I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

 

Wednesday 29 November 2023

10am

Rodney Local Board Office,

3 Elizabeth St, Warkworth

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Brent Bailey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Louise Johnston

 

Members

Michelle Carmichael

 

 

Mark Dennis

 

 

Tim Holdgate

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

Geoff Upson

 

 

Ivan Wagstaff

 

 

Guy Wishart

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Ignacio Quinteros

Democracy Advisor

 

24 November 2023

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21579781

Email: ignacio.quinteros@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Local Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Central Shooters Inc

President

Auckland Shooting Club

Member

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

Member

Kaipara ki Mahurangi Act Party

Candidate

Michelle Carmichael

Fight the Tip Tiaki te Whenua Inc

Deputy chairperson

Tapora School Board of Trustees

Staff representative

Mark Dennis

Helensville Tennis Club

Elected member

 

Parakai Springs Complex

Operations manager

Tim Holdgate

Landowners Contractors Association

Vice chairman

Agricultural & Pastoral Society Warkworth

Committee member

 

Rodney Co-Operative Lime Company Limited

Director

 

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Colin Smith

Landowners Contractors Association

Committee member

Geoff Upson

 

 

Ivan Wagstaff

 

 

Guy Wishart

Huapai Kumeū Lions

 

President and zone chairperson

Kaipara ki Mahurangi LEC

Member

Kumeū Community Centre

Committee member

Kumeu Small Landowners Assoc

Member

Future Kumeū Inc Committee

Member

Kumeū Live (Music Events)

Manager

Kumeu Emergency Network

Member

Kumeu Community Action

Member

Kaipara ki Mahurangi Labour Party

Candidate

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: Kaukapakapa pedestrian safety upgrades                                  5

8.2     Deputation: North Harbour Budgeting Free Services                                      6

8.3     Deputation: Mahurangi East Business Case                                                    6

8.4     Deputation: The Forest Bridge Trust                                                                 6

8.5     Deputation: Kawau Island pest eradication programme                                 7

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              7

11        Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group                                               9

12        Unsealed Road Improvement Programme and on-demand bus services in the Warkworth Subdivision                                                                                               17

13        Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan adoption                                                      31

14        Northern Busway Bylaw review                                                                                 37

15        Spatial Land Use Strategy Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zone             61

16        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024                                                                                                                      73

17        Record of urgent decision: Rodney Local Board feedback appended Auckland Council's submission on the National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making                                                                                                                           85

18        10-year Budget 2024-2034 - local consultation content                                          91

19        Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule November 2023                                            103

20        Rodney Local Board workshop records                                                                 107

21        Rodney Ward Councillor update                                                                              117

22        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of

            Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public        125

C1       10-year Budget 2024-2034 – Local Board input on regional consultation content 125

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday 18 October 2023, and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday 1 November 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Kaukapakapa pedestrian safety upgrades

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Danielle Hancock from the Kaukapakapa Area Residents and Ratepayers Association Incorporated has requested a deputation to discuss Kaukapakapa pedestrian safety upgrades.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Ms Hancock for her presentation and attendance at the meeting.

Attachments

a          29 November 2023 - Rodney Local Board, Item 8.1 - Kaukapakapa pedestrian safety upgrades - Presentation.................................................. 129

b          29 November 2023 - Rodney Local Board, Item 8.1 - Kaukapakapa pedestrian safety upgrades - Letter of support............................................ 135

 

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation: North Harbour Budgeting Free Services

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Sarah de Zwart has requested a deputation to discuss North Harbour Budgeting Free Services.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Ms de Zwart for her attendance at the meeting.

 

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation: Mahurangi East Business Case

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mike Day has requested a deputation to discuss the Mahurangi East Business Case and the services provided at their facilities

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Mr Day for his attendance at the meeting.

 

 

 

 

8.4       Deputation: The Forest Bridge Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Ana Christmas has requested a deputation to discuss the Forest Bridge Trust.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Ms Christmas for her presentation and attendance at the meeting.

Attachments

a          29 November 2023 - Rodney Local Board, Item 8.4, The Forest Bridge Trust - Presentation...................................................................................... 137

 

 

8.5       Deputation: Kawau Island pest eradication programme

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Caroline Boot has requested a deputation to discuss the Kawau Island pest eradication programme.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Ms Boot for her presentation and attendance at the meeting.

Attachments

a          29 November 2023 - Rodney Local Board, Item 8.5 - Kawau Island pest eradication programme - Presentation......................................................... 145

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Local board appointment for Play Leadership Group

File No.: CP2023/16485

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Play Leadership Group for elected members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have included play advocacy projects in their 2023/2024 work programmes and are seeking opportunities to increase play diversity within their parts of the region.

3.       The council’s play advocacy advisor has established a staff network of play champions to support the ongoing development and promotion of play opportunities. When the Play Advisory Group was promoted on the council’s Kotahi intranet in 2022, some elected members asked to participate.

4.       To further support local board play advocacy activities and to respond to the appetite for increased play participation from some elected members, a Play Leadership Group is proposed. This will be a version of the staff play network, except just for elected members.

5.       As the terms of reference in Attachment A to the agenda report confirm, the Play Leadership Group will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision of the group will be “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

6.       The Play Leadership Group will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about play in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for play within their local boards, and to provide informal guidance to relevant staff on play issues.

7.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

8.       Staff recommend a quarterly meeting schedule for the Play Leadership Group. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes from the meetings.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Play Leadership Group.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Auckland Council employed its first play advocacy advisor in September 2022. The role leads advocacy work in the area of play at Auckland Council and advocates for and influences the consideration, empowerment, enablement and equitable promotion of play.

10.     Play advocacy is an initiative in 17 local board work programmes for the 2023/2024 financial year. Three local boards do not have capacity to include play advocacy in their work programmes for 2023/2024 but have asked for ad-hoc advocacy support and will consider including play advocacy in their 2024/2025 work programmes.

11.     The play advocacy advisor has a responsibility to establish a network of play champions within council, to increase knowledge and awareness of play across the council group. The advisor established a Play Advisory Group in 2022 which has grown to include 45 play champions from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, and other organisations affiliated with the council, including Auckland Zoo, Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand Maritime Museum, and Stardome Observatory and Planetarium.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local boards have embraced the play advocacy approach and indicated interest to explore how they can increase play diversity for their communities and achieve play outcomes through different projects.

13.     After several local board workshops, elected members showed a strong personal interest in play. There are high levels of enthusiasm for play discussions and a keen interest in understanding more about how to promote play.

14.     In November 2022 the council’s Kotahi intranet and publicised the staff Play Advisory Group. Some elected members contacted the play advocacy advisor and asked if they could join the group. However, the group’s terms of reference restrict membership to staff only.

15.     During workshops with local boards in 2023, the play advocacy advisor sought guidance from elected members regarding their appetite for participating in an equivalent special interest group for elected members with a strong interest in play.

16.     In response to local boards’ interest, the play advocacy advisor has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of a Play Leadership Group, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·        learn more about play

·        share relevant knowledge with other elected members

·        improve connections between participants at a governance level

·        encourage collaboration between local boards to support play outcomes

·        increase knowledge and understanding of play equity issues

·        provide informal guidance to staff as the play advocacy work area grows

·        share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

17.     The vision of the Play Leadership Group is “elected members with an interest in play collectively work to support the goal of enabling play for all”.

18.     Participation in the Play Leadership Group is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint elected members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes of the group’s meetings.

19.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

20.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Play Leadership Group and provides further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet four times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed by the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The formation and operation of the Play Leadership Group has no climate impact.

22.     The continued advocacy to support play as ‘an everywhere activity’ supports positive climate outcomes by encouraging the community to embrace local suburbs as sites for play. This approach will reduce the need to drive to reach playgrounds.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Play Leadership Group will be administered by staff from the council’s Active Communities team, with support from kaimahi in the Regional Services and Strategy and Parks and Community Facilities departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The play advocacy advisor has presented at 20 local boards between March and October 2023.

25.     Local boards have expressed interest in the formation of a governance-level group for elected members who are interested in play. One local board requested that the opportunity to participate was presented in a business report, to enable participation to be formally agreed by the board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Play Leadership Group will provide play leaders with opportunities to learn more about Māori values relevant to play, Sport New Zealand’s bicultural play plan and its relevance to the development of play activities nationwide, and current and potential Māori play opportunities. This includes opportunities to develop and install māra hūpara in local parks and reserves, and the potential for projects such as Te Kete Rukuruku to generate play outcomes.

27.     The play leaders could also provide a mechanism for regional iwi engagement regarding play on a relatively informal basis, enabling mana whenua to share their views about play on an ongoing basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The Play Leadership Group will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that elected members could become members of the Play Leadership Group with expectations that they will be able to influence broader play investment or make decisions affecting play at a regional level.

30.     The terms of reference are intended to mitigate the risk of misunderstandings by making clear the scope of the Play Leadership Group. This will ensure participants become involved with a realistic expectation of what can be achieved through their membership.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Play Leadership Group will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

32.     An initial Play Leadership Group hui will be scheduled before the end of 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Terms of Reference for Play Leadership Group

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacquelyn Collins - Activation Advisor - Young People

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Pippa Sommerville - Manager Sport & Recreation

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 




Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Unsealed Road Improvement Programme and on-demand bus services in the Warkworth Subdivision

File No.: CP2023/18736

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the funding required to deliver on-demand bus services in the Warkworth subdivision using the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

2.       To seek approval of the proposed unsealed road improvements for the Warkworth subdivision using the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       On the 17 May 2023 the local board approved (resolution number RD/2023/61) pausing the On-Demand Bus Service Trial in the Warkworth subdivision to investigate available options to deliver improved roading surfaces with the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate and to investigate alternative approaches and funding streams to deliver on-demand bus services in the Warkworth subdivision. The local board previously agreed to fund new on-demand and fixed-route bus shuttle services for Warkworth, Leigh and Sandspit through the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate at their 21 September 2022 business meeting (resolution number RD/2022/130).

