I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 20 February 2024

1:00pm

Limelight Room
Aotea Centre

50 Mayoral Drive Auckland 1010

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Genevieve Sage

 

Deputy Chairperson

Greg Moyle, (JP, ED)

 

Members

Alexandra Bonham

 

 

Allan Matson

 

 

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

 

 

Anahera Rawiri

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Katherine Kang

Democracy Advisor

 

 

14 February 2024

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: katherine.kang@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Michael Wallmannsberger and Tony Miguel - Freemans Park Body Corporate Committee - Freemans Bay flooding                                                        5

8.2     Deputation - Rohan West - Tennis Auckland                                                      6

8.3     Deputation - Gael Baldock - Disabled parking on side streets off Queen Street (WTM/2020/133)                                           7

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Approval of detailed design for 254 Ponsonby Road                                                                       9

12        Waitematā Local Crime Prevention Fund        17

13        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2023/2024                                                             21

14        Transfer of the Community Centre Management Agreement to a new trust established to manage the Grey Lynn Community Centre                                             31

15        Proposed new community lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Society at 545 Parnell Road, Parnell                                                                  37

16        Permanent changes to landowner approval process for filming activities                             43

17        Planning, Environment and Parks Committee - 20/12/2023 Memorandum on Helicopter activity                                                                              49

18        Chairperson's Report                                         51

19        Board Members' Reports                                   53

20        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                               55

21        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

22        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                               59

13        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2023/2024

c.      Quarter 2 Financial Appendix                  59

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

Chair G Sage will welcome those present and open the meeting with a karakia

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 14 February 2024, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

8.1       Deputation - Michael Wallmannsberger and Tony Miguel - Freemans Park Body Corporate Committee - Freemans Bay flooding

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Michael Wallmannsberger and Tony Miguel on behalf of the Freemans Park Body Corporate Committee will be in attendance to present to the Local Board on the impacts of the 2023 flooding in Freemans Bay.

3.       The 2023 Auckland floods affect the Freemans Park complex (between Howe Street, Wellington Street, Hepburn Street and Beresford Street West); properties downstream in Hepburn Street and Napier Street, road users and pedestrians in Howe Street and Wellington Street and users of Western Park.

4.       The ongoing wastewater overflows also have potential impacts on public health.

5.       Freemans Park contains 201 units occupied by a mixture of owners and tenants and it includes large park like grounds that are common property.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on the Freemans Bay flooding and thank Michael Wallmannsberger and Tony Miguel for their attendance.

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Rohan West - Tennis Auckland

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Rohan West on behalf of the Tennis Auckland will be in attendance to speak to the board about the proposed ASB Tennis Arena Centre Court Roof project.

3.        The ASB Tennis Arena Centre is a tennis facility located in the Parnell district, one of the biggest risks facing the Centre is the impact of climate change and weather extremes. Following the 2023 Auckland floodings, 17 of 20 sessions in the 2023 were affected by rain. The Centre is also being affected by heat, high humidity and direct sunshine.

4.        Tennis Auckland is the regional sports organisation responsible for promoting and delivering tennis to the general public in the wider Auckland region. As an incorporated society with charitable status, Tennis Auckland is a not-for-profit organisation.

5.       Tennis Auckland provides a range of facilities – ASB Tennis Arena Centre in Parnell, Merton Road, Tennis Centre in Glen Innes, Manukau Tennis Centre in Manukau and Nicholson Park in Mt Eden. All these facilities are fully accessible to the public.

6.        The key objective of Tennis Auckland, is to develop opportunities, programs and facilities to enable, encourage and enhance participation in tennis.

7.        Tennis Auckland is seeking endorsement from, and support of, the Waitematā Local Board of the proposed project to build a roof over centre court of the ASB Tennis Arena.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on the ASB Tennis Arena Centre Court Roof project from Rohan West and thank him for his attendance.

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Gael Baldock - Disabled parking on side streets off Queen Street (WTM/2020/133)

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2020, the Waitematā Local Board resolved at its June Business Meeting that “the board request Auckland Transport urgently to investigate and take appropriate action on: ensuring the provision of adequate disabled parking on the side streets off Queen street.” (WTM/2020/133).

3.       This resolution was forwarded to Auckland Transport staff for their consideration.

4.       Gael Baldock will be in attendance to speak to the board about the resolution above.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Gael Baldock regarding a previous terms deputation for the local board and the ongoing need for the provision of adequate disabled parking on the side streets off Queen street, and thank her for her attendance.

