I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 5 December 2023

5.00pm

Woodside Room
Level 1, Manukau Civic Building
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

Deputy Chairperson

Dr Ofa Dewes, MNZM

Members

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

Topou Folau

 

Vi Hausia

 

Li'amanaia Lorenzo Kaisara

 

Albert Lim

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

Darsshita Shah

Democracy Advisor

 

29 November 2023

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21 106 2942

Email: Darshita.shah@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                               5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                       5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                                   5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence   5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements            5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                    5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                         5

8.1    Deputation - David Riley from Reading Warriors                      5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum              6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                              6

11        Governing Body member Update     9

12        Board Members' Report                  11

13        Chairperson's Announcements      13

14        New Telecommunications License – Manukau Sports Bowl Velodrome, 19R Boundary Road, Otara             15

15        Library and community service provision in Old Papatoetoe           21

16        Local Board Views on South Frequent Transit Network Notices of Requirements                                   37

17        Local Board Views on Takaanini Crossings Notices of Requirement from Auckland Transport                45

18        Adoption of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan               53

19        Record of Workshop Notes           111

20        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar                 117

21        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

22        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public       123

15        Library and community service provision in Old Papatoetoe

d.      High-level financial analysis                                                123

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

……………..will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)           whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 November 2023, and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 28 November 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - David Riley from Reading Warriors

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.    David Riley from Reading Warriors just finished a celebration of the streets, book project with children at Bailey Road School in Mt Wellington. He would like to do this project with children in Ōtara as well.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / will thank David Riley for his deputation and attendance.

 

Attachments

a          The Streets................................................................................ 127

b          The Streets (2)........................................................................... 135

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)       The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Governing Body member Update

File No.: CP2023/18943

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / will receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Board Members' Report

File No.: CP2023/18944

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide board members with an opportunity to update the local board on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / will receive the board members’ written and verbal reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

File No.: CP2023/18946

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / will receive the chairperson’s verbal update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

New Telecommunications License – Manukau Sports Bowl Velodrome, 19R Boundary Road, Otara

File No.: CP2023/16695

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval to grant a new commercial license for the continued use of telecommunications equipment at Manukau Sports Bowl Velodrome, 19R Boundary Road, Otara.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Manukau Sports Bowl Velodrome is held by Auckland Council and is classified as a recreation reserve therefore is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

3.      The current license between Spark New Zealand Trading Limited (Spark) and Auckland Council commenced on 1 March 2009, finally expired on 28 February 2021 and is currently holding over on a month-to-month basis under the same terms and conditions.

4.      Connexa Limited (Connexa) have made a formal application to Eke Panuku for a new commercial license to enable the continuation to operate telecommunications equipment, which is currently installed. No additional equipment is being installed and the permitted use of the license will not change.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve a new commercial license between Auckland Council (Licensor) and Connexa Limited (Licensee) at Manukau Sports Bowl Velodrome, 19R Boundary Road, Otara with the following terms:

i)       Commencement Date: 1 September 2023

ii)      Term: 5 Years

iii)     Final Expiry Date: 30 August 2028

iv)     For the purpose of operating and maintaining equipment for telecommunications purposes.  

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      The land is legally described as Part Lot 490 DP 76628 and comprised in All Record of Title 153189. The land is held by Auckland Council in fee simple and is approximately 11.8329 hectares.

6.      The land is classified as a Recreation Reserve and subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

7.      There is a Manukau Sports Bowl Draft Master Plan that was completed and adopted in February 2023.

8.      Public notification of the intention to grant a new license under section 54(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 was required to be completed before entering the proposed new license.

9.      Iwi engagement was not required under section 54(2) of the Reserves Act 1977, however Eke Panuku undertook this exercise in good faith.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.    Manukau Sports Bowl Velodrome forms part of the Eke Panuku Transform Manukau Project.

11.    Telecommunications equipment has been onsite since 1 March 1997.

12.    The current license between Spark New Zealand Trading Limited (Spark) and Auckland Council commenced on 1 March 2009, finally expired on 28 February 2021 and is currently holding over on a month-to-month basis under the same terms and conditions.

13.    In June 2022 Spark informed Eke Panuku that they have established an independent tower operator Spark TowerCo Limited to design, build and operate passive infrastructure for its mobile network.

14.    Spark TowerCo Limited became Connexa Limited by incorporation in November 2022.

15.    Connexa operates a nationwide portfolio of over 1240 mobile sites and is responsible for an ongoing build programme for the growth of its network of passive mobile assets across New Zealand.

16.    The new license will be between Auckland Council (Licensor) and Connexa Limited (Licensee).

17.    Eke Panuku are satisfied that Connexa can meet the obligations of the license.

18.    Connexa formally applied for a new license with a term of 30 years.

19.    Eke Panuku standard term of license is 5 years.

20.    Eke Panuku staff recommends a license term of 5 years for flexibility.

21.    Eke Panuku understand no short-term (5 years) implementation/development plan has been identified for the subject area/location.

22.    Eke Panuku attended a workshop with Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on Tuesday 1st August 2023 and it was discussed that a new 5-year term would be suitable.

23.    The rental amount has been reviewed as part of the process to implement a new license.

24.    The permitted use of the site will not change.

25.    No additional telecommunications equipment is being installed.

26.    A license for telecommunications equipment within the Recreation Reserve is not contemplated by the Manukau Sports Bowl Draft Master Plan therefore in accordance with section 54(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 public notice of the intention to grant a new license is required to be completed.

27.    Auckland Council must consider all objections and submissions from the public in relation to the proposed license. Public notice includes publishing a notice in one local newspaper and on the Auckland Council Have Your Say website.

28.    A public notice was published in the Manukau Courier on 21 September 2023.

29.    A public notice was published on the Auckland Council Have Your Say website on 22 September 2023 and was available online for one month.

30.    No submissions were received in response to the public notice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.    There will be no direct climate impact by granting a new license as no additional equipment is being installed on the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.    Eke Panuku support the continued use of telecommunications equipment at Manukau Sports Bowl Velodrome, a positive working relationship with Connexa has been formed since June 2022.

33.    The existing agreements have been in place since 1997 and equipment has been operating on site for over 26 years with no issues recorded.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.    A workshop was attended with Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on Tuesday 1st August 2023 to discuss the new commercial license, feedback received was positive.

35.    The telecommunications equipment services the Ōtara area and provides network coverage for residents and users of the Manukau Sports Bowl Velodrome.

36.    No submissions were received from the public through the public notification process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.    Page 6 of the Manukau Sports Bowl Draft Master Plan records that Mana Whenua has worked closely with Auckland Council and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on the development of the Master Plan, Eke Panuku consulted with Mana Whenua on entering the proposed license as an act of good faith.

38.    Eke Panuku received a request from Ngaati Te Ata Rangatahi that we are currently working through with Connexa.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.    The annual rent has been reviewed as part of the new license negotiations. Eke Panuku obtained a market valuation by a registered valuer and have negotiated an increased rental rate with Connexa.

40.    An increase in revenue to align with the market will create a positive financial impact and generate more revenue than previously.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.    There is a reputational risk to Auckland Council if the continued use of the site for telecommunications purposes is not approved. Residents will lose coverage on their mobile network if the equipment were to be removed.

42.    Should the new commercial license not be granted the telecommunications equipment may have to be moved to another site, new site options may be less desirable to the community.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps .

