in February 2024 regarding the proposed Waiapu Precinct public realm concept design through an online ‘Have Your Say’ form.

55.     Eke Panuku will provide the local board with updates prior to, during, and after the consultation process.

56.     Eke Panuku will present the results of the community consultation, along with the final Waiapu Precinct public realm concept design, to the local board for approval by June 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiapu Precinct Public Realm Concept Design

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Stewart Andrews – Senior Project Manager

Authorisers

Kate Cumberpatch - Priority Location Director

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Delegation of approval for input into the 2024 letter of expectation to the Tāmaki Regeneration Company

File No.: CP2023/18320

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board input into the 2024 letter of expectations to the Tāmaki Regeneration Company.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Tāmaki Regeneration Company[1] (TRC) is a joint venture between the crown and council designed to achieve large-scale urban regeneration.

3.       TRC are required to prepare a statement of intent every three years, which sets their strategic objectives, functions and performance measures. Convention is for the crown (as majority shareholder) to send a letter of expectation, to provide direction to TRC. Council has the opportunity to input into this letter (as minority shareholder).

4.       Council’s input into the TRC letter of expectation, will be agreed by the CCO Direction and Oversight Committee on 22 February 2024. This cannot be done earlier, due to the central government election.

5.       The next local board business meeting is on 27 February 2024, with the following meeting on 26 March 2024. In order for the local board to input into the letter of expectation within the required timeframes, it is recommended to delegate local board input to the Chair and Deputy Chair.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      tautapa / delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board input into the letter of expectation 2024 to the Tāmaki Regeneration Company.

Horopaki

Context

6.       TRC is a crown entity, created in 2012 to bring about the urban regeneration of Tāmaki. The area includes Glen Innes, Panmure and Point England. Auckland Council has a 41 per cent shareholding in TRC, with the crown owning the remaining 59 per cent. TRC’s strategic priorities are fourfold, to achieve – social transformation, economic development, placemaking and housing resources.

7.       TRC are required to develop a statements of intent (four-year plan) every three years and a statement of performance expectations annually. These are documents under the Crown Entities Act 2004 and Public Finance Act 1989 to ensure public accountability to the crown.

8.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 outlines the importance of TRC in the local board area. That TRC will help to revitalise the area by attracting new businesses, residents and increasing housing choices. It includes actions for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to:  

·    Partner with TRC (and others) to help fund community initiatives and community infrastructure gaps, such as active play spaces in the surrounding area.

·    Work with TRC to ensure low carbon and environmentally sustainable developments, that minimises impact on the local ecosystem and existing infrastructure.

·    Work with TRC (and others) to ensure that infrastructure upgrades are coordinated and well-communicated to minimise disruption to residents and businesses.

·    Advocate to ensure a mix of social and private developments throughout the communities, and to develop a range of housing types such as for larger families and elderly.

·    Advocate to maintain the character of local suburbs in any new TRC developments.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The crown (as majority shareholder), by convention, sends a letter of expectation to TRC to guide the development of their statement of intent and/or statement of performance expectation. As minority shareholder, Council has the opportunity to input into this letter.

10.     Council’s input into the TRC letter of expectation, will be agreed by the CCO Direction and Oversight Committee on 22 February 2024. This has not been able to be done earlier, due to the central government election. Council will need to understand the crown’s priorities for TRC to ensure the two shareholder perspectives are aligned.

11.     The CCO Direction and Oversight Committee will want to understand the view of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. To allow them to consider the views of the local board, it is recommended that authority to provide this input is delegated to the Chair and Deputy Chair.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     TRC have an environment strategy to restore and revitalise the taiao of Tāmaki. The strategy supports TRC to respond to climate change and restore the whenua (land), hau (air), wai (water) and koiroa (biodiversity) of Tāmaki. It is expected that the key moves identified in the strategy will continue to be implemented.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     TRC work across the council group, including the Development Programme Office, Auckland Transport and Watercare. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     This report is to obtain views of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to input into the direction of TRC for the next four years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     Te Tiriti o Waitangi is currently one of TRCs two strategic commitments. TRC work to achieve Māori outcomes across all four of their strategic priorities – housing resources, social transformation, economic development and placemaking. This includes a close relationship with mana whenua. It is expected that this focus will continue.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The expected financial performance of TRC will be set out in their Statement of Intent 2024-2028 (four-year plan) and Statement of Performance Expectations 2024/2025 (annual plan). 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     There are no specific risks associated with the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board providing input into the direction of TRC for the next four years.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Council’s input into the TRC letter of expectation, will be agreed by the CCO Direction and Oversight Committee on 22 February 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rachel Wilson - Principal Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Adoption of the scope for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

File No.: CP2023/17839

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek adoption of the scope to develop the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 25 July 2023 the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services work programme including item #3913, to develop the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (MT/2023/86).