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of five minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Approval of detailed design for 254 Ponsonby Road

File No.: CP2024/00562

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the detailed design for the new civic open space at 254 Ponsonby Road and to progress the project to procurement and construction.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       254 Ponsonby Road was acquired by Auckland City Council (pre-amalgamation) in 2006 to address the need for more civic space within the Ponsonby precinct that had been strategically identified in 2000.

3.       The Waitematā Local Board has allocated $5,581,354 to the Ponsonby Park project from the sale of an endowment property at 200 Victoria Street West.

4.       The project was approved by the local board as part of the Customer and Community Services Work Programme (Waitematā Local Board 18 July 2023 business meeting, resolution WTM/2023/117).

5.       The 254 Ponsonby Road civic space will deliver on outcomes identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plans 2017, 2020, and 2023: Our community is resilient and have places and activities to connect and foster a sense of belonging.

6.       The detailed design is based on the concept design approved by the local board in 2020, LandLAB option C, and meets the needs identified by strategic analysis.

7.       The preliminary design was presented to the Waitematā Local Board at workshops on 6 June 2023, 29 August 2023, and 3 October 2023. Feedback from members was considered in the preliminary design development, which was approved by the Waitematā Local Board at the 17 October 2023 business meeting (resolution WTM/2023/74).

8.       The draft detailed design was presented to Waitematā Local Board at a workshop on 5 Dec 2023. The detailed design was presented to the Waitematā Local Board at a workshop on 7 Feb 2024.

9.       Staff now seek approval of the detailed design before progressing the project to procurement and construction.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the detailed design for the new civic open space at 254 Ponsonby Road and request staff to progress the project to procurement and construction.

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The site is at 254 Ponsonby Road. It was occupied by a liquor store, and fresh food retailer, while managed by Eke Panuku. The site has now been transferred to Auckland Council. The site is at a key location along Ponsonby Road to create a high-quality civic open space and urban infrastructure to provide for a current shortfall in open space provision and to support future growth within the Ponsonby area.

11.     At the Waitematā Local Board workshop on 5 December 2023, staff gave an update on the progress of detailed design.

12.     The project cost estimate exceeded the budget and items were discussed for cost savings.

13.     Staff were requested to evaluate these options with the designer and select items to achieve the best outcome for the project within the budget.

14.     Elected members requested that staff report back with the final scope included in the detailed design to remain on budget.

15.     The enabling works contract has been awarded and the resource consent application has been lodged.

16.     The O’Neill Street works have been included in the project and are funded through the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and will be delivered by Auckland Council.  (Resolution WTM/2023/104)

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     A workshop was held with the local board on 5 December 2023 to discuss the detailed design.  Design items that were deleted or changed include:

·    skylights in the canopy were deleted

·    some raised planters were deleted

·    the northern pergola is scaled back

·    the toilet block will be re-used ex-Bledisloe, not new

·    the common storeroom will be located behind the toilet block.

18.     The final detailed design includes:

·    development of the entire site

·    a variety of civic spaces

·    covered space for events

·    public toilet facilities

·    a storeroom to support activation of the space

·    a vertical marker to represent mana whenua narratives

·    a safeguarded area for a future building

19.     A further workshop was held with the local board on 7 February 2024 to provide an update on detailed design. The adaption of the re-used toilet block was discussed.

·    The designer had presented a design with timber battening covering the reused toilet block. This included input from Mana whenua and was sympathetic to the established cultural narratives for the site relating to the Te Rimutahi - 'The Lone Rimu';  a sacred Rimu tree was once located near the water reservoir near Artstation.

·    Staff had raised issues regarding the maintenance of this option but are satisfied that they can be addressed in the final design.

·    Some elected members suggested staff consider a mesh screen and planting, similar to the Auckland Domain toilet block. 

·    Staff recommend continuing with the battened design since it is sympathetic to cultural narratives, is supported by the community design group, and is more consistent with the whole site design.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

21.     Sustainability and carbon reduction are prime drivers for the design. Some elements aim to be exemplars of best practice and will include an educational focus. Key elements include:

·    adaptive re-use of the existing structures on the site

·    solar PV panels on the roof to provide power to the site

·    storm water retention and soakage

·    water storage for use on the site

·    tree canopy

·    ecology

·    re-use of an existing toilet block from storage

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     This project will meet the needs identified by strategic assessment in 2017 for more public open space in the area. This site will be a civic space, where people can meet, socialise, enjoy events and markets. It will be a structured urban space.

23.     Retaining the existing canopy will be beneficial in supporting outdoor events. The size and height of the canopy make it a unique outdoor event space in the area. It will provide shade and shelter from the weather. The canopy is 363m2 (11m x 33m) and 3m high.

