I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 7 December 2023

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Komiti mō ngā Tūnuku me ngā Rawa Tūāhanga / Transport and Infrastructure Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr John Watson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

Members

Cr Andrew Baker

Cr Mike Lee

 

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Kerrin Leoni

 

IMSB Member Billy Brown

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Mayor Wayne Brown

IMSB Member Pongarauhine Renata

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Chris Darby

Deputy Mayor Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Julie Fairey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

Cr Ken Turner

 

Cr Lotu Fuli

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Shane Henderson

Cr Maurice Williamson

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Lata Smith

Senior Governance Advisor

 

4 December 2023

 

Contact Telephone: 027 202 0586

Email: lata.smith@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 December 2023

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5  

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input                                                                           5

5.1     Public Input:  NZ Police - Improving practices to achieve safety outcomes 5

5.2     Public Input:  Students Against Dangerous Driving (SADD) - Importance of safe speeds from a youth perspective                                                              6

5.3     Public Input:  Boopsie Maran - Benefits to safer speeds                                6

5.4     Public Input:  Geoff Upson - Katoa, Ka Ora – Draft Speed Management Plan for Auckland                                                                                                               7

5.5     Public Input:  Surface Light Rail - Surface light rail project along the City Centre to Māngere transport corridor                                                                7

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input                                        8

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              8

8          NZ Transport Agency Waka Kotahi Update - December 2023                                  9

9          Waitematā Harbour Connections (WHC)                                                                  11

10        Te Whatu Ora / Auckland Regional Public Health Service - Transport as a Public Health Issue                                                                                                                  17

11        Summary of Transport and Infrastructure Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 7 December 2023                                                                                                                               19

12        Auckland Transport Update - December 2023                                                         21

13        Feedback on Katoa, Ka Ora - Draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027                                                                                                                                       23

14        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

 


1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

 

 

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

 

 

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

            Click the meeting date below to access the minutes.

 

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 16 November 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

 

 

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input

 

5.1       Public Input:  NZ Police - Improving practices to achieve safety outcomes

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       NZ Police will address the Transport and Infrastructure Committee regarding ways NZ Police are improving practices to achieve safety outcomes, which support a whole of network approach to speed management for Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       NZ Police will speak on the role of NZ Police in relation to enforcement of speeding and other high-risk behaviours on the road.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the public input from NZ Police and whakamihi / thank them for attending the meeting.

 

 


 

 

 

5.2       Public Input:  Students Against Dangerous Driving (SADD) - Importance of safe speeds from a youth perspective

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Students Against Dangerous Driving (SADD) will address the Transport and Infrastructure Committee about the importance of safe speeds, in support of the Katoa, Ka Ora – Draft Speed Management Plan for Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Students, Rachel Slacke and Ryan Antia will address the Committee.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the public input from Students Against Dangerous Driving (SADD) regarding the importance of safe speeds; and whakamihi / thank Rachel Slacke and Ryan Antia for their attendance

 

 

 

 

5.3       Public Input:  Boopsie Maran - Benefits to safer speeds

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Boopsie Maran will address the Transport and Infrastructure Committee on the benefits to safer speeds, in support of the Katoa, Ka Ora - Draft Speed Management Plan for Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Boopsie Maram has supplied a letter of support from Donald McLean, Principal of Fruitvale School, New Lynn.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the public input from Boopsie Maran regarding the benefits to safer speeds; and whakamihi / thank Boopsie Maran for her attendance.

 

 

 


 

 

5.4       Public Input:  Geoff Upson - Katoa, Ka Ora – Draft Speed Management Plan for Auckland

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Geoff Upson will address the Transport and Infrastructure Committee requesting to pause all work and financial outlay on the speed limit reduction program until the incoming government has had sufficient opportunity to adjust the Land Transport Rule: Setting of speed limits Rule 54001.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Geoff Upson will address the Committee in relation to the Katoa, Ka Ora – Draft Speed Management Plan for Auckland.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the public input from Geoff Upson; and whakamihi / thank him for attending the meeting.

