I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Governing Body will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 14 December 2023

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Tira Hautū / Governing Body

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Wayne Brown

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Councillors

Cr Andrew Baker

Cr Mike Lee

 

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Kerrin Leoni

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Julie Fairey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

Cr Ken Turner

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Lotu Fuli

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Shane Henderson

Cr Maurice Williamson

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Sarndra O'Toole

Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

 

11 December 2023

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8152

Email: sarndra.otoole@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

4          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input                                                                           5

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input                                        5

6          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              5

7          Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer Update                                     7

8          Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council Quarterly Performance Reports for the quarter ended 30 September 2023                                                                      11

9          2024/2025 Letters of expectation to substantive council-controlled organisations                                                                                                                                       17

10        Recovery Office Update                                                                                              27

11        Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan                                                                              33

12        Joint Governance Working Party update and recommendations for a local board reorganisation and Auckland Council representation arrangements for the 2025 elections                                                                                                                        41

13        Referred from the Audit and Risk Committee - Health, Safety and Wellbeing Performance Report                                                                                                    51

14        Strategic Asset Consultation - Waterfront                                                                53

15        Draft Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025                                55

16        Summary of Confidential Decisions and related information released into Open 59

17        Summary of Governing Body and Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 14 December 2023                            61

18        Referred from the Audit and Risk Committee - Enterprise Risk Update December 2023                                                                                                                               63

19        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

20        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public        65

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Referred from the Audit and Risk Committee - Enterprise Risk Update December 2023 Supplement                                                                         65

 


1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

An apology from Cr S Stewart has been received.

 

 

 

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

 

 

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

            Click the meeting date below to access the minutes.

  

That the Governing Body:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 23 November 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input

 

 

 

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input

 

 

 

6          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer Update

File No.: CP2023/16733

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a monthly update to the Governing Body on key matters from the Auckland Council Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer as at 30 November 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer’s Update

2.       Phil Wilson, Chief Executive and Peter Gudsell, Group Chief Financial Officer (GCFO) will provide a summary of highlights and key activities and updates for the following:

·    Chief Executive priorities including government relationships and reform

·    Long-term Plan (LTP) update

·    Economic/market update.

Government relationships and reform

3.       The previous government’s resource management reforms included a range of elements including new legislation, the National Planning Framework, the Parliamentary Inquiry into Community-led Retreat and Adaptation Funding and updates to new policy tools under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA), such as National Policy Statements.

4.       The new Government has signalled that they will repeal the Natural and Built Environment Act 2023 and Spatial Planning Act 2023 before Christmas with “planning to revert to previous RMA rules”.  They will commence work on new resource management laws over a longer time frame.

5.       The Government will also:

·        establish a fast-track one-stop-shop consenting and permitting process for regional and national projects of significance.

·        introduce financial incentives for councils to enable more housing, including considering sharing a portion of GST collected on new residential builds with councils.

·        legislate to make the Medium Density Residential Standards (MDRS) optional for councils, with the need for councils to ratify any use of MDRS, including existing zones.

6.       The Government has also indicated that they will introduce or update existing National Policy Statements and National Environmental Standards for freshwater, indigenous biodiversity, plantation forestry, housing, energy, transport and water infrastructure.  These are instruments under the RMA.

7.       While there is some clarity on the new Government’s decisions on resource management, there are unknowns in relation to some aspects of the work programme. For example, Minister Bishop referred to spatial planning as an example of “good things to take forward”.

 


 

 

8.       Staff are finalising feedback on the engagement draft of the transitional National Planning Framework (NPF) to support the development of the first regional spatial strategies (RSS). The Ministry for the Environment has advised that further engagement has been paused until clear direction is provided by the new government. Staff will make a technical submission on behalf of the Auckland Council group. Once the Government is able to make decisions on this work programme, the council will have another opportunity to provide feedback / input which will be discussed by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

Long-term Plan process 2024 - 2034

9.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, along with staff advice to support the Proposal was published on 1 December for the 6 December Budget Committee meeting.

10.     Decisions on regional items for public consultation and other related matters were made by the Budget Committee at the 6 December meeting. Focus now moves to preparing draft consultation material to reflect the Budget Committee decisions including key compliance requirements. External advice on the Auckland Future Fund and options for the Port of Auckland is also being sought to inform the consultation material. Staff will also prepare material to support the communication and engagement campaign for consultation, including an information pack for elected members. On behalf of the Auditor-General, Audit New Zealand will audit the consultation material ahead of adoption, scheduled for February 2024.

Financial performance for Auckland Council and the Auckland Council Group

11.     The November monthly financial dashboard for Auckland Council and the Auckland Council Group is not able to be prepared in time for this reporting month (due to this meeting being earlier in the month) and will be provided to the Governing Body when available.

12.     The quarterly performance results for the first quarter (July to September) of 2023/2024 are on the agenda and will be presented.

Economic/ market update

13.     Key economic/ market activity and updates are:

·        Annual inflation rate – Consumer Price Index was 5.6 per cent at end of September 2023 (updated quarterly, next due 24 January 2024).

·        Non-tradable inflation was at 6.3 per cent for the year to September 2023. Non-tradables are goods and services that do not face foreign competition and are an indicator of domestic demand and supply conditions. (updated quarterly, next due 24 January 2024)

·        Unemployment rate – 3.9 per cent to the end of October 2023, an increase of 0.3 per cent on the previous quarter (updated quarterly, next due 7 February 2024).

·        Gross Domestic Product increased by 0.9 per cent in the June 2023 quarter, bringing annual growth to 3.2 per cent (next update is 14 December 2023)

·        The Official Cash Rate (OCR) rate remained at 5.5 per cent on 29 November 2023 (next update is 28 February 2024)

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whiwhi / receive the information provided in this report and the verbal updates by the Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Karuna Dahya - Manager Group Performance Reporting

Lisa Tocker - Executive Officer

Kerri Foote - Executive Officer : Chief Finance Office Division

Authorisers

Peter Gudsell - Group Chief Financial Officer

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council Quarterly Performance Reports for the quarter ended 30 September 2023

File No.: CP2023/18317

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a quarterly performance update for the Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council for the quarter ended 30 September 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Annual Plan anticipated significant recovery work in the first quarter of the financial year due to the impact of weather events early in the calendar year, and that proved to be the case.  Design work for remediation and renewal of damaged assets picked up pace, and the Recovery Office significantly progressed the establishment of buy-out rules and the Voluntary Buy-out Scheme.

3.       With storm recovery as a focus, Auckland Council Group delivered $698 million in capital projects for the quarter, which was 92 per cent delivery against budget. There was solid progress on major capital works such as the City Rail Link and the Central Interceptor. Other major milestones were met such as the construction completion of Lincoln Road bus stops as part of the Northwestern Bus Improvements project. Most major flood recovery projects were in the design phase and capital spend for these will pick up pace later in the financial year.

4.       Although capital programmes progressed, group net debt decreased by $0.7 billion to $11.7 billion over the quarter, mainly due to the receipt of the proceeds from the sale of 7 per cent of Auckland International Airport shares for $833 million.

5.       We saw an increase in revenue, with building consents, licenses and permits revenue having slightly higher processing volumes than budgeted. There was continued recovery in revenue with bus patronage being in line with budget. This was partially offset by lower water and wastewater revenue, mainly due to an error in the budget assumptions around the timing of the annual price increase.

6.       Direct expenditure was in line with budget at $935 million.

7.       In this quarter $38.1 million in operating savings was achieved against the $50 million target set for Auckland Council parent. $28.7 million of the savings was from permanent cost reductions and $9.4 million was from one-off expenditure reductions.

8.       Performance highlights included:

·    43 battery electric buses being added to the fleet to help keep the accelerated transition of the bus fleet to zero emissions on track,

·    Delivery of more than 300,000 food scraps bins to date, resulting in over 5,000 tonnes of food scraps being diverted from landfill.

9.       For non-financial performance measures, 24 measures were updated this quarter. We achieved 58 per cent (14) and did not achieve 42 per cent (10).

10.     Customer satisfaction targets were met for building consents, resource consents and licenses.

11.     Performance against statutory timeframes improved for building and resource consents over the last quarter due to the decreased volumes of lodged applications.

12.     Customer and Community Services achieved 50 per cent of their measures with the number of participants in activities at art facilities, community centres and hire venues reaching target for the first time since the 2019/2020 financial year. Additionally, all Customer and Community Services measures have improved results compared to quarter one last financial year.

13.     Total group full time equivalent employees were 2 per cent lower at the end of the quarter at 10,996, compared with 11,223 at 30 June 2023. This was mainly due to restructures at Auckland Transport and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Auckland Council Group and Auckland Council quarterly performance reports for the quarter ended 30 September 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     This quarterly performance report is for the three months from 1 July to 30 September 2023. In addition to financial information, it includes non-financial performance measures, capital project delivery, debt management metrics and information on progress in key strategic areas.

15.     The Governing Body is provided with management and statutory results on a quarterly basis. While these two sets of results reconcile, they are aggregated and analysed with different lenses. The quarterly performance report reflects management’s view of the group and the organisation (refer Attachments A and B respectively) and is tailored to highlight key performance areas. The statutory results are externally focussed and based on financial reporting standards (refer Attachment C).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Group performance

16.     The group’s quarterly performance report is included in Attachment A.

17.     Capital investment of $698 million was delivered in the quarter, against a budget of $759 million – a delivery of 92 per cent of budget. Progress continued for major capital works such as the City Rail Link and the Central Interceptor.

18.     Capital highlights include:

·    Completion of the Lincoln North and South bus stop construction stages as part of the Northwest Bus Improvements Programme.

·    Port of Auckland’s Fergusson main office upgrade, ground floor south side window replacement and Stage 3 of the Fergusson berth pavement upgrade was completed.

·    Footpath construction was completed for several Huapai, Riverhead and Dairy Flat roads using funding from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

·    Tamaki Drive northern footpath was completed and opened to the public. 

19.     Net debt decreased by $0.7 billion to $11.7 billion over the three months mainly due to the proceeds from the sale of 7 per cent of Auckland International Airport shares for $833 million. Auckland Council still owns 163 million of shares in Auckland Airport.

20.     The council’s credit ratings from S&P Global Ratings and Moody’s Investor Services remained at AA and Aa2 respectively, on stable outlook. Both ratings were re-affirmed following the end of the quarter.

21.     Direct revenue was slightly favourable to budget by $26 million with building consents, licenses and permits revenue having higher processing volumes than budgeted and bus patronage being higher than budgeted.