3.       This item has $25,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget allocated, with Sport New Zealand contributing a further $25,000 administered through their regional partner Aktive.

4.       Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plans offer strategic guidance to inform decision-making regarding investment, advocacy, partnerships, and opportunities within the sport and recreation facility network.

5.       The scope adopted by Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board (the scope) will guide the development of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (the plan).

6.       The plan will focus on facilities providing community access and participation needs. The scope can be defined by three sub-categories: geographic area, type of activity, and facility model. The recommended scope is detailed below:

a)   Geographic area

The geographic scope will focus on provision within Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area with consideration for neighbouring communities, rohe boundaries specifically identified by mana whenua, sub-regional facilities and/or bespoke facilities.

b)   Activity type

The scope of activity type is sport and active recreation as defined within Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.

c)   Facility model

A full facility network scope is adopted comprising of all facilities providing community access for sport and active recreation irrespective of ownership or operating model.

7.       Development of the plan will continue through various community consultation and engagement phases before an analysis of findings and presentation of the draft plan by June 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)   whai / adopt the scope of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan as detailed in Attachment A.

Horopaki

Context

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board - Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2022/2023

8.       On 25th July, 2023 the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services work programme including item #3913:

·    Activity Name: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board - Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

·    Activity Description: Develop a sport and recreation facilities plan that highlights the needs of our growing and diverse community.

9.       The board allocated $25,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget  with Sport New Zealand contributing a further $25,000 administered through their regional partner Aktive.

 

Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plans

10.     Sport and active recreation facilities plans offer strategic guidance to inform decision-making regarding investment, advocacy, partnerships, and opportunities within the sport and recreation facility network.

11.     These plans outline the current network of sport and active recreation facilities across a specified geographic area and identifies existing and future provision challenges and needs.

12.     Key outputs include:

·    consolidated inventory of sport and active recreation facilities

·    themes and trends of local facility needs and issues

·    assessment of potential impacts of demographic and infrastructure changes

·    identification of gaps in facility provision against current and future needs

·    framework for prioritising projects/potential opportunities for further analysis and assessment

·    prioritised list of projects/opportunities to provide clear direction to support advocacy, resource allocation and leasing decisions

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan

13.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board currently support sport and active recreation facilities through operational funding, capital funding and community leases within the Customer and Community Services work programme.

14.     The development and effective implementation of the plan relates to several outcomes, objectives, and key initiatives within the Local Board Plan as detailed below.

Table 1: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan - Strategic alignment

Outcome

Objective or key initiative

Our community facilities and open spaces are interconnected, cost efficient, and fit-for-purpose

·    Prioritise a precinct approach to investment, enabling staging of key projects within our precincts and providing interconnected and multifunctioning community spaces

·    Investigate opportunities to dispose of underutilised assets that are costing us more to repair and maintain, and use any revenue to fund other projects in the community

·    Investigate opportunities to reduce the building footprint on our reserves to reduce ongoing maintenance costs and focus on delivering high-quality integrated community spaces that meet our growing community needs

·    Investigate different delivery models for provision of local facilities to increase community access to cost efficient and multiuse spaces, such as partnerships with local schools where feasible and private facility providers

·     Further investigate the service levels at our community facilities, such as pools, libraries, and community and art centres, to minimise overlap in delivery and provide services where they are needed most

 

 

Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport – Investment Plan 2019 – 2039

15.     In July 2019, the council adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport – Investment Plan 2019 – 2039 (“Sport Investment Plan”), a strategic plan to guide investment into community sport identifying three key sector challenges:

·    The demand for sport in Auckland is growing and changing, while the existing facilities are ageing

·    Not all Aucklanders have the same access and opportunities for sport

·    Auckland Council needs a more structured and strategic approach to invest in sport

16.     Development of the plan will align with the Sport Investment Plan and the principles it lays out to assess projects and opportunities identified following community consultation.

17.     The plan will offer specific insights into opportunities and challenges across the facilities network whilst highlighting synergies and uniqueness relative to sector-wide trends.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The scope will guide the development of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

19.     This scope (as set out in Attachment A) offers a platform to capture a holistic understanding of facility provision and critically, a network overview of facilities offering community access and the subsequent levels of supply and demand.