 

 

 

 

5.5       Public Input:  Surface Light Rail - Surface light rail project along the City Centre to Māngere transport corridor

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Connor Sharp and Rachel Bate, representing Surface Light Rail, will address the Transport and Infrastructure Committee to propose a surface light rail project along the City Centre to Māngere transport corridor and seeking support from the Mayor and Councillors.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Connor Sharp and Rachel Bate will address the Committee on behalf of their newly formed campaign group of Aucklanders interested in solving transport issues and believe surface light rail is an important component of the solution.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the public input from Surface Light Rail; and whakamihi / thank Connor Sharp and Rachel Bate for attending the meeting.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input

 

 

 

 

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

 

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 December 2023

 

NZ Transport Agency Waka Kotahi Update - December 2023

File No.: CP2023/18677

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive the December 2023 update from the NZ Transport Agency, Waka Kotahi with a specific focus on its Harbour Bridge maintenance programme and any other relevant matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Transport and Infrastructure Committee has responsibility for the oversight of major transport and infrastructure matters that affect the region.

3.       The NZ Transport Agency, Waka Kotahi is the Crown entity tasked with promoting and funding safe and functional transport by land, including the responsibility for driver and vehicle licensing, and administering the New Zealand state highway network.

4.       Senior staff from Waka Kotahi will provide the committee with an update on its Harbour Bridge maintenance programme and any other relevant matters as part of its regular update to the committee.

5.       The presentation which will be discussed at the committee meeting is attached to this report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the December 2023 update from the NZ Transport Agency, Waka Kotahi with a specific focus on its Harbour Bridge maintenance programme.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waka Kotahi Update - December 2023

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mara Bebich - Executive Officer

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 December 2023

 

Waitematā Harbour Connections (WHC)

File No.: CP2023/18184

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm Auckland Council’s position on the draft Indicative Business Case (IBC) recommended option for the Waitematā Harbour Connections (WHC) project, and to note council staff involvement in the development of lower-cost alternatives and support for early project improvements.

Whakarāpop ototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The WHC project is a partnership between Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, Auckland Transport, Auckland Council and Ngā Iwi Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau. The WHC project seeks to resolve North Shore transport network issues, including in relation to Auckland Harbour Bridge resilience, a permanent active modes crossing, freight reliability, rapid transit network development and supporting urban growth.

3.       A draft IBC and recommended option has been developed and will be presented to the NZTA Waka Kotahi Board in February 2024 for their consideration. Auckland Council staff have identified several areas of concern with the draft IBC recommended option which were discussed with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee at a workshop on 13 November 2023. Staff recommend that the Transport and Infrastructure Committee not support the recommended option and note that Auckland Transport and the Ministry of Transport do not support the recommended option.

4.       Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency has commenced work on lower-cost alternatives which responds to Auckland Council’s request in July 2023 to comprehensively investigate more affordable options. This may address some of the concerns raised by the council. Auckland Council and Auckland Transport staff are currently working with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency on the development of these lower-cost alternatives.

5.       The government’s position on the WHC project is not yet known. While awaiting further decisions on WHC, and considering the likely timeframe before any decision on WHC is implemented, a number of early project improvements have been identified to make better use of the existing system. These improvements could be started immediately without precluding future options and would provide real benefits for Aucklanders.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)     whakaū / confirm Auckland Council does not support the Waitematā Harbour Connections project draft Indicative Business Case recommended option because of:

i)          lack of integration with the Auckland Integrated Transport Plan

ii)         significant affordability and value-for-money issues

iii)        lower cost options being discarded early in the Indicative Business Case process

iv)        the long wait for active mode and public transport crossings

v)         marginal improvement on mode shift, Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) and emissions, but high embodied carbon in road tunnels

vi)        lack of a clear problem definition on resilience

vii)       failure to consider other ways to improve resilience and freight outcomes

viii)      negligible land use opportunities being unlocked

ix)        lack of clarity about asset ownership and the impact on Auckland Transport’s operational expenditure.

b)     whakaae / agree to restate Auckland Council’s concern that it has no governance or decision-making role on the Waitematā Harbour Connections project.

c)     whakaū / confirm support for the early project improvements related to the project including:

i)          Northern Busway enhancements (such as busway station improvements)

ii)         SH1 Cycleway (Constellation to Akoranga)

iii)        Targeted active mode improvements to better connect people to busway stations and ferry terminals (providing interim cross-harbour links).