4.       Options discussed with the local board to date have included the possibility of revisions to existing Auckland Transport bus services. Auckland Transport has further investigated this and does not support making changes to any of these existing Auckland Transport bus services due to the negative impact on these services for customers.

5.       It may be possible to implement an on-demand solution for the Warkworth area at a lower cost than the $2.5 million (over three years) as originally resolved in September 2022. However, the benefit may not be proportional to the amount saved.

6.       In order to ensure an on-demand bus service is in operation by 1 July 2025, the date required to undertake a three-year trial within the current Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate period, Auckland Transport would need local board confirmation of the service to be undertaken by 31 May 2024.

7.       Auckland Transport’s recommendation remains the same as in the report submitted in September 2022; that based on the planning study conducted by Via Mobility an on-demand bus service solution proposed will best serve the Warkworth community.

8.       Auckland Transport has undertaken an investigation into the use of the transport targeted rate funding for unsealed road improvements in the Warkworth subdivision. 

9.       On 20 September 2023 the local board approved (resolution number RD/2023/147) a request for Auckland Transport to bring with urgency options for a decision for spending $1.64 million, the unallocated Warkworth subdivision share of the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate, on the Unsealed Roading Improvement programme.

10.     On 1 November 2023 a workshop was held with the local board where a proposed programme of work for unsealed road improvements for the Warkworth subdivision using the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate was presented.

11.     Auckland Transport is able to seek a subsidy from Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency for the unsealed road improvements in the Warkworth subdivision of 50 per cent of the total costs for the programme.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve proceeding with the allocation of $2,550,000 ($850,000 per year) from the Warkworth subdivision portion of the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate to fund an on-demand bus service linking Warkworth, Leigh and Sandspit for three years

b)      whakaae / approve $1,484,350 funding from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate for the unsealed roading improvement programme of roads in the Warkworth subdivision to be subsidised 50/50 by Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency that have been prioritised under the Auckland Transport Unsealed Road Improvement Programme for the following roads, with estimated costs:

Road name

Route Position

Length of road

Estimated cost

Krippner Road

RP 2824 – 3827

1003m

$300,900

Hepburn Creek Road

RP 787 - 1275

488m

$122,000

Hepburn Creek Road

RP 3762 – 4030

268m

$67,000

Upper Waiwera Road

RP 2955 – 3110

155m

$46,500

Upper Waiwera Road

RP 2072 – 2955

883m

$264,900

Jones Road (Omaha Flats)

RP 45 – 1263

1218m

$304,500

Anderson Road (Matakana)

RP 238 – 930

692m

$173,000

Tauhoa Road

RP 1411 – 6033

4622m

$1,386,600

Omaha Valley Road

RD 1411 – 6033

1011m

$303,300

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     In May 2018, the Rodney Local Board recommended that the Governing Body approve a targeted rate to accelerate investment in transport in the Rodney Local Board area. The recommendation was accepted, and the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate (RLBTTR) is currently scheduled to run for 10 years (2018–2028).

13.     The local board is the decision-maker regarding allocating funds raised through the targeted rate. Auckland Council receives the targeted rates payments, and Auckland Transport provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

14.     The RLBTTR is ring-fenced for transport projects in the Rodney Local Board area that are not included in the Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2031. It was established on the basis that the fund is to support:

·       new bus stops and bus services

·       new park-and-ride community hub facilities

·       new footpaths.

15.     The original consultation material for the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate led by Auckland Council sought feedback on the plan to bring forward investment in transport projects including public transport, road sealing and footpaths.

Warkworth subdivision on-demand bus service trial

16.     In September 2022, the local board approved the allocation of $2,550,000 ($850,000 per year) from the Warkworth subdivision portion of the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate to fund an on-demand bus service linking Warkworth, Leigh and Sandspit for three years (resolution number RD/2022/130). 

17.     On 17 May 2023, the local board approved the following (resolution number RD/2023/61):

·       approve pausing the On-demand Bus Service Trial in the Warkworth Subdivision (resolution number RD/2022/130) and investigate available options to deliver improved roading surfaces with the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate

·       investigate alternative approaches and funding streams to deliver on-demand bus services in the Warkworth Subdivision

·       confirm the consultation requirement for any proposed changes to the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate funding allocations.

Unsealed Road Improvement Programme

18.      Auckland Transport also delivers the Unsealed Road Improvement Programme (URIP). A prioritisation process is used to ascertain the work programme to be delivered. Funding to this programme has been facing cuts and Auckland Transport is constantly advocating for better funding to meet the needs in the Rodney Local Board area.

18.     The Unsealed Road Improvement Programme is based on a prioritisation process which was developed with the affected local boards in 2020. 

20.     In terms of the Auckland Transport prioritisation and decision-making process, the first step is to analyse the need; assessing the strategic role of each road based on the Roads and Streets Framework and traffic volumes. 

21.     Each road is then assessed quantitatively and qualitatively based on a multi-criteria analysis including:

·       safety – using gradient and crash data

·       public health – using dwelling and amenity proximity

·       natural environment – examining sensitive receiving environments

·       climate change – looking at the risk of dust events

·       cost – taken once treatment option is determined.

22.     This analysis establishes the priority order from the five criteria which are assessed as high, medium or low priority based on the score they receive.

23.     The second step is to decide on the most appropriate response and road asset treatment. The treatment options available are:

·         surface strengthening

·         road widening

·         safety improvements

·         pothole, corrugation and drainage improvement

·         dust mitigation

·         full seal.

24.     Roads will be assessed with the treatment option determined by the core issue affecting the road. If there are multiple issues, then Auckland Transport will select the highest rated treatment option and if warranted, Auckland Transport will seal roads.

25.     Each road is prioritised by treatment type and funding is allocated according to relative priorities within each treatment group.

26.     The prioritisation for the URIP is updated every three years to align with Auckland Council’s funding requirements and Auckland Transport’s Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP).

27.     Since 2015 Auckland Transport has had an unsealed road improvement programme in place which has seen approximately 280km of unsealed roads undergo strengthening of the existing road pavement, reshaping to provide improved crossfall, carriageway widening and drainage improvements.

28.    The original 2021-2024 RLTP funding allocations for the URIP was:

·       2021/2022 - $6 million

·       2022/2023 - $6 million

·       2023/2024 - $6 million.

29.     The 2022/2023 budget was reduced to $3.25 million due to the COVID-19 budget constraints.

30.     Figure 1 below shows the URIP including all the Rodney locations:

A screenshot of a computer screen

Description automatically generated

Figure 1 Unsealed Road Improvement Programme - Rodney

31.     The URIP improvements receive a Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency subsidy of 50 per cent of the total cost for each road under the Unsealed Road Improvement Programme using the criteria and treatments outlined above. Seal extensions and maintenance seal treatments do not qualify for the subsidy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Proposed on-demand bus services and existing bus services in the Warkworth subdivision area

32.    Following the local board meeting on 17 May 2023, Auckland Transport has undertaken the following:

·        a review of the potential to revise the routes of the 997 and 998 bus services during off-peak times with the establishment of a Western route around Warkworth

·        an investigation into the use of a fixed shuttle service only for Point Wells/Omaha/Leigh to complement the revised 997 bus service

·        a review of alternative approaches and a lower cost on-demand option.

33.     In June 2023 a briefing was held with local board members to discuss alternative approaches and funding streams to deliver on-demand bus services and existing bus services in the Warkworth subdivision and a number of options were discussed as follows, that Auckland Transport agreed to investigate.

Bus 998 Wellsford to Warkworth

34.     Auckland Transport has carried out a review of the existing 998 Wellsford to Warkworth route to determine if for the off-peak period (approximately 9am to 4pm) the service could be diverted on the way into Warkworth to add service for the Woodcocks Road and Falls Road area to the west of the old State Highway One (SH1).  See below Figure 2 detailing the investigated route.

A map with a road and text

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Figure 2 – Investigated route

35.       Auckland Transport does not support the suggested change to the 998 service as this would mean additional hours and kilometres. As there are no additional financial resources, the alternative is to reduce frequency. Passengers travelling between Wellsford and Warkworth would have a longer journey than they currently do. As the service is already only hourly this would be a downgrading of the service and may lead to a reduction in patronage, particularly if this was to be combined with a reduction in frequency.

36.       The suggested changes to this established service would disadvantage the current customers. Auckland Transport therefore does not support any changes to the 998 bus service.

37.       During the six-months between March and August 2023, 3,235 passengers from the bus route 998 alighted from the bus at the Percy Street stop in Warkworth. Of these 972 (30 per cent) transferred to the route 995. This means any extension to the route 998 would add to the journey time of 70 per cent of passengers.

Bus 997 Warkworth to Matakana, Point Wells and Omaha

38.       Auckland Transport has carried out a review of the existing 997 Warkworth to Matakana, Point Wells and Omaha bus service to a service that includes an additional loop around Warkworth servicing commercial areas such as Woodcocks Road, Mansel Drive, Falls Road, Hudson Road and the surrounding streets.  See Figure 3 below.