43.    Eke Panuku will continue negotiations with the Licensees and finalise the new license.

44.    Eke Panuku will implement the agreed rental rate and execute the new license.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Licensed Area

19

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rosalyn Cowe - Alternative Assets Property Manager

Authorisers

Alaina Beattie - Property Portfolio Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Library and community service provision in Old Papatoetoe

File No.: CP2023/17833

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To endorse development of an Indicative Business Case to investigate options to improve the provision of library and community services in Old Papatoetoe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Community Facilities Network Action Plan (2022), Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan (2023) and a local board resolution (OP/2022/36), have actions and initiatives to investigate improving community service provision in Old Papatoetoe to meet community need. This includes opportunities for a community hub to support revitalisation of the Old Papatoetoe town centre.

3.      The Eke Panuku Unlock Old Papatoetoe High Level Project Plan (PLA/2017/78) focuses on revitalising the town centre and supports the development of a community hub to meet the key goals and strategies identified for the area.

4.      To understand current library and community service provision and local community requirements, a community needs assessment was undertaken. The report was received by the local board in March 2023 (resolution OP/2023/33).

5.      In line with council’s strategic direction and consistent with the community needs assessment findings, it is recommended that the development of a community hub delivering integrated library and community services within a fit-for-purpose facility be investigated.

6.      Options for the provision of a community hub have been identified and assessed at a high level. These were workshopped with the local board in October and November 2023, including a site visit. The resulting recommendation is to explore options associated with the following three sites:

·    Location 1– develop a community hub on the Papatoetoe Chambers/Town Hall site (35 St George Street)

·    Location 2 – develop a community hub on the Papatoetoe Food Hub site (part 27 St George Street)

·    Location 3 – develop a community hub on the Library site (30 Wallace Road).

 

7.      The Allan Brewster Leisure Centre was considered as a potential location but has been discounted due to its location, cost to implement and to focus effort on scope of viable options.

8.      Due to financial constraints, funding a new community hub is challenging. Whilst some budget has been allocated through the Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme, it will not be sufficient to cover the full cost. Other funding tools will need to be investigated and confirmed. It is recommended that an Indicative Business Case be developed to investigate options within the three locations, including potential sources of funding. The results and recommendations will be presented to the local board in the first quarter of financial year 2024/25.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      ohia / endorse the development of an Indicative Business Case to investigate the feasibility of developing a community hub to deliver integrated library and community services in Old Papatoetoe.

b)      tautoko / support the investigation of options for the development of a community hub including funding sources within the following three locations:

i. Location 1 - the Papatoetoe Chambers/Town Hall site (35 St George Street)

ii.         Location 2 - the Papatoetoe Food Hub site (part 27 St George Street)

iii.        Location 3 - the Papatoetoe War Memorial Library site (30 Wallace Road).

Horopaki

Context

9.      The key strategic drivers for reviewing the provision of library and community services in Old Papatoetoe are:

·    strategic direction and a priority action (#79) in the Community Facilities Network Action Plan (2022)

‘Investigate community facility provision to meet community needs in Papatoetoe’

·    key initiatives in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan (2023) to progress a community hub and the revitalisation of the town centre

·    the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee endorsed local board resolution (OP/2022/36), resulting from work undertaken by Community and Social Policy;

‘To investigate opportunities to optimise the ageing community facilities portfolio and to provide an integrated facility that provides library and arts and culture spaces as well as delivers additional community services space in Papatoetoe.’

·    the key goals and strategies in the Unlock Old Papatoetoe High Level Project Plan (HLPP) adopted in 2017 (PLA/2017/78) that support the development of a community hub.

10.    A community needs assessment was undertaken in 2022/2023. The assessment considered current service provision, local community service requirements and analysed the community facilities in scope – the Papatoetoe Town Hall, Papatoetoe Chambers, Papatoetoe War Memorial Library and the Allan Brewster Leisure Centre.

11.    A report presenting the outcome of the assessment was received by the local board at its business meeting in March 2023 (resolution OP/2023/33). The key findings of the needs assessment directly relevant to this project are:

·    a range of community services and facilities are provided – council and non-council

·    library provision is sufficient

·    there is a general decline in use of facilities

·    the council-owned buildings are ageing, in moderate condition, and some are not fit-for-purpose e.g. issues with layout, size, accessibility

·    there is a gap in the provision of a ‘community centre’ and small and medium spaces for hire and a partial gap in provision for art and cultural programmes and spaces

·    there is a lack of awareness of existing community services and facilities

·    the feeling of safety in the Town Centre is an issue

·    the development of a community hub is supported.

12.    Based on strategic direction and the findings of the community needs assessment, it is recommended that the development of a community hub be explored. A community hub would be designed to deliver integrated library and community services within a flexible, fit-for-purpose facility that can meet the needs of a growing and changing community.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.    A review of council owned properties in Old Papatoetoe identified four locations as suitable for a new community hub;

·    Papatoetoe Town Hall (Town Hall) – 35 St George Street

·    Papatoetoe Chambers (Chambers) – 35 St George Street

·    Papatoetoe Food Hub site – part 27 St George Street

·    Papatoetoe War Memorial Library (Library) – 30 Wallace Road.

14.    Property information and a location map for each of these sites is contained in Attachment A.

15.    A long list of 12 options were identified across the four locations and assessed by staff against criteria (refer to Attachment B for the criteria and Attachment C for the assessment results).

16.    The assessment process was informed by the following inputs:

·     Old Papatoetoe Community Needs Assessment

·     strategic alignment to council policies and strategies

·     network provision analyses

·     building and site related information

·     demographic, growth and communities of greatest need information

·     asset and high-level financial information

·     staff technical advice

·     community and library service trends.

17.    The key assumptions that informed the identification and assessment of the options were shared with the local board. They are as follows:

·     recognise the identity of Old Papatoetoe and objectives of the Unlock Programme

·     retain the Town Hall and Allan Brewster Leisure Centre

·     preference for integrated library and community services (community hub)

·     centrally locate services within the town centre

·     consider duplication of key community services delivered by others

·     community hub to be split over no more than 2-3 levels 

·     continue to support provision for leaseholders

·     capacity for some onsite parking to support the diversity of those who use the services

·     preference is to have access to an adjoining open space

·     delivery of some library and community services does not need to be asset based

·     consider safety and security of facility and adjoining areas

·     if the Town Hall/Chambers is not the preferred location, the future of the Chambers building and site will be determined as a separate project

·     preference is to retain the existing library building, even if the site is sold, for its architectural merit and contribution to the character of the Old Village Papatoetoe.

18.    The resulting four short listed location options were discussed with the local board at workshops and a site visit during October and November 2023.

19.    During these discussions, the Allan Brewster Leisure Centre was discounted due to:

·  its location at the rear of the town centre and within a flood plain

·  potential redevelopment limitations of the existing building design and structure

·  retention of ageing facilities which may result in increasing investment for renewals delivering decreasing value

·  implementation costs being the highest of all the locations (includes seismic remediation and flood mitigation).