d)     whakaae / agree that the Chair of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee advise the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Board of the council’s position on:

i)          the draft Indicative Business Case recommended option, as outlined in clauses a) and b) above

ii)         the early project improvements, as outlined in recommendation c)

e)     tuhi ā-taipitopito / note council staff involvement in the development of lower-cost alternatives.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Overview of the Waitematā Harbour Connections project draft Indicative Business Case recommended option

6.       Auckland Council with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, Auckland Transport and Ngā Iwi Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau have been involved in the lBC phase of the WHC project. The draft IBC and recommended option is now due to be considered by the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Board in February 2024.

7.         The WHC project draft IBC recommended option involves:

·     upgrading the Northern Busway stations and constructing an active mode path between Constellation Dr and Akoranga Drive

·     two road tunnels (three lanes in each direction) between Central Motorway Junction and Akoranga Drive (no peak direction capacity increase)

·     raising of State Highway 1 between Auckland Harbour Bridge and Akoranga Drive to protect against sea level rise/flooding

·     continuous bus lanes between Akoranga Station and city centre including re-allocation of Auckland Harbour Bridge lanes

·     active modes path from Westhaven to Constellation Dr including re-allocation of the eastern Auckland Harbour Bridge clip-on to active modes

·     new light rail tunnels from Wynyard Quarter to Albany, with suggested stations at Belmont, Takapuna, Smales Farm, Glenfield, North Harbour and Albany West.

8.       Note that a map of the WHC draft IBC recommended option (referred to as the Emerging Preferred Option when announced in August 2023) has been appended to this report as Attachment A.


 

 

 

9.       Auckland Council staff have identified concerns about the recommended option which build on the issues raised by Auckland Council in its feedback to Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency on the shortlist options in July 2023. They relate to:

·     Auckland Council having no governance or decision-making role on the WHC project

·     significant affordability and value-for-money issues – $56B ($22B Stage 1, $34B Stage 2)

·     lower cost options being discarded because they did not address all of the project’s stated investment objectives, resulting in the highest cost option being selected. Note that Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s work on lower-cost alternatives is an opportunity to investigate the discarded and other options

·     the long wait for active mode and public transport crossings – improved public transport and active mode crossings would not be delivered until the 2040s

·     marginal improvement on mode shift, VKT and emissions (investment objective), but high embodied carbon in road tunnels

·     lack of a clear problem definition on resilience, despite this driving option selection

·     failure to consider other ways to improve resilience and freight outcomes, including non-infrastructure solutions, enhancements to the Western Ring Route and an inland port

·     negligible land use opportunities being unlocked (investment objective)

·     lack of integration with the Auckland Integrated Transport Plan

·     lack of clarity about asset ownership and the impact on Auckland Transport’s operational expenditure.

10.     For the reasons outlined above, Auckland Council staff recommend that the Transport and Infrastructure Committee should not support the draft IBC recommended option.

Development of lower-cost alternatives

11.     Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency is currently investigating lower-cost alternatives in response to issues raised during the WHC project review process and partner feedback. This responds to the council’s request to Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency in July 2023 to comprehensively investigate more affordable options. To that end, staff have worked with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency to determine the scope of this work. The results of this work may address some of the council’s concerns.

12.     Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency is expecting to complete the lower-cost alternative work by early December 2023 so that it can be included in the draft IBC for the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Board’s consideration. Auckland Council and Auckland Transport staff are working closely with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and will provide the Transport and Infrastructure Committee with an update once available.

Early project improvements

13.     The $56b estimated cost of the WHC is equivalent to significantly more than double the government’s total ten year investment in Auckland’s entire transport system as proposed in ATAP 2021. Given the sheer scale of the investment it is important to invest at the right time. However, the exact timing of the different components of the WHC project and its implications remain unclear.

14.     The government’s position on the WHC project is not yet known and given the likely time to determine the way forward, council staff propose seeking the government’s commitment to several smaller, earlier, project improvements.

 

 

15.       Early project improvements which could be progressed by the government include:

·     Northern Busway enhancements (such as busway station improvements)

·     SH1 Cycleway (Constellation to Akoranga)

·     Targeted active mode improvements to better connect people to busway stations and ferry terminals (providing interim cross-harbour links).