24.     There are a variety of spaces within the site that provide for different uses and delineate the site into distinctive character areas. Retaining the frames of the existing building gives the space a 3D vertical dimension, creating a sense of enclosure.

25.     On-going maintenance has been considered.

26.     Crime prevention through environmental design, CPTED, has been considered and a report prepared to demonstrate measures taken.

27.     The site is zoned Open Space Community at the back (western end) and Town Centre at the eastern Ponsonby Road end. This zoning prevents building on the western area of the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The existing site is in poor condition. The existing buildings require maintenance and there are asbestos containing materials on the premises. The structure is deficient, being assessed at 45 per cent of the national building standard. The front part of the building has been vacant for some time and the back car park area fosters unruly activity after hours. The site is overdue for re-development.

29.     The need for more civic space has been consistently confirmed as a high priority through extensive local community consultations. It has also been represented through the local community’s sustained passion, involvement, and interest in the delivery of the project through the community led design group.

30.     The local community, represented by the community led design group, is eager to see the site developed into a civic space, as per the approved concept plan (resolution WTM/2020/20)

31.     Local board views have been expressed through four workshops and staff have responded to queries and requests.

32.     The Ponsonby Business Association felt that the site was too long for a civic space and suggested that the back area is developed as medium density residential, and that the front area has commercial or community use buildings on two sides to activate the space. Neither of these suggestions fit the strategic assessment or needs analysis.

33.     Local schools have indicated that they would like to use the proposed civic spaces.

34.     The O’Neill Street element of the project will require further engagement with the adjoining residents, as part of the Auckland Transport approval process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Staff have engaged with mana whenua representatives from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua.

36.     There is a lack of physical recognition of Māori history and narratives in the Ponsonby area. This project is seen by iwi as an important opportunity to improve outcomes and representation for Māori in the area.

37.     The Ponsonby Road Masterplan - Māori Heritage report by Ngarimu Blair (2013), provided an historical summary of Māori activity in the area and a Māori vision for this site. The masterplan identifies that Maori values can be acknowledged by continuing to reinforce the Te Rimutahi ridgeline as a transport route.

38.     The designer, LandLAB, working in collaboration with mana whenua representatives and artist Graeme Tipene, has provided a range of design opportunities for recognition of cultural narratives, to align with the Blair report vision and input from mana whenua representatives. These include:

·    a vertical marker

·    naming of the site

·    bilingual naming of the facilities

·    detailed patterning

·    tree canopy – urban ngahere

·    wananga – education space

·    ecology – rimu trees, gardens

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     The site has been transferred from Eke Panuku to Auckland Council to become a service asset. The tenant has vacated the site.

40.     $5,581,354 was allocated to the Ponsonby Park project from the sale of an endowment property at 200 Victoria Street West.

41.     The Waitematā Local Board has allocated $357,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022-2025 to the safety improvements on O’Neill Street. (Resolution WTM/2023/104)

42.     The funding is allocated in the financial years 2023/2024, 2024/2025 and 2025/2026, with completion set for December 2024. Total forward funding is $5,938,354.

43.     The following table shows funding allocation over the financial years:

 

Financial year

Allocated Funding

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

Totals

2023/2024

$1,432,090

$69,891.71

$1,501,981.71

2024/2025

$4,138,764

$287,108.29

$4,425,872.29

2025/2026

$10,500

 

$10,500.00

 

$5,581,354

$357,000.00

$5,938,354.00

 

44.     A contingency allowance of $608,000 and escalation of $134,000 is included.

45.     The project can be delivered within the funding available. The following table summarizes this:

 

Stage 1 - Enabling works (Tendered costs)

Cost $

1

Asbestos removal

20,000

2

Deconstruction

330,000

3

Traffic management

20,000

4

Stage 1 Project contingency (15%)

56,000

 

Stage 1 Total

$ 426,000

 

Stage 2 – Construction works

Cost $

5

Further de-construction and site stripping

119,000

6

Green discovery room & Urban Plaza (Eastern area)

1,219,000

7

Hybrid space (Western area)

814,000

8

Public toilets and storeroom

244,000

9

Urban canopy

1,137,000

10

Traffic management

94,000

11

Water retention & harvesting system

48,000

12

Design, operational costs & consenting.

781,394

13

Stage 2 Project contingency (15%)

552,000

14

Escalation

134,000

15

O’Neill Street works (design costs included in item 12)

325,606

 

Stage 2 Total

$5,468,000           

Project total (Stage 1 and Stage 2)

 $5,894,000

 

 

46.     Staff have developed a preliminary annual Operating Expenditure (OPEX) budget of $70,000 per year.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     The following risks and mitigations have been identified.