22.     Direct expenditure was in line with budget (less than 1 per cent variance). The minor favourable variance was mainly due to lower than budgeted consultancy and professional expenditure across the group as several planned projects were still in the preliminary stages, partially offset by the rising contract costs, ongoing storm recovery work and consenting support.

23.     Performance highlights included 43 battery electric buses being added to the fleet over the quarter to help keep the accelerated transition of the bus fleet to zero emissions on track.

24.     There was a 227 reduction (2 per cent) of full-time equivalent employees across the group since June 2023. The bulk of the reductions coming from Auckland Transport and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited which underwent restructures.

Auckland Council performance

25.     Auckland Council’s quarterly performance report is included in Attachment B.

26.     The council delivered capital expenditure of $93 million against a budget of $97 million – a 96 per cent delivery of budget.

27.     Capital highlights included:

·    Te Wharekura (Western Kiosk), Quay Street – the 108-year-old heritage kiosk located next to the Tāmaki Makaurau Downtown Ferry Terminal was repurposed into a cultural and marine education space and was opened to the public on 14 September 2023.

·    St Heliers Library seismic strengthening and interior renewal was completed in July 2023.

·    Main works on the Myers Park underpass project was largely completed. Public art installation is currently underway.

·    As part of the Kitchener Road project, the existing box culvert was renewed, and new stormwater infrastructure was installed to resolve frequent flooding issues at the Kitchener-Shakespeare Road intersection.

·    Portland Road enhancement project in Remuera was issued with a practical completion in August 2023 improving the water conveyance through the Portland Stream and wetlands.

·    Several community recreation projects were completed including play spaces renewals in Riverhead and Lloyd Elsmore Park, a new pathway in Rosedale Park, a skate park renewal in Barry Curtis Park and the main carpark renewal in Harold Moody Park.

28.     Direct revenue of $171 million was favourable against the budget of $155 million, by $16 million, driven by higher than budgeted processing volumes for building consents and inspections, as well as licensing and compliance.

29.     Direct expenditure was in line with budget at $448 million (budget $453 million).

30.     $38.1 million in savings was achieved in the last quarter against the $50 million full year target. $9.4 million of the savings was from one-off expenditure reductions and $28.7 million was from ongoing cost reductions.

31.     The rollout of the rates-funded weekly collection of the food scraps programme has continued and is on track to be completed in the third quarter. More than 300,000 food scraps bins had been delivered, and over 5,000 tonnes of food scraps had been diverted from landfill.

32.     For our non-financial performance measures, 24 measures were updated this quarter. We achieved 54 per cent (13) and did not achieve 46 per cent (11).  Updates against the measures include:

·    Regulatory services continued the trend of achieving customer satisfaction targets for building consents, resource consents and licensees satisfied with food and alcohol licensing services.

·    Performance against statutory timeframes improved for building and resource consents over the last quarter due to decreased volumes of lodged applications.

·    Customer and Community Services achieved 50 per cent of their measures, with the number of participants in activities at art facilities, community centres and hire venues reaching its target for the first time since the 2019/2020 financial year. Additionally, all Customer and Community Services measures have improved results compared to the first quarter of last year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     This is an information report providing an update on performance across the Auckland Council Group. No decision is sought in this report that has a direct impact on the group’s greenhouse gas emissions nor the group’s approach to preparing for climate change. Climate action is a strategic focus area for the group and an update on the progress of climate action projects is provided in Attachment A. Further, details of statutory climate reporting, which reports on the impact of climate risks and opportunities on the group, is also included at the end of Attachment A.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     The group quarterly performance report reflects the results of the group for the quarter ended 30 September 2023. Council-controlled organisations (CCOs) and Port of Auckland Limited provide input into the preparation of these reports.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     Community investment is one of Auckland Council’s strategic focus areas. The Auckland Council quarterly report in Attachment B provides highlights, issues and risks related to local and regional projects.

36.     No decisions are being sought in this report that could have an impact on local communities or on local board decision-making.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Māori outcomes are a group and council strategic focus area. Attachment A provides key information and progress on delivery of the agreed programmes for the group and the council.

38.     No decisions are being sought in this report that could have an impact on Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     No financial decisions are sought and accordingly there are no financial implications directly arising from the information contained in the report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     There is a minor risk that the information in this report and the attachments may lack accuracy or completeness due to it not being subject to an audit. Management has performed due diligence by obtaining detailed explanations from all Auckland Council business units as well as group entities supplemented by representation letters provided by CCOs and Port of Auckland Limited.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The next quarterly performance report to 31 December 2023 will be provided at the March 2024 Governing Body meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Council Group Quarterly Performance Report 30 September 2023

 

b

Auckland Council Quarterly Performance Report 30 September 2023

 

c

Auckland Council Group reconciliation of management to statutory results 30 September 2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Karuna Dahya - Manager Group Performance Reporting

Kent Annear - Senior Group Performance Advisor

Tracy Gers - Group Accounting & Reporting Manager

Yvonne Teo - Senior Group Reporting Technical Account

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Peter Gudsell - Group Chief Financial Officer

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

2024/2025 Letters of expectation to substantive council-controlled organisations

File No.: CP2023/18428

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve content for inclusion in the 2024/2025 letters of expectations to substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The letters of expectations are important documents that provide direction on: 

i)        the development of the substantive CCOs’ Statements of Intent (SOI) for 2024-2027

ii)       other priorities and issues of importance for the council to inform CCO operations and service delivery. 

3.       The expectations have been informed by: a substantive series of workshops to prepare the draft Long-term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP), the final mayoral proposal for the LTP, decisions of the Budget Committee on 6 December 2023 on items for consultation, and will be informed by councillor input at a joint Transport and Infrastructure Committee and CCO Direction and Oversight Committee workshop on 12 December 2023.

4.       Staff will provide a verbal summary of the main feedback points received at the joint workshop.

5.       The letters of expectations will be finalised based on the Governing Body’s resolutions, under delegation by the Mayor and the Deputy Mayor. The letters of expectations will be issued to the board chair of each substantive CCO prior to Christmas 2023.  

6.       It is recommended that substantive CCOs are given a one-month extension of all statutory deadlines in the SOI process for 2024, as allowed for in the Local Government Act 2002. Given the uncertainty of the financial context, this will allow CCOs more time to align their work programmes with the agreed outcomes and final decisions of the LTP process. 

7.       Initial submission of draft SOIs will be on or before 1 April 2024, and final submission on or before 31 July 2024.  The final SOIs will need to reflect the final LTP decisions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whakaae / approve the proposed content for inclusion in the 2024/2025 letters of expectations to substantive council-controlled organisations as set out in this report and with any amendments requested by the Governing Body

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the Mayor and Deputy Mayor to finalise and issue the 2024/2025 letters of expectations to substantive council-controlled organisations

c)      whakaae / approve a one-month extension of statutory deadlines for all council-controlled organisation statements of intent for 2024-2027, as provided for in the Local Government Act Schedule 8, section 4 

d)      tautapa / delegate to the Manager, CCO Governance and External Partnerships to write to all council-controlled organisations advising of the extension of statutory deadlines.

Horopaki

Context

8.       Letters of expectations provide direction to the substantive CCOs that will inform the development of their SOI which is required by legislation. The council aims to provide these letters before the end of every year in order to provide sufficient time for the CCOs to submit a draft before 1 April and a final copy before the start of the next financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Mayor’s proposal for the 2024-34 Long-term Plan

9.       The council agreed items for consultation as part of the 2024-34 LTP process at the Budget Committee meeting on 6 December 2023. 

10.     The Mayor’s expectation is that the draft 2024-2027 SOIs will be consistent with the relevant aspects of the Mayor’s Proposal for the 2024-34 LTP.

Letters of expectations

11.     The letters of expectations will contain two parts:

i)        general expectations for all CCOs

ii)       specific expectations for each CCO

12.     The content below summarises the key matters that will be expanded on in the final letters of expectations.

Expectations of all CCOs

13.     Expectations proposed for all CCOs are:

Alignment to final 2024-2034 LTP

·        Council will commence public consultation on the draft 2024-2034 LTP in late February 2024. Following consultation and deliberations, a final LTP will be adopted in June 2024. Once this occurs, final SOIs (including financial information and performance measures) should be aligned with the final LTP and the strategic priorities contained within.

Group budget responsibility and transparency rules

·        Better advice to elected members, including:

use of cost/benefit analysis for spending decisions

some contestable advice (i.e. advice provided to elected members which is separate from the department asking to spend the money)

a thorough assessment of options against LTP strategic priorities

Capital expenditure 

·    Fix, finish, optimise - consolidate, finish what we have started, fix what is broken and get the best out of what we already have. Slow down growth in capital programmes, look after what we already have, before embarking on big new capital projects.  

·    Any new capital projects to support growth should be in accordance with the direction of the Future Development Strategy.

 

 

Operating savings

·    Council group will need to deliver additional cost savings that have not yet been identified, of at least $20m in year one, rising to $50m in year three of the LTP (based on the core scenario). 

Better, faster, cheaper: cost savings and value for money

·    Fit for purpose technology: do not set up any separate technology functions, share generic technology functions

·    Deliver group shared services and consolidation of service functions (council to set mandate)

·    Optimise the performance of our significant property portfolio, implement the findings of the Group Property model review

·    Support and actively engage in any section 17A, value for money and other reviews council may commission.

Climate emissions (mitigation and resilience)

·    Continue to be guided by Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan by incorporating climate change considerations (whole of life greenhouse gas emissions and resilience) into work programmes and decisions.

·    Continue reducing climate emissions and focus on lower cost delivery of climate positive projects.

·    Demonstrate leadership and accountability through measurement and reporting on the climate performance of their decisions.

·    Work towards reducing the impacts of climate-related risks.

Local Boards

·    Provide timely, delivery focused, quality, concise advice to local boards. 

Māori Outcomes

·    Continue to be guided by Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau and deliver, monitor, and report on each Achieving Māori Outcomes plan.

·    Actively work as a partner with Māori, along with central government and external partners.

·    Actively seek to maximise opportunities for Māori businesses to participate in procurement processes.

Compliance with Statement of Expectations of substantive CCOs

·    CCOs should adhere to the Statement of Expectations of substantive CCOs, which explains how CCOs should conduct their business and manage their relationships with council and other interested groups (including matters such as the ‘no surprises’ principle).