16.     These could be progressed without precluding future options and could provide real benefits for Aucklanders by making better use of the existing system whilst awaiting further decisions on the WHC project.

17.     Improvements could be started immediately and completed in the coming decade but would need specific project funding. It is not intended for this work to be funded out of the active modes/public transport activity classes in the National Land Transport Programme. There is currently no funding for this in the council’s Long-term Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     There are significant climate impacts with the WHC project. These have been considered as part of a separate workstream in the WHC project and are included in the draft IBC.

19.     The recommended option has a large amount of embedded carbon as well as ongoing emissions from operating the tunnel control systems. Traffic modelling shows the resulting travel patterns are not consistent with a scenario that meets either the governments’ Emissions Reduction Plan or the council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Auckland Transport is a partner on the WHC project and has been working closely with Auckland Council during the development of the draft IBC and consideration of options. Auckland Transport has a specific interest as the potential asset owner and/or operator. Auckland Transport does not support the draft IBC recommended option.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The WHC project team engaged with local boards on an ongoing basis in recognition of the local boards’ close relationship with, and knowledge of, their local communities. Local board views were considered as part of the development of options.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     Ngā Iwi Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau are partners on the WHC project. Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency has responsibility for ensuring ongoing involvement of mana whenua in the project given their specific interests in relation to, and their special relationship with, the Waitematā.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The recommended option, should it proceed, has been costed at $56B. Auckland Council staff have raised concerns about the significant affordability and value-for-money issues of the project and recommend that Auckland Council does not support the draft IBC recommended option for financial and other reasons.

24.     The recommendation of this report to provide feedback to the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Board has no financial implication on the council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     A number of risks for the WHC project have been identified during the development of the options which are discussed in detail in the draft IBC, both in relation to the project proceeding and the likelihood of it not going ahead.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     If the Transport and Infrastructure Committee resolve to support the recommendations included in this agenda report, then:

·    staff will update the Transport and Infrastructure Committee on the results of the lower-cost alternatives once when this work is complete.

·    the Chair of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee will communicate with the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Board the council’s position on the draft IBC recommended option, and the council’s request that the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Board commit to, and progress, the early project improvements.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Map of the Waitematā Harbour Connections project draft Indicative Business Case emerging preferred option

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elise Webster - Principal Transport Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 December 2023

 

Te Whatu Ora / Auckland Regional Public Health Service - Transport as a Public Health Issue

File No.: CP2023/18680

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive an update from National Public Health Service – Northern Region (NPHS) regarding population health issues and opportunities associated with Council’s role in the transport system.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Transport and Infrastructure Committee has responsibility for the oversight of the transport system and projects that affect the region.

3.       The NPHS has responsibility for promoting and protecting the health of Aucklanders and is seeking to address major population health concerns arising from the transport system.

4.       NPHS and Auckland academics have developed a presentation to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee on public health issues impacted by the transport system, including:

·        The topics covered in the attached Memo from NPHS to Auckland Council on public health impacts of the transport system (Attachment A).

·        A high-level update on existing costs attributed to air pollution, physical inactivity, and road safety in the Auckland region.

·        Opportunities to respond to public health concerns and minimise the mortality and morbidity impacts on the Auckland population, through reform of existing systems and processes within Council and Auckland Transport. This includes avenues for greater engagement and collaboration between Council, NPHS – Northern Region and community groups with an interest in these areas.

5.       The presentation will be circulated to councillors ahead of the committee meeting and appended to the meeting minutes.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the presentation from National Public Health Service (NPHS) on public health issues associated with the transport system.

b)      tono / request that Auckland Council and Auckland Transport staff engage further with National Public Health Service (NPHS) – Northern Region to incorporate public health costs and benefits into transport strategy, planning and prioritisation processes, where appropriate.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

National Public Health Service - Letter to Transport and Infrastructure Committee November 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Roth - Lead Transport Advisor

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 December 2023

 

Summary of Transport and Infrastructure Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 7 December 2023

File No.: CP2023/14369

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To whiwhi / receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda or briefing papers that may have been distributed to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility and openness and transparency of information circulated to Transport and Infrastructure Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following item was distributed.