Risk Description

Mitigation

Date Identified

Owner

Project runs over time.

 

·    The project schedule is regularly updated.

·    Ensure project documentation and correspondence is recorded.

Sept 2023

Project Manager

Lack of support from key stakeholders and community groups.

 

·    The communications plan is being followed.

·    Communicate regularly with stakeholders and community groups.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

Project scope creep occurs.

 

·    Design reviews focus scope creep.

·    Delete non-core items to remain on budget.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

The design moves away from the core strategic needs and council standards.

·    The PCSG (Project Control Steering Group) acts as an officer and subject matter advice group.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

 

Potential negative public / media reaction for the project, particularly if the communication is ineffective.

·    Ensure communication is clear and well timed with the project.

·    Communicate effectively via the established communications plan.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

Delayed delivery of the project due to project politics and council processes.

·    Ensure communication is clear and well timed with the project.

·    Provide adequate time for processes, reporting, and reviews.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

The project runs over budget.

 

·    Engage a Quantity Surveyor to ensure project element budgets are accurate.

·    Include appropriate level of contingency.

Sept 2023

 

Project Manager

Quantity Surveyor

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Subject to local board approval of the detailed design, staff will instruct the designer to lodge for building consent and initiate the procurement and delivery of the project.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Detailed design drawings, LandLAB, December 2023

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Bill Jackson - Senior Project Manager

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Waitematā Local Crime Prevention Fund

File No.: CP2024/00278

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve allocation of the Local Crime Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Crime Fund is a one-off, $2 million central government allocation to Auckland Council for community safety / crime prevention initiatives.

3.       The Regulatory and Safety Committee approved distribution of this fund at its 30 May 2023 meeting. $1 million was distribution to local boards for activities focused on crime prevention. The remaining $1 million was distributed to Business Improvement Districts (BIDs).

4.       Waitematā Local Board received $45,867 out of the $1 million for all local boards.

5.       The local board discussed allocation of this one-off grant funding on 31 October 2023 and 7 February 2024.

6.       A memo was circulated to the local board on 25 January 2024 with recommended allocations (attachment A). 

7.       On 7 February 2024, the Ponsonby Business Association presented to the local board its annual BID compliance report.  As part of its presentation, the BID requested that the board considers additional funding towards CCTV cameras on Ponsonby Road.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      allocate $45,867 from the one-off Local Crime Fund towards one or more of the following programmes:

i)       extended security patrols on Karangahape Road - $10,000

ii)       funding for Community Patrol NZ (CPNZ) - $7,867

iii)      update for safety videos for international students - $10,000

iv)      safe bystander intervention training - $8,000

v)      Neighbourhood Support - Auckland Coordinator - $10,000

vi)      CCTV cameras on Ponsonby Road - $20,000.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       On 28 November 2022, the then-Prime Minister announced a multi-million dollar funding package to address retail crime and reoffending throughout New Zealand.

9.       Of that, $2 million was granted to Auckland Council to support crime prevention and youth engagement approaches or intervention programmes, referred to by council as the ‘Local Crime Fund’.

10.     The Local Crime Fund was set up to assist with crime prevention with a focus on youth interventions and Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) measures such as patrols, street lighting, CCTV cameras and planters, as well as community development.

11.     At its 30 May 2023 meeting the Regulatory and Safety Committee approved distribution of this fund (resolution #RSCCC/2023/24). $1 million was distributed to local boards for activities focused on Crime Prevention. The remaining $1 million was distributed to Business Improvement Districts (BIDs).

12.     The $1 million for all local boards was allocated according to the Local Board Funding Policy. The Waitematā Local Board received $45,867.

13.     This was added into the board’s work programme in July 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The funding will activate new or strengthen existing community-led partnerships that focus on youth crime prevention and town centre / retail crime prevention through a CPTED lens. It is a one-off fund that cannot be used to fund business-as-usual council operations.

15.     Staff and local board members have engaged community safety stakeholders formally and informally during the development of options to distribute the Local Crime Fund. This includes, but is not limited to NZ Police, education organisations and community health and welfare services.

16.     Feedback from partners was key to ensuring there was alignment with existing initiatives and availability of partners to deliver on programme options.

17.     Workshop discussions were held with the local board to discuss options for how to distribute the funding. Additional project ideas were also received from constituents and the Police Local Area Commander. Those options included:

·    support for community partners to deliver security patrols

·    Crime Prevention through Environmental Design assessments

·    graffiti removal response, prevention and management

·    outreach programmes for rough sleeping

·    CCTV cameras

·    education programmes.