·    Visible chair and board leadership should be provided to elected members

Engagement with government

·    Work with the new government, only where interests are aligned and messages are consistent with those of Auckland Council

·    Inform council of any conversation with the government on any new proposal

·    Ensure any relevant data and work undertaken on the previous government's proposals are retained and utilised where relevant

Auckland Transport

14.     For Auckland Transport we expect the following:

Auckland Transport needs to build upon the priorities set out in the previous letter of expectation and reflect progress on these:

·    continue work to change how they interact with Aucklanders and listen to Aucklanders

·    get the most out of the existing transport network

·    reduce Auckland Transport’s cost to council

·    improve temporary traffic management, reduce its impact and seek revenue and improve open road traffic management to ensure it is removed when works are complete

·    take direction and oversight from council

·    support development of an integrated transport plan 

·    reduce delays incurred by utilities & developers when working with Auckland Transport.

15.     Auckland Transport's capital programme needs to reflect the priorities set out in the Mayoral Proposal:

·    Fix the roads by looking after what we have. Fully fund our share of road renewals, if co-funding is available from the National Land Transport Fund.

·    Ensure the whole region benefits progress the Unsealed Road Improvement Programme.

·    Make public transport faster, more reliable and easier to use:

introduce a $50 weekly public transport pass, a maximum weekly charge for adults

introduce open loop ticketing, pay for public transport with payWave

reduce travel times for public transport with network optimisation and dynamic lanes, and small capital works that will improve reliability of buses

finish existing mega rapid transit projects, notably the City Rail Link and Eastern Busway, including work to progress removing level crossings and low cost early improvements.

Progress work on affordable Rapid Transit network projects that Auckland needs, including delivery of dynamic lanes and other low cost early improvements 

Continue work to progress the integrated transport plan, which includes things like the Northwestern Busway, Avondale to Southdown rail and the third and fourth main trunk line

progress a trial of a low-cost bike ferry connecting Northcote and the City Centre.

·    Cut spending on low-value initiatives and find cheaper alternatives for raised pedestrian crossings. Focus safety spending on initiatives that are proven to reduce deaths and serious injuries and where the community demonstrates support. This includes enabling variable speed reduction around schools.

·    Refocus cycle programme on low-cost opportunities to complete the network and that can be delivered with minimal disruption.

·    Manage operating cost pressure, make savings and increase revenue including from increasing parking fines and charges where allowed.

·    Increase revenue from enforcement and parking. Employ an additional 50 enforcement officers to assist with this.

·    Ensure all the Regional Fuel Tax funds that are in reserve are committed to be spent on projects where contracts have been signed.

·    Reduce transport emissions in line with target to reach net zero by 2050.

16.     In addition to the expectations in the Mayoral Proposal, we expect Auckland Transport to work with the council and wider council family:

·    Demonstrate capital and growth programme is aligned with Watercare and wider Council strategic direction, including the Future Development Strategy.

·    Support Auckland Council in objecting to Private Plan Changes that do not conform with the Future Development Strategy.

·    Provide information as required and in a timely way to support council's financial, climate and statutory reporting.

·    Progress Time of Use charging to reduce congestion, including supporting network infrastructure, and make use of other tools to support demand management where applicable.

·    Work with council to advocate to government on a number of initiatives, including Time of Use charging, ongoing northern cycle pathway, level crossing funding and changes to parking regulations.

·    Progress innovative pricing and marketing models to drive further use of the public transport network, in light of recent Fringe Benefit Tax changes

·    Ensure no further spending or council resources are expended on the Auckland Light Rail and Waitemata Harbour Crossing initiatives initiated by the previous Government.

·    Continue work to maximise funding from NZ Transport Agency Waka Kotahi.

Eke Panuku

17.     For Eke Panuku we expect the following:

Urban regeneration 

·    For Eke Panuku to continue to progress urban regeneration programmes, including maintaining capital investment levels. This will include progressing a rolling five-yearly review / refresh of current programmes (as previously agreed).

·    Restoration of the $100m Strategic Development Fund to enable faster regeneration of run-down parts of Auckland.  

·    That Eke Panuku will allocate funding from existing budgets for the master planning of released Port land. This may have financial support from the Mayor's office budget and an allocation of $5m from the Community ‘do differently’ fund to progress a waterfront swimming pool.

·    As lead agency in the city centre, Eke Panuku will continue to recognise the council group role in central city safety and the need to work in partnership with the Crown, social services and community groups.  

Property management

·    Eke Panuku will work to contribute to the asset sale target of $300m over 10 years of the LTP, with the timeline and pipeline of asset sales to be decided by council.   

·    Eke Panuku is also expected to contribute to work led by council on group property ownership and management, including: 

establishing principles for asset ownership and a framework to support decision-making 

review of the group property model and any changes to management of the property portfolio 

section S17A review of the ongoing management of marinas 

establishment of a taskforce on service property optimisation. 

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (Tātaki)

18.     For Tātaki Auckland Unlimited we expect the following:

·    Subject to consultation and final decisions on the LTP, Tātaki is expected to implement either:

(i) the status quo option (investing in essential renewals of $33m at North Harbour Stadium) or,

(ii) an option to redevelop the North Harbour Stadium (NHS) Precinct into a fit-for-purpose multisport area in conjunction with the community, existing users and stakeholders, to ensure the community is better-off following any changes, or
(iii) change the operational management of NHS to ensure greater use by the community.

·    Tātaki is expected to work, in partnership with council, to progress options for a bed night visitor levy with the new Government, to fund major events and destination marketing.  

·    Expiring government funding for events will leave a $5m funding gap at the end of the FY24 financial year. Tātaki is expected to fund this gap from the proceeds of selling Auckland Film Studios or seeking additional Government funding.

·    Tātaki is expected to support and actively engage with Council's review of economic development activity and events delivery across the council, to reduce any duplication. Work on events (regional and local) should identify how teams and activity can be consolidated into one entity.

·    Tātaki should support progress of the recommendations from the Arts, Social, Sports and Community Political Working Group regarding closer integration of Auckland War Memorial Museum and MOTAT with Tātaki. 

·    Following conclusion of the 'main stadium’ expression of interest (EOI) process, Tātaki should further progress discussions with Eden Park Trust on a single operator for the region’s four stadiums.

·    Tātaki, specifically the Auckland Art Gallery, is expected to work in partnership with council on how the council's art collection can be better utilised.  The Auckland Art Gallery should explore ways the collection can be exhibited or leased around the region.

·    Tātaki should investigate the development of an 'Auckland Pass' integrated ticket solution, in collaboration with Auckland's cultural institutions.

Watercare Services Limited

19.     For Watercare we expect the following:

·    Under current water services reform legislation that establishes the water entity for Auckland and Northland, Watercare is not allowed to be included in council’s draft LTP. However, the new Government intends to repeal the reform legislation establishing new water entities. 

·    Mayoral advocacy to Government is for an alternative model that enables balance sheet separation, so Watercare can deliver necessary investment without big price increases. 

·    In the context of making preparations for Watercare’s inclusion in the draft LTP, the direction for Watercare is that:  

debt to revenue should be maintained at 340% 

it is acknowledged that water charges and growth charges will need to increase

the capital expenditure programme should keep water charges affordable but recover as much as possible from developers for the costs of growth infrastructure.   

·    Clarify the water charge increase as a result of failure to separate balance sheets

·    Provide evidence of your plan to maximise income from development growth charges

·    Watercare should undertake proactive preparations for drought conditions.    

·    Watercare collaboration with Auckland Council to achieve the outcomes in the Auckland Water Strategy should include: 

proactively planning for climate change e.g. managing peak demand 

updating current targets to more ambitious targets for per capita water consumption and a diversified water supply (recycled/reused water, rainwater collection) and a proactive plan to achieve these targets

work in partnership with mana whenua in the protection, management, and enhancement of water.

·    Demonstrate that the capital and growth programme is aligned with Auckland Transport and the wider council family in accordance with the Future Development Strategy.

·    Support Auckland Council in objecting to Private Plan Changes that do not conform with the Future Development Strategy.

·    Reporting on efficiency programme targets and results. 

·    While Watercare had not been part of the council group shared services work due to the previous government’s water reforms, it should now start to engage with this work programme.

·    Watercare should ensure compliance with council's no surprises principle, particularly in the context of the current situation of water reform changes and potential drought conditions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Addressing the challenges that climate change presents for Auckland continues to be a priority for the council group and this is reflected in the common expectations proposed in the letters of expectations. 

21.     The decision to approve proposed content for substantive CCO letters of expectations does not have a direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     The letters of expectations are one part of an overall accountability framework for substantive CCOs. The expectations have been drafted based on the Mayor’s proposal for the 2024-2034 LTP, the items approved by the Budget Committee on 6 December 2023 for consultation in the draft 2024-2034 LTP and with input from subject matter experts from across the council. 

23.     It is suggested that the letters include a closing paragraph which invites CCOs to contact the Manager CCO Governance and External Partnerships should they wish to discuss or clarify any aspects of the letter. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The governance relationship between the substantive CCOs and the council sits with the Governing Body, and therefore local boards have not been consulted on issues for inclusion in the letters of expectations. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Māori outcomes continue to be a priority for the substantive CCOs and this is reflected in the proposed common expectations for the letters of expectations.  Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau is still the basis for council’s expectations to the council group.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     Through the letters of expectations CCOs will be asked to ensure that final 2024-2027 SOIs (including financial information and performance measures) are aligned with the final 2024-2034 LTP.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There is a risk that CCOs may misunderstand the expectations provided in the letters of expectations. However, there are additional opportunities for CCOs to clarify the expectations, whether by discussion with council staff or through Lead Councillors. 

28.     Additionally, the process of reviewing the draft SOIs after they are received on 1 April 2024 provides another opportunity to ensure that expectations in the letters of expectations are responded to appropriately.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     The Mayor will issue the letters of expectations to CCOs based on the resolutions of this committee prior to Christmas 2023. 

30.     CCOs will then begin drafting their SOIs for submission to council in 2024.  

31.     Given the uncertainty of the financial situation of council through the draft 2024-34 LTP process, staff recommend that the Governing Body approves an extension of the statutory deadlines for all SOIs in 2024. This ability to extend deadlines by one month is provided for in the Local Government Act 2002 (schedule 8, section 4). It would extend: 

· the date of submission of the draft SOIs to on or before 1 April 2024. 

· the date when the boards must consider shareholder feedback to 1 June 2024, and 

· the date for final submission of SOIs on or before 31 July 2024.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Johnstone-Smith - Principal Advisor

Rachel Wilson - Principal Advisor

Trudi Fava - Principal Advisor

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Anna Bray - Acting Director - Governance and CCO Partnerships

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Recovery Office Update

File No.: CP2023/16731

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report  

1.       To provide an update on progress with Tāmaki Makaurau recovery programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

2.       Recovery efforts are continuing. With the policy work for accessing the co-funded Storm Recovery package now largely completed, delivery for affected communities remains the priority. Coming up to Christmas 2023 and then the one-year anniversary of the severe weather events in January, we are aware that there are high levels of anxiety in affected communities. Significant resources are being directed to the recovery effort, however the scale of the impacts and the number of individuals affected mean that recovery will take time.