Date

Subject

27/11/2023

Delivery of the Waitematā (Britomart) Station Plaza and Tyler Street Upgrade.

 

5.       The following workshops have taken place for the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

Date

Subject

13/11/2023

CONFIDENTIAL:  Waitematā Harbour Connections Indicative Business Case (IBC)

15/11/2023

Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) Reduction Programme

 

6.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Transport and Infrastructure Committee. members should direct any questions to the authors.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      whiwhi / receive the Summary of Transport and Infrastructure Committee information memoranda and briefings – 7 December 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme (FWP)

 

b

Memorandum:  Waitemata station plaza and Tyler Street, 27 November 2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Memorandum:  Attachment A - Waitemata station plaza Tyler Street, 27 November 2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Workshop:  Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) Reduction Programme,15 November 2023 - Workshop Notes (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Workshop:  Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) Reduction Programme, 15 November 2023 - Information Pack (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lata Smith - Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 December 2023

 

Auckland Transport Update - December 2023

File No.: CP2023/18682

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive the December 2023 update from the Chief Executive of Auckland Transport on the performance of the organisation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Transport and Infrastructure Committee has responsibility for the oversight of major transport and infrastructure matters that affect the Auckland region.

3.       Auckland Transport is a Controlled Organisation of Auckland Council. Auckland Transport designs, build and maintains Auckland’s roads, ferry wharves, cycleways and walkways, coordinates road safety and community transport initiatives such as school travel, and plans and funds bus, train, and ferry services across Auckland.

4.       An update (attached) will be provided by the Chief Executive on strategic issues, operational updates and key performance metrics for the most recent reporting period.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the update from Auckland Transport’s Chief Executive on the performance of the organisation.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport Update - December 2023 - Presentation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mara Bebich - Executive Officer

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 December 2023

 

Feedback on Katoa, Ka Ora - Draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

File No.: CP2023/19257

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of feedback on the draft Auckland speed management plan received from public consultation, local boards and mana whenua and seek feedback from the committee on the plan.

2.       To seek approval for Karioitahi Beach to be included in the final Katoa, Ka Ora: Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027, for submission to the Regional Transport Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The draft Katoa, Ka Ora: Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027 (draft plan) (Attachment A) is a plan that is legally required under the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 to set safe and appropriate speed limits, particularly near schools.

4.       The draft plan focuses on speed limits mostly on streets near schools and changes that communities can more easily understand and seeks to deliver value for money. The plan also includes a number of town centres, several rural roads and streets supported by local boards, mana whenua, partners and communities. It does not set limits on highways which are the responsibility of Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi).

5.       Public consultation closed in August 2023 with 7,927 pieces of feedback received. A summary of feedback received is attached to this report as Attachment B and the full summary of feedback document is Attachment C. Following this consultation, mana whenua and local boards have also provided feedback on the draft plan.

6.       All Local Boards provided formal feedback on the draft plan (Attachment D). In summary, 16 local boards mostly supported the proposed changes, one mostly opposed, three had mixed or neutral views and one requested more information. 12 out of the 13 local boards asked supported a speed limit review of the remaining 60 schools that do not have current or proposed safe school speed limits. Economic analysis of speed limit scenarios near schools showed the expected travel time delay from all scenarios was between 12 and 14 seconds for an average urban vehicle trip of around 20 minutes. This is because most speed limit changes are proposed on local roads, and very few are proposed on high traffic arterial roads where most travel time occurs during an average journey.

7.       One road requested by mana whenua for speed limit review, Karioitahi Beach, is partly controlled by Auckland Council as per the map in Attachment E to this report. Staff recommend that this area of Karioitahi Beach be approved for inclusion in the draft plan for submission to the Regional Transport Committee.

8.       Pending the outcome of this committee staff will amend the draft plan for submission to the Regional Transport Committee for final approval in March 2024, subject to considering all feedback received and making the recommended changes.