20.    The three tables below provide a description and the pros and cons for each location.

Location 1: Develop a community hub on the Chambers/Town Hall site

Description

·   Existing Chambers building to be demolished, and a new standalone community hub and small civic plaza built on the site

·   Town Hall to remain, service may change

·   Library and Food Hub sites to be sold

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

·   High strategic alignment

Strategic alignment

·   Services are divided between two sites

Facility outcome

·   Opportunity to provide fit-for-purpose, flexible, integrated facilities that can accommodate changing community need and growth

·   Opportunity to minimise carbon footprint

·   Town Hall on a priority list for seismic strengthening to align with community hub construction to reduce costs

Facility outcome

·  Development may be limited by the Town Hall’s existing building design, structure and heritage status

Service outcome

·   Co-located/integrated services and opportunity to review service provision to meet community need

·   Services are in an accessible, central, prominent location

·   Closest to public transport

Service outcome

·  Leaseholder space and venues for hire will be spread across two sites

·  Perception of lack of parking (public carpark 70m south)

·  Disruption to services during construction

Value for investment

·   Cost savings can be realised by reducing assets

·   Maximise site sales as funding source

 

Value for investment

·  Ability to fund

·  Perception of loss of the Chambers building and Library and Food Hub sites

 

Location 2: Develop a community hub on the Food Hub site

Description

·   Develop a new fit-for-purpose community hub

·   Future of the Chambers to be determined, Library site to be sold, Town Hall to remain a venue for hire

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

·  Medium strategic alignment

Strategic alignment

·  Services are divided between three sites

Facility outcome

·   Opportunity to provide a fit-for-purpose, flexible, integrated facility that can accommodate changing community need and growth

 

Facility outcome

·   Increased carbon footprint

·   Facility may need to be three levels to accommodate services

·   Limited potential to incorporate parking

Service outcome

·   Opportunity to improve the delivery of integrated services and review service provision to meet community need

·   Services are in an accessible, visible and central location

·   Located adjacent to open space with access to parking

·   Limited disruption to current services during construction

Service outcome

·  Whilst the majority of services will be integrated, they will be spread across three sites

 

Value for investment

·   Cost savings (operational and renewals) can be realised by reducing assets

Value for investment

·   Ability to fund

·   Loss of potential funding from selling the site

·   Would require a zone change to enable development

·   Community perception of loss of the Chambers building and Library site

 

Location 3: Develop a community hub on the Library site

Description

·   Retain the Library building

·   Future of the Chambers to be determined, Food Hub site to be sold, Town Hall to remain a venue for hire.

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

·  Medium strategic alignment

Strategic alignment

·   Services are divided between three sites

Facility outcome

·   Opportunity to provide a fit-for-purpose, flexible, integrated facility that can accommodate changing community need and growth

Facility outcome

·   Incorporating the existing library building may result in design limitations

Service outcome

·   Opportunity to improve the delivery of integrated services and review service provision to meet community need

·   Services are in an accessible and generally central location

·   Located adjacent to open space with the potential to include some parking

Service outcome

·   Whilst the majority of services will be integrated, they will be spread across three sites

·   Redevelopment limitations may impact ability to deliver required services

·   Located on periphery of the masterplan area

·   Disruption to current services during construction

Value for investment

·   Cost savings (operational and renewals) can be realised by reducing assets

·   Opportunity to minimise carbon footprint

Value for investment

·   Ability to fund

·   Loss of potential funding from selling the site

·   Would require a zone change to enable development

·   Redevelopment of an aging facility, increasing investment for renewals will deliver decreasing value

·   Community perception of loss of the Chambers building and Food Hub site

An Indicative Business Case to consider the options is recommended

21.    The Indicative Business Case (IBC) will investigate options within the three locations. It will explore the merits of the proposed investment, strategic alignment and the costs and benefits to ensure there is a robust case for change.

22.    This process will involve working with and receiving input from key stakeholders. The IBC will recommend a preferred option.

23.    The key findings and preferred option will be workshopped with the local board followed by a business report. Further analysis of the local board’s preferred option will then be undertaken through a Detailed Business Case.

24.    More detailed analysis is required to understand the costs of refurbishing the existing buildings or building a new facility, and the potential sale proceeds of divesting service properties. It is anticipated this will involve valuation, engineering, architectural and quantity surveying input. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.    The recommendations in this report have no direct climate impact.

26.    The proposed development of a community hub is likely to increase emissions in the short term due to construction, however by reducing assets and meeting current building standards, an overall reduction in emissions is expected in the long term. Any climate impacts will be measured and mitigated to align with council’s Climate Action Plan.

27.    Striving to maintain library and community services in the Old Papatoetoe town centre enables localism; the ability for local people to accomplish all they need to do within a walkable distance of home, supported by good public transport connections and minimised car use.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.    The review of library and community services in Old Papatoetoe has involved input and specialist advice from across the council group, including Eke Panuku, Connected Communities, Parks and Community Facilities and Regional Services and Strategy.

29.    Representatives from the same departments will contribute to the development of the IBC. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.    It is important to ensure library and community services meet the service needs of growing and changing communities.

31.    The Old Papatoetoe Community Needs Assessment was received by the local board at the March 2023 business meeting (resolution number OP/2023/33). At the meeting the local board requested council and Eke Panuku staff to urgently provide options to meet the gaps in service provision identified by the needs analysis, including funding options and delivery timelines. This piece of work seeks to address this request.

32.    The local board are the decision makers on the number of new local community facilities and their specific location, design, build and fit out within budget parameters set by the Governing Body. 

33.    Workshops and a site visit have been held with the local board during October and November 2023 to discuss the identification and assessment of emerging options to help inform investment opportunities.

34.    This work aligns with the following key initiatives in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan (2023): 

·    Recognise and ensure Māori arts, culture and history is visible in public places

·    Increase the exposure of te reo Māori in our area through naming and signage by collaborating, supporting the mahi of Te Kete Rukuruku

·    Assess our community leases and assets to ensure they are financially sustainable, and prioritising local needs and the changing demographics

·    Develop innovative and flexible options in programmes and services to meet the changing lifestyles of local communities

·    Improve and renew council assets to make them more vibrant and welcoming

·    Prioritise and provide high-quality infrastructure for our growing and changing community

·    Continue developing the Old Papatoetoe Community Hub Plan and town centre revitalisation

·    Support and fund initiatives that are aimed at improving safety in our communities including increased lighting and CCTV cameras

·    Regenerate town centres to make them thriving and safe areas for business and the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

36.    These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

37.    ​The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area has the fourth largest population of Māori in Auckland and the Māori community make up 16 per cent of the local population.  

38.    Engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka will commence as part of the IBC.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.    Funding of each of the options will be considered through the IBC.

40.    Table 4 in Attachment D (confidential) sets out the estimated gross cost of construction for each option, the indicative capital receipts from potential site sales and the estimated additional funding required for each option.

41.    All values are indicative only and will be further developed as part of the IBC. While an allowance for cost escalations has been incorporated, there is no way of knowing how the changing financial environment will impact the overall cost at this stage.

42.    The costs for all options are based on a feasibility assessment allowing for a 2,200m2 facility. Through the IBC this size may be changed.

43.    Table 4 shows that the capital receipt from potential site sales through the Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme will only partly fund all options and additional sources of funding will need to be secured.

44.    Ongoing operational costs will be developed through the IBC and inform recommendations to the local board.

45.    Development of the IBC will be led by Regional Services and Strategy and Eke Panuku. Funding of the IBC will be accommodated through internal operational budgets. Subject to a preferred option being identified through the IBC and approved, all further costs will be capitalised against the project.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.    Risks and mitigations have been identified in the table below.