39.       Auckland Transport investigated truncating the 997 bus route to only run between Warkworth and Matakana and then to have an on-demand service between Point Wells and Omaha starting from the bus stop in Matakana. The time and distance saved from truncating the bus route could potentially be used to add a loop service around Woodcocks Rd and Falls Rd area to the west of the current SH1.

 

A map of a route

Description automatically generated

Figure 3 – 997 Service including Warkworth loop

 

40.       Auckland Transport does not support the suggested change to the 997 bus service as this would provide a relatively low level of service for the western part of Warkworth. Although the time and distance saved by not serving Point Wells and Omaha may allow for a loop service through the western part of Warkworth, there wouldn’t be the opportunity to add any more frequency to the timetable. The route 997 would remain an approximately two-hourly service.  Furthermore, this option would also increase the travel time between Matakana and Warkworth.

41.       Should the 997 bus route be changed to end at Matakana, there would also need to be a suitable site (or sites) in Matakana for the 997 bus to turnaround, layover between trips and make a safe transfer of passenger between the 997 and on-demand vehicle.

42.       See figures 4 and 5 below for patronage figures for the 998 and 997 bus services.

 

Figure 4 - patronage figures for the 997 bus services

Figure 5 - patronage figures for the 998 bus services

 

Additional bus stops

43.       Any changes to bus services to serve the western side of Warkworth with standard sized buses would require building new bus stops. The cost of building these stops would need to be funded by the local board, through the transport targeted rate. When using a standard sized bus formal stops are required for the following reasons:

·        Safety: a bus needs to be able to pull into a kerbside stop to allow for the safety of the bus, other traffic and passengers

·        a formal stop, with a flag, timetable, etc. to give assurance to an intending passenger that they are waiting in the right place for their bus

·        the cost of a pair of bus stops would be approximately $25,000, not including shelters. Therefore, for three or four pairs the cost would be in the region of $75,000 – $100,000.

Reduced on-demand service

44.       Auckland Transport has investigated the potential to reduce the allocation of funds to the Warkworth On-demand Trial of $2.5 million over three years.

45.       There are options whereby a service could be delivered at a lower cost with amendments to the original proposal. These could include:

·       removing the Sandspit and Leigh services

·       reducing the service zone

·       reducing the hours of operation

·       reducing the days operated to Monday to Friday only.

46.       Although an on-demand service with a reduced scope is likely to be cheaper, the savings would not be proportional. For example, a service costing half ($1.25 million) would not necessarily deliver half the service nor half of the passenger benefits. There are variable costs such as the hourly cost of operating a service which would be scalable. However, there are other fixed costs which may only generate a minor, cost saving overall. These fixed costs savings include the cost of tendering the service, any set-up costs, technology provision and community engagement.

47.       Due to the fixed costs associated with an on-demand service, proportional savings can be made by reducing the length of the on-demand service period rather than reducing the size and scale of the operating scope. For example, reducing the service from three years to two years would have a more proportional savings than reducing the on-demand service route. While a reduced time period for the trial would deliver a lower cost overall, it would provide less time for the service to get established and grow patronage. Although not reducing the annual cost, the overall cost could be reduced by operating the trial for two years rather than three.

48.       Any changes to the proposed on-demand service area, such as serving Point Wells, Omaha and Matakana, would require further simulation work to establish customer forecasts. The original simulation which was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of an on-demand service for Warkworth was based on a service area including Warkworth township and the area to the west of the old SH1. This additional simulation work would be necessary to assess the feasibility of a changed on-demand area and would incur a cost, Auckland Transport staff time and/or external consultants.

49.       If the local board resolves to implement any bus services on a three-year trial during the term of the current transport targeted rate, these would need to be in place by 1 July 2025. In order to meet this deadline, Auckland Transport would require confirmation of any service to be implemented by 31 May 2024 to allow 12 months to get a service up and running.

50.       Via Mobility undertook a simulation study on behalf of Rodney Local Board and Auckland Transport to develop the scope of an on-demand service in Warkworth and determine the likely patronage. The study outlines that the estimated target patronage is 18,000 per year for the on-demand zone (costed as below) and 14,000 for the fixed route shuttles to Leigh and Sandspit combined. On-demand public transport services typically experience a 5-10 per cent growth rate year-on-year.

51.       The approximate costs per year of delivery for an on-demand bus trial are as follows:

·       Year One: $1,121,000

·       Year Two: $705,000

·       Year Three: $680,000.

The first year of any on-demand service will experience higher costs due to the initial set up costs and background work that is required to get the service up and running. The costs given above are an estimate for the on-demand zone in Warkworth, as per the Via Mobility study and not for the fixed route shuttles to Leigh and Sandspit.

52.       At the local board workshop on 1 November 2023 the local board requested that Auckland Transport investigate a fixed route loop bus service for Warkworth; the route plan shown below in Figure 6 details the potential route. The annual cost to fund a fixed route loop bus service for Warkworth is $373,000. This route would also require approximately five new bus stops at a one-off cost of approximately $60,000 - $75,000.

53.       Auckland Transport costs to date on the Warkworth On-Demand trial are $25,000; the remaining budget is $2,525,000.

Figure 6 – potential Warkworth loop

Draft Unsealed Road Improvement Programme 2024/2025 to 2026/2027

54.     The draft programme for financial years 2024/2025 to 2026/2027 is currently being prepared.  Data for the URIP is being refreshed using traffic, crash, dwelling, amenity and road gradient details.

55.     Regional Land Transport Plan funding requested for the URIP.

·        2024/2025 - $6.24 million

·        2025/2026 - $6.40 million

·        2026/2027 - $13.04 million

·        Total 2024/2025 to 2033/2034 RLTP budget $124.60 million.

Proposed unsealed road improvements for the Warkworth subdivision using the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate

56.     The following is based on the URIP prioritisation procedure to qualify for Waka Kotahi funding for the road improvement work. The programme comprises two stages: unsealed road improvement work to bring the roads up to standard and sealing the road. Waka Kotahi subsidy will be requested for the unsealed road improvement work. Seal extensions and maintenance seal treatments do not qualify for a Waka Kotahi subsidy.

57.     The proposed unsealed road improvement programme for the Warkworth subdivision with estimated costs is as follows:

Road name

Route Position

Length of road

Estimated cost

Krippner Road

RP 2824 – 3827

1003m

$300,900

Hepburn Creek Road

RP 787 - 1275

488m

$122,000

Hepburn Creek Road

RP 3762 – 4030

268m

$67,000

Upper Waiwera Road

RP 2955 – 3110

155m

$46,500

Upper Waiwera Road

RP 2072 – 2955

883m

$264,900

Jones Road (Omaha Flats)

RP 45 – 1263

1218m

$304,500

Anderson Road (Matakana)

RP 238 – 930

692m

$173,000

Tauhoa Road

RP 1411 – 6033

4622m

$1,386,600

Omaha Valley Road

RD 1411 – 6033

1011m

$303,300

Total unsealed road improvement cost

$2,968,700

Cost less Waka Kotahi subsidy

$1,484,350

Funding required from RLBTTR

$1,484,350

 

58.     Following the local board workshop on 1 November, Auckland Transport has received updated estimates for the Unsealed Road Improvement Programme. Due to reduced estimated costs for the works on Hamilton Road and Goatley Road, these improvements can now be delivered under the main unsealed road improvement programme funding and no longer require RLBTTR funding.

59.     Should seal extensions be carried out on the roads detailed in the table above instead of the proposed unsealed road improvements, the cost would come to $1,740,800 and would not be subsidised by Waka Kotahi.

Consultation requirements

60.     There is no statutory requirement to consult on the proposed use of RLBTTR funding to deliver projects within the Unsealed Roads Improvement Programme as roading comes within the broadly stated activities for which funds from the targeted rate will be used as set out in the council’s Funding Impact Statement in the Annual Budget 2023/2024.

61.     However, the local board also needs to consider the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in, the matter in accordance with section 78 of the Local Government Act 2002. Relevant community views are summarized below in the ‘Local impacts and local board views’ section of this report. If the local board considers that it does not have sufficient information on the current views of the community in respect of the proposed decision, it may consider it appropriate to undertake consultation in order to obtain feedback to inform its decision-making. 

62.     If the local board decides to consult, it has discretion in terms of how that consultation is undertaken. It must however take into account the significance of the proposal and who is likely to be affected by it.

63.     While there is no requirement to use a special consultative procedure, engagement should be undertaken under the level of consult on the IAP2 spectrum in order to hear and consider the views and preferences of those affected. 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

64.     The Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate supports the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan, the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 and Auckland Council priorities regarding mitigating the effects of climate change and reducing the council’s carbon emissions. The RLBTTR funds projects that enable better access to active and public transport, namely footpaths, bus services, bus infrastructure and community transport hub facilities.