18.     A memo was circulated to the local board on 25 January 2024 with recommended allocations (attachment A).  The recommended options and analysis within the memo are in the below table:

Options

Analysis

Recommend

Extended security patrols on Karangahape Road

The Development Programme Office (DPO) contributed funding to Karangahape Road Business Association (KBA) in 2022 towards extended security patrols as part of support to respond to impacts of covid.  DPO do not currently provide any funding towards security/safety on Karangahape Road.

KBA would appreciate extra warden support and additional funding would increase patrol times.

$10,000

Funding for Community Patrol NZ (CPNZ)

Community Patrol NZ is a non-profit organisation working with the Police.  They are currently recruiting as part of the Safety Hub.  There is opportunity to further support CPNZ with equipment and to develop their database (Comms tools, branding and supply of high viz vests).

$7,867

Update for safety videos for international students

Connected Communities previously supported the Police to develop safety videos for international students on how to protect themselves. Police are currently working on orientation with new international students.  There is potential to provide funding to Education NZ to update two of the safety videos.

 

$10,000

Safe bystander intervention training: focus on AUT

Community Impact Team presented to the local board an opportunity to support safe bystander intervention training. These are available and can be rolled out before the end of the financial year. 

Rape Prevention Education has a long history of delivering workshops on a number of topics relating to sexual violence prevention, raising awareness of rape culture and its impact, and advising people on bystander/upstander intervention so they can step in safely. Workshops are able to focus on broader safety for young people.

There is the potential to run workshops with AUT students to address concerns about safety in Albert Park.

$8,000

Neighbourhood Support - Auckland Coordinator

The Auckland Coordinator coordinates the programme across Auckland.  Staff are not aware of any Neighbourhood support groups in Waitematā, but this would support groups that want to be set up.

Albert-Eden Local Board has set aside $10k contribution, and Council’s Auckland Emergency Management is considering a contribution.  Request that Waitematā to consider contribution of $10k.

$10,000

 

19.     On 7 February 2024, the Ponsonby Business Association presented to the local board its annual BID compliance report. The Ponsonby Business Association received $9,413 from the Local Crime Prevention Fund. They have resolved to implement CCTV cameras and CPTED measures along the length of Ponsonby Road over a 3-year period. The BID has requested that the local board considers additional funding to Ponsonby Business Association to accelerate this programme. The CCTV surveillance would join the monitoring network with Newmarket and Parnell BIDs, monitored by two dedicated staff and supported by Police.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     No climate impact has been identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Staff from Connected Communities and Development Programme Office have contributed to the advice and analysis of the options listed. The impacts of this decision on the council group will be minimal. The options identified are designed to utilise existing mechanisms for efficiency purposes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Workshop discussions were held with the local board to discuss options for the best possible spend of this one-off grant funding.

23.     Staff and local board members have engaged community safety stakeholders formally and informally during the development of options to distribute the Local Crime Fund.  Feedback from partners was key to ensuring there was alignment with existing initiatives and availability of partners to deliver on programme options.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The overall purpose of the fund is to address crime and is therefore expected to have a positive impact on all communities including Māori.

25.     One of the recommended options is to provide funding to Community Patrol NZ (CPNZ), who work closely with the Akarana Māori Wardens and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei to deliver community patrols in the city centre.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     This fund is required to be spent within this financial year. There are no adverse financial implications of the decision to allocate this funding.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no risks associated with this decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     The Community Delivery Specialist Advisor will organise delivery of the approved programmes and will provide regular updates for the local board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo Waitematā Local Crime Prevention Fund

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor

Bevan Chuang - Specialist Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/00872

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waitematā Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The full work programme attachment update can be found in Attachment B to this report, however key activity updates from this period include:

·        ID 481 Parnell Festival of Roses: The 2023 Parnell Festival of Roses was successfully delivered at Dove-Myer Robinson Park on Sunday 5 November to an estimated audience of 7,000.

·        ID 467 Community Arts Broker: Procurement process for new vendor was completed in Q2, with service agreement being issued to the new community arts broker. A workshop is scheduled for February to present the new work programme.

·        ID 475 Access to Community Places: Q2 booking hours have increased by 203 percent and participant numbers have increased by 18 percent compared to the same period last year.

·        ID 992 Full Facilities Contracts: The second quarter continued to bring the weather challenges experienced in the last quarters. However, towards the tail end of the period we saw an improvement in conditions. Winter weather conditions continued to be a challenge. Despite this, the contractors adapted to the constraints encouraging a solution-focused approach in getting business as usual completed in our open spaces.