Table 5:   Risks and Mitigations

Risks

Mitigations

Community concern about any change in service delivery and/or perception of loss of service (understanding what an ‘integrated facility’ is)

Development of a communications and engagement plan with the local board to support stakeholder, mana whenua and community understanding and engagement

Ability to fund

Through the IBC, development and operational costs and potential funding sources will be explored

Escalating development costs

Evidence from current development projects has shown a significant increase in construction costs. A contingency to address cost inflation will be included in IBC investigations

If population growth rates exceed projections, demand for additional or larger facilities may result

Design adaptable and flexible spaces aimed at serving a changing population

The timeframe to deliver the community hub may not meet expectations and may take longer than anticipated

Development of a communication plan to share project timeframes for delivering the confirmed option and progress updates

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.    Subject to local board endorsement of the recommendations of this report, an IBC will be developed by Regional Services and Strategy and Eke Panuku with support from other council departments.

48.    It is anticipated that the IBC will take approximately six months to complete.

49.    The IBC key findings and preferred option will be workshopped with the local board in the first quarter of the 2024/25 financial year, followed by a business report for formal approval.

50.    Should the local board approve the preferred option in the IBC, the next step will be to undertake a detailed business case.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Property information and location map

31

b

Option assessment criteria

33

c

Option assessment results

35

d

High-level financial analysis - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Elcoat - Strategic Property Specialist, Eke Panuku

Sophie Bell - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Richard Davison - Priority Location Director, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Local Board Views on South Frequent Transit Network Notices of Requirements

File No.: CP2023/18046

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To invite the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s views on four Notices of Requirement (NoRs) lodged by Auckland Transport.

2.      Auckland Transport have lodged four Notices of Requirement to designate land for route protection between Manukau and Drury.  The land to be designated is within the Manurewa and Papakura Local Board areas.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      Decision makers on a Notice of Requirement to the Auckland Unitary Plan (operative in part), must consider local board views on the Notices of Requirement if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

4.      Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including Notices of Requirement.  A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board[1].

5.      Under the Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth Programme, Auckland Transport has served four Notices of Requirement on Auckland Council for the “South Frequent Transport Network”. 

6.      The notices are described below.

7.      (NoR 1) South Frequent Transit Network - Great South Road FTN Upgrade

·   Upgrades to Great South Road between Manukau and Drury to provide a multi-modal transport corridor that will accommodate bus priority measures, active mode facilities, and intersection upgrades.

8.      (NoR2) South Frequent Transit Network - Great South Road FTN Upgrade (Drury section)

·   Upgrades to Great South Rd between Waihoehoe Rd and the State Highway 1 Drury Interchange to provide a multi-modal transport corridor that will accommodate general traffic lanes, active mode facilities and intersection upgrades.

9.      (NoR3) South Frequent Transit Network - Takaanini FTN - Weymouth, Alfriston and Great South Road Upgrades

·   Upgrades to Weymouth and Alfriston Roads between Selwyn Road and Saralee Drive; and Great South Road between Halver and Myers Roads to accommodate bus priority measures, general traffic lanes, active mode facilities, and intersection upgrades.

10.    (NoR4) South Frequent Transit Network - Takaanini FTN - Porchester Road and Popes Road Upgrades

·   Upgrades to Porchester Road between Alfriston Road and Walters Road; and to Popes Road between Takanini School Road and Porchester Road to accommodate general traffic lanes, active mode facilities and intersection upgrades.

11.    The Notices of Requirement were publicly notified on 16 November 2023 and submissions close on 14 December 2023.

12.    This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on the Notices of Requirement.  Staff do not recommend a view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whakarite /provide views on four Notices of Requirement for the South Frequent Transport Network

b)      kopou / appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on the Notices of Requirement

c)      tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution (b) is unable to attend the Notices of Requirement hearing.

Horopaki

Context

13.    Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws.  Local boards must provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents[2].

14.    The Notices of Requirement are intended to add four new designations (sought by Auckland Transport)  to the Auckland Unitary Plan.  Local boards must have the opportunity to provide their views where any process proposes a change to the Auckland Unitary Plan.

15.    If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planners include those views in the s42a Resource Management Act 1991 hearing report.  Local board views are included in the analysis of the Notice of Requirement along with all submissions.

16.    If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who will make a recommendation on the Notices of Requirement.

17.    Following receipt of the recommendation, the Requiring Authority would be required to advise the council, within 30 working days, whether they accept or reject the recommendation in whole or in part.  Once the council has received a decision from the Requiring Authority, submitters will be advised and are then given an opportunity to lodge an appeal with Environment Court if they are not satisfied with the outcomes.  Auckland Council will also have the opportunity at this stage to appeal the decisions.

18.    This report provides an overview of the four Notices of Requirement.

19.    The report does not recommend what views the local board should convey.  Staff cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.    South Future Transport Network Notices of Requirement Overview

 

21.    NoR 1 (within the Manurewa and Papakura local board areas)

·   Comprises eight separate intersection upgrades for the Great South Road FTN route between Manukau and Drury.  Applies to a collective linear extent of approximately 2.5km of a total route length of 15.5 km, reflecting that the existing road reserve along Great South Road is sufficient to accommodate the desired corridor form and function for the majority of the route length (and therefore does not fall within the NoR 1 extent)

·   The eight Notice of Requirement sections provide for bus priority measures, walking and cycling facilities, upgrades to eight key intersections, replacement of the Otūwairoa / Slippery Creek bridge, and localised provision for stormwater treatment raingardens.  Four lane and three lane FTN arterial cross sections are used as a basis for concept design

·   Approximately 171 affected properties

·   Proposed lapse period of 15 years

·   Recommended implementation between 2028 to 2038; highly likely to be in stages

·   Possible construction duration: 2- 3 years (but this Notice of Requirement is made up of eight separate areas).

22.    NoR 2 (within the Papakura local board area)

·   Enables upgrades of approximately 520 m of Great South Road in Drury.  Not part of the FTN route but a “Key Connection”

·   Enables two general traffic lanes per direction, walking and cycling facilities, replacement of the Hingaia Steam Bridged, localised provision of stormwater treatment raingardens, and an extension of one existing culvert

·   Needs to integrate with three adjacent projects – SH1 Drury interchange, upgrade of Waihoehoe Road, and the Drury Train Station.  These projects are proposed to be implemented in the mid to late 2020s

·   Recommended lapse period of 10 years

·   Recommended implementation likely to be at the earlier ends of 2028 to 2038

·   Possible construction duration: 2-3 years.

23.    NoR 3 (within the Manurewa local board area)

·   Enables upgrades of approximately 1.7 km along Weymouth and Alfriston Roads, and 590 metres along Great South Road

·   Enables a four lane FTN arterial cross section for the Weymouth and Alfriston Road extent, and for part of its extent as it applies to Great South Road.  Enables bus lanes in both directions, walking and cycling facilities, upgrades and tie-ins to eight key intersections, replacement of the existing Weymouth Road bridge over the NIMT and the Alfriston Road bridge over SH1, and four stormwater treatment wetlands

·   Approximately 430 affected properties

·   Recommended lapse period of 15 years

·   Recommended implementation between 2028 and 2038. Co-ordination with Weymouth bridge and replacement and future four tracking of rail

·   Possible construction duration: 2-3 years.

24.    NoR 4 (within the Manurewa and Papakura local board areas)

·   Enables upgrades of approximately 3 km along Porchester Road between Alfriston Road and Walters Road, and for 0.5km along Popes Road between Takanini School Road and Porchester Road. Popes road is not part of the FTN route but a “Key Connection”

·   Enables two vehicular traffic lanes, walking and cycling facilities, upgrades and tie-ins to six key intersections along both routes, and stormwater management devices comprising two treatment wetlands (on Porchester Road) and treatment swales (on Popes Road)

·   Approximately 99 affected properties 

·   Recommended lapse period of 15 years

·   Recommended implementation 2028 to 2038, possibly not fully implemented until the later end of this time range

·   Possible construction duration: 1- 2 years.