20.     The scope can be defined by three sub-categories; geographic area, type of activity, and facility model, to provide focus on what is captured and where.

Geographic area

21.     The plan will consider community need and facility priorities within a defined geographic area.

22.     The geographic area will focus on provision within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area, rohe boundaries specifically identified by mana whenua, sub-regional facilities and/or bespoke facilities that cater to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki catchment.

Table 1: Benefits of geographic scope

Element of geographic scope

Benefits

Local board boundaries

This enables local board decision-makers to identify specific needs in their local community. Understanding participation patterns and facility needs help guide decision-making.

 

Rohe boundaries or areas of cultural significance identified by mana whenua

 

 

Provides decision-makers and user-groups with facility needs, specific direction for sites of significance and considerations when working in collaboration with mana whenua.

Rohe boundaries do not align with local board areas however this scope allows mana whenua iwi to include areas with supporting rationale.

Sub-regional facilities outside of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Facilities of scale provide scope to facilitate participation for a wide population catchment and should be factored into provision requirements across the catchment they service.

Insights of sub-regional provision will identify network gaps and ensure future investment is not duplicated.

Bespoke facilities outside of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Facilities that provide a unique or highly specific offering may have less localised need.

Understanding the network and the relative demand and supply will ensure decision-making is strategic and avoids duplication.

 

Type of activity

23.     There are a myriad of different ways Aucklanders get active. The focus of this plan is to identify supply and demand gaps and opportunities within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki sport and active recreation infrastructure network.

24.     The scope will help define and categorise what people are doing to get active, before the development of the plan then provides a geospatial analysis of how and where this occurs, what infrastructure requirements there are and solutions to promote and support participation aspirations.

25.     The type of activity is sport and active recreation as defined within the Sport Investment Plan.

·    Sport: Physical activity that is competitive, organised and involves the observation of rules. It may be participated in either individually or as a team.

·    Active Recreation: Physical activity that is informal and done for wellbeing, health and/or enjoyment. It may be participated in either individually or with a group.

26.     Other forms of physical activity including ‘play’ and ‘physical education’ will not be specifically addressed however a mix of existing local and regional plans and policies will complement this mahi.

27.     The type of activity will include consideration for non-affiliate and/or casual sport and recreation facility use.

Facility model

28.     The demand for sport in Tāmaki Makaurau is growing and changing with communities participating across a wide range of places and spaces of differing facility ownership and operating models.

29.     The scope entails investigation of all facilities providing community access for sport and active recreation irrespective of ownership or operational model including:

a)         Council owned land; council owned and operated facilities

b)         Council owned land; council owned facility; community operated facilities (leased)

c)         Council owned land; community owned and operated facilities

d)         Council owned community facilities with potential for sport and active recreation

e)         Ministry of Education (MoE) owned and operated facilities

f) Facilities of cultural significance providing community outcomes

g)         Places of worship and education facilities (non-MoE) where there is community access

h)         Private or commercially owned and operated facilities where there is community access

30.     Offering insights of provision across the full range of providers delivers several key benefits and considerations.

 

Table 2: Key benefits and considerations

Facility model or opportunity

Benefit or consideration 

Council-related

Understanding the council owned network allows the local board and the council to make informed asset-based decisions and direct resourcing strategically.

Community facilities

Support for community-led development can be provided via direct grant investment, advocacy to regional or external funders and providing tenure assurances through leasing decisions that achieve the best community outcomes.

Community sport sector

Diversity of needs provides opportunities for partnership and to highlight new, innovative solutions for provision.

Partnership

A broad mix of providers offers opportunity for mutual strategic alignment and to leverage council investment.

Network overview

Capturing a true sense of the network will provide decision-makers with direction as to where, what and how to achieve the best outcomes for the community irrespective of ownership.

 

Scope summation

31.     The scope detailed will provide a platform to capture the full local sport and active recreation facilities network in its truest sense, recognising that the community sport sector is complex, diverse, and growing.

32.     The three sub-categories help to focus the extent of investigation and subsequent findings, to support decision-making across the facilities network.

33.     Defining the type of activity gives clarity whilst acknowledging various other plans and workstreams exist, all of which will complement this kaupapa.

34.     The broad facility model scope recognises that whilst the local board plays an important role in the community sport facilities network, implementation of the plan will require a diverse mix of funders and partnerships.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     There will be no direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions from the adoption of the scope to develop the plan.