·        ID 43597 Heard Park Concept Plan: Parks and Community Facilities staff have completed the engagement plan and met with key stakeholder group to discuss project elements and collaborative opportunities.

·        ID 30481 Open Space Play Space Renewals: Gladstone Park Playground was successfully renewed and re-opened to the public towards the end of Quarter 2 in December.

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred, or merged).

5.       The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery or significant risk):

·        ID 379 Waitematā Waste Away: There has been limited delivery this quarter due to contractor capacity issues. The contractor facilitated a Love Food Hate Waste workshop in early December at the Waiōrea Community Recycling Centre. Discussions are underway with the contractor to determine what can be delivered through this project this financial year. Options for reallocation of some of the budget from this project is presented as a recommendation for re-allocation for this quarter 2 report.

6.       Auckland Council (Council) currently has several bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of half-year financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX on or about 28 February 2024.

7.       Due to these obligations the financial performance (Attachment C) attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

8.       Further attachments to support this quarter two report can be found as Attachment A, comprising a workshop memo on re-allocation discussion with the local board.

9.        The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

10.      This report presents several recommendations to support re-allocation or allocation of underspend/revenue amounts identified during quarter 2 reporting.

11.      These underspend/revenue amounts total $35,500 and includes $18,000 in filming revenue collected during the 2023/2024 Financial Year.

12.     As underspend or additional revenue amounts are identified, staff nominate or are asked to investigate whether projects or programmes within the department would benefit from additional funding to deliver an existing programme or service more efficiently, or to enhance a project or programme to deliver increased value.

13.     Projects suitable for re-allocation or further funding of Locally Driven Initiatives funding (LDI) have been identified by department staff and included as recommendations to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2023.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment C of the agenda report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group half-year results for 2023/2024 are released to the New Zealand Exchange (NZX), which are expected to be made public on 28 February 2024.

c)       Allocate $20,000 LDI from a combination of filming revenue ($18,000) and partial underspend of ID 782 Event Partnerships Fund ($2,000) towards the Grey Lynn Business Association Stages 1, 2, and 3 to procure specialist resource in support of the Business Improvement District establishment project.

d)      Re-allocate ID 739 Waitematā Waste Away underspend of $7,500 towards ID 704 Waipapa Stream Restoration.

e)      Allocate $8,000 LDI to Victoria Park Carpark from the remaining ID 739 Waitematā Waste Away underspend ($2,500) and the remaining ID 782 Event Partnerships Fund underspend ($5,500).

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     The Waitematā Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        External Partnerships

·        Auckland Emergency Management;

15.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph. [standard paragraph]

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

16.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green, and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

 

17.     The graph below shows the status of activity by stage in each department’s work programme. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates with staff commentary:

18.     ID 475 Access to Community Places: Q2 booking hours have increased by 203 percent and participant numbers have increased by 18 percent compared to the same period last year. The top two activities for Q2 were arts and cultural and meetings events. 89 percent of surveyed hirers indicated that they would recommend the facilities in this local board to others and 89 percent were satisfied with the facilities.

19.     ID 992 Full Facilities Contracts: The second quarter continued to bring the weather challenges experienced in the last quarters. However, towards the tail end of the period we saw an improvement in conditions. Winter weather conditions continued to be a challenge. Despite this, the contractors adapted to the constraints encouraging a solution-focused approach in getting business as usual completed in our open spaces. Infill planting was carried out and was successful in contributing to the overall infill planting goal for the year. The audit scope for this quarter remains steady, as we head into the warmer months, we will continue to work with the contractors to improve audit scores in response works, open space, built space and streetscapes. Mowing across our reserves and parks has been a slow process - this is due to the persistent high water table levels. To alleviate public pressure, signs were placed across all our parks alerting the public of areas which were too wet to mow. Moving into the spring season, we are already seeing the spring flush, resulting in exponential growth.

20.     ID  671 Local Civic Events: Gladstone Playground opening was held on 21 December 2023 with an attendance of 500 guests from the community and stakeholders. Guests included: Waitematā Local Board members and representatives of Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei.

21.     ID 726 Climate Action Network – Waitematā: This quarter, climate action network brokering included holding five climate network pop-up events at the Grey Lynn Farmer’s Market and the Parnell Farmer’s Market, with a further three events planned for December. Support was also provided to the sustainability ‘tent talks’ at the Grey Lynn Festival. There has been progress towards engagement at the Auckland City Library with an engagement pack created and meetings held with library staff. Membership of the Waitematā Climate Action Network Facebook page and email list were at around 381 and 493 respectively.