3.       Storm Recovery Navigators are working to support whānau through this phase. New funding has been secured to increase mental wellbeing and health initiatives in communities. Christmas relief grants have been approved by the Red Cross, to come from the Community Relief fund. 

4.       Technical work is progressing. The first final categorisations are being released and properties are moving into the buy-out process. In November, the Governing Body agreed to a Category 2P Property Risk Mitigation Scheme. Scheme terms and a Category 2P homeowner handbook are being finalised for release this year. Key monthly recovery data is provided in Attachment A.

5.       Infrastructure repairs and improvements are progressing. The first quarter report of the Storm Response Fund is attached as Attachment B. The report notes good progress with increased proactive maintenance and compliance activity.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi-ā-taipitopito / note progress with the Tāmaki Makaurau recovery efforts.

 

Horopaki

Context

Recovery efforts are a significant and necessary commitment

6.       After the devastating storms of January and February 2023, the Recovery Office was established to coordinate the region’s recovery efforts across Auckland Council group, government, and other partners.

7.       Recovery from such significant events is complex and multi-faceted, with responses needing to cater for communities and individuals, infrastructure, and homes. To give a sense of the scale of the challenge, more than 4,500 households have needed storm-related assistance to date this year. Access to around 3,000 homes has been restricted or prohibited, with many still under investigation.

 

 

8.       For the Auckland Council Group, coordinating the recovery is a significant commitment, requiring unplanned expenditure and generating a significant additional workload for some parts of its operations. It requires the coordination of resources across the council group and oversight from the Governing Body.

9.       The Recovery Office is working across the council group to ensure alignment with council policy and priorities, and to deliver necessary work programmes. This is an all-of-council effort, and includes Auckland Transport, Healthy Waters, Development Programme Office and Resilient Land and Coasts. Eke Panuku is managing the Category 3 Voluntary Buy-out Support Scheme. Waste Solutions is supporting the deconstruction of Category 3 dwellings. Parks and Community Facilities are working to agree a process for land that the council may wish to retain for parks reserve. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Recent Recovery Office activity

10.     The Recovery Office is entering the next phases of the programme. Policies for the implementation of the co-funded Storm Recovery funding are now largely in place, and the emphasis is on delivery.

11.     Coming up to Christmas, and then the one-year anniversary of the first severe storms (Auckland Anniversary weekend 2023), we are aware that there are high levels of anxiety in affected communities. Significant resources are being directed to the recovery effort, however the scale of the impacts and the number of individual property-based risk assessment mean that recovery will take time.

12.     Staff are working as quickly as they can to support whānau to make decisions about their future. There is a very high level of interaction with affected communities, through phone calls, e-mails, public meetings and site visits. A range of emotions are being expressed in these interactions as people come to terms with their situations. Employee assistance programmes are in place to support staff with their own wellbeing as they support community.

13.     Key monthly recovery data is provided in Attachment A. Recovery office activities of note since the 23 November 2023 Governing Body update report are outlined below.

Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan

14.     The Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan (the Plan) is being reported to the December Governing Body meeting for adoption, under separate cover.

15.     The Plan sets the strategic direction for Auckland’s recovery from the severe weather events of 2023. It will ensure that we keep a strategic focus on recovery activities, that we invest in the areas that need support, and that we prioritise the right activities at different phases of recovery.

Natural and built environment

16.     Placarded properties: There are now 188 red placarded properties (down from 223 on 10 November and 609 issued) and 1000 yellow placarded properties (down from 1067 on 10 November and 2250 issued). 

17.     Property assessment and categorisation: 1021 properties have received site visits. 183 affected properties have confirmed categorisations under the co-funded Storm Recovery programme. This includes 66 category 3, ten category 2P, four category 2A, and 103 category 1 properties, for those property owners who have opted into the scheme.

 

 

 

18.     The Governing Body approved the Category 2P Property Risk Mitigation Scheme at the November meeting. This is to provide support to property owners where their property has been assessed as having a feasible mitigation solution to the current intolerable risk to life. Supporting documentation is being developed and recruitment is underway, with a view to having the scheme available before Christmas 2023 if possible.

19.     Infrastructure repairs and improvements: As reported in the 16 November memo to the Governing Body, nine local roads remain with full closures in place, 31 roads open to single lane, two roads open under restrictions, and six roads open to residents only. This remains fluid and subject to change throughout the day and week.

20.     The community consultation and design phase is now commencing for the Making Space for Water projects.  Early engagement with mana whenua and local boards in the Blue-green network project focus areas, aims to establish working groups for the development of the design concepts.  Design of the projects will be governed to an extent by the result of the voluntary buy-out process.   

Community and social recovery

21.     Storm Recovery Navigation Service: The first group of iwi and NGO Storm Recovery Navigators were welcomed on 20 November 2023. A second group is expected to start on 22 January 2024. 

22.     Free drop-in sessions with Navigators are being organised across Tāmaki Makaurau. These drop-in sessions are for impacted Aucklanders to speak to a Navigator one-on-one about their situation and get information to support their recovery. Specific dates and times will be advertised on Our Auckland (Storm recovery support drop-ins), at the following locations:  

·   Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office         

·   Muriwai (Portacom next to the Ranger Station)         

·   Epsom Library           

·   Milford Senior Citizens' Club Hall      

·   Wesley Market          

·   Mt Roskill Library       

·   Titirangi Community House  

·   Glenfield Library        

·   Central City Library 

23.     Community led recovery: The Storm Recovery Liaisons and the three Community Convenors for priority communities, are currently focussed on building capacity with resident groups and community organisations and assisting them to access applicable grants for their recovery priorities.  Liaisons are also helping connect community groups with operational business as usual teams to resolve and identified operational issues.  

24.     The first round of Community Grants was launched on Monday 20 November 2023. Applications are open until 11 December 2023. The grant will help groups to fund a coordination role, to create regular meetings, updates and deliver activities. The second grants round is expected to open in late January 2024.  

25.     Community Christmas Relief Funding:  New Zealand Red Cross has agreed that the Recovery Office can use some of the Community Relief Fund to support a Christmas Relief Fund for all the families, whānau and individuals who are connected through the Navigators. Once we find an appropriate means to distribute the funds, we are looking to provide $500 to individuals and $1000 to whānau who are supported by the Navigation Service.  

 

 

 

26.     Mental Wellbeing Fund: The Recovery Office has secured funding to establish a new Mental Wellbeing Fund, with $899,302 has provided by Ministry of Social Development through the North Island Weather Events Mental Wellbeing Fund and $700,000 from Te Whatu Ora. The Mental Wellbeing Fund will be distributed to community organisations for initiatives and services that meet current gaps in community-based mental health services and alleviate waiting times currently being reported. This will include mental wellbeing recovery programmes, events and initiatives, and to enable access to mental health and addiction support services when needed. Part of the funding will be provided to marae. The fund will be administered in early 2024 via an expressions of interest process. 

Storm Response Fund

27.     In the 2023/2024 Annual Budget, Auckland Council agreed to increase funding for storm-related events to fund proactive and reactive activities, enabling council to respond better to such events in the future. $20M per annum was allocated to this fund, to cover four areas:

·   Proactive maintenance and monitoring of council assets.

·   Strengthening Auckland Emergency Management.

·   Providing better and targeted information on risks and preparedness.

·   Coordination of capital works and land use planning.

28.     Highlights from the first quarter were reported to the Governing Body via memo on 16 October 2023, including increased proactive maintenance and compliance activity. A more detailed update on projects is attached to this report as Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out two core goals: achieving net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and adapting to the impacts of climate change. The risk of more frequent and extreme weather events is rising with the effects of climate change. The impacts of individual events compound – making communities more vulnerable to crises and undermines resilience building efforts. This compound risk puts our communities, natural environment, infrastructure, utilities, and services under further pressure. Responding and recovering from extreme weather events becomes harder if communities are still coping with the impacts of the last event.

30.     In addition to setting out specific actions, the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan describes work at a regional level that will contribute to Auckland’s ability to adapt to the impacts of climate change. This includes elements of the Resilient Auckland programme which will help to ensure Auckland’s resilience in the long-term and also prioritise adaptation planning for communities that have less adaptive capacity.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The Recovery Office is working across the council group to ensure alignment with council policy and priorities, and to deliver necessary work programmes. This in an all-of-council effort, and includes Auckland Transport, Healthy Waters, Development Programme Office, Resilient Land and Coasts. Eke Panuku has now been commissioned to manage the Category 3 Voluntary Support Buy-out Scheme. Waste Solutions is supporting the deconstruction of Category 3 dwellings. A supplier panel has been established to progress this work. 


 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Local boards have been engaged with throughout the recovery process, including development of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan. Further targeted engagement with local boards will happen throughout the implementation of the Recovery Plan, particularly in areas with impacted communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     Mana whenua and mataawaka living in Auckland were impacted by the January Floods and Cyclone Gabrielle as individuals and whānau and through impacts on marae and sites of cultural significance. Many marae acted as community hubs providing support to those impacted by the weather event.

34.     The recovery is an opportunity to partner with iwi, mataawaka, marae and Māori businesses. Regular contact from Auckland Council will be important moving forwards to strengthen relationships with mana whenua, and ensure they are able to meaningfully participate in the recovery effort.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     There are no financial implications from this update report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     The ongoing risks and mitigations for the recovery effort are identified in Table 1. These risks have been addressed in the development of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan that is on the Governing Body agenda for this meeting.

Risk

Mitigation

Vulnerable Communities: risk of inadequate service provision to prevent further hardship

Undertaking community needs assessments to inform approach (scale and scope) required for Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan development.

Working with Government to agree how funding for the Government’s Social Sector Recovery Plan will be allocated to Auckland to deliver on the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan.

 

Reputational: risk of losing social license to operate and deliver Recovery outcomes

Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan developed to define recovery activities and ensure coordination and integration within council teams and across the council group.

Utilising community groups to convey key messages and information, and to understand from the community what the communication and engagement needs are.

Resourcing recovery communications function to enable proactive media and communication across all key stakeholders.