36.     Following adoption of the final plan, implementation may involve investment into individual projects which would be assessed for climate impact before decision-making or investment by the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     Staff will seek input into development of the plan from teams across Parks and Community Facilities, Regional Services and Strategy, and Active Communities.

38.     Parks and Community Facilities will be able to use the completed plan to inform the development of its work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     On 24 October 2023 the local board gave direction on the proposed scope to develop the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

40.     As part of the local board engagement verbal feedback was provided with key considerations including provision of a general stocktake on lease status for council owned facilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     Throughout the duration of the plan development there will be consultation with mana whenua iwi, mataawaka, marae, kura, and internal Māori Outcomes staff within council.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     There are no financial implications related to the adoption of the scope to develop the plan.

43.     This item has $25,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget allocated (MT/2023/86) with Sport New Zealand contributing a further $25,000 administered through their regional partner Aktive.

44.     Future implementation of the plan may have a standalone budget and subsequently offer an opportunity to analyse related financial implications. This will be considered as part of future work programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     There are no significant risks in adopting the scope to develop the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Should the board resolve to adopt the scope of works, staff will proceed to appoint a consultant and formalise a services agreement including the adopted scope of works.

47.     Development of the plan will continue through various community consultation and engagement phases before an analysis of findings and presentation of the draft plan in June 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Reccomended Scope

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marissa Holland - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Dave Stewart - General Manager Active Communities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group

File No.: CP2023/16720

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Play Leadership Group for elected members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have included play advocacy projects in their 2023/2024 work programmes and are seeking opportunities to increase play diversity within their parts of the region.

3.       The council’s play advocacy advisor has established a staff network of play champions to support the ongoing development and promotion of play opportunities. When the Play Advisory Group was promoted on the council’s Kotahi intranet in 2022, some elected members asked to participate.

4.       To further support local board play advocacy activities and to respond to the appetite for increased play participation from some elected members, a Play Leadership Group is proposed. This will be a version of the staff play network, except just for elected members.

5.       As the terms of reference in Attachment A confirm, the Play Leadership Group will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision of the group will be “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

6.       The Play Leadership Group will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about play in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for play within their local boards, and to provide informal guidance to relevant staff on play issues.

7.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

8.       Staff recommend a quarterly meeting schedule for the Play Leadership Group. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes from the meetings.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Play Leadership Group.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Auckland Council employed its first play advocacy advisor in September 2022. The role leads advocacy work in the area of play at Auckland Council and advocates for and influences the consideration, empowerment, enablement and equitable promotion of play.

10.     Play advocacy is an initiative in 17 local board work programmes for the 2023/2024 financial year. Three local boards do not have capacity to include play advocacy in their work programmes for 2023/2024, but have asked for ad-hoc advocacy support and will consider including play advocacy in their 2024/2025 work programmes.

11.     The play advocacy advisor has a responsibility to establish a network of play champions within council, to increase knowledge and awareness of play across the council group. The advisor established a Play Advisory Group in 2022 which has grown to include 45 play champions from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, and other organisations affiliated with the council, including Auckland Zoo, Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand Maritime Museum, and Stardome Observatory and Planetarium.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local boards have embraced the play advocacy approach and indicated interest to explore how they can increase play diversity for their communities and achieve play outcomes through different projects.

13.     After several local board workshops, elected members showed a strong personal interest in play. There are high levels of enthusiasm for play discussions and a keen interest in understanding more about how to promote play.

14.     In November 2022 the council’s Kotahi intranet published a story about play advocacy and publicised the staff Play Advisory Group. Some elected members contacted the play advocacy advisor and asked if they could join the group. However, the group’s terms of reference restrict membership to staff only.

15.     During workshops with local boards in 2023, the play advocacy advisor sought guidance from elected members regarding their appetite for participating in an equivalent special interest group for elected members with a strong interest in play.

16.     In response to local boards’ interest, the play advocacy advisor has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of a Play Leadership Group, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·        learn more about play

·        share relevant knowledge with other elected members

·        improve connections between participants at a governance level

·        encourage collaboration between local boards to support play outcomes

·        increase knowledge and understanding of play equity issues

·        provide informal guidance to staff as the play advocacy work area grows

·        share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

17.     The vision of the Play Leadership Group is “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

18.     Participation in the Play Leadership Group is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint elected members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes of the group’s meetings.

19.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

20.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Play Leadership Group and provides further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet four times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed by the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The formation and operation of the Play Leadership Group has no climate impact.