65.     Auckland Transport strives to provide attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reduce the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. These projects all support pedestrian and/or cyclist safety, therefore contributing to climate change actions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

66.     The appropriate council group inputs were sought by Auckland Transport in the formulation of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

67.     The Rodney Local Board is the decision-maker for funds collected through the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate. Auckland Council receives the rates payments, and Auckland Transport provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

68.     Council is aware of strong views within the Rodney Local Board community in support of both roading improvement and the need for additional and more frequent public transport, specifically buses such as smaller, shuttle buses in Warkworth. These views have recently been expressed through the recent Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 consultation (see feedback report), the Annual Budget 2023/2024 consultation (see report at the local board’s extraordinary business meeting on 10 May 2023) and a deputation presented at the local board 17 May 2023 business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

69.     Receipt of this report has no identified impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Engagement with Māori, giving consideration of impacts and opportunities for Māori will be progressed through Auckland Transport’s Mana Whenua Northern Hui.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

70.     The local board will complete the allocation of funds to projects under the programme. There will be no further funds available for additional services or capital projects within this subdivision.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

71.     A delay in making a decision on the approval for the projects will lead to additional costs.

72.     The projects being developed under the RLBTTR programme are subject to the usual project risks including scope changes and cost escalation. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     If confirmed, Auckland Transport will finalise the contractual arrangements for the on-demand bus service in Warkworth and the Unsealed Road Improvement Programme in the Warkworth subdivision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jeremy Pellow - Programme Director, Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate Programme  | Flood Recovery Controller

Dave Hilson – Principal Service Network Planner

Peter Scott – Asset Manager Road Corridor

Authorisers

John Gillespie – Head of Stakeholder & Elected Member Relations

Zigi Yates – Acting Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan adoption

File No.: CP2023/18212

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan has been developed over the past 18 months with extensive engagement and feedback from the Warkworth community.

3.       A draft of the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan was approved for community consultation by the local board at their meeting on the 21 June 2023. The community consultation period finished at the end of August 2023.

4.       The feedback has been analysed and minor changes have been made to the draft Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan. It is ready for adoption by the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan 2023–2033.

Horopaki

Context

5.       On the 16 June 2021, the Rodney Local Board approved the development of a town centre plan for Warkworth and the adjacent riverbank and allocated a budget of $102,795 for this work.

6.       In May 2022, once COVID-19 restrictions had eased, a team of community engagement specialists (Community Think) and urban design specialists (Motu Design) were contracted to work with mana whenua and the community – residents, businesses, community groups, property owners and developers to create a plan for the town centre and river.

7.       The purpose of the town centre plan was to set the direction for the development of the area and guide future decisions on place-making projects, public spaces, accessibility and connectivity projects, land use and community projects in and around the town centre and riverfront.

8.       It was also intended to demonstrate more sustainable and collaborative ways of designing and developing the town centre that would meet the needs of the whole community, nurture and protect the river and provide a well-designed, vibrant and attractive place for everybody.

9.       The goals of the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan are to:

·        illustrate a commitment to actions that improve the health and wellbeing of the river

·        identify opportunities and projects for council and private landowners to improve the appearance and functioning of the town centre

·        identify opportunities to improve the relationships between community facilities, the town centre and residential areas, including shared outcomes for further development

·        provide for high quality public spaces that will become social and community hubs with attractive and safe pedestrian connections

·        reflect Ngāti Manuhiri aspirations, culture and identity

·        improve accessibility of the town centre for all modes of transport – walking, cycling, public transport, parking

·        create a sense of place that reflects the diversity of the culture, history, people and their connections to the area

·        demonstrate best practice community engagement and urban design.

10.     In conjunction with the technical urban design expertise of Motu Design the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan has been built on an extensive community engagement process undertaken by Community Think. This plan is a good reflection of what many different parts of the local community would like to see in Warkworth in the future.

11.     At the heart of the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan are a series of key action areas. These are:

·        Mahurangi River – improving the river and town interface along both sides of the river, providing more opportunities for interaction with the river including walkways, environmental restoration and heritage exploration, improving the health of the river, acknowledging the mana of Ngāti Manuhiri and their relationship with the river

·        Neville, Elizabeth and Queen Streets – improving accessibility and pedestrian safety in the town centre, supporting cycling, improving street character and preserving heritage buildings, better management of car parking

·        Laneways and walkways – developing a co-ordinated strategy to transform the laneways into safe, fun, accessible spaces with artwork, lighting, seating and planting that will create a new entertainment and arts focus for the town

·        Green network – supporting the ecology of the natural environment in the face of anticipated intensification through good access to green spaces, creating walks and trails, tree planting and protection, provision for outdoor events and community gardens

·        A vibrant riverfront – revitalize the waterfront along Wharf Street, create a new community plaza and riverfront play space next to the old Warehouse Stationery building, create a market space and village green area between the Masonic Hall and Lucy Moore Park and improve the accessibility and usability of Lucy Moore Park.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The draft Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan invited a final round of community feedback from early July 2023 to the end of August 2023 before the plan was to be formally adopted by the local board.

13.     The consultation was promoted through Mahurangi Matters, the Warkworth Library, social media, community networks and targeted key stakeholder groups. The draft plan was also sent directly out to the 100 plus individuals and groups who were involved in its early development. Feedback was able to be provided online, in person at the Warkworth Library or by directly emailing or phoning a staff member.

14.     A total of 29 submissions were received. The majority of these were from individuals with three being from groups. There was an even age distribution of people under 44 years and over 44 years old and roughly the same numbers of men and women.

15.     Of the 29 submissions, 19 supported the draft Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan, five did not support it and five partially supported it.

 

Comments from people in support (19 people)

·   A lot of thought and planning went into it, its heading in the right direction

·   Like the green spaces, cultural connections, cycling and walking

·   Important that all ages had input, good to turn cafes and shopping to the river and relocate parking from the river

·   Great plan, attractive to tourists, enhances river, arts and cultural aspects

·   Essential to revitalise the CBD in the face of the changing demographics

·   Town is faded, needs to be brought into the now

·   Important to promote cycling and more pedestrianised spaces

Comments from people who partially support (5 people)

·   Must replace car parking if removed

·   There needs to be more residential density in the centre

·   Needs universal design, mobility parking and general accessibility right across the town centre

·   More seating and shade for larger groups

·   Need to create an attractive entranceway to town at Hill Street

·   Extend current pathway to the point at the end of Lucy Moore

Comments from people who do not support (5 people)

·   Do not take away parking or shrink the road space for cycling

·   Stop using Māori names

·   Need to cater for retirees and children better

·   Need more sports and a swimming pool

·   We should retain the colonial history and heritage, its part of the town

·   This is not a plan, just one groups vision

 

16.     Many of the suggestions for change or improvements are already in the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan although they may have been framed in a more general or slightly different way.

17.     Staff have made small changes to the plan as a result of the community feedback to strengthen the emphasis on universal design and general accessibility. We have also included the need for an attractive town entranceway at Hill Street and repurposing the old bridge.

18.     There is a new section from Ngāti Manuhiri that provides additional information about their early history in the area.

19.     Although the numbers of submitters to this final part of the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan community consultation was relatively small, large numbers of people contributed to and were engaged during the first six months of the plan development. It was a robust process and the final version of the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan has been built on a solid foundation of community input.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     The Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan has a strong emphasis on environmental sustainability and mitigating the effects of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Several council teams and subject matter experts have been involved in the development of the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan and there is general support for the direction and actions outlined in the plan. As a part of this final consultation session the draft plan was sent out to all internal subject matter experts for comment and feedback. Its successful implementation will require ongoing input from many council teams.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     There has been extensive community consultation in the development of this plan and the local board have been kept informed of its progress. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Ngāti Manuhiri have been involved in the development and contributed to the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan from the outset. They are very interested in seeing the river better cared for and the town more reflective of their culture and identity. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     No further funding is required for the completion of the Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan has identified many opportunities for future projects to be developed and implemented. There is a risk that these will be limited by budget constraints and dependence on external providers. The Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan will need to continue to be socialised on an ongoing basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Circulate and promote the approved Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - The Puhinui Warkworth Town Centre Plan 2023 - 2033 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sue Dodds - Rodney Community Broker, Connected Communities

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Northern Busway Bylaw review

File No.: CP2023/17813

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide views on the proposed changes and any additional factors for consideration on the Northern Busway Bylaw review.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Northern Busway corridor runs along State Highway One from the Auckland Harbour Bridge to Albany.

3.       The Northern Busway significantly increases the capacity of State Highway One by reducing private vehicle use, making it possible for more people to travel, and supporting the growth of northern Auckland.

4.       The forecasted passenger transport demand is likely to exceed the functional capacity of core Albany to Auckland city centre public transport corridors by the 2030s. This exceptional growth will further increase pressure on the Northern Busway.

5.       Access to and activities on the busway are regulated under the Northern Busway Bylaw. Auckland Transport manages the busway’s daily operations with support from the Auckland Transport Operation Centre.

6.       Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency have proposed the following key changes are made through a replacement bylaw:

·        Proposal 1: extending the bylaw to cover the new section of the Northern Busway from Constellation Station to Albany Station

·        Proposal 2: updating vehicles eligible to apply for Northern Busway access

·        Proposal 3: improving operational and decision-making processes on the Northern Busway.

7.       Consultation on the proposed changes to the Northern Busway Bylaw runs from 6 November to 1 December 2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide views on the proposed changes to the Northern Busway Bylaw

b)      whakarite / provide any additional factors that Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency should consider for the bylaw review.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Northern Busway is a rapid transit corridor that runs along State Highway One (SH1) from the Auckland Harbour Bridge to Albany. It forms the backbone of public transport services on the North Shore and is a critical component of the wider Auckland Rapid Transit Network.

9.       The corridor includes a dedicated dual busway and bus lanes, and provides fast, reliable, frequent, and high-capacity bus services, free from congestion to Auckland’s city centre.  

10.     The first section of the Northern Busway between Onewa and Constellation Station opened in 2008. In May 2022, an additional five kilometre stretch from Constellation Station to Albany Station opened as part of the Northern Corridor Improvements project. A map of the route is provided in Attachment A to the agenda report.

11.     Passenger growth on the Northern Busway has exceeded that of both the rail network and the rest of the bus network. The forecasted passenger transport demand is likely to exceed the functional capacity of core Albany to Auckland city centre public transport corridors by the 2030s. This exceptional growth will further increase pressure on the Northern Busway.  