 

Funding: risk of funding sources (local and central govt) and levels of funding being inadequate

Recovery leadership team have monthly commercial forecasting and expenditure meetings with finance to track costs and forecasts. Dedicated Recovery finance business partner commencing in October 23. There is a good faith provision in the co-funding agreement with government to re-enter discussions if it proves the funding for the Voluntary Buy-out Support Scheme is insufficient.

Māori partnership and participation: risk of losing endorsement, trust, and confidence from mana whenua and Māori communities

Dedicated resourcing for Māori engagement implemented and engagement underway.

Governance, decision-making, mandate, and scope: risk of changes to or incorrect scope for Recovery, unclear decision-making processes, ambiguity of owners and influencers, unclear mandate

Being clear about what is in and out of the council’s scope to address and the anticipated timeframes for resolution.

Developing tailored solutions for affected communities with dedicated liaison officers for priority communities.

Further severe weather events occur before Recovery is complete

Storm Response funding is being used to increase proactive maintenance and improve the council’s ability to respond quickly to events. Recovery continues to focus on the most vulnerable communities (category 2 and 3) and developing community interventions to reduce risk.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     The Recovery Office will continue to progress recovery efforts including support for impacted whānau and communities, and the technical assessments of impacted properties. Confirmation of property categories will continue in tranches as property risk assessments are completed and reviewed. Arrangements for the grant scheme for Category 2P properties are being finalised, with a view to having the scheme available before Christmas if possible.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Recovery Office Dashboard for November 2023

 

b

Storm Response Fund Update for First Quarter 2023/2024

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Megan Howell - Programme Manager

Mace Ward - Deputy Group Recovery Manager

Tanya Stocks - Recovery Office Strategic Support

Authorisers

Mat Tucker - Group Recovery Manager

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan

File No.: CP2023/18257

 

  

 

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan sets out the actions needed for Auckland’s recovery from the severe weather events of early 2023. Many people, communities and organisations need to be involved in recovery and this plan provides an umbrella for bringing together all their efforts.

3.       Following National Emergency Management Agency guidelines, an emergency-specific recovery plan can be prepared as part of the process to coordinate recovery efforts. It needs to set out a community vision for recovery, with supporting goals, objectives and priorities.

4.       The Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan (the Plan), presented as Attachment A, updates the Interim Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan, which was reported to the Governing Body on 22 June 2023. The Governing Body made decisions to support recovery delivery since the interim plan was developed. This includes the establishment of a co-funded, locally-led and centrally-supported Storm Recovery Package (GB2023/187). The updated Plan reflects these decisions and identifies the medium to long term activities needed to secure recovery for Auckland. It incorporates public feedback obtained through the consultation held in August 2023, as well as feedback from mana whenua that the interim plan lacked an ao Māori view and recognition of Te Tiriti o Waitangi obligations and partnership considerations.

5.       The Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan is focused on the following priorities:

i)        providing information, advice and resources for Aucklanders

ii)       delivering programmes and initiatives to support wellbeing and recovery

iii)      making repairs and improvements to key infrastructure

iv)      enabling mana whenua to partner and lead in the recovery

v)      empowering communities to lead their own recovery.

6.       The Plan signals local recovery planning will be shaped and driven by each community at the appropriate time. Governance of the Plan along with key performance indicators to measure progress on the plan’s delivery are included.

7.       This Plan will guide recovery efforts through to the formal wind-down of the Recovery Office in late 2024 and, through development of an exit strategy, ensure transition of recovery efforts into regular operations for Auckland Council and other recovery partners.

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whai / adopt the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan – 2023 in Attachment A to this report

b)      tautapa / delegate responsibility to the Group Recovery Manager to approve minor amendments to the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan prior to publication in January 2024

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that unfunded projects identified in the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan will be considered through the Long-term Plan 2024 – 2034 process

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that a Recovery Exit Strategy will be developed for presentation to the Governing Body in July 2024.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Following the Auckland Anniversary weekend floods (27 January – 1 February 2023) a local state of emergency was declared for the Auckland region. This was superseded by the declaration of a national state of emergency after the widespread impacts of Cyclone Gabrielle (13 – 14 February 2023).

9.       Following the expiry of the state of emergency, a transition period came into force for the Auckland region. Its purpose (under the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Act 2022) is to aid recovery by providing powers to manage, co-ordinate or direct recovery activities. The local transition period for Auckland has been extended a number of times and remains in place currently. The transition period remains necessary to sufficiently mitigate risks to public safety and critical infrastructure until land movement stabilises, road access is remediated, flooded roading and parking areas are remediated, and damaged properties are no longer a risk to the safety of the public.

10.     Where a notice of local transition has been issued in the aftermath of such events, a recovery plan can be prepared to coordinate recovery efforts. As described in the National Emergency Management Agency guidelines (Recovery Preparedness and Management Director’s Guideline [DGL 24/20]), the purpose of the recovery plan is to set out a community recovery vision for what the community will look and feel like in the future. This vision needs to be supported with recovery goals, objectives and priorities.

11.     An interim Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan was reported to the Governing Body on 22 June 2023 (GB/2023/107). The interim plan established four whenu (strands) for recovery: community and social wellbeing, Māori partnership and participation, economic growth, and natural and built environment. These whenu were derived from a survey of other recovery plans in New Zealand and Australia, including the Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Plan’s outlined approach to recovery.

12.     Since June, staff have been preparing a final Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan, building on the interim version to identify, coordinate and consolidate the efforts needed to secure recovery over the medium to long term. The Plan also clarifies the programmes of work needed to implement decisions made subsequent to publication of the interim plan and incorporates new actions identified through the recovery process. 

13.     Joint consultation was carried out on the Plan and the Making Space for Water programme during August 2023. A summary of feedback from these consultation and engagement processes was reported to the Governing Body on 28 September 2023.

14.     Staff have continued to engage with mana whenua, local boards, all affected parts of the council group, and central government agencies to ensure the Plan reflects the diverse partners, stakeholders and activities that are part of recovery.

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The Plan is attached as Attachment A. An accompanying summary of actions is attached as Attachment B. Note that the final versions of the Plan will be designed in time for publication in January 2024.

A plan to bring efforts together

16.     The Plan sets out the actions needed for Auckland’s recovery from the severe weather events of 2023. Many people, communities and organisations need to be involved in recovery and the Plan provides an umbrella for coordinating all their efforts.

17.    The Plan:

·   sets principles and outcomes for recovery and the objectives we want to achieve

·   describes work programmes already underway and future programmes

·   identifies those involved in collaborative delivery of projects and initiatives

·   sets out the funding approach and funding for major programmes

·   paves the way for recovery planning at a local level when the time is right.

18.     The Plan is focused on the following priorities:

·   providing information, advice and resources for Aucklanders

·   delivering programmes and initiatives to support wellbeing and recovery

·   making repairs and improvements to key infrastructure

·   enabling mana whenua to partner and lead in the recovery

·   empowering communities to lead their own recovery.

19.     Staff have worked with central government and other agencies to develop the Plan and to ensure it reflects actions undertaken by other agencies.

Community input has shaped the Plan

20.     Feedback was sought from Aucklanders on the Plan in August 2023. Questions included what would help people and communities to feel ‘recovered’. Key feedback themes included concern for ongoing well-being and access to support in the long-term, and advocacy for increased connection between communities and the council in recovery. The Plan recognises the well-being impacts felt by communities and the council is working with Te Whatu Ora to develop a psychosocial recovery plan and provide well-being grants to meet gaps in community-based mental health services. The Recovery Navigation service is intended to provide individualised support to access information and services that people need to facilitate their recovery. 

21.     Mana whenua have consistently raised several themes throughout engagement. These include identifying genuine opportunities for partnership, placing greater emphasis on supporting the well-being of te taiao and enabling mana whenua to practice kaitiakitanga, and opportunities to strengthen Māori economic resilience. The Plan establishes an action to appoint a Māori Partnership and Participation lead to identify and facilitate opportunities for partnership across the plan’s programmes of work.

 


 

 

22.    Representatives from the council’s six demographic advisory panels advocated for partnering and community engagement in the recovery, equitable recovery, a coordinated and inclusive approach, and building capability. The Plan signals the role for community-led local planning when the time is right so that communities can shape and influence their own recovery. Noting that impacts from the events will not be felt the same everywhere, the plan identifies three community and social recovery areas that will require more investment and resources to recover well. These are Māngere, Henderson/Rānui, and Mt Roskill/Wesley (Puketāpapa).

 Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out two core goals: achieving net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and adapting to the impacts of climate change. The risk of more frequent and extreme weather events is rising with the effects of climate change. The impacts of individual events compound, making communities more vulnerable to crises and undermines resilience building efforts. This compound risk puts our communities, natural environment, infrastructure, utilities, and services under further pressure. Responding and recovering from extreme weather events becomes harder if communities are still coping with the impacts of the last event.

24.     Implementation of the co-funded storm recovery package will support Auckland’s climate adaptation, through improving the resilience of communities and infrastructure, and removing people from intolerable risks to life from climate-related natural hazards. 

25.     The Category 2P scheme will enable homes to be repaired, made more resilient to severe weather events, and continue to be lived in. This is an efficient use of resources, avoiding the significant waste associated with demolition of homes. Where possible, Category 3 homes that are purchased in the voluntary buy-out will be relocated or deconstructed, reducing waste to landfill and enabling recovery of valuable materials for re-use or recycling.

26.     In addition to setting out specific actions, the Plan describes work at a regional level that contributes to Auckland’s ability to adapt to the impacts of climate change and reduce future exposure to hazards and their associated risks. This includes elements of the Resilient Tāmaki Makaurau programme and implementation of the Future Development Strategy which identifies constraints from natural hazards. Combined, these interventions will help to ensure Auckland’s resilience in the long-term and also prioritise adaptation planning for communities that have less adaptive capacity.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The Recovery Office has worked across the council group to inform the development of the Plan. Actions will be assigned to individual departments and CCOs and they will be responsible for reporting on progress.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     Local boards provided their feedback on the Plan through resolutions at their August business meetings. This feedback was reported to the Governing Body on 28 September. Further engagement with local boards was sought with an online briefing on 24 November 2023.

29.     While the Plan is a region-wide plan, it paves the ways for local recovery plans specific to each impacted area. These will follow as need and appropriate timing dictates.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Mana whenua and mataawaka living in Auckland were impacted by the January floods and Cyclone Gabrielle as individuals and whānau and through impacts on marae and sites of cultural significance. Many marae acted as community hubs providing support to those impacted by the weather event.

31.     Development of the Plan is an opportunity to partner with mana whenua and mataawaka. The Māori Partnership and Participation whenu identifies a number of actions to support this, including Auckland Council partnering with iwi entities to deliver the Storm Recovery Navigation service. Mana whenua are also well-placed and have an expectation to play a key role and/or participate in local recovery planning, and making decisions on things that are important to them in their own rohe.