22.     The continued advocacy to support play as ‘an everywhere activity’ supports positive climate outcomes by encouraging the community to embrace local suburbs as sites for play. This approach will reduce the need to drive to reach playgrounds.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Play Leadership Group will be administered by staff from the council’s Active Communities team, with support from kaimahi in the Regional Services and Strategy and Parks and Community Facilities departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The play advocacy advisor has presented at 20 local boards between March and October 2023.

25.     Local boards have expressed interest in the formation of a governance-level group for elected members who are interested in play. One local board requested that the opportunity to participate was presented in a business report, to enable participation to be formally agreed by the board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Play Leadership Group will provide play leaders with opportunities to learn more about Māori values relevant to play, Sport New Zealand’s bicultural play plan and its relevance to the development of play activities nationwide, and current and potential Māori play opportunities. This includes opportunities to develop and install māra hūpara in local parks and reserves, and the potential for projects such as Te Kete Rukuruku to generate play outcomes.

27.     The play leaders could also provide a mechanism for regional iwi engagement regarding play on a relatively informal basis, enabling mana whenua to share their views about play on an ongoing basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The Play Leadership Group will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that elected members could become members of the Play Leadership Group with expectations that they will be able to influence broader play investment or make decisions affecting play at a regional level.

30.     The terms of reference are intended to mitigate the risk of misunderstandings by making clear the scope of the Play Leadership Group. This will ensure participants become involved with a realistic expectation of what can be achieved through their membership.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Play Leadership Group will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

32.     An initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Play Leadership Group

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacquelyn Collins - Activation Advisor - Young People

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Pippa Sommerville - Manager Sport & Recreation

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/18410

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·        Dunkirk Road Activity Centre continues to enable and co-ordinate a wide range of activities that cater to the diversity of the local community.

·        Maungakiekie Songbird continues to grow its presence and provide advice, tools and resources to support biodiversity around the maunga.

·        Fergusson Domain courts have been renewed with minor works still remaining.

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed), grey (cancelled, deferred or merged) or red (behind delivery, significant risk). The following key activities were reported with some risk or issues, which are being managed:

·        Jubilee Bridge – renew and upgrade bridge.

5.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2023/2024 is attached. Overall operating results for the first three months of the year is $4.4 million or seven per cent below the budget due to higher revenue and lower expenditure. Capital expenditure delivery of $4.4 million is five per cent above budget. The focus is on local asset renewals.

6.        The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

7.        Auckland Emergency Management has undertaken a change proposal process which has resulted in the Resilience team that formerly engaged with Local Boards being disestablished. Future work with Local Boards and communities will be delivered through a new planning team, which will eventually have seven Senior Planners, each working with three local boards.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)   receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2023

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Auckland Emergency Management

9.       The local board work programmes were not adopted until a month into the financial year due to uncertainty of local board funding in the development of the Annual Budget 2023/2024. Local board funding for 2023/2024 was agreed by the Governing Body at the end of May 2023 and required changes to planned work programmes, which were then approved in July 2023.

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     AEM Resilience staff members have continued to attend community meetings to provide feedback, subject matter expertise where required this quarter. This has included supporting community activities that is attached to the work of Community Brokers that arose following the emergency events this year.

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates

14.     Activation of community-led venue partners. Dunkirk Road Activity Centre continues to enable and co-ordinate a wide range of activities that cater to the diversity of the local community. The community-led venue provides community groups access to space and supports some programmes for the community with free space hire.

15.     Maungakiekie Songbird. Maungakiekie Songbird’s current membership base sits at 665 with 344 households falling within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area. These households are provided with a range of free resources including native trees, pest traps, weta motels and bird feeders. Planning for a workshop with a schools collective in November is underway.

16.     Fergusson Domain – renew and upgrade courts to multipurpose courts. The courts have been renewed with minor works still remaining including equipment installation and line marking.

17.     Completed activities in this quarter included:

·    Manukau Foreshore East – renew cycleway

·    Panmure Basin - renew play space - stage two

Key activities with some risk or issues which are being managed

18.     ID9404: Jubilee Bridge – renew and upgrade bridge. The existing Jubilee Bridge was closed on 21 July 2023 due to safety concerns. Design and consenting were completed last year, and a tender was released in late October for construction works. Due to significant global supply chain constraints and rising construction costs, the closed tender process was unsuccessful with only one tender with a quoted price well above the available budget. The Jubilee Bridge – renewal and upgrade bridge project is back in the procurement phase, with the new procurement plan expected to attract more innovation from suppliers to work within our budget. With more stable supply chain pricing and a weaker industry pipeline compared to last year, we are expecting prices in line with our engineer’s estimate. An Expression of Interest (EOI) was released to the open market in early August 2023. Five supplier interests were received, and three suppliers were shortlisted for the next stage of procurement which includes a request for tender (RFT). The RFT was released to the shortlisted suppliers in late September and will close on 10 November 2023.