9.       In parallel the project team will obtain clarity from the new government on any policy changes that may or may not impact this draft plan before submitting the final plan to the Regional Transport Committee for approval.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / notes the public consultation, mana whenua and local board feedback received on the draft Katoa, Ka Ora: Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027.

b)      whakarite / provide feedback on the draft Katoa, Ka Ora: Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027.

c)      whakaae / approve Karioitahi Beach (Lot 1 DP 28962, ALLOT 468 Parish WAIPIPI DISTRICT & SECT 3 SO 506161) for inclusion in the final Katoa, Ka Ora: Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027, for submission to the Regional Transport Committee.

d)      tautoko / support finalisation of the Katoa, Ka Ora: Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027, for submission to the Regional Transport Committee for approval in March 2024, subject to considering all feedback received and making the recommended changes.

e)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / notes the project team will obtain clarity from the new government on any policy changes before submitting the final plan to the Regional Transport Committee for approval.

Horopaki

Context

10.     Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s Road Controlling Authority (RCA). Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and use.  Katoa, Ka Ora: Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027 is a plan to set safe and appropriate speed limits with a focus on roads around schools. The draft plan includes speed limit changes covering 359 schools, 13 town centres and 982km of rural roads.

Alignment with Central Government policy and legislation

11.     The Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 (the Rule) requires the Regional Transport Committee to develop, consult and finalise a regional speed management plan within legal timeframes. AT and Auckland Council are both RCAs with responsibilities under the Rule. For AT, this includes setting safe speed limits near all schools by December 2027. Auckland Council controls roads in some parks and beaches.

12.     In 2019, Waka Kotahi adopted a vision of a New Zealand where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes and launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy.  The strategy’s target is to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on New Zealand’s roads by 40 per cent by 2030. A key part of the strategy is protecting vulnerable road users, for instance children travelling to and from school.

13.     The national strategy’s action plan includes the Rule which sets out requirements road controlling authorities must comply with when setting speed limits. The Rule requires AT to make best efforts to have speed limit changes for roads near schools completed by December 2027 and to submit a regional speed management plan to the Director Land Transport by March 2024.

Alignment with Auckland Council policy

14.     Auckland Council’s Governing Body has consistently supported the programme.

15.     In 2018, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee in Resolution Number PLA/2018/83 requested that AT accelerate its road safety and speed management programme, including direction to work with partners like New Zealand Police and Waka Kotahi.


 

 

16.     Since then, both Auckland Council’s Planning Committee; and in this term the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have been regularly briefed. In April 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee unanimously carried recommendations on the proposed approach and provided feedback supporting consistent easy-to-understand changes for communities. See Resolution Number TICCC/2023/44.

AT and partner roles

17.     Katoa, Ka Ora is fundamental to Auckland’s Vision Zero approach to road safety and is aligned to the Auckland Plan 2050 vision of a safe transport network, free from death and serious injury.

18.     This plan is overseen by the Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Safety Governance Group, a group of eight organisations partnering to deliver safe transport for all. Safe speed limits are one part of delivering a safe transport system and working in partnership is fundamental to lifting road safety performance.

19.     Katoa, Ka Ora is the first speed management plan under the 2022 Rule. It follows three phases implemented between June 2020 and March 2023 under previous legislation.

20.     Since early 2022, Katoa, Ka Ora has evolved based on insights gathered during 64 separate engagements with local boards, mana whenua, stakeholder groups and local communities.

21.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in 2024, and the Rule requires that every proposed change is consulted on.

22.     Katoa, Ka Ora focuses on changing speed limits and installing signage, followed by monitoring and evaluation. The need to install physical infrastructure to manage speed will be assessed separately and on its own merits.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     Public consultation for Katoa, Ka Ora was open from 24 July to 28 August 2023. 7,927 pieces of feedback were received. Mana whenua and local boards were also consulted.

24.     A public consultation feedback summary is provided as Attachment B. The full public consultation report is available on the AT website and appended as Attachment C.

25.     A 15km/h speed limit for Karioitahi Beach was requested by Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua as part of a Safe Zone Proposal for Karioitahi Beach presented in February 2022.

26.     Legislation restricts options to multiples of 10, and a number of options were considered including 10km/h, 20km/h or 30km/h. 30km/h is a survivable speed for people walking or standing however there are additional risks when there are people sitting or lying down who would be harder to see and have more potential for crush injuries.