32.     Delivery of work programmes such as Making Space for Water create opportunities for mana whenua to exercise their kaitiakitanga, drawing on mātauranga Māori to deliver outcomes for the natural and built environments, consistent with tikanga.

33.     The recovery also provides procurement opportunities for Māori businesses, including in relation to sustainable deconstruction of category 3 properties. Auckland Council's deconstruction supplier panel includes objectives to work with Māori businesses.

34.     It is expected that projects outside of this whenu will have allocated funds to enable and resource partnerships with mana whenua and Māori communities. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     To date, the actions noted within the Plan have secured more than $2 billion funding. This includes:

·   An agreement to co-fund up to $1.984 billion between Auckland Council and the Crown. This is for the voluntary buy-out of Category 3 homes, risk mitigation projects, and transport repairs and improvements.

·   $20 million annually in the Auckland Council Storm Response Fund, to fund proactive and reactive activities so that the council can better respond to storm events in the future.

·   $700,000 Te Whatu Ora Mental Wellbeing Fund for programmes, events and initiatives that support mental wellbeing and recovery and enable access to mental health and addiction support and services

·   $899,000 Ministry of Social Development Mental Wellbeing Fund for community organisations to support initiatives and services to meet current gaps in community-based mental health services and reduce waiting times

·   $500,000 Ministry for Social Development Future of Severely Affected Land Support Fund to support establishment of the Navigation Service

·   $2.4 million Ministry of Social Development Iwi and Community Fund for iwi and community organisations to deliver the Navigation Service.

·   The Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund has contributed $2 million to support impacted individuals and households.

36.     The council actions in the Plan will be funded either through the Recovery Office budget or considered as part of the LTP.

37.     Not all actions are council-led and may be funded through government or other agencies.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     The risks and mitigations for the Plan are identified in Table One.

Table One: Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Vulnerable Communities: risk of inadequate service provision to prevent further hardship

The Plan identifies 13 communities across Tāmaki Makaurau that have been impacted by the weather events. Amongst those impacted communities, three community and social recovery areas have been identified for more investment and resources to recover well: Māngere, Henderson/Rānui, Mt Roskill/Wesley (Puketāpapa).

 

Reputational: risk of losing social license to operate and deliver Recovery outcomes

The Plan is developed to define recovery activities and ensure coordination and integration within council teams and across the council group and other partners and stakeholders.

Establishment of recovery navigators and community convenors within the community to support understanding.

Utilising community groups to convey key messages and information, and to understand from the community what the communication and engagement needs are.

Resourcing recovery communications function to enable proactive media and communication across all key stakeholders.

 

Funding: risk of funding sources (local and central govt) and levels of funding being inadequate

Recovery leadership team have monthly commercial forecasting and expenditure meetings with finance to track costs and forecasts. Dedicated Recovery finance business partner commencing in October 23. There is a good faith provision in the co-funding agreement with government to re-enter discussions if it proves the funding for the Voluntary Buy-out Support Scheme is insufficient.

Māori partnership and participation: risk of losing endorsement, trust, and confidence from mana whenua and Māori communities

The Plan establishes an action to appoint a Māori Partnership and Participation lead to identify and facilitate opportunities for partnership across the plan’s programmes of work.

Further severe weather events occur before Recovery is complete

Storm Response funding is being used to increase proactive maintenance and improve the council’s ability to respond quickly to events. Recovery continues to focus on the most vulnerable communities (category 2 and 3) and developing community interventions to reduce risk.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Implementation of the actions identified in the Plan are already underway, with monthly reporting to the Governing Body.

40.     Subject to adoption by the Governing Body, the Plan will be finalised and designed for publication in January 2024.

41.     Unfunded projects identified in the Plan will be considered in the Long-term Plan 2024 – 2034 process.

42.     The Plan is intended to be a ‘living document’, reflecting the rapidly changing situation and needs in impacted communities. For this reason, the Plan will be reviewed and, if necessary, updated in mid-2024.

43.     Auckland Council needs to prepare an exit strategy from the recovery process. This strategy will be presented to the Governing Body for approval in July 2024 and will include a description of assistance required in the long term, a transition plan to business-as-usual so as to manage long-term recovery, how planning and reporting will continue in the long term, how public information and communications will be managed, opportunities for communities to discuss unresolved issues and to continue to participate in their recovery, changes to organisational arrangements that may be needed, and a plan for how debriefing and reviewing will occur. This work will focus on governance, co-ordination and leadership to ensure a smooth transition.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan

 

b

Summary of actions in the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mace Ward - Deputy Group Recovery Manager

Denise O’Shaughnessy - Manager Strategic Advice

Authorisers

Mat Tucker - Group Recovery Manager

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Joint Governance Working Party update and recommendations for a local board reorganisation and Auckland Council representation arrangements for the 2025 elections

File No.: CP2023/18353

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider whether to proceed to the next stage of the development of a reorganisation plan for the number of local boards and also to consider whether to retain 20 ward councillors through the representation review process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The council is required to conduct a review of representation arrangements for the 2025 elections.  The council may also adopt a reorganisation plan in relation to local boards which it submits to the Local Government Commission for approval. On the Mayor’s initiative the opportunity to adopt a reorganisation plan was reported to the Governing Body. The Governing body referred both matters to the Joint Governance Working Party (JGWP) for further development.

3.       This report updates the Governing Body on considerations by the JGWP and seeks confirmation of next steps.

4.       Before the JGWP considers wards and their boundaries it would be helpful to have confirmation on the total number of councillors to be included in council’s proposal for public notification. There is a legal requirement that wards provide effective representation of communities of interest. A key issue is whether rural communities should have distinct representation. The JGWP supports the representation of rural communities. If the current rural communities of Franklin and Rodney are represented then the population per councillor is around 85,000, resulting in a total of 20 councillors (the current case).

5.       Regarding local board reorganisation, the JGWP has considered a number of options for comparison with the status quo, with details set out in the report. Further investigation is required to robustly determine the merits of making a change from the status quo.  The JGWP recommends further investigation into options based on between 13 and 15 local boards. This work will be reported back to the Governing Body to determine whether to proceed with a change from the status quo.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whakaae / agree that the Joint Governance Working Party continue to develop an initial proposal for the Auckland Council review of representation arrangements, based on retaining rural Governing Body wards and noting that this results in 20 ward councillors

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that the Joint Governance Working Party intends to report an initial proposal for representation arrangements for the Governing Body and for all current local boards, to the May 2024 meeting of the Governing Body, for public notification for submissions

c)      whakaae / agree that the Joint Governance Working Party continue to develop a draft reorganisation plan for local boards based on option one (15 local boards) vs the status quo as per resolution number JGWPC/2023/28 and report back its findings at the same time as it reports its recommendations for the review of representation arrangements

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that when the Joint Governance Working Party reports back its findings that the Governing Body will then decide whether to proceed further with formal public consultation on a reorganisation plan, based on the Working Party’s investigation into costs and benefits, or to stay with the status quo in terms of number of local boards

e)      whakaae / agree that as part of developing a reorganisation plan for local boards the Joint Governance Working Party will seek initial local board, Māori and targeted community feedback on preferences either for the status quo or for one or more other options for the number of local boards, as identified by the Joint Governance Working Party and that this will also include early engagement on representation arrangements.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The council is required to undertake a review of representation arrangements for the 2025 elections. The Governing Body has referred the development of an initial proposal to the JGWP. The Governing Body resolved:

That the Governing Body:

e)      whakaae / agree that the council’s initial proposal for representation arrangements for the 2025 elections is developed by the Joint Governance Working Party as follows:

i)     the Joint Governance Working Party will develop Auckland Council’s initial review of representation arrangements after seeking feedback on issues and options from the Governing Body and local boards, then make recommendations to the Governing Body for the Governing Body to formally resolve its proposal for public notification for submissions.

ii)     the Joint Governance Working Party will conduct the hearing of submissions and report its findings to local boards and the Governing Body before the Governing Body makes the final statutory resolution on any representation changes, which will then be publicly notified for objections and appeals.

(Resolution: GB/2023/68, 27 April 2023)

7.       On the initiative of the mayor, the Governing Body has also referred to the JGWP the development of a reorganisation plan relating to local boards. The Governing Body resolved:

That the Governing Body:

a)      whakaae / agree that any reorganisation of local boards is considered under the provisions of the “unitary authority-led reorganisation application” of the proposed Schedule 3A to the Local Government Act 2002

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that these provisions include requirements for the council to consider the views and preferences of affected local boards and to demonstrate community support for a reorganisation plan

c)      tautohu / refer to the Joint Governance Working Party the development of a reorganisation plan, or options for reorganisation plans, for recommendation back to the Governing Body so that the Governing Body may then decide whether to proceed further, including whether to undertake public consultation.

(Resolution: GB/2023/108, 22 June 2023)

8.       The table below outlines the differences between a review of representation arrangements and a local board reorganisation plan.

 

Representation review

Reorganisation application

Legislation

Local Electoral Act 2001

Local Government Act 2002

Scope

·    Total number of councillors

·    Wards and boundaries

·    Number of members of local boards

·    Subdivisions and boundaries

·    Names of local boards

·    Number of local boards

·    Local board boundaries

·    Representation arrangements for each local board

Frequency

At least once every six years

Ad hoc

 

9.       The output of a review of representation arrangements is a council “proposal” for arrangements for the coming election. It is a review of the current arrangements including the current arrangements of local boards. Objections or appeals to the council’s final proposal are decided by the Local Government Commission. The council appears as a submitter in front of the Local Government Commission.

10.     The output from the council under a unitary authority-led reorganisation application is a reorganisation plan, and accompanying documentation, that is submitted to the Local Government Commission for approval. If approved, the reorganisation plan is implemented through an Order in Council.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Review of representation arrangements

11.     The review of representation arrangements includes a review for the governing body and for each local board (based on current local boards).

12.     For the governing body:

·    the number of councillors

·    whether councillors are elected at-large, by ward or by a combination

·    the ward names, boundaries and number of councillors in each.

13.     For each local board:

·    the number of members

·    whether members are elected at-large or by subdivision

·    the subdivision names, boundaries and number of members in each

·    the local board name.

14.     There are two key matters that both the council and the Local Government Commission must take into account:

·    the effective representation of communities of interest

·    fair representation (in a ward or subdivision the number of people represented by each member must not vary by more than 10 percent from the average across the whole of Auckland, for the governing body, or the whole local board area, for a local board).