19.     There has been significant community interest in what led up to the closure of Jubilee Bridge in Panmure. Parks and Community Facilities has supplied the attached “Jubilee Bridge-Structure Condition Assessment Report Redacted” which was used to support the decision. Some financial information including costs, rates and estimates have been withheld pursuant to the following sections of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) -Section 7(2)(b)(ii), where supplying this information could prejudice the commercial position of the persons who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

Activities on hold

20.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        ID28345: Te Kete Rukuruku Māori naming of parks and places  - the renewal of signs work programme is on hold awaiting agreement of the naming of parks and places, for which consultation is underway with mana whenua.

Changes to the local board work programme

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

21.     These activities have been merged with other activities for efficient delivery:

·        ID3875: Events Unit Production and Civic staff costs for delivery merged with ID295: Onehunga Christmas in the Park as both budgets are delivering on the same event.

Activities with changes

22.     The following work programmes activities have been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and they were made by staff under delegation.

Table 2: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

Reason for change

Budget Implications

30168

Customer and Community Services

Panmure Basin renew play space

Reduce budget by $65,005.91

This project line is confirmed to be nearly completed, with no further costs expected going forward. Therefore, a savings of $65,005.91 can be realised

Reallocation of $65,005.91 to other activity.

37041

Customer and Community Services

Glen Innes Library – renew roof

Increase budget by $65,005.91

Additional funding is required to ensure design costs for the roof are accommodated for.

Reallocation of $65,005.91 from other activity

292

Customer and Community Services

Event Partnership fund

Correct error in formally adopted budget from $105,000 to $60,000

Due to an error, the budget adopted for this work programme item was displayed as $105,000 rather than the intended $60,000 as detailed in the activity description.

None.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

24.     Work programmes were approved in July 2023 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report informs the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of the performance for ending 30 September 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     The local board remains committed to integrating and supporting work that contributes to outcomes for Māori. This includes enhancing partnerships and collaborative ways of working with mana whenua and mataawaka.

28.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 has the lens of Te Ao Māori woven throughout, as well as an outcome that focuses on: Te ao Māori is thriving and visible. The local board plan guides local board decision making, including through the development and delivery of the 2023/2024 work programme.

29.     Some of the activities in the local board’s 2023/2024 work programme (Attachment A) have specific impact on the wider Māori community, these activities include:

·        ID289: Māori Responsiveness: Ruapōtaka Marae support

·        ID291: Strategic Partnerships Programme

·        ID298: Youth empowerment

·        ID4023: Rangatahi Leadership

·        ID1482: Māori Participation and partnership in local board decision-making

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     This report is provided to enable the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

31.     Revenue at $222,000 is $48,000 above the budget. This is from commercial leases and venues for hire in Onehunga and Panmure community centres and Fergusson hall.

32.     Expenditure of $4.6 million is $289,000 below the budget overall, mainly in local driven initiatives.  There are fluctuations between actual and planned expenditure as projects are in progress.

33.     Capital spend is $499,000 and is above budget by $22,000. The focus is on the local asset renewals programme such as Dunkirk Activity Centre roof replacement, renew and upgrade courts in Fergusson Domain, renew heritage facilities in Jellicoe Park and renew play spaces and parks furniture.

34.     The Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Financial Performance report is in Appendix B

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

36.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

37.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board - 1 July to 30 September 2023 Work Programme Update

 

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board - Operating Performance Financial Summary

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Samantha Tan Rodrigo - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Amendment to the 2024 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2023/15727

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for one extraordinary meeting date to be added to the 2024 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (the Long-Term Plan) and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 (Annual Plan) timeframes and to include a change of date for the April business meeting from 23 April 2024 to 30 April 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Tuesday, 22 November 2022. MT/2022/166

3.       At that time, the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision-making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unknown. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve one extraordinary meeting date as an addition to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule and a change of date for the April business meeting so that the modified 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes can be met.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      whakaae /approve the addition of one extraordinary meeting date to the 2022-2025 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes as follows:

i)       Tuesday 11 June 2024, 1.00pm

b)      whakaae / approve the change of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board April 2024 meeting from 23 April 2024 to 30 April 2024.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Tuesday, 22 November 2022. MT/2022/166

8.       The timeframes for local board decision-making in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

9.       The local board is being asked to make decisions in late-April and early-June 2024 to feed into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 processes. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meetings as additions to the meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meetings as extraordinary meetings.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025 process could be considered at this meeting.