 

25.    Technical report content

The Notices of Requirement include technical reports that evaluate the following effects:

·   arboricultural

·   archaeological and historic heritage

·   construction noise and vibration

·   cultural values

·   ecological

·   environmental

·   flooding

·   landscape

·   operational noise

·   social impact

·   transport

·   urban design.

26.    The reports and other application details are available from council’s website at: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/notices-of-requirement-to-designate-land/Pages/default.aspx

27.    Council’s planners and other experts will be evaluating and reporting on:

·   technical reports supplied by the applicant

·   submissions

·   views and preferences of the local board, if the local board passes a resolution.

28.    The Requiring Authority requested that the Notices of Requirement be publicly notified.  The Notices of Requirement were publicly notified on 16 November 2023 and submissions close on 14 December 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.    The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhihi: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach zero emissions by 2050 and

·   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

30.    The local board could consider if the Notices of Requirement:

·   will reduce, increase, or have no effect on Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. do they encourage car dependency, enhance connections to public transit, walking and cycling or support quality compact urban form?)

·   prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.  That is, do the Notices of Requirement elevate or alleviate climate risks (e.g. flooding, coastal and storm inundation, urban heat effect, stress on infrastructure).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.    Auckland Transport is the Requiring Authority that has lodged the Notices of Requirement.

32.    Watercare has been asked for comment on the Notices of Requirement.

33.    The council’s Plans and Places department have specialists and consultants within the project team for arboriculture, archaeology, engineering, ecology (terrestrial and aquatic), flooding, heritage, landscape and visual, planning, noise and vibration, social impact, transportation, and urban design.  These specialists will contribute to the reporting planner’s hearing report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.    While none of the Notices of Requirement fall within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area, factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view include:

·   interests and preferences of people in the local board area

·   well-being of communities within the local board area

·   local board documents, such as local board plan, local board agreement

·   responsibilities and operation of the local board.

35.    Supporting Growth have advised that they have provided in-person project updates to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board about the South FTN Notices of Requirement.

36.    This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views.  The decision maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the Notices of Requirement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.    If the local board chooses to provide its views on the Notices of Requirement, it includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori world view).  In the 2018 census results, there were 85 122 people usually resident in the local board area with 16% identifying as being of Māori ethnicity and 17% being of Māori descent.

38.    Supporting Growth have advised that the upgraded and new transport corridors are not known to contain any Māori Land or documented sites of significance to mana whenua.  Parts of NoR 1 and the whole of NoR 2 fall within the Ngāti Tamaoho Statutory Acknowledgement Area, and Supporting Growth advise that Ngāti Tamaoho have been engaged as partners throughout the development of the project.

39.    Supporting Growth have advised that they engaged with mana whenua throughout the development of this project.  This included a monthly kaitiaki forum over the past five years dating back to the inception of Te Tupu Ngātahi, and at a project-specific level since the inception of the detailed business case process in 2021.  Nine iwi’s have a direct interest in the project area.

40.    Supporting Growth advised that mana whenua were invited to prepare Cultural Values Assessments or Cultural Impact Assessments in July 2023.  In response, the Supporting Growth team received CVAs in the form of report/documentation from Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua and Ngaati Whanaunga, and an in person oral CVA from Te Ākitai Waiohua.  Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua did not support their CVA being appended or provided to council to avoid information contained being misinterpreted or mistreated.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

We need to exercise caution with all financial decisions and ensure up-to-date financial advice.

Requirement for all council staff (does not apply to CCO staff)

For any report that have financial implications (including the spend of any money), you must seek input and advice from:

·    Commercial Managers for committee reports

·    Lead Financial Advisers for local board reports

 

Instructions

To author: You must add an internal note here that you have gained agreement from relevant Finance staff on the financial implications of your advice.

To authorisers: Please check that confirmation of agreement from relevant Finance staff is included.

To DA or GA: After compiling the agenda please delete all highlighted text before publishing.

41.    There are no financial implications with the local board providing its views.

42.    The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views.

43.    The costs associated with processing the Notice of Requirement requests are recoverable from Auckland Transport.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.    The power to provide local board views regarding the content of Notices of Requirement cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).  To avoid the procedural risk of an individual local board member expressing the views of the local board, this report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.    The reporting planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing report.  The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Joy LaNauze - Senior Policy Planner

Authorisers

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Local Board Views on Takaanini Crossings Notices of Requirement from Auckland Transport

File No.: CP2023/18047

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To invite the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s views on two Notices of Requirement (NoRs) lodged by Auckland Transport.

2.      Auckland Transport have lodged two Notices of Requirement to designate land for the construction, operation, maintenance and upgrade of grade-separated crossings of the North Island Main Trunk (NIMT) railway in Takanini.  The land to be designated is within the Papakura Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      Decision makers on a Notice of Requirement to the Auckland Unitary Plan (operative in part), must consider local board views on the Notice of Requirement if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

4.      Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including Notices of Requirement.  A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board[3].

5.      Under the Te Tupu Ngātahi Supporting Growth Programme, Auckland Transport has served two Notices of Requirement on Auckland Council for the “Takaanini Crossings”. 

6.      The notices are described below.

7.      (NoR 1) Takaanini Level Crossing Project: Spartan Road, Manuia Road, Manuroa Road and Taka Street - New multi-modal bridge crossings of the North Island Main Trunk (NIMT) at Manuia Road and Taka Street; and new active mode bridge crossings of the NIMT at Spartan Road and Manuroa Road with two consequential road closures

8.      (NoR2) Takaanini Level Crossing Project: Walters Road level crossing closure and new multi-modal bridge - New multi-modal bridge crossing of the North Island Main Trunk (NIMT) at Walters Road

9.      The Notices of Requirement were publicly notified on 16 November 2023 and submissions close on 14 December 2023.

10.    This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on the Notices of Requirement.  Staff do not recommend a view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide views on two Notices of Requirement (NoRs) for the Takaanini Crossings.

 

b)      kopou / appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on the Notices of Requirement.

c)      tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution (b) is unable to attend the Notices of Requirement hearing.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.    Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws.  Local boards must provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents[4].

12.    The Notices of Requirement are intended to add two new designations (sought by Auckland Transport) to the Auckland Unitary Plan.  Local boards must have the opportunity to provide their views where any process proposes a change to the Auckland Unitary Plan.

13.    If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planners include those views in the s42a Resource Management Act 1991 hearing report.  Local board views are included in the analysis of the Notices of Requirement, along with all submissions.

14.    If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who will make a recommendation on the Notices of Requirement.

15.    Following receipt of the recommendation, the Requiring Authority would be required to advise the council, within 30 working days, whether they accept or reject the recommendation in whole or in part.  Once the council has received a decision from the Requiring Authority, submitters will be advised and are then given an opportunity to lodge an appeal with Environment Court if they are not satisfied with the outcomes.  Auckland Council will also have the opportunity at this stage to appeal the decisions.

16.    This report provides an overview of the two Notices of Requirement.

17.    The report does not recommend what views the local board should convey.  Staff cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.    Takaanini Crossings Notices of Requirement Overview


 

 

A map of a city

Description automatically generated

A map of a city

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Overview

19.    The indicative design has been prepared for assessment purposes and to indicate what the final design of the project may look like.  The final design will be refined and confirmed at the detailed design stage.  Key features of the works common across the project areas include:

·   Bridge structures across the NIMT with a vertical clearance from existing ground level to road surface of approximately 7.8 metres

·   Works to tie in with existing roads

·   Batters and/or retaining and associated cut and fill activities

·   Vegetation removal within the project areas to enable construction; and

·   Areas identified for construction related activities including site compounds, construction laydown, alternative access, and construction traffic manoeuvring.