Governing body issues

15.     For the first time, the council can review the number of councillors. In previous terms of the council, the Governing Body supported Māori wards in principle but only if a councillor elected from a Māori ward would be an additional member. The council therefore submitted to Parliament in favour of being able to review the number of councillors as any other council is able to. Legislation has now been passed that enables this.

16.     The Governing Body has not decided to have Māori representation for the 2025 elections and therefore that reason for increasing the number of councillors does not apply.

17.     A starting point for deciding the number of councillors is to consider whether rural areas need their own representation. With the current arrangements both Rodney and Franklin are separately represented by one councillor each.

18.     If the requirement for effective representation of communities of interest requires the northern and southern rural areas to be represented, then this sets the number of people per councillor at around 85,000 leading to a total of 20 councillors under the +/- 10 percent rule.  Fewer than 20 councillors would result in more people per councillor and larger wards with the outcome that rural areas would lose their distinctive representation.

19.     To enable an efficient approach to the development of options for wards, the Governing Body is asked to confirm support for basing this analysis on a total of 20 councillors.

Local board issues

20.     The following table indicates known and emerging issues for the review of representation arrangements for current local boards.

Local board

Issue

Status

Devonport-Takapuna

Name change

Suggested by a local board member - not yet the formal position of the board.

Devonport-Takapuna

Saunders Reserve is split between Devonport-Takapuna and Upper Harbour LB, requiring two different reserve management plans

Investigated. Problem is due to a large meshblock. Solution is to split the meshblock and do minor boundary change to the local board area.

Franklin

Looking at a name change

Suggestion - not yet the formal position of the board.

Franklin

Subdivisions do not comply with 10 percent rule. Largest variance is Waiuku at ‑13.80 percent

 

Hibiscus and Bays

Subdivisions do not comply with 10 percent rule. Variance is 10.67 percent.

 

Howick

Subdivisions do not comply with 10 percent rule. Largest variance is Botany at 34.20 percent

Staff to attend workshop with Howick Local Board on Thursday 1 February 2024

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Maungakiekie subdivision does not comply with 10 percent rule being -10.94 percent

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

Ōtara subdivision does not comply with 10 percent rule being -13.13 percent

 

Rodney

Rearrange subdivisions to provide better rural representation

Proposal of Rodney Northern Action Group which convened a workshop with local board members on 22 November 2023. Local board yet to adopt a position.

 

Rodney

Subdivisions do not comply with 10 percent rule. Largest variance is Wellsford at
‑22.63 percent

 

Rodney

Subdivision arrangements

A local board member has submitted a suggestion

Upper-Harbour

Create subdivisions

Suggestion made during 2019 review. Not yet discussed with local board.

 

21.     The JGWP will continue to investigate these, and any other issues that become known.

Reorganisation plan for local boards

Process and criteria

22.     A reorganisation plan for local boards is adopted by the council under Schedule 3A of the Local Government Act 2002 using the provisions for a unitary authority-led reorganisation application.

23.     This means that the council adopts a reorganisation plan for local boards and submit this plan to the Local Government Commission for approval. If the application meets all the specified requirements, then the Commission must approve it.

24.     In summary form, the matters that the council must take into account include:

·    the scale and likelihood of potential benefits:

enabling democratic decision making by, and on behalf of, communities

better enabling the purpose of local government

efficiencies and cost savings

boards have the necessary resources

effective responses to opportunities, needs, and circumstances of the area

alignment with communities of interest

enhanced effectiveness of decision making

enhanced ability of local government to meet the changing needs of communities for governance and services into the future

co-governance and co-management arrangements

·    implementation costs

·    consequences of not implementing

·    communities of interest

·    public support

·    views and preferences of affected local boards.

25.     The documentation provided to the Local Government Commission must show that the council has considered all these matters.

26.     The legislation directs the Commission to not approve the application in certain situations, including if the reorganisation plan does not have the support of affected communities. Community consultation and support is crucial.

27.     It is intended that at the same meeting that the council resolves its initial proposal for representation arrangements for the 2025 elections, it will also resolve whether to seek public feedback on a proposed local board reorganisation. These decisions are currently timed for the May 2024 meeting of the Governing Body.

28.     Representation arrangements for 2025 and, if supported by the Governing Body, a proposal for local board reorganisation, will be publicly notified simultaneously so that the public will have a holistic view of any proposed changes to Auckland’s local governance. While it is reasonable to seek community feedback on an initial proposal for the representation review and on a proposal to reorganise local boards at the same time, there are issues around how these two processes are integrated.  Staff are discussing possible options with Local Government Commission staff.

Options considered by the Joint Governance Working Party

29.     The Royal Commission on Auckland Governance recommended to the Governor General that Auckland should have a unitary authority and six “local councils”.

30.     The government at the time decided the local tier should be closer to the community and that there should be between 20 to 30 local boards, the exact number being determined by the Local Government Commission as 21 local boards.

31.     The JGWP has considered options in addition to the status quo, those being:

·    Option 1: amalgamation of the two local boards in any ward which comprises two local boards. This provides 15 local boards.

·    Option 2: an option based on a model of 11 “local councils” considered by the Royal Commission but retaining separate local boards for the two islands, resulting in 13 local boards.

·    Option 3: options based on current practices for clustering operations and local board representation.

32.     The JGWP has identified the options for 13 local boards and 15 local boards for further investigation. As further investigation progresses the configuration of local boards should be free to be changed to respond to issues raised by stakeholders. The options identified by the JGWP indicate there will not be fewer than 13 local boards nor more than 15 local boards in the options prepared for public consultation. All analysis and any public consultation will include the status quo as an option.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     This report requests support for the JGWP to develop further work. Climate impacts will be considered when options analysis is completed and reported mid-year in 2024.

 


 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     This report requests support for the JGWP to develop further work. Consultation with the council group will be held early in 2024. Council-controlled organisations will have an interest in local board reorganisation as it may affect their planning and reporting.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     Both the representation review and the local board reorganisation plan have significant impacts on local boards. Local boards have been kept informed through representatives on the JGWP, local board chair forums and local board member briefings. The agendas of meetings of the JGWP are available to all local board members through Nexus.

36.     Early in 2024 there will be targeted engagement with local boards followed by formal feedback on the proposals recommended to the Governing Body meeting in May by the JGWP.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The Governing Body has not decided to include Māori representation in its representation arrangements for 2025. It has resolved:

That the Governing Body:

a)    whakaae / agree that further work is required to determine the appropriate arrangements for Māori representation on Auckland Council, including in discussion with Māori and the Auckland public, and request that this be considered by the Joint Governance Working Party and reported back to the Governing Body by 31 December 2024.

(Resolution GB/2023/195, 26 October 2023)

38.     For the local board reorganisation plan there is a requirement to consider the “effective provision for any co-governance and co-management arrangements that are established by legislation (including Treaty of Waitangi claim settlement legislation) and that are between local authorities and iwi or Māori organisations”.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     There will be internal resource requirements and costs associated with the programme stages and public consultation in both the current financial year and FY2024/2025. Costs through each stage of decision-making by the Governing Body, include:

·    If Governing Body confirms support for the JGWP to further investigate the matters outlined in the recommendations, the early engagement costs are estimated at $30-35k, in addition to some fixed term staff resource. The Governance and CCO Partnerships Directorate will look to absorb these costs within operational budgets. 

·    If the reorganisation of local boards proceeds through to a final proposal to the Local Government Commission, the bulk of additional fixed term staff resources will be needed through to April 2025. This cost is estimated at $210k. The Governance and CCO Partnerships Directorate will look to resource this through reprioritisation of resources and deferral of other work.


 

 

40.     If Governing Body confirm support for regionwide public consultation on both a representation review proposal and a local board reorganisation plan at the May 2024 meeting, the costs associated with consultation are between $165 - $200k. A contribution from the Mayor’s discretionary budget has been requested to support consultation costs, should this proceed. The above costs relate to undertaking further work on the analysis and policy elements to support Governing Body decisions for the representation project. Should a change to the status quo be supported by the Governing Body, the cost of change will be reported to the Governing Body as the analysis progresses.

41.     Existing staff will undertake most of the analysis that is required for the local board reorganisation work. Staff do not anticipate a need to engage external resource in order to undertake the analysis. 

42.     The financial implication of a reorganisation decision, particularly a reduction to 13 or 15 local boards, is being evaluated and this information will be made available in due course.

43.     A budget of $66k associated with the mandatory review of representation arrangements is unavoidable and has been budgeted for.

44.     There are implications of adopting a reorganisation plan at the same time as conducting a representation review.  Staff have held discussions with the Local Government Commission staff about how the two projects interact. These discussions are continuing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     Work on both the review of representation arrangements and local board reorganisation has commenced earlier than necessary in order that final decisions are not made too close to the 2025 elections. There is a risk that if there is slippage, final decisions might not be known until early April 2025, which is the local government election year.

46.     There is a risk that, if the council proceeds with a local board reorganisation application, that the Local Government Commission will not approve it due to shortcomings in documentation or due to lack of community support. There is on-going contact between council staff and Local Government Commission staff to ensure the correct process is followed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     The purpose of this report is to confirm with the Governing Body some key decisions in order to facilitate further progress by the JGWP.

48.     If the Governing Body confirms that it supports a proposal for 20 councillors for the 2025 elections, then the next steps for the JGWP will be to look at whether changes are needed to wards.

49.     If the Governing Body confirms its support for continuing to investigate options for a local board reorganisation, then the JGWP will consider all the matters that the council is required to consider, including the costs and benefits, engagement with local boards and the community and report back to the Governing Body in May 2024.  If the Governing Body agree to proceed with a reorganisation proposal, then consultation with the public will occur in mid-2024.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Anna Bray - Acting Director - Governance and CCO Partnerships

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Referred from the Audit and Risk Committee - Health, Safety and Wellbeing Performance Report

File No.: CP2023/18786

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Health, Safety and Wellbeing Performance Report referred by the Audit and Risk Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Audit and Risk Committee considered Health, Safety and Wellbeing Performance Report at its meeting on 5 December 2023.

3.       The Audit and Risk Committee resolved as follows:

“Resolution number ARCCC/2023/78

That the Audit and Risk Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the information in this report and the associated health, safety, and wellbeing indicators.

b)      whakaae / agree to refer this report to the Governing Body, and recommend that the Governing Body forwards this report to local boards for their information.“

4.       Clause b) of the recommendation to the Audit and Risk Committee refers the report to the Governing Body for noting along with any commentary the Audit and Risk Committee feels is appropriate and recommends that the report be forwarded to local board for their information.