13.     Staff recommend option two, approving one extraordinary meeting as there are sufficient meetings to manage usual business in the schedule, and including a change of business meeting date, to meet the required 10-year budget timeframes and enable the local board recess dates to align with ANZAC day. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mal Ahmu - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Urgent Decision - Local Board Feedback on the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making (NPS-NHD)

File No.: CP2023/17515

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of an urgent decision made under delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair to provide feedback on the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making (NPS-NHD).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Boards 22 November 2022 business meeting, the local board considered the urgent decision-making process and passed resolution MT/2022/162:

a)   delegate authority to the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board, if the local board is unable to meet

b)   confirm that the Local Area Manager, chairperson, and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the use of the local board’s urgent decision mechanism by approving the request for an urgent decision in writing

c)   note that all urgent decisions made, including written advice which supported these decisions, will be included on the agenda of the next ordinary meeting of the local board. CARRIED

3.       Local boards have a role in representing the views of their communities on issues of local importance, such as inputting local impacts of Central Government proposals into Auckland Council submissions.

4.       The draft NPS-NHD covers all natural hazards and applies to council decisions on new developments regarding resource consents, plan changes, and notices of requirement for new development only. Natural hazard risk assessment will be required, with restrictions in high-risk areas and mitigation in moderate-risk areas. As a result of local board feedback being due prior to the next business meeting on 28 November 2023 an urgent decision was required.

5.       A copy of the urgent decision and the local board’s feedback is Attachment A of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the urgent decision made on 8 November 2023, providing local board feedback on the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making (NPS-NHD)

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision - Local Board Feedback on the draft National Policy Statemement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making (NPS-NHD)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2023/17533

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa/ governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 November 2023 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Business Meeting: Item 22 - Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2023/17534

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 17, 24, 31 October and 7, 14 November.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on 17, 24, 31 October and 7, 14 November.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

28 November 2023 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Business Meeting: Item 23 - Record of Workshops

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

10-year Budget 2024-2034 - local consultation content

File No.: CP2023/18249

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve local consultation content and supporting information as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 process, along with a local engagement event.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement that is agreed between the Governing Body and the local board in each local board area. These agreements set out local board priorities and the local activities to be provided for the year. The 21 local board agreements for 2024/2025 will be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

3.       Consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February – 28 March 2024. Content relating to each local board agreement must be included as part of that consultation.

4.       This report seeks approval from the local board for local consultation content. It also seeks approval of a Have Your Say event to be held in the local board area to give Aucklanders an opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback during the consultation period.

5.       The Governing Body will approve regional items for consultation on 6 December 2023. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation document and supporting information, which is also planned to be adopted by the Governing Body in February 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve local consultation document content (Attachment A) and local supporting information content (Attachment B) for inclusion in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation material.

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the local board Chair to approve any changes required to finalise the local consultation document and supporting information content for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034. 

c)       whakaae / approve the following Have Your Say event in the local board area during the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation period:

i)       Panmure Basin Fun Day, 3 March 2024 from 11am - 3pm

d)      tautapa / delegate authority to the local board Chair to approve any changes required to the Have Your Say event.

e)      tautapa / delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events during the consultation period for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034:

i)       local board members and Chair

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Area Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Group Chief Financial Officer.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Council is required to adopt a 10-year budget (Long-Term Plan or LTP) every three years. The LTP sets out the priorities and funding for council activities that are planned over a 10-year period. It includes financial and non-financial information for the whole Auckland Council group.  The Governing Body is responsible for adopting the 10-year budget, and will be adopting the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 in June 2024.

7.       Auckland Council is required to consult on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 using the special consultative procedure set out in the Local Government Act 2002. The Budget Committee will be deciding on items for consultation for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 on 6 December 2023. Local Boards have the opportunity to provide input into the regional topics for consultation for consideration by the Budget Committee.

8.       For each financial year, Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board) for each local board area. These local board agreements are included in each year’s annual budget, or the 10-year budget (every three years).

9.       Local board agreements set out how the council will reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board’s plan through the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

10.     Content relating to each local board agreement must be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation document and supporting information.