Bylaw Review

12.     Access to and activities on the Northern Busway are regulated under the Northern Busway Bylaw (NZTA 2008/01 Prescribing Use of the Northern Busway in Auckland). 

13.     To ensure the bylaw supports the Northern Busway’s rapid transit function now and into the future, Waka Kotahi and Auckland Transport are working together to review the bylaw to make sure it:  

·        helps to optimise/manage the capacity of the busway and its stations  

·        has a clear authorisation process for vehicles accessing the busway  

·        has clear penalties and enforcement mechanisms  

·        provides for a safe journey  

·        promotes equitable travel choices for customers, including those with accessibility needs.  

14.     Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) is consulting on the following proposed changes: 

·        Proposal 1: Extending the bylaw to cover the new section of the busway from Constellation Station to Albany Station

·        Proposal 2: Updating vehicles eligible to apply for busway access 

Waka Kotahi is proposing that the following operators should be eligible to apply for access:

-   First priority: scheduled bus services (including inter-regional buses and special event buses that are scheduled)

-   Second priority: Specialised School Transport Assistance, National Travel Assistance and Total Mobility buses.

·        Proposal 3: Improving operational and decision-making processes on the busway.  

Waka Kotahi is proposing changes to the following:

-   key criteria for deciding whether to authorise operator access to the busway

-   access conditions

-   enforcement powers under the bylaw

-   emergency vehicle access

-   emergency and breakdown procedures for operators

-   transitional provisions.

15.     Additional information on the proposed changes is provided in Attachment B to the agenda report.

16.     Consultation on the proposed changes to the bylaw runs from 6 November to 1 December 2023. This report enables the local board to provide their formal views.

17.     Additional consultation material is available online at https://nzta.govt.nz/about-us/consultations/northern-busway-consultation.

18.     Waka Kotahi presented the bylaw review to impacted local boards at a briefing on 6 November 2023. A copy of the presentation is provided in Attachment C to the agenda report.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Northern Busway route map

41

b

Northern Busway Bylaw review proposals

43

c

06112023 Local Board Briefing presentation

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 






Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 













Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Spatial Land Use Strategy Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zone

File No.: CP2023/17694

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report back to the Rodney Local Board on the feedback received on the draft Spatial Land Use Strategy for Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones.

2.       To obtain the Rodney Local Board’s views on the amended Spatial Land Use Strategy for Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Future Urban Zones to inform the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth) transport project is preparing a Detailed Business Cases  to provide route protection for key transport projects in the North to support the growth anticipated in the Future Urban zones over the next 10 to 30 years. The Detailed Business Cases North was adopted by the Auckland Transport  and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) boards in October 2023 subject to the adoption of the Auckland Council Future Development Strategy which is discussed further below.

4.       A Spatial Land Use Strategy (the Strategy) has been prepared for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban zoned areas. The Strategy’s purpose is to identify future land uses to inform the Detailed Business Cases and the subsequent long term route protection through the designation process.

5.       Key to this is that the Strategy identifies a location for a future metropolitan/town centre that the transport network will support and impact upon, particularly the proposed Rapid Transit Corridor, whether that is a busway or rail corridor. A small metropolitan centre or a large town centre will be needed to provide services to the large future community (potentially 60,000 -70,000 dwellings) in Dairy Flat when fully developed.

6.       The Strategy will also inform future structure planning.

7.       The former Auckland Council Planning Committee established a Working Party, comprising the chairperson of the Planning Committee, the ward councillor for Rodney, the Rodney Local Board chairperson, and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board to approve the draft strategy for consultation. The draft Strategy was approved for consultation by the Working Party on 22 June 2022.

8.       The draft Spatial Land Use Strategy for Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zone was open for consultation from 11 July 2022 to 19 August 2022. The consultation was publicised in conjunction with the Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth Programme for future transport plans for the North of Auckland.

9.       There were 134 pieces of feedback received on the Strategy. In terms of the feedback to the online questions, 55 per cent of did not support the strategy while 44 per cent did support it. In terms of the location of the proposed town centre, 63 per cent opposed it and 36 per cent supported it.

10.     The main themes of the feedback opposing the Strategy were:

·       opposition to the proposed location of the centre extending from the Rapid Transit Corridor  alignment to Green Road Park

·       there was no need for growth or such a large centre

·       opposition to urban development near Green Road Park

·       inadequate infrastructure.

11.     Based on the feedback and further discussions, particularly with the Parks and Community Facilities Department concerning the Green Road Park, and Healthy Waters in regard to flood levels, changes are recommended to the Strategy. The key change is that the proposed metro/town centre has now been re-located on higher ground closer to the central Rapid Transport Corridor and away from more flood prone land.

12.     The feedback and the amended Strategy will be reported to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 30 November 2023 for adoption.

13.     Reporting to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on the feedback received on the draft Strategy, and the completion of the amended final Strategy, has been delayed due to the release of the draft Future Development Strategy  in June 2023 and the need to await its adoption by this Committee. This was because the draft Future Development Strategy had shown the Dairy Flat Future Urban Zone as “an area for further investigation” which had created some uncertainty about the future of the Dairy Flat Future Urban Zone.

14.     The Future Development Strategy was adopted by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee at its meeting on 2 November 2023. The Future Development Strategy no longer identifies the Dairy Flat area as an area for further investigation but extends the time frame for development out to 2050+ from 2038 in the original Future Urban Land Supply Strategy, primarily due to the cost of infrastructure requirements.

15.     It is therefore now appropriate to finalise the Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones. Te Tupu Ngātahi lodged Notices of Requirement  for the North transport projects on 20 October 2023. It is therefore desirable to adopt the Strategy to provide a high-level land use framework for consideration of the Notices Of Requirements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on the draft Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones.

Horopaki

Context

Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth

16.     Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth) (TTN) is a collaboration between Auckland Transport (AT), the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) and Auckland Council and mana whenua to plan transport investment in Auckland’s Future Urban zoned areas over the next 10 to 30 years.

17.     TTN is required by Waka Kotahi and AT to carry out investigations to support long term route protection. In the past it has been extremely difficult and expensive to retrofit new arterial routes once development has commenced. This is part of a series of long-term route protection planning and approval process within and around Future Urban Zoned areas in Auckland. However, it does not mean that development will happen in the near future.

18.     In July 2019, Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi confirmed via a series of Indicative Business Case workshops an Indicative Strategic Transport Network for the greenfield areas. Since then, TTN has been working on a Detailed Business Case for this area and has lodged Notices of Requirements(NORs) with the council based on this work.

19.     This Detailed Business Case (DBC) work includes more detailed technical investigation for each of the projects in the networks, particularly a Rapid Transit Corridor (RTC), state highway upgrades and upgrades and new roads in the arterial roading network. This has led to a specific route protection process with the lodging of NORs to ensure that the land needed to build and operate the routes in the future is set aside and protected in advance of the transport projects being constructed and the land being developed.

20.     Of the projects for the north, the most critical in terms of the inter-relationship with land use is the RTC.

21.     After an exhaustive analysis of many options, the final three consisted of the following:

·       immediately to the west of the existing motorway

·       close to Green Road Park – to connect with a centre located adjacent to the park 

·       a central route through the Dairy Flat Future Urban Zone (FUZ) area.

22.     The route to the west of the motorway was not favoured as it would not access the bulk of the future urban area and a future centre. The route option close to Green Road Park was not favoured either as it was lower lying, involved more stream crossings, crossing Dairy Flat Highway twice with additional costs and was slightly longer meaning longer travel times.

23.     TTN took preferred transport options to landowners and the community for consultation from 11 July 2022 to 19 August 2022. This was at the same period as the draft Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zone was released for public feedback.

24.     The preferred route for the RTC is the central route through the Dairy Flat FUZ area which is a new 16km corridor from Albany via Dairy Flat and onto Milldale. This was agreed after lengthy workshops with staff and mana whenua and arrived at using multicriteria analysis. This option enabled better access to more of the future urban area, involved fewer stream crossings, better followed the terrain and was not too long.

25.     The Detailed Business Case recommended network is shown in Figure 1 below.

A picture containing map, atlas, text

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Figure 1 Detailed Business Case Recommended Network

26.     The north DBC was adopted by both the AT and Waka Kotahi boards in October 2023 and notices of requirement were lodged with the council on 20 October 2023 and publicly notified on 16 November 2023.

The Spatial Land Use Strategy

27.     A Spatial Land Use Strategy has been prepared for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban zoned areas. The Strategy’s purpose is to identify future land uses to inform the DBC and the subsequent long term route protection through the designation process.

28.     Key to this is that the Strategy identifies a location for a future metropolitan/town centre that the transport network will support and impact upon, particularly the proposed Rapid Transit Corridor, whether that is a busway or rail corridor. A small metropolitan centre or a large town centre will be needed to provide services to the large future community (60,000 -70,000 dwellings) in Dairy Flat when fully built out.

29.     The Strategy will also inform future structure planning.

The Draft Spatial Land Use Strategy

30.     A draft Strategy was prepared in July 2022.The preferred metropolitan/town centre option set out in the draft Strategy had the centre located on a central RTC alignment extending southwest to Green Road Park and is shown in Figure 2 below.

Map

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Figure 2 Draft Spatial Land Use Strategy

31.     The initial proposal was that the centre should be located adjoining the Green Road Park and that there would be benefits for the park and the town centre, particularly for the location of civic facilities such as a library. It was also considered that there would be advantages if the RTC corridor could be located adjoining or even crossing Dairy Flat Highway to integrate the centre, the park and the RTC.