27.     Therefore 20km/h was recommended in public consultation to manage the risk of vehicles mixing with people on the beach and maximising the opportunity for drivers to observe and avoid anyone sitting or lying down on the beach (Attachment E).  The holistic response to the safe zone request from mana whenua has been led by the Parks and Community Facilities team at Auckland Council. The proposed 20km/h speed limit is supported by Franklin Local Board.

Technical advice

28.     AT’s technical advice is that from a statutory perspective, AT must act in accordance with its legal purpose to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system; the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport and its legal obligations under the Rule. Under these legal obligations, AT must act once it has reviewed a road and found the speed limit is unsafe.

29.     The impact of speed reduction on the number of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) is statistically significant.  In Auckland:

a)      Since June 2020, when the safe speed programme started road deaths reduced 30 per cent in the areas where speed limits have changed.

b)      In comparison, over this same period, the rest of the network has seen a 9 per cent increase in road deaths.

30.     30km/h is the internationally accepted speed at which there is a sensible balance between maintaining traffic movement and still significantly reducing the chances of people walking or cycling being killed or seriously injured if they are struck by a vehicle. This is the reason that the 30km/h speed limit outside schools is used for the safe speed programme.

31.     Economic analysis of speed limit scenarios near schools showed the expected travel time delay from all scenarios was between 12 and 14 seconds for an average urban vehicle trip of around 20 minutes. This is because most speed limit changes are proposed on local roads, and very few are proposed on high traffic arterial roads where most travel time occurs during an average journey.

Staff recommend the committee supports the draft plan

32.     In summary, AT’s advice is that the draft Katoa, Ka Ora: Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027 meets a statutory requirement to reduce speed across the city. It aligns strongly with Auckland Council and AT’s Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport related DSI within the Auckland road network by 2050.

33.     Setting safe speed limits that recognize the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI.

34.     The proposed speed of 30km/h outside schools is supported by substantial overseas research and study that demonstrates significant reductions in DSI on roads operating at this speed, with minimal disruption to traffic flow.

35.     Customer research shows a good level of support by Aucklanders for lowering speed limits where this could help reduce DSI and high levels of support for speed limit reductions near schools.

36.     Since June 2020, when the safer speeds programme started, road deaths reduced 30 per cent in areas where speed limits were changed.

37.     It is for these reasons that AT’s advice to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee is to support the draft Katoa, Ka Ora: Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027.  

Customer research

38.     As directed in Auckland Council’s letter of expectation, AT has completed customer research to more deeply understand the views and needs of Aucklanders on this issue. The latest research shows that 61 per cent of Aucklanders believe that lower speed limits could help reduce the number of serious injuries and deaths on Auckland roads, with 74 per cent of Aucklanders willing to accept increases in travel time if it would help make travel safer in Auckland.

39.     Overall, around 44 per cent of Auckland residents oppose speed limit reductions and 43 per cent support. After being informed about the decrease in road deaths and serious injuries on roads where speed limits have been reduced, support for the speed limit reductions increases to 57 per cent and opposition decreases. Support remains highest for speed limit reductions near schools, kindergartens, or other community facilities at 74 per cent.

40.     Recent customer research on safety near schools shows the safety of children travelling to school is a critical and increasing concern to parents. School speed limits, and physically separating children from danger are strongly supported by parents and in locations with comprehensive speed management parents feel more comfortable letting their children walk to school.

 

 

41.     In survey responses from almost 180 schools, 78 per cent supported permanent 30km/h speed limits on local roads near their school.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage walking, cycling and micro-mobility by reducing the risk to active road users, making these modes more attractive.

43.     A key action required in the Auckland Council Transport Emissions Reduction Plan is to ‘rapidly deliver safe speeds across urban Auckland’ in order to create a more pleasant urban environment and make it safer for children to travel independently.

44.     A recent road safety perceptions study was completed in town centres where speed limits were reduced, and safety improvements introduced. Overall, 19 per cent of people surveyed say they participate in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.     Auckland Council is the RCA for parts of Karioitahi Beach and has legal obligations under the Rule. AT and the Parks and Community Facilities team at Auckland Council have worked together to develop and consult on the preferred option which is recommended for approval in this report.

46.     Setting safe speed limits complements Eke Panuku’s regeneration objectives.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     AT workshopped with all local boards during February and March 2023 and the changes consulted on reflect formal local board feedback received in April 2023.  These are appended as Attachment D to this report.