11.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

12.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation period through a variety of channels, which include face-to-face (for spoken and New Zealand sign language interaction), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Local boards held workshops during November 2023 to determine their proposed priorities for their 2024/2025 local board agreement. Each local board is now requested to approve its local consultation document and supporting information content for inclusion in the consultation material for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (Attachments A and B respectively).

14.     Should changes be required to the local consultation content during the document production, they will be provided to the local board chair for approval.

15.     The Council is required to use the special consultative procedure set out in the Local Government Act 2002 when consulting on the 10-year Budget (LTP).  The special consultative procedure requires, among other things, the council to provide an opportunity for people to present their views to the council in a manner that enables ‘spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction’ between the person and the council’s decision-makers or their official delegates.

16.     Further, people who wish to have their views on the proposed content of the local board agreement 2024/2025 and 10-year Budget 2024-2034 considered by Auckland Council should be provided a reasonable opportunity to present those views in a manner and format that is appropriate to their preferences and needs.

17.     The recommended Have Your Say events, along with the recommended delegation to elected members and staff to hear from the public ensures that the Council is meeting its obligations relating to consultation

18.     The Have Your Say event recommended to be held in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area is:

·        Panmure Basin Fun Day, 3 March 2024 from 11am – 3pm

19.     Other Have Your Say events will also take place across the region along with a range of ways for people to engage with the council during the consultation period.  There will also be online information available and the opportunity to submit written or digital feedback. Note that the proposed date for the Have Your Say event will be checked with Ward Councillor/s to ensure they are able to attend.

20.     The consultation period does not begin for a couple of months. If circumstances change between now and the consultation period requiring any changes to the approved Have Your Say event, these will be provided to the local board chair for approval in line with the recommended delegation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The decision to consult is procedural in nature and the small scale of the Have Your Say events means any climate change impacts will be negligible. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

22.     However, where practicable, events proposed will be in locations accessible by public transport, to reduce private vehicle travel and increase opportunities for attendance.  

23.     Some of the proposed initiatives or projects included in the consultation content may have climate change impacts. The impacts of any initiatives or projects Auckland Council chooses to progress as a result of this consultation will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is an Auckland Council group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level.

25.     Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group. This will be reflected in the report on regional consultation items going to the Budget Committee on 6 December 2023.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Local board chairs have been invited to be involved in the development of the regional topics for consultation by attending Budget Committee workshops. Local board members were invited to attend eleven separate 10-year Budget 2024-2034 briefings summarising topics discussed at Budget Committee workshops.

27.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 process.

28.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals through the public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034. All feedback received from submitters that indicate that they reside in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. The local board agreement and 10-year Budget 2024-2034 are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. The local board plan adopted in November 2023 forms the basis for local priorities.

30.     The approach to Māori engagement for 10-year Budget 2024-2034 will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials.

31.     There is a need to continue to build local board relationships with iwi and the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist the local board and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and challenges.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     There may be marginal costs associated for Have-Your-Say events including venue hire (where council premises cannot be utilised).

33.     After consultation local boards will make decisions on local spending in the local board agreement with financial impacts that affect local communities. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires content relating to each local board agreement to be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation document. Under the Local Government Act 2002, the consultation document for the 10-year Budget must be audited.  The draft consultation document (including local consultation content) will be prepared by staff and audited in December 2023 and January 2024 ahead of adoption by the Budget Committee in mid-February 2024.  Therefore, local boards need to approve their local consultation content for inclusion in the draft consultation document by the end of November 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The Budget Committee will agree items for consultation and approve the consultation approach for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 on 6 December 2023.

36.     Following the decisions of the local board to approve local consultation content, and the decisions of the Budget Committee on regional items for consultation, staff will prepare the consultation document and supporting information for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.  These will be adopted by the Budget Committee in mid-February 2024.

37.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and the local board will make decisions on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and local board agreements respectively in June 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local Board Consultation Document (To be tabled)

 

b

Local Board Supporting Information content (To be tabled)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Phoebe Peguero -  Senior Advisor Operations and Policy, Local Board Services

Renee Burgers – Lead Advisor Plans and Programme

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

28 November 2023

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       10-year Budget 2024-2034 – Local Board input on regional consultation content

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the report contains information from confidential Budget Committee workshops that has not yet been released. This information will become public when the Mayoral Proposal is released (planned to be release on 4 December 2023).

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Tāmaki Regeneration Company is the brand or trading name of Tāmaki Redevelopment Company Limited ("TRC”).