22.     ID 709 Newmarket / Middleton stream restoration – Waitematā: This quarter an on-site meeting was held with the new lead from Wai Ora Partnerships, From the Deck Community Group and the contractor. The plan was laid out and discussed for the work programme in the next six months and a site walkover was done on some of the areas that will need attention. Upcoming work includes a combination of pest plant control and pest animal control, with trap replacement where required. The community group also undertook eDNA testing in the stream at the end of the quarter and await results. There is a lot of storm damage including slips and one access point needs some attention, the group has costed this, and it will be looked at in the next quarter.

23.     ID 739 Waitematā Waste Away: There has been limited delivery this quarter due to contractor capacity issues. The contractor facilitated a Love Food Hate Waste workshop in early December at the Waiōrea Community Recycling Centre. Discussions are underway with the contractor to determine what can be delivered through this project this financial year. Options for reallocation of some of the budget from this project is presented as a recommendation for re-allocation for this quarter 2 report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

25.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is underway. Should changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

26.     The local board is invested in several sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include programmes such as:

·    ID 3482 Queen’s Wharf Bike Hub: In quarter two, the bike hub was open 49 days, had 756 visitors, 48 volunteer hours and repaired 246 bikes. Twelve bikes were gifted or sold at low cost to the community. The hub has had several additional positive reviews on online platforms. The e-bike loan scheme now operating from the site has been very successful with a long waiting list of people wanting to try the e-bikes for the two-week loan period. We have eight e-bikes at the site including two cargo bikes. This scheme is fully funded by Waka Kotahi for a trial period through to 2025.

·    ID 710 Te Wai Ōrea lake and wetland restoration: Maintenance and monitoring of previous plantings continues in this quarter. Te Ngahere will look to perform infill and aquatic species planting in quarters three and four in the new year.

·    ID 704 Waipapa stream restoration: Pest plant control contractors have carried out 18 hours of work targeting blue morning glory, privet seedlings, brush wattle, tradescantia and climbing dock in the upper areas of the Waipapa stream. Four community events have taken place. Ten students from two local high schools were hosted for a stream workshop and weeding bee. Some of these students returned for another workshop focusing on cleaning up a site they found with dumped inorganic rubbish in the Auckland Domain. The pōhutukawa donated have survived the flooding events and are growing well.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This report informs the Waitematā Local Board of the performance for ending 31 December 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The Waitematā Local Board Local Board Plan 2020 acknowledges and celebrates its commitment to te ao Māori by incorporating and delivering on initiatives which enhance these values and relationships.

30.     As reflected in Local Board Plan 2020: Outcome 1, the local board aspires that Māori are empowered, and their identity and culture is visible. The local board aims to celebrate and showcase Māori culture and grow respectful and reciprocal partnerships to ensure te ao Māori is embedded in decision making.

31.     The local board is currently investing in projects that seek to deliver on the values of Māori empowerment, cultural enrichment, and partnership. These include programmes such as:

·    ID 472 Māori Responsiveness: Local Māori aspirations in Waitematā: Judges Bay Mural renewal completed. Led by Facilities and Civic Contractor, designed by Hana Maihi, with the support of Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei. Taurarua is a significant landmark for Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei, particularly with the Auckland Founding story.

 

·    ID 471 Youth: Increased rangatahi voice, participation, and initiatives: Karl Bailey (who is leading the Waitematā Rangatahi Leadership initiative) has now established rangatahi representation on a core group from local schools, tertiary institutions, residents, Pasifika and rangatahi Māori. A strong connection with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei has been established along with other local stakeholders, institutions, and networks. The group are exploring opportunities for a dedicated space (for meetings and activations), including vacant premises in Newmarket square and the Waterfront. The Waitematā Youth Providers Network hosted two events: - In October, Koi Tu Centre for Informed Futures (University of Auckland) presented their research into youth mental health, and Andrea Webley presented the recommendations of the Waitematā Youth Deliberative Democracy Pilot (YDDP). Both presentations generated lively discussion amongst representatives from twelve diverse youth-serving agencies.

 

 

·    ID 3682 Library Services Waitematā: Waitematā local libraries' commitment to promoting the Māori language continued to grow, with an increase in spoken te reo Māori in the under 5 programmes across our local board libraries. This initiative enriches the learning experiences of our youngest community members and contributes to the preservation and revitalization of the Māori language. Over the last three months our Kapa Korero program at has had a notable increase in participation with 5 in September growing to 12 regular participants in December 2023.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     This report is provided to enable the Waitematā Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programmes.