32.     However, as work on the RTC options progressed, the preferred RTC alignment was concluded to be the more central location to the north-east of Dairy Flat Highway.

33.     Given the size of the centre required, it was considered that a centre option that combined a location adjoining the RTC and Green Road Park could still be achieved with benefits to the centre of being accessible to both the Green Road Park and the RTC. The distance from the RTC to the Park was approximately 1000m which is at the edge of a walkable distance.

34.     The draft Strategy also showed a possible high density residential area extending for 800m adjoining the metropolitan/town centre and the Green Road Park to take advantage of the amenities of both.

35.     A local centre was identified in the Pine Valley Road area associated with the RTC alignment. Residential zoning for the remainder of the area was not specified and will be determined at the subsequent structure plan stage.

Consultation on the draft Strategy

36.     The former Auckland Council Planning Committee established a working party, comprising the chairperson of the Planning Committee, the Ward Councillor for Rodney, the Rodney Local Board chairperson, and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board to approve the draft Strategy for consultation. The draft Strategy was approved for consultation by the working party on 22 June 2022.

37.     The draft Spatial Land Use Strategy Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zone was open for consultation from 11 July 2022 to 19 August 2022. The consultation was publicised in conjunction with the Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth Programme for future transport plans for the North of Auckland. One open day was held in Dairy Flat on 13 August 2022, where both the future transport plans and the Spatial Land Use Strategy were presented.

38.     There were 134 pieces of feedback received on the draft Strategy. The majority of the responses used the council’s feedback form (114). Of these 16 included detailed attachments. A further 14 pieces of feedback were received via email to the dedicated email address set up for the engagement. It is noted that there were around 241 pieces of feedback on the TTN related transport network consultation.

39.     In terms of the feedback to the online questions, 55 per cent of did not support the draft Strategy while 44 per cent did support it. In terms of the location of the proposed town centre, extending from Green Road Park to the RTC, 63 per cent opposed it and 36 per cent supported it.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Feedback on Draft Strategy

40.     The main themes of the feedback and how the Strategy responds to them are outlined below. The detailed feedback is outlined in the Strategy’s Appendix 1 and its attachments (see Attachment A to this agenda report).

41.     Themes in support of the Strategy and comments made are as follows.

·    Growth Management: The land is zoned for future development and is the next best area, need more growth areas to support multi modal transport, needs to happen sooner, better than intensification in existing areas

·    Centre location: Metropolitan/Town Centre located centrally within intended development and between Albany and Silverdale, other areas getting congested, e.g., Silverdale, Albany, good access to transport if active modes provided

·    Green Road Park: Unlocks potential of Green Road Park, unique opportunity to integrate the park and the centre

·    Infrastructure: Infrastructure will be improved.

42.     Themes in opposition to the Strategy and comments made are as follows.

·       Centre Location: Advantages of proximity of centre to Green Road Park overstated, too far from RTC, centre located on a floodplain, centre severed by Dairy Flat Highway and Bawden Road, there are other better locations for a centre and RTC, shape of centre will not achieve transport outcomes, land use transport integration and reduced vehicle kilometres travelled (VKT), transit-oriented development not mentioned

·       Growth Management: No demand for a new centre, centre too large, intensify in existing areas, too close to Albany and Silverdale, creating urban sprawl, keep the area rural/green open space, disruption to existing residents’ lifestyles, leaves them in limbo for a long time, need other services required by the community, e.g. schools, hospitals etc

·       Effects on Green Road Park: Oppose urban development adjacent to Green Road Park, not the intended use of the park, it is to be a rural park

·       Infrastructure: Inadequate infrastructure and it will be expensive.

Response to Feedback and Key Changes to the Strategy

43.     Detailed discussion of the response to the feedback is provided in section 6.4 of the Strategy and in Appendix 1 of the Strategy.

A picture containing text, map, screenshot, atlas

Description automatically generated44.     The key change to the strategy is the location of the metro/town centre. Following the public feedback, further discussions have been held with the Parks and Community Facilities Department, the Healthy Waters Department, and with TTN, with the result that the location of the centre has been moved to be centred solely on the RTC alignment and does not now extend toward Green Road Park, see Figures 3 and 4. This will reduce the likelihood of flooding within the centre and will retain the park as a predominantly open space recreation facility rather than a  park for urban civic amenities. This is in line with the Rodney Local Parks Reserve Management Plan adopted on 19 July 2023.

Figure 3 Spatial Land Use Strategy - Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones

Figure 4 Dairy Flat Metropolitan/Town Centre

45.     With the preferred location of the RTC being centrally located in the FUZ the Parks and Community Facilities Department now consider that the preferred location for community facilities is close to the RTC and any future stations, rather than on or close to the Green Road Park.

46.     Prior to the recent flood events and as part of recent wider investigations, Healthy Waters carried out additional flood modelling to reflect climate change and increased temperature scenarios (+2.1oC and +3.8oC) This has shown that the extent of the floodplains in the area will increase slightly, particularly the east west floodplain just north of Dairy Flat Highway. While the increases to the extent of floodplains from those identified in the draft strategy are not that great, they could have made it difficult to connect the centre across them.

47.     Given the public feedback received on flooding in the area and following the January and February 2023 flood events, initial investigations of the floods across Auckland show that the flood levels were likely to have been within the wider floodplains referred to above for the +3.8 oC scenario.

48.     The existence of floodplains in some parts of the area does not necessarily mean that the area is unsuitable for development and development can be integrated with them for example through the open space and walking and cycling network. The extent of flooding, and the nature of mitigation, can also be considered at the more detailed structure plan stage when finer grained analysis and detailed options, including costings, can be canvassed. 

49.     Given the public feedback and the further consideration of the location of community facilities and flooding the Strategy has been amended to remove the centre’s direct connection with Green Road Park and avoid it spanning floodplains.  It now focuses the centre solely on the RTC alignment and its associated station.

50.     There is still the opportunity to build strong connections between the centre and Green Road Park, as it will still have passive uses, even if the centre does not need to directly interact with it. This matter can be considered further at the structure plan stage.

51.     In relation to the Pine Valley Road area, a change that has emerged from the TTN work is that two station locations are now proposed in this  area as opposed to the one shown in the draft Strategy. The more eastern of these is proposed to include a park and ride facility. This means that there is now the prospect of two local centres associated with the stations in the Pine Valley Road area. See Figure 3.

52.     Other changes have been made to the Strategy to address matters raised in the feedback and these are highlighted in section 6.5 of the Strategy and its Appendix 1.

53.     Since the draft Spatial Land Use Strategy was released, the draft Tāmaki Makaurau Future Development Strategy (FDS) was released for public engagement in June 2023. The Future Development Strategy is required by the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020. The draft identified the Dairy Flat and Wainui areas (including the Pine Valley Road area) as areas “Recommended for further investigation" due to uncertainty about the development capacity needed by the city, the infrastructure investment required, funding constraints, impacts on emissions and vehicle kilometres travelled, and potential natural hazards. It also proposes that Dairy Flat should not be planned to support development before 2050+ which is much later than identified in the Future Urban Land Supply Strategy.

54.     Reporting the Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones to the Committee was therefore delayed due to the need to await the adoption of the FDS by this Committee. The FDS was adopted by the Committee on 2 November 2023. It no longer identifies the Dairy Flat area as an area for further investigation but retains the time frame for development identified in the draft of 2050+, extended from 2038 in the original Future Urban Land Supply Strategy due primarily to infrastructure requirements.

55.     It is therefore now appropriate to consider the Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones. Te Tupu Ngātahi lodged Notices of Requirement (NOR) for the North transport projects on 20 October 2023. It is therefore desirable to adopt the Strategy to provide a high-level land use framework for consideration of the NOR’s.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

56.     Council declared a climate emergency in Auckland, in June 2019. The decision included a commitment for all council decision-makers to consider the climate implications of their decisions. In particular, consideration needs to be given in two key ways:

·        how the proposed decision will impact on greenhouse gas emissions and the approach to reduce emissions

·        what effect climate change could have over the lifetime of a proposed decision and how these effects are being taken into account.

57.     The decision to prepare a spatial land use strategy does not in itself impact on climate change. However, the subsequent outcomes of preparing it and the DBCs, have impacts on climate change. Key in this is the work looking at providing for RTNs and walking and cycling networks. Consideration of the NORs is an opportunity to consider climate change.

58.     The future development of greenfield land for urban activities will likely lead to an increase in the region’s greenhouse gas emissions. The growth will result in increased traffic movements, which are currently Auckland’s largest single contribution to greenhouse gas emissions.

59.     However, there are several aspects of the Strategy supporting the DBC that go toward mitigating the effects of emissions from vehicles. These include the following:

·        providing for a centre with services and employment central to a large residential catchment to help reduce trips for new and existing residents

·        providing for high density residential development close to the centre

·        providing a Rapid Transit Network through the centre of a future residential area

·        providing a walking and cycling network.

60.     As noted above, the issue of climate change and effects on flooding have also been recognized and taken into account in the strategy. Flooding was in part a reason for the recommended reconfiguration of the preferred location for the metro/town centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

61.     Auckland Transport are part of Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth) which has been established by AT and Waka Kotahi. They have both been a key part of the development of the Strategy to ensure that the location of the centre and the route of the RTC are aligned.

62.     Watercare will be more impacted in the future at the structure plan stages when detailed consideration will be given to the supply of water and wastewater.