48.     Following consultation, a business report was submitted to all local boards in October 2023 which included a summary of public consultation feedback for each local board area, including AT’s response to requests for speed limit reviews in additional locations.

49.     In addition, AT asked local boards for their support for the location and scope of proposed speed limit changes identified for each local board area. Where relevant, local boards were asked for their support to carry out future consultation for schools that do not have current or proposed safe speed limits and any additional locations requested in consultation feedback.

General sentiment of local board feedback on proposed changes

# Local boards

Mostly support. May include some concerns*

16

Mostly oppose. May include some support.

1

Mixed or neutral views.

3

Requested more information.

1

*Several local boards provided more detailed comments about specific locations. Two local boards qualified their support with concerns about action being taken prior to policy confirmation from the new government.

 

 

 

50.     In accordance with our legal obligations to make best efforts to set safe speed limits near all schools by December 2027, we asked the 13 relevant local boards for their support to review speed limits near all 60 remaining schools in a future consultation.

Local board feedback on speed limit review for remaining schools

# Local boards

Support

12

Noted request

1

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     Māori are overrepresented in death and serious injuries  statistics making up 12 per cent of Auckland’s population but representing  16 per cent of road deaths and serious injuries.

52.     Engagement with iwi at the northern/west, central, and southern transport kaitiaki hui has taken place as part of the wider programme since 2021. In 2022, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum confirmed their strategic plan has an objective to reduce road deaths for mana whenua and mātāwaka.

53.     As a result of early consultation,  the draft plan includes a number of kura, marae and papakainga speed limit changes requested by mana whenua and mātāwaka. The request for speed limit review of Karioitahi Beach was made by Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua and is recommended for approval within the revised draft plan.

54.     Across 2022 and 2023 a series of hui and a wānanga with mana whenua were completed for Katoa, Ka Ora. Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the programme and the positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     Three funding bid options have been submitted into the 10 year Regional Land Transport Plan for $33.5m, $66.5m and $78.5m, each delivering progressively more of the streets identified for speed limit changes, as part of the Katoa, Ka Ora programme.

56.     AT will seek co-funding from Waka Kotahi at a Funding Assistance Rate of 51%.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Public understanding

Provide comprehensive communications including evidence and key facts to increase understanding and support for safe speeds.

Unexpected negative impacts

Active monitoring to assist in planning any further adaptions, which may include communications, engineering or enforcement as appropriate.

Other causes of road safety harm continue

Safe speed limits are only one part of delivering a safe transport system. Continue to partner and work on all parts of a safe system.

Changes are confusing to drivers

Reduce the number of speed limit changes through setting consistent safe speed areas and use paint and signage to make this easy to understand.

Funding constraints delay delivery

Prioritise changes that have higher safety benefits and strong local board support.

Changes to the Government Policy Statement may impact the availability of Waka Kotahi funding

Consider scaling back the programme or seeking alternative funding.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     Include Auckland Council controlled roads in the final plan for submission to the Regional Transport Committee.

58.     Obtain clarity from the new government before submitting the final plan to the Regional Transport Committee for approval in March 2024.

59.     Subject to approval by the Regional Transport Committee, submit the final plan to the Director Land Transport by 29 March 2024, for certification.

60.     Katoa, Ka Ora implementation is planned to start in FY2025, subject to funding.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Katoa, Ka Ora Auckland speed management plan 2024-2027

 

b

Katoa, Ka Ora, Public Feedback Summary

 

c

Full Report on Public feedback Katoa, Ka Ora Draft Speed Management Plan for Auckland 2024-2027

 

d

Local board resolutions on Katoa, Ka Ora - draft Auckland Speed Management Plan 2024-2027

 

e

Auckland Council controlled roads submission  – Kariotahi Beach analysis and map

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Diane Burden - Manager Business Delivery, Auckland Council

Michael Roth - Lead Transport Advisor, Auckland Council

Stacey van der Putten – Executive General Manager, Safety, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities, Auckland Council

Dean Kimpton – Chief Executive, Auckland Transport

Barry Potter, Director Infrastructure & Environmental Services