33.     This report contains several recommendations for re-allocation of existing underspends and/or revenue.

34.     Waitematā Local Board currently has underspend amounts that it can consider for re-allocation via its Quarterly Report process, one from its Events Partnership Fund, managed by Connected Communities, and one from its Waste Away Programme managed by Infrastructure and Environmental Services.

35.     ID 482 Event Partnerships Fund underspend amount is $7,500. Previous re-allocation occurred during Quarter One (WTM/2023/106).

36.     ID 739 Waste Away Programme underspend amount is $10,000, due to limited contractor capacity in quarters one and two, resulting in lower programme delivery than what was forecasted.

37.     Waitematā Local Board is also in receipt of filming revenue which it collects as a contribution from filming permits and related activities which occur on its parks, reserves, and public spaces. This revenue is attributed directly to the Local Board and can be allocated to any project within the Local Board Work Programme. Filming revenue must be spent within the year in which it was collected, in this case the 2023/2024 Financial Year, otherwise it is lost.

38.     The filming revenue available for allocation is $18,000.

39.     The total underspend/revenue amount identified for possible re-allocation in Quarter 2 is $35,500.

40.     Not all projects or programmes can feasibly accommodate additional funding due to capacity or time constraints, so identified options are ones in which departments reasonably believe that additional funding would have a clear benefit for the delivery of a project before June 30, the end of the 2023/2024 Financial Year.

41.     As underspend or additional revenue envelopes are identified, staff nominate or are asked to investigate whether projects or programmes within the department would benefit from additional funding to deliver an existing programme or service more efficiently, or to enhance a project or programme to deliver increased value.

42.     Identified projects with re-allocation requests for Quarter 2 are as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Current FY23/24 Allocation

Additional Amount Requested

Staff Advice

 

1354, 3862, 3863

 

External Partnerships Business Associations

 

Grey Lynn Business Association Stages 1, 2, 3

 

Stage 1 - $5,000

 

Stage 2 - $5,000

 

Stage 3 - $12,000

 

 

$15,000 - 20,000

The Grey Lynn Business Improvement District (BID) establishment project requires additional funding to secure a resource for a minimum of 6 weeks but ideally 8 weeks leading up to, and during the ballot period. The resource will be engaged to manage the ballot campaign, update, and check voter details, monitor voting with focus on achieving the mandate and support the GLBA executive committee in communicating the benefits of BID programme to prospective BID members.

 

Staff recommendation is $20,000.

 

 

3057 (FY 2021/2022 Work Programme)

 

Parks, Sports, & Recreation

 

Victoria Park Carpark Commuter Parking Investigation

 

 

No current budget allocation

 

$8,000

Previously a project in the Local Board 2021/2022 Work Programme (WTM/2021/128), there are options for consideration regarding management and enforcement strategies for Victoria Park Carpark in response to unsustainable commuter parking.

 

This includes investigation design and planning for possible enforcement solutions, including paid parking and signage/line markings, which require approval from the Auckland Transport Traffic Control Committee. Funding would enable design works to occur to support this project.

 

Staff recommendation is $8,000.

 

 

704

 

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 

Waipapa Stream Restoration

 

$20,000

 

$5,000-12,000

 

(scalable activity based on further funding)

 

Additional funding for the Waipapa Stream Restoration programme would deliver increased outreach and engagement with the community, including market day pop-ups, collaboration events with Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei, and environmental DNA testing to monitor organism activity as an indicator of stream health. This funding is scalable to the amount allocated, however $5,000 is the minimum request.

 

Staff recommendation is $7,500, noting Waipapa Stream has previously suffered negative impacts because of adverse weather events.

 

 

702

 

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

Urban Ark Te Manawa Taiao

 

$40,000

 

$5,000 - $15,000

 

(scalable activity based on further funding)

 

Increase staff hours to focus more time on community engagement through events, communications, predator monitoring and biodiversity monitoring. This funding is scalable to the amount allocated, however $5,000 is the minimum request.

 

Staff recommendation is $0, noting limited budget available and that this request is exclusively for enhancement.

 

 

 

Financial Performance

43.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has several bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of half-year financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX on 28 February 2024.

Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g., building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

45.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

46.     The identified projects with re-allocation requests are exposed to levels of risk depending on the amount of additional funding allocated, if any.

47.     The Grey Lynn Business Improvement District establishment project requires additional support to effectively deliver on their ballot period and maximise the reach of the campaign to prospective BID members. Should the Local Board choose to allocate less funding than the requested amount, there is a risk that the BID establishment project