63.     Various internal council teams including Healthy Waters and Parks and Community Facilities have been involved in the development of the Strategy and provided additional comment following receipt of feedback on the draft. As noted above Healthy Waters also provided additional comment following the flood events of January and February this year.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

64.     This report provides the opportunity for the Rodney Local Board to have input into the final Spatial Land Use Strategy taking into account the community feedback received on the draft strategy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

65.     Mana Whenua are part of Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth) and were involved in developing the DBC. The following iwi groups are part of Supporting Growth:

·       Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·       Te Kawerau a Maki

·       Te Ākitai Waiohua

·       Ngai Tai Ki Tāmaki

·       Ngāti Whanaunga

·       Ngāti Maru

·       Te Patu Kirikiri

·       Ngāti Manuhiri

·       Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board

·       Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua.

66.     The draft Strategy was made available to 14 of the above iwi groups who had expressed an interest in being informed about the project. At that time, Ngāti Manuhiri advised that they did not have the resources to provide comment on the draft.

67.     Subsequently Te Kawerau a Maki with Ngāti Manuhiri, have prepared a further Cultural Impact Assessment for the Supporting Growth project.  This reached conclusions on the proposed transport network, but these are also relevant to the proposed future land uses. It concluded that the proposal will result in a range of adverse cultural impacts including cumulative changes to the cultural landscape and urbanisation of waterways and flood prone areas.

68.     Positive impacts relate to transport efficiencies and opportunities for ecological and cultural interpretation enhancement. It identified a number of significant adverse effects that will either need to be reduced further or require offsetting. These particularly related to effects on streams and significant areas of native vegetation. It also indicated that the new RTC introduces the largest source of new impacts and while they are not opposed to this in principle, they do have concerns about the unlocking of inappropriate development within flood prone areas and the impact to the landscape of introducing a parallel transit corridor to SH1 rather than integrating their footprints.

69.     This concern however is prefaced on the RTC unlocking or coming prior to most development rather than the reverse where it is responding to existing development created within the FUZ over the next decades. The former case (unlock) is challenging for iwi as a level of harm. The latter case (respond) is supported as a means of lessening existing harm.

70.     As noted above an important issue identified by mana whenua through the DBC process is the impact on streams. The revised Strategy addresses this to the extent that the proposed metropolitan/town centre no longer spans streams in the area. The development of the rest of the area and its relationship with the stream network will be considered through the future more detailed structure plan process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

71.     The completion of the Strategy can be met from within council’s existing budget. The costs of infrastructure funding will be considered through future long-term plans.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     There is the risk that the Strategy will raise landowner expectations of particular land uses in particular areas. It has also raised concerns from some landowners who are opposed to future urban development in the area. However, the council’s position on this has now been confirmed through the adoption of the FDS and the retention of the Dairy Flat FUZ as a future development area. The Strategy does not change the timing planned for development that is set out in the Future Development Strategy and there will still be the need for detailed structure plans to be prepared for the area in future prior to any rezoning to live zones.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     The feedback received on the draft Strategy and the amended Spatial Land Use Strategy will be reported back to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 30 November 2023. The committee will be provided a verbal update of any comments the local board have on the strategy received at this meeting.

74.     Once adopted, the Strategy will form part of the evidence base for the Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth) detailed business case for the future transport network in the North and the notices of requirement to designate future transport infrastructure by Te Tupu Ngātahi (Supporting Growth).

75.     The landowners that were initially advised of the draft Strategy and those that provided feedback will be advised of the response to the feedback and the adopted Strategy.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dave Paul - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Victoria Wicks-Brown - Principal Advisor Panels

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter one 2023/2024

File No.: CP2023/16491

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Rodney Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the local board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·        ID389: Connected and resilient communities Rodney

·        ID4058: Support and Activation – Rodney Community Centres and Halls North-East

·        ID1128: Tātou Belonging - we bring communities together support and encourage volunteers in our libraries – Rodney.

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status.

5.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2023/2024 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note;

·        overall, the net operational financial performance of the local board is nine percent below budget for the first quarter of 2023/2024

·        both operating revenue and expenditure are largely on target for the first quarter. Locally Driven Initiatives operational projects were overall on budget

·        capital spend for the quarter was primarily on renewal of local community assets, such as 49 Commercial Road and walkway renewals in Omaha.

6.         The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

7.         Auckland Emergency Management has undertaken a change proposal process which has resulted in the Resilience team, that formerly engaged with local boards being disestablished. Despite this, remaining staff have continued to attend community meetings to provide feedback, subject matter expertise where required this quarter. Future work with local boards and communities will be delivered through a new planning team, which will eventually have seven senior planners, each working with three local boards.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2023 as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Rodney Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services.

9.       The local board work programmes were not adopted until a month into the financial year due to uncertainty of local board funding in the development of the Annual Budget 2023/2024. Local board funding for 2023/2024 was agreed by the Governing Body at the end of May 2023 and required changes to planned work programmes, which were then approved in July 2023 with some additional funding approved for the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme in August 2023. (Resolutions RD/2023/95, RD/2023/96, RD/2023/131).

The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Auckland Emergency Management (AEM) staff have continued to attend community meetings to provide feedback and subject matter expertise where required following the change proposal process, this quarter. This has included supporting community activities that are attached to the work of community brokers that arose following the emergency events this year.

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

A green circle with a yellow triangle and a green triangle

Description automatically generated

12.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes.  

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

A graph of a number of individuals

Description automatically generated

Key activity updates

13.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2023/2024 include:

·        ID389: Connected and resilient communities Rodney. Community Gardens. Work has continued supporting groups wanting to establish community gardens in Matheson Bay and Snells Beach. A garden in the lower half of Goodall Reserve is now making progress thanks to support from the Women's Centre in Warkworth who are keen to form a partnering relationship with the local community group instigating the garden

·        ID4058: Support and Activation – Rodney Community Centres and Halls North-East. In quarter one a new Community Places Coordinator for North-East Rodney has been appointed. This role will be activating Wellsford District Community Centre, Mahurangi East Community Centre and Warkworth Town Hall and will also be providing support to other rural halls advisory committees

·        ID1128: Tātou Belonging - we bring communities together support and encourage volunteers in our libraries – Rodney. Mahurangi East Library, ably supported by the Friends of the Mahurangi East Library hosted the celebrated New Zealand author Dame Fiona Kidman. It was an evening to remember with people attending from around the Rodney region and much positive feedback was received. The same volunteer ‘Friends’ committee group continue to regularly support events at the library while volunteer individuals support library operations, events and programmes, on a regular basis in other Rodney libraries.

Activities on hold

14.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        ID30619: Rodney Town Centre Revitalisation implement centre plan stage 2 -Warkworth. This project is on hold until the Warkworth Town Centre Plan has been adopted by the local board

·        ID31411: Waterloo Reserve, Milldale – develop new suburb park. This project is on hold pending a financial contribution to the developer-led work at Waterloo Reserve. The timeframe for the transaction is yet to be confirmed

·        ID30136: Dida Park Drive, Huapai – develop new neighbourhood park. This project is on hold until a scope change proposal is approved by the local board

·        ID40299: Bourne Dean Recreation Reserve – renew open space assets. When project manager capacity allows, active progression of this project will start. This is expected to be towards the end of the 2023 or early 2024

·        ID24230: Point Wells Recreation Reserve – renew accessway and associated assets. Awaiting project manager allocation to this project

·        ID36673: Rautawhiri Park – renew playspace and open space assets. When project manager capacity allows, active progression of this project will start. This is expected to be towards the end of the 2023 or early 2024.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

15.     The following work programme activity has been cancelled:

·        ID390: Support and Activation – Rodney Halls. The budget from this line has joined the budget for lines ID4058: Support and Activation - Rodney Community Centres and Halls and ID388: Activation of community led venue partners Rodney.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

16.     The following work programme activity has been merged with other activities for efficient delivery:

·        ID3881: Events Unit Production and Civic staff costs for delivery – Rodney Local Board. This budget will be reallocated and merged with lines ID395: Local Civic Events - Rodney and ID397: Anzac Services Rodney.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

18.     Work programmes were approved in June and August 2023 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     This report informs the Rodney Local Board of their work programme performance for the quarter ending 30 September 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     All libraries in Rodney continue to support the growth of te reo Māori and promote Māori outcomes in or communities through the use of Māori greetings and incorporation of te reo Māori into pre-schools sessions.

22.     The local board is committed through its activity ID 3852 – Local implementation of Ngā Hapori Momoho (Thriving Communities) council’s social wellbeing strategy Rodney. This activity will have a strong focus on supporting Māori-led initiatives, including empowering individuals, whānau and communities to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     This report is provided to enable the Rodney Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

24.     For the first quarter of 2023/2024, Locally Driven Initiatives operational projects were on track against budget. All other operating expenditure totaled $336,000 below budget.

25.     Capital spend of $2.9 million was $1.1 million above the first quarter budget. Investment in the renewal of local community assets totaled $2.4 million, mostly on 49 Commercial Road and renewal of walkways in Omaha. Delivery progress on individual projects can be found in the work programme update (Attachment A).

26.     The complete Rodney Local Board financial performance report for the first quarter of 2023/2024 can be found in Attachment B to the agenda report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

28.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

29.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board quarter one 2023/2024 work programme update (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Rodney Quarterly Performance Report Q1 FY24 Fin Appendix

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 






Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Record of urgent decision: Rodney Local Board feedback appended Auckland Council's submission on the National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making

File No.: CP2023/17331

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the record of an urgent decision using the local board’s urgent decision-making process (resolution number RD/2022/158) which outlined the Rodney Local Board feedback into Auckland Council’s submission on the National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for the Environment’s draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making is open for public submission from 18 September 2023, with a closing date of 20 November 2023.