·   Expected construction start: 2038

·   Expected full operation: 2048

·   Construction durations are indicative and assume that each project area will be constructed independently of each other.  These durations may change if the bridges were to be constructed concurrently or sequentially

·   Proposed lapse period of 15 years.

20.    NoR 1 (within the Papakura local board area)

Spartan Road project area

·    Closure of the existing road corridor to vehicular traffic across the NIMT

·    Construction of an active mode bridge across the NIMT

·    Construction of culs de sac (accommodating footpaths) and works to tie into the existing corridor on either side of the NIMT along Spartan Road

·    Ramps and stairs will connect the bridge on either the side (east and west) of the NIMT and will tie into the cul de sacs.

·    Approximately 12 affected properties

·    Expected construction duration: 1 to 2 years.

Manuia Road project area

·    There is currently no existing east-west corridor / level crossing across the NIMT in this project area

·    Construction of new arterial road bridge across the NIMT accommodating two lanes (one in each direction) and separated active mode facilities

·    Construction of new arterial road corridors tying into either side of the bridge (east and west of the NIMT) accommodating two vehicle lanes (one in each direction) and separated active mode facilities

·    Stormwater culvert and associated flood offset storage area

·    Approximately 41 affected properties

·    Expected construction duration: 2.5 to 3 years.

Manuroa Road project area

·    Closure of the existing road corridor to vehicular traffic across the NIMT

·    Construction of an active mode bridge across the NIMT

·    Construction of cul de sacs (accommodating footpaths) and works to tie into the existing corridor on either side of the NIMT along Manuroa Road

·    Ramps and stairs will connect to the bridge on either side (east and west) of the NIMT and tie in to the cul de sacs

·    Approximately 12 affected properties

·    Expected construction duration: 1 to 2 years.

Taka Street project area

·    Construction of an arterial road bridge across the NIMT accommodating two vehicle lanes (one in each direction) and separated active mode facilities

·    Construction of arterial road corridors tying into either side of the bridge and existing intersections (east and west of the NIMT). The corridors will accommodate two vehicle lanes (one in each direction) and separated active mode facilities

·    Closure of existing Takanini Road (north) to vehicular traffic at the intersection with Taka Street bridge i.e. no through-traffic provision

·    Construction of four access lanes

·    Stormwater culvert and associated flood offset storage area

·    Approximately 102 affected properties

·    Expected construction duration:2.5 to 3 years.   

21.    NoR 2 (within the Papakura local board area)

Walters Road project area

·    Construction of an arterial road bridge across the NIMT accommodating two vehicle lanes (one in each direction) and separated active mode facilities

·    Construction of arterial road corridors tying into either side of the bridge and existing intersections (east and west of the NIMT).  The corridors will accommodate two vehicle lanes (one in each direction) and separated active mode facilities

·    Construction of two access lanes

·    Upgrade of intersections

·    Stormwater culvert

·    Approximately 64 affected properties

·    Expected construction duration:2.5 to 3 years.

22.    Technical report content

The Notices of Requirement include technical reports that evaluate the following effects:

·   arboricultural

·   archaeological and heritage

·   construction noise and vibration

·   ecological

·   environmental

·   flooding

·   landscape

·   operational noise

·   social impact

·   transport

·   urban design.

23.    The reports and other application details are available from council’s website at: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/notices-of-requirement-to-designate-land/Pages/default.aspx

24.    Council’s planners and other experts will be evaluating and reporting on:

·   technical reports supplied by the applicant

·   submissions

·   views and preferences of the local board, if the local board passes a resolution

25.    The Requiring Authority requested that the Notices of Requirement be publicly notified.  The Notices of Requirement were publicly notified on 16 November 2023 and submissions close on 14 December 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.    The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhihi: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach zero emissions by 2050 and

·   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

27.    The local board could consider if the Notices of Requirement:

·   will reduce, increase, or have no effect on Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. do they encourage car dependency, enhance connections to public transit, walking and cycling or support quality compact urban form?)

·   prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.  That is, do the Notices of Requirement elevate or alleviate climate risks (e.g. flooding, coastal and storm inundation, urban heat effect, stress on infrastructure).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.    Auckland Transport is the Requiring Authority that has lodged the Notices of Requirement.

29.    Watercare has been asked for comment on the Notices of Requirement.

30.    The council’s Plans and Places department have specialists and consultants within the project team for arboriculture, archaeology, engineering, ecology (terrestrial and aquatic), flooding, geotechnical, landscape and visual, planning, noise and vibration, social impact, transportation, and urban design.  These specialists will contribute to the reporting planner’s hearing report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.    While none of the Notices of Requirement fall within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area, factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view include:

·   interests and preferences of people in the local board area

·   well-being of communities within the local board area

·   local board documents, such as local board plan, local board agreement

·   responsibilities and operation of the local board.

32.    Supporting Growth have advised that they have provided in-person project updates to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board about the Takaanini Crossings Notices of Requirement.

33.    This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views.  The decision maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the Notices of Requirement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.    If the local board chooses to provide its views on the Notices of Requirement, it includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori world view).  In the 2018 census results, there were 85 122 people usually resident in the local board area with 16% identifying as being of Māori ethnicity and 17% being of Māori descent.

35.    Supporting Growth have advised that the project does not affect any identified properties or land currently being negotiated under Treaty settlements, land returned under a Treaty settlement, marae, Māori freehold lands, Tupuna Maunga Affected Areas, Tangata Whenua Management Areas, Sites of Significance to Mana Whenua identified in the Auckland Unitary Plan (operative in part) and/or Auckland Council GIS.  Supporting Growth also advise that the sites are not within the coastal environment under the marine and coastal Area (Takutai Moana) Act 2011, and there are therefore no customary marine title areas/ / groups or protected customary rights that need to be considered in relation to the project.

36.    Supporting Growth have advised that they engaged with mana whenua throughout the development of this project.  This included a monthly kaitiaki forum over the past five years dating back to the inception of Te Tupu Ngātahi, and at a project-specific level since the inception of the detailed business case process in 2021.  Nine iwi have a direct interest in the project area.

37.    Supporting Growth advised that mana whenua were invited to prepare Cultural Values Assessments or Cultural Impact Assessments in November 2022.  In response, the Supporting Growth team received CVAs in the form of report/documentation from Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua and Ngaati Whanaunga, and an in person oral CVA from Te Ākitai Waiohua.  Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua did not support their CVA being appended or provided to council to avoid information contained being misinterpreted or mistreated.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.    There are no financial implications with the local board providing its views.

39.    The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views.

40.    The costs associated with processing the Notice of Requirement requests are recoverable from Auckland Transport.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.    The power to provide local board views regarding the content of Notices of Requirement cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).  To avoid the procedural risk of an individual local board member expressing the views of the local board, this report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.    The reporting planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing report.  The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Joy LaNauze - Senior Policy Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Adoption of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan

File No.: CP2023/18200

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To adopt the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report presents the ‘Ōtara -Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan’ for the board’s consideration and adoption (see Attachment A).