5.       The original Health, Safety and Wellbeing Performance Report to the Audit and Risk Committee can be accessed at this link:  https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2023/12/20231205_ARCCC_AGN_11386.htm#PDF2_ReportName_97538

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Auckland Council's Health, Safety and Wellbeing (HSW) Performance report (presented to the Audit and Risk Committee on 5 December 2023) and any commentary from the Audit and Risk Committee

b)      tuku ki tangata kē / forward the report to all local boards for their information.

 

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authoriser

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Strategic Asset Consultation - Waterfront

File No.: CP2023/19479

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To obtain approval to consult on the transfer of control of 22-32 Jellicoe Street under the Long-term Plan 2024 - 2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Section 97 of the Local Government Act provides that a decision to transfer the ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from the local authority must be provided for in the long-term plan (LTP).  This enables the proposal to be consulted on as part of the LTP process.

3.       The current site at 22-32 Jellicoe Street operates as a fish processing plant.  The lessee recently sold its fishing rights and has marketed its leasehold interests in 22-32 Jellicoe Street.

4.       The land is currently owned by Auckland Council and subject to four separate 20 year ground leases to the lessee, which are renewable in perpetuity.

5.       Eke Panuku understands that the lessee has secured a conditional agreement to sell its leasehold interest to a party which intends on redeveloping the site into a mixed-use development.

6.       The sale would enable quality mixed use development outcomes at Wynyard Quarter. It would be subject to design and quality standards and in accordance with the Waterfront Plan and Unitary Plan.

7.       The existing ground leases generate income for council on an annual basis.

8.       As the existing leases have been granted in perpetuity, there is no opportunity for Auckland Council to cancel and utilise in another way or sell via the open market.

9.       Due to the 20-year terms in perpetuity, the existing leases are not suitable for a redevelopment scenario. To enable redevelopment of the site, it is likely the purchaser will request from Eke Panuku a long-term, prepaid ground lease.

10.     The market value of a long-term prepaid ground lease is generally similar to that of a freehold sale.

11.     This approach is consistent with the model used by Eke Panuku for all Wynyard Quarter development since 2010 and will support the ongoing regeneration work in the area. This is considered a favourable outcome for Council as it unlocks an additional large block of land for high quality redevelopment whilst also generating income for council. It also ensures that the underlying freehold ownership remains with the council in the long term.

12.     This site is identified as a strategic asset under the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy (freehold interest in waterfront land) and therefore s 97 applies to a proposed decision to transfer control of the site to a third party. This possible transfer of control, therefore, needs to be consulted on as part of the consultation for the Long-term Plan 2024 – 2034. By including this site in the LTP consultation will avoid future delays when the request for a long term prepaid ground lease, which is likely, is received.


 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whakaae / agree to consult, as part of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, on a proposed long-term lease of 22-32 Jellicoe Street.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tom Belgrave – Development Manager – Eke Panuku

Authoriser

David Rankin - Chief Executive - Eke Panuku

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Draft Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025

File No.: CP2023/19737

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider approval of the Draft Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025 and the Draft Summary of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025 (for inclusion in the consultation material for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Legislation requires the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority) and Auckland Council to annually agree an operational plan as part of the annual plan (annual budget) process (or long-term plan process every three years). This requires the council to consult on a summary of the Draft Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Operational Plan (draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan).

3.       The Tūpuna Maunga Authority met on 27 November 2023 to approve its proposed budget for inclusion in the council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP). The proposed budget for the 2024/2025 financial year fits into the funding envelope previously agreed through the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. The Draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan (Attachment A) and a summary of the draft plan (Attachment B) were approved for public consultation by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority at that hui.

4.       The Governing Body must now also agree the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan (Attachment A) and the summary (Attachment B) for inclusion in the consultation material for the LTP. The draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan will then be consulted on alongside the LTP in 2024.

5.       The Tūpuna Maunga Authority will meet on a date to be determined in May 2024 to adopt the final plan and summary. Following that hui, the Governing Body will also need to agree the plan and summary at a meeting before 30 June 2024 so that the agreed summary can be included in the final LTP document that is required to be adopted before that date.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whakaae / agree the Draft Tūpuna Maunga Operational Plan 2024/2025 and a summary of the draft plan (for inclusion in the consultation material for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Council and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority must agree the Tūpuna Maunga Plan, and summary of that plan, each year pursuant to section 60 of Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act 2014. A summary of the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan must be included in the consultation material for the annual plan (or long-term plan every three years).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Each year a Tūpuna Maunga Plan is developed to provide a framework in which the council will carry out its functions for the routine management of the Tūpuna Maunga and administered lands for that financial year. The Tūpuna Maunga Plan must be prepared and adopted concurrently with the council’s annual or long-term plan and must be included in summary form in the annual or long-term plan consultation material.

8.       The Tūpuna Maunga Authority met on 27 November 2023 and approved the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan (Attachment A) and a summary of the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan (Attachment B) for consultation. Content relating to the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan will be referred to in the consultation document and the agreed summary of the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan will be included in the LTP supporting information.

9.       Two consultation streams will be undertaken during the consultation period. Both the council and Tūpuna Maunga Authority will receive submissions during the consultation period. The various consultation feedback to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority and the council will be reviewed and reported to a joint workshop of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority and council in early 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.     This report relates to the budget and operational plan of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority, an independent co-governance entity. Matters relating to climate impacts may be addressed by that authority.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The organisations that are part of the council group will have an opportunity to comment on the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan prior to the final plan being presented for adoption, and any feedback received will be presented to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority and the council for consideration.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

12.     The work of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority spans eight local board areas, but agreeing the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan for consultation by Auckland Council is a Governing Body decision. The views of local boards have not been sought at this stage but local boards will have an opportunity to provide input on the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan through the long-term plan process. In particular, each year the Tūpuna Maunga Authority writes to the eight local boards with Tūpuna Maunga within their local board areas seeking comment on the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

13.     The Tūpuna Maunga Authority is a tangible expression of a Treaty-based partnership between Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau and Auckland Council. It is a vehicle through which the mana whenua worldview and historical, cultural and spiritual connections with the maunga will be given visibility and guide decision-making for the health and wellbeing of these important taonga.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

14.     The Draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan annual budget for the 2024/2025 financial year is provided for in the council’s Long-term Plan 2021- 2031 and no increase is sought.

15.     The Draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan includes long term plan funding in outer years that reflect a transition from a substantial capital works programme to a focus on maintaining assets, and funding operational programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     The Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025 is necessary to support the council’s routine management of the Tūpuna Maunga under the direction of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority. There is a moderate reputational risk to Māori outcomes and relationships if the council did not approve funding for the Tūpuna Maunga in the Auckland area. This could seriously affect council’s ongoing relationships with mana whenua organisations of Tāmaki Makaurau.

17.     Further, there is a risk of non-compliance with section 60 of the Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act 2014 if the council and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority do not agree a draft operational plan and summary for inclusion in the consultation materials for the LTP. The Tūpuna Maunga Authority agreed the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan and summary for consultation at its hui on 27 November 2023.

18.     If the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan is approved for consultation, there is a potential reputational risk in relation to any members of the community opposed to co-governance entities established by Treaty of Waitangi settlements.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.     If the Governing Body agrees the draft Tūpuna Maunga Plan and summary for inclusion in the consultation material for the LTP then the public will have an opportunity to provide feedback either to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority or to the council through the public consultation phase.

20.     Following the public consultation, the Tūpuna Maunga Authority and Auckland Council will need to consider the feedback before agreeing to a final Tūpuna Maunga Plan and summary.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025

 

b

Draft Tūpuna Maunga Operational Plan Summary

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dominic Wilson - Head of Co-governance

Authorisers

Anna Bray - Acting Director - Governance and CCO Partnerships

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Summary of Confidential Decisions and related information released into Open

File No.: CP2023/16729

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note confidential decisions and related information released into the public domain.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of confidential decisions made that can now be released into the public domain.

3.       The following decisions/documents are now publicly available:

Date of Decision

Subject

8.6.23

Auckland International Airport Share Sale Process

 

4.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the confidential decision and related information that is now publicly available:

i)        Auckland International Airport Share Sale Process

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland International Airport Share Sale Process (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authorisers

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Summary of Governing Body and Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 14 December 2023

File No.: CP2023/16727

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda or briefing papers that may have been distributed to the Governing Body or its committees.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to Governing Body members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

3.       The following memos or information were circulated to members of the Governing Body:

Date

Subject

11.12.23

Action from Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Meeting of 6 December 2023 relating to the Israeli / Palestine Conflict

11.12.23

Action from Albert-Eden Local Board Meeting of 6 December 2023 relating to the Israeli / Palestine Conflict

 

4.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place for the Governing Body:

Date

Subject

29.11.23

Workshop:  Tamaki Makaurau Recovery Plan

 

5.       This document can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/Te hui “Governing Body” from the drop-down tab and click “View”;

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

6.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Summary of Governing Body information memoranda and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) – 14 December 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

 

b

Action from Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Meeting of 6 December 2023 relating to the Israeli / Palestine Conflict

 

c

Action from Albert-Eden Local Board Meeting of 6 December 2023 relating to the Israeli / Palestine Conflict

 

d

Workshop:  Tamaki Makaurau Recovery Plan

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authoriser

Phil Wilson - Acting Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

Referred from the Audit and Risk Committee - Enterprise Risk Update December 2023

File No.: CP2023/18787

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Enterprise Risk Update December 2023 referred by the Audit and Risk Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Audit and Risk Committee considered the Enterprise Risk Update December 2023 at its meeting on 9 May 2023.

3.       The Audit and Risk Committee resolved as follows:

“Resolution number ARCCC/2023/80

That the Audit and Risk Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Enterprise Risk Update – December 2023 report and updated strategic risks

b)      tūtohungia / recommend referring the Enterprise Risk Update – December 2023 report to the Governing Body for information.

4.       Clause d) of the recommendation to the Audit and Risk Committee refers the report to the Governing Body for information.

5.       The original Enterprise Risk Update December 2023 to the Audit and Risk Committee can be accessed at this link:  https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2023/12/20231205_ARCCC_AGN_11386.htm#PDF2_ReportName_97398

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Enterprise Risk Update May 2023 (presented to the Audit and Risk Committee on 5 December 2023).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authorisers

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

14 December 2023

 

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Governing Body

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Referred from the Audit and Risk Committee - Enterprise Risk Update December 2023 Supplement

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the report contains detail information on the mitigation activities of the strategic risks that could be detrimental to risk management objectives if in the public domain.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.