3.       The draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making aims to direct how decision-makers consider natural hazard risk in planning decisions relating to new development under the Resource Management Act 1991. The draft covers all natural hazards and applies to council decisions regarding resource consents, plan changes, and notices of requirement for new development only. Natural hazard risk assessment is required, categorised as high, moderate, or low risk, with restrictions in high-risk areas and mitigation in moderate-risk areas.

4.       Auckland Council will be making a submission on the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making for consideration by the Planning and Environment and Parks Committee on 2 November 2023. With final approval delegated to Councillor Hill’s, Councillor Dalton and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

5.       A memo was sent to all local board members on 29 September 2023 providing information on the council’s submission process to the draft National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making. A briefing was held on 2 October 2023.

6.       The deadline for the local board to provide feedback to be appended to the Auckland Council submission was Friday 10 November 2023. This was outside normal business meeting timeframes therefore the local board feedback was formalised using the urgent decision delegation process.

7.       The Rodney Local Board formal feedback and associated documents are provided under Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the record of the urgent decision made on 13 September 2023 as set out in Attachment A on the National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board feedback appended to Auckland Council submission on the National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making

87

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

PDF Creator

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Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

10-year Budget 2024-2034 - local consultation content

File No.: CP2023/18300

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve local consultation content and supporting information as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 process, along with a local engagement event.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement that is agreed between the Governing Body and the local board in each local board area. These agreements set out local board priorities and the local activities to be provided for the year. The 21 local board agreements for 2024/2025 will be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.

3.       Consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024. Content relating to each local board agreement must be included as part of that consultation.

4.       This report seeks approval from the local board for local consultation content. It also seeks approval of a Have Your Say event to be held in the local board area to give Aucklanders an opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback during the consultation period.

5.       The Governing Body will approve regional items for consultation on 6 December 2023. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation document and supporting information, which is also planned to be adopted by the Governing Body in February 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve local consultation document content (Attachment A to the agenda report) and local supporting information content (Attachment B to the agenda report) for inclusion in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation material

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the local board chairperson to approve any changes required to finalise the local consultation document and supporting information content for the Rodney Local Board for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034

c)      whakaae / approve the following Have Your Say event in the local board area during the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation period:

i)        Hearing-style event, Tuesday 19 March, 4 to 6pm at the Rodney Local Board office, 3 Elizabeth Street, Warkworth.

d)      tautapa / delegate authority to the local board chairperson to approve any changes required to the Have Your Say event

e)      tautapa / delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through “spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction” in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events during the consultation period for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034:

i)        local board members and chairperson

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Area Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Group Chief Financial Officer.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Council is required to adopt a 10-year Budget Long-Term Plan (LTP) every three years. The LTP sets out the priorities and funding for council activities that are planned over a 10-year period. It includes financial and non-financial information for the whole Auckland Council group. The Governing Body is responsible for adopting the 10-year budget, and will be adopting the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 in June 2024.

7.       Auckland Council is required to consult on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 using the special consultative procedure set out in the Local Government Act 2002. The Budget Committee will be deciding on items for consultation for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 on 6 December 2023. Local Boards have the opportunity to provide input into the regional topics for consultation for consideration by the Budget Committee.

8.       For each financial year, Auckland Council is required to have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board) for each local board area. These local board agreements are included in each year’s annual budget, or the 10-year budget (every three years).

9.       Local board agreements set out how the council will reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board’s plan through the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

10.     Content relating to each local board agreement must be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation document and supporting information.

11.     Public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is planned to take place from 28 February to 28 March 2024.

12.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation period through a variety of channels, which include face-to-face (for spoken and New Zealand sign language interaction), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Local boards held workshops during November 2023 to determine their proposed priorities for their 2024/2025 local board agreement. Each local board is now requested to approve its local consultation document and supporting information content for inclusion in the consultation material for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 (Attachments A and B respectively).

14.     Should changes be required to the local consultation content during the document production, they will be provided to the local board chairperson for approval.

15.     The council is required to use the special consultative procedure set out in the Local Government Act 2002 when consulting on the 10-year budget (LTP).  The special consultative procedure requires, among other things, the council to provide an opportunity for people to present their views to the council in a manner that enables ‘spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction’ between the person and the council’s decision-makers or their official delegates.

16.     Further, people who wish to have their views on the proposed content of the local board agreement 2024/2025 and 10-year Budget 2024-2034 considered by Auckland Council should be provided a reasonable opportunity to present those views in a manner and format that is appropriate to their preferences and needs.

17.     The recommended Have Your Say event, along with the recommended delegation to elected members and staff to hear from the public ensures that the council is meeting its obligations relating to consultation

18.     The Have Your Say event recommended to be held in the Rodney Local Board area is:

·        Hearing-style event, Tuesday 19 March, 4 to 6pm at the Rodney Local Board office, 3 Elizabeth Street, Warkworth.

19.     Other Have Your Say events will also take place across the region along with a range of ways for people to engage with the council during the consultation period. There will also be online information available and the opportunity to submit written or digital feedback. Note that the proposed date for the Have Your Say event will be checked with ward councillor/s to ensure they are able to attend. 

20.     The consultation period does not begin for a couple of months. If circumstances change between now and the consultation period requiring any changes to the approved Have Your Say event, these will be provided to the local board chairperson for approval in line with the recommended delegation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The decision to consult is procedural in nature and the small scale of the Have Your Say events means any climate change impacts will be negligible. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

22.     However, where practicable, events proposed will be in locations accessible by public transport, to reduce private vehicle travel and increase opportunities for attendance.  

23.     Some of the proposed initiatives or projects included in the consultation content may have climate change impacts. The impacts of any initiatives or projects Auckland Council chooses to progress as a result of this consultation will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The 10-year Budget 2024-2034 is an Auckland Council group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level.

25.     Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group. This will be reflected in the report on regional consultation items going to the Budget Committee on 6 December 2023.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Local board chairpersons have been invited to be involved in the development of the regional topics for consultation by attending Budget Committee workshops. Local board members were invited to attend 11 separate 10-year Budget 2024-2034 briefings summarising topics discussed at Budget Committee workshops.

27.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 process.

28.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals through the public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034. All feedback received from submitters that indicate that they reside in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the local board, prior to the local board finalising its local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Many local board decisions are of importance to, and impact on Māori. The local board agreement and 10-year Budget 2024-2034 are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. The local board plan adopted in November 2023 forms the basis for local priorities.

30.     The approach to Māori engagement for 10-year Budget 2024-2034 will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials.

31.     There is a need to continue to build local board relationships with iwi and the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist the local board and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and challenges.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     There may be marginal costs associated for Have Your Say events including venue hire (where council premises cannot be utilised).

33.     After consultation local boards will make decisions on local spending in the local board agreement with financial impacts that affect local communities. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires content relating to each local board agreement to be included in the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 consultation document. Under the Local Government Act 2002, the consultation document for the 10-year Budget must be audited. The draft consultation document (including local consultation content) will be prepared by staff and audited in December 2023 and January 2024 ahead of adoption by the Budget Committee in mid-February 2024. Therefore, local boards need to approve their local consultation content for inclusion in the draft consultation document by the end of November 2023.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The Budget Committee will agree items for consultation and approve the consultation approach for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 on 6 December 2023.

36.     Following the decisions of the local board to approve local consultation content, and the decisions of the Budget Committee on regional items for consultation, staff will prepare the consultation document and supporting information for the 10-year Budget 2024-2034.  These will be adopted by the Budget Committee in mid-February 2024.

37.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and the local board will make decisions on the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and local board agreements respectively in June 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Local Board consultation document

97

b

Attachment B - Local Board supporting information content

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Phoebe Peguero - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Renee Burgers - Lead Advisor Plans and Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Heather Skinner - Acting Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 




Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 



Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule November 2023

File No.: CP2023/01364

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule update for November 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule, a schedule of items that will come before the Rodney Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months.

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for the Rodney Local Board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is required and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed and is subject to change. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule update for November 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule November 2023

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ignacio Quinteros - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Rodney Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2023/01389

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Rodney Local Board workshop records for November 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give local board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Rodney Local Board workshop records for 1 November, 8 November, 14 November and 22 November 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 1 November

109

b

Workshop record 8 November

111

c

Workshop record 14 November

113

d

Workshop record 22 November

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ignacio Quinteros - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 



Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 



Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 



Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2023/05362

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive Councillor Sayer’s update on activities of the Governing Body.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward councillor report October 2023

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ignacio Quinteros - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 




 


 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Rodney Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       10-year Budget 2024-2034 – Local Board input on regional consultation content

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the report contains information from confidential Budget Committee workshops that has not yet been released. This information will become public when the Mayoral Proposal is released (planned to be release on 4 December 2023).

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    29 November 2023 - Rodney Local Board, Item 8.1 - Kaukapakapa pedestrian safety upgrades - Presentation                                                   Page 129

Item 8.1      Attachment b    29 November 2023 - Rodney Local Board, Item 8.1 - Kaukapakapa pedestrian safety upgrades - Letter of support                                                           Page 135

Item 8.4      Attachment a    29 November 2023 - Rodney Local Board, Item 8.4, The Forest Bridge Trust - Presentation         Page 137

Item 8.5      Attachment a    29 November 2023 - Rodney Local Board, Item 8.5 - Kawau Island pest eradication programme - Presentation                                                   Page 145


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 







Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 


Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023

 

 









Rodney Local Board

29 November 2023