3.      The local board allocated $30,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards the development of a local climate action plan in 2022/2023 (resolution OP/2022/84). This was supplemented with $10,000 from 2022/2023 community climate action regional budget to support plan completion.

4.      The action plan was developed to align with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which outlines a pathway for transforming Auckland to a resilient, zero carbon community actively adapting to the impacts of climate change.

5.      To support the development of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan, a stock take was conducted of existing low carbon projects and workshops and interviews were held with community stakeholders.

6.      The action plan builds on existing initiatives of the council, local board, council-controlled oganisations, and key community-based oganisations including Pest Free South Auckland, Ōtara Waterways and Lakes Trust, Ōtara-Papatoetoe Eco neighbourhood groups and various other community initiatives.

7.      The Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board provided input into the plan at several workshops between June 2022 and August 2023. Final feedback was provided in November 2023 via email. Staff now recommend that the plan be adopted.

8.      If the climate action plan is adopted, staff from across the council group will contribute to the implementation of currently funded action. Staff will provide the board with a brief update on some key climate indicators and actions in the plan annually.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan’ as per Attachment A.

b)      tautapa / delegate to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Chair the ability to approve minor amendments of the action plan document.

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that staff will continue to work with mana whenua to identify more opportunities to partner with them on climate/ te taiao projects in the board area.

Horopaki

Context

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

 

9.      In 2019 Auckland Council declared a Climate Emergency and in 2020 Auckland Council launched ‘Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’.

10.    The Auckland Plan and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan lay the foundation for Auckland’s transformation to a resilient, zero carbon community which is actively adapting to the impacts of climate change.

11.    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out a decarbonisation pathway and two core goals:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050

·        to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway.

12.    In order for the aspirations of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to be realised, local communities must be aware, engaged, and contributing to climate action mitigation efforts.

13.    Local boards may contribute to fulfilling Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri through:

·        leading delivery of local board projects that support increased community awareness of climate issues and encourage action to reduce emissions

·        provision of funds through grants and other mechanisms to support the delivery of community or Māori-led climate action projects

·        partnering with businesses and other key organisations to deliver climate action.

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan

14.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board allocated $30,000 in their 2022/2023 local board work programme (resolution OP/2022/84) to support the development of a local climate action plan. Staff subsequently supplemented this with an investment of $10,000 from regional climate budgets to support the completion of the plan.

15.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan (Attachment A) has been developed in alignment with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan. In particular, the action plan supports the Local Board Plan (2023) objectives:

·        communities leading on sustainability and climate action

·        accessible, reliable, and safe transport options for all.

16.    Over 20 stakeholders contributed to the development of the plan including representatives from key community organisations and businesses, Auckland Council staff, and council-controlled organisations.

17.    Engagement events were held between December 2022 and April 2023, canvassing the views of community groups, schools, and individuals to help understand climate action priorities of the community. Engagement events included a public workshop held in Papatoetoe, an online survey and engagement activities with Ōtara-Papatoetoe schools including feedback on climate action sought through the April 2023 Young Leaders Manukau wānanga.

18.    Input into the action plan from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board was sought at a number of stages during the plan’s development. The draft action plan was presented to the board in August 2023 and has been refined based on feedback from the local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.    The local climate action plan focuses on promoting actions by individuals, households and businesses which will lead to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. It also includes consideration of how the board can reduce emissions from infrastructure and buildings in the board area. It gives effect to both local board and regional outcomes which relate to sustainability, carbon reduction and caring for the environment.

20.    The action plan aligns with council’s regional Live Lightly programme. This involves collaboration between community groups, Auckland Council, and partners to engage with Aucklanders about how they can take action to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and live a low carbon lifestyle.

21.    Feedback from the community during development of the Live Lightly programme indicated a need to focus on low or no-cost solutions and initiatives, and this feedback has been considered through the development of the local climate action plan.

22.    The action plan builds on Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s existing environmental and sustainability initiatives and focuses on the eight action priority areas from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. These action areas are listed below, and are further detailed in Attachment A to this report:

·        Natural Environment

·        Built Environment

·        Transport

·        Economy

·        Community and Coast

·        Food

·        Te Puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai

·        Energy and Industry.

23.    For each of these action areas, the action plan includes:

·        goals based on achieving regional, national, and global greenhouse gas emission reduction targets

·        opportunities to amplify existing regional and local initiatives

·        actions suggested through consultation with community stakeholders

·        a monitoring framework for measuring progress against these targets.

24.    The action plan includes quantitative detail on specific targets, as well as a proposed programme to measure progress against these.

25.    The plan identifies priority areas for the board to support emissions reductions (particularly in relation to the built environment, active transport, energy, and the economy) and key areas to promote climate resilience (particularly, in relation to food and the natural environment).

26.    Within the action plan three climate action priority projects have been identified. Priority projects are activities identified as being particularly impactful in reducing carbon emissions or empowering community resilience within key priority areas. Priority projects are detailed in Table One.

 

 

 

Table One: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan priority projects

Action area

Priority project

Ikiiki / Transport

Support residential and town centre developments incorporating secure bike and scooter parking, and e-vehicle charging and rapid transit bus stops.

Ngā hapori me te tahatai/ Community and coast

Deliver disaster preparedness workshops

with interested communities and neighbourhoods in the board area that support them to become more resilient to climate-induced hazards.

Support communities to develop their own disaster resilience plans.

Ngā kai / Food

Support community-led low carbon food initiatives particularly those enabling Māori food sovereignty and supporting Pacific food security. Initiatives could include mara kai, community gardens, markets, cooking lessons, plant-based meal choices, Pātaka kai and garden projects.

 

27.    The intention of the action plan is for implementation and ownership by the whole community. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will support the implementation of the action plan where possible through a variety of mechanisms including:

·        advocacy

·        funding to enable local project delivery

·        further investigation of potential climate initiatives

·        leadership (delivering projects directly as well as enabling and encouraging others)

·        partnerships

·        promotion

·        monitoring and recognition.

 

Options analysis for the Ōtara -Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan

28.    Staff have identified two options for the board’s consideration in relation to the local climate action plan including:

·        Option A: Adopt a local climate action plan, noting that implementation of the plan  is dependent on funding being available.

·        Option B: Do not adopt the plan.

 

Table Two: Options for the local climate action plan against key outcome criteria

 

Increased community awareness of climate change

Guidance for strategic local board climate action advocacy and funding

Direction for local climate action within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area specifically

Option A: Adopt a local climate action plan, noting that implementation of the plan may be delayed until funding becomes available given current budget constraints

 

✓✓

Moderate outcomes

 

✓✓✓

Highest outcomes

 

✓✓✓

Highest outcomes

Option B: Do not adopt the plan

Limited Outcomes

Limited Outcomes

Limited Outcomes

 

29.    Adopting the local climate action plan (Option A) will provide the Otara Papatoetoe community with a resource to inform their own climate action, whether this be at the individual, household, or community group level. The local climate action plan also provides a foundation for future coordinated climate action, such as funding a local climate action programme, and it signals the board’s prioritisation of climate action.

30.    If the local board choose not to adopt the plan (Option B), climate action in the area will not be coordinated for maximum efficiency and the local board will have not clear guidance for how to prioritise their advocacy and funding in future.

31.    A full risk assessment for adopting the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan is included in the risks and mitigations section below.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan’ provides a roadmap for Ōtara-Papatoetoe to become a low carbon community and deliver on the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

33.    Climate action recommendations and priorities within the local plan have been informed by feedback from a range of community stakeholders, experts from various Auckland Council departments and Council Controlled Organisations, as well as a stocktake of existing climate action activities in the community.

34.    The approval of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan will provide guidance for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe community to:

·        take effective actions to reduce local greenhouse gas emissions

·        prepare for the adverse impacts of climate change.

35.    The plan covers all eight priority areas from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan as outlined above.

36.    Key climate action priorities for the board area include:

·        amplifying current work protecting the natural environment, including increasing funded tree plantings

·        reducing emissions from community facilities

·        reducing transport emissions through investment in active travel infrastructure

·        educating and engaging communities and local businesses to reduce their emissions and prepare for the adverse impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.    Key staff from across the council group contributed to the development of the action plan, including representatives from Chief Sustainability Office, Parks and Community Facilities, Connected Communities, Auckland Emergency Management, Resilient Land and Coasts, Environmental Services, Local Board Services and Auckland Transport.

38.    Some actions identified under the transport section of the plan will be delivered by Auckland Transport as part of other plans and strategies.

39.    Goals in the action plan relating specifically to the council group are those outlined in existing council group plans and strategies.

40.    Key staff from across the council group will contribute to the implementation of the action plan and will also contribute to periodic review and update of the action plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.    The action plan supports the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2023 objectives including ‘communities leading on sustainability and climate action’ and ‘accessible, reliable, and safe transport options for all.

42.    Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board members considered draft versions of the action plan at a workshop held in August 2023. Local board members were provided with a full draft plan and staff have incorporated members’ feedback into the final version.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.    A Te Ao Māori lens was used for the development of the action plan to help frame thinking about and approaches to climate change. This helped ensure that taiao (nature), whenua (land) and tangata (people) remain the focal point for all climate related decisions. Key values and principles of the Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau Wellbeing Framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan will be applied as the action plan is developed and implemented.

44.    In 2021/2022 staff presented to the I&ES Mana Whenua Hui, which includes operational kaitiaki representatives of Ngā Iwi Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau to seek their feedback on development of previous local climate action plans. Staff asked mana whenua for feedback on how they would like to be engaged on this project in more depth.

45.    Informal feedback from mana whenua representatives at this hui covered topics such as:

·        the need for local boards to work in partnership with mana whenua to develop climate projects and to support mana whenua as kaitiaki of Auckland’s natural environment

·        a desire to be engaged in projects that respond to climate change through a partnership approach

·        the urgent need for more support for mana whenua to respond to climate impacts, particularly in relation to sea level rise and coastal change

·        the need for regional support to be offered to mana whenua to support them with drafting their own climate response plans.

46.    In March 2023 staff sent an invitation to representatives of all iwi with an interest in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe area to participate in a one on one hui. No responses were received to this request.

47.    Feedback from mana whenua to the Ōtara Papatoetoe Local board as part of Auckland Council 10-year Budget 2021-2031 also informed development of the plan. Twelve iwi (Ngaati Whanaunga Incorporated Society, Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust, Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Ngāti Tamaoho, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua.Ngāti Maru, Te Patukiriri.and Waikato Tainui) provided feedback. Feedback was received on coastal issues, food, housing, the natural environment, transport, water, waste, climate policy, built environment, rates, emissions and Māori engagement and opportunities.

48.    In response to this feedback, practical ways of supporting kaitiakitanga outcomes have been identified and included in Te Puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai section of the action plan. This includes supporting rangatahi Māori leadership on climate change, the protection and restoration of our natural environment, strengthening awareness of tikanga and taonga species.

49.    The plan proposes that ongoing engagement with mana whenua be carried out to guide implementation of the action plan and future reviews and updates of the plan.

50.    Staff will also work to try and identify additional opportunities for the local board to support Māori-led climate or te taiao projects in the future.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.    The Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan is aspirational and as such, many of the proposed actions are not currently funded within regional or local board budgets. 

52.    Auckland Council adopted a new climate action investment package as part of the Recovery Budget 2021-2031 with a total value of $152 million over ten years to implement Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. The council also adopted a Climate Action Targeted Rate in the Annual Budget 2022/2023. This rate will directly generate $574 million over 10 years and seek to leverage a further $482 million in co-funding from central government and other sources.

53.    These budgets will provide support for some of the council-led actions in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan, such as improving bus services.

54.    The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board currently provides funding for some of the climate actions identified in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan through its locally driven initiatives budget and environment grants programme. For example, the local board funds Pest Free South Auckland, OPE Programme, EcoNeighbourhoods, Ōtara Waterways and Lake Trust and Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum (resolution OP/2023/115).

55.    Implementing the plan is not solely reliant on investment derived from Auckland Council-related funding. Central government incentives and programmes, philanthropic funding entities, as well as investment decisions of local businesses all have a part to play. As part of the community climate activation work programme, staff will work to identify opportunities for partnerships with businesses and community organisations to leverage funding from external sources to deliver on the aspirations of the action plan.

56.    The intention of the action plan is implementation and ownership by the whole community. As such, priority projects outlined in the action plan may be subject to change, due to community interest and changes in central government policies and legislation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

57.    Staff have conducted a risk assessment on the two options identified for the local climate action plan. These are listed below.

Table Three: Risks of adopting the climate action plan

Risk

Mitigation

Likelihood

Financial / Funding Risk - after adoption the board may not be able to fund implementation of the plan due to budget constraints.

Many actions within the plan, are already partially or fully funded through existing regional and local board budgets. The local climate action plan also includes advocacy points for the board, which can be delivered without additional funding.

Staff can provide scalable and phased options for plan activation for the board’s consideration during the 2024/2025 work programme planning process.

Due to current budget constraints, funding for community climate activation may need to be deferred until there is increased budget availability.

Medium - High

Priority projects outlined in the action plan may be subject to change, due to factors such as community interest, funding, and legislative changes

The action plan is designed as an evolving plan with regular updates in anticipation of a rapidly changing environment as Auckland and Aotearoa’s climate response accelerates.

Given current budget constraints, it is likely some of the actions outlined in the plan will not be able to be resourced next financial year. These may be revisited when there is increased budget availability

Medium

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.    Once the climate action plan is adopted, staff from across the council group will contribute to the implementation of currently funded action.

59.    As a community climate action programme is not funded in the current financial year, annual reporting would be provided on priority actions through existing channels.

60.    If a community climate action programme is funded in future financial years, staff will monitor some key indicators and actions in the plan on an annual basis (Attachment A). The local climate activator will also provide a more in-depth update on community actions in the plan if they are employed in a future year.

61.    Scalable options for community climate action activation through the board’s 2024/2025 environmental work programme will be presented during the work programme planning process in the coming months.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Climate Action Plan

63

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nicola Perry - Relationship Coordinator

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 
















































Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Record of Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2023/18942

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board record for the 21 November and 28 November 2023 workshops.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.      Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the workshop records for: 21 November and 28 November 2023 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Notes - 21 November 2023

113

b

Workshop Notes - 28 November 2023

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2023/18945

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.      To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.      The Hōtaka Kaupapa for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.      The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.      The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Hōtaka Kaupapa.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

5 December 2023 - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board - Hōtaka Kaupapa

119

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Darshita Shah - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

 


 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

15        Library and community service provision in Old Papatoetoe - Attachment d - High-level financial analysis

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains information that may prejudice future negotiations and commercial activities..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains information that may prejudice future negotiations and commercial activities..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a The Streets    Page 127

Item 8.1      Attachment b The Streets (2)    Page 135


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 









Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

05 December 2023

 

 







































 



[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c)

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

[3] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c)

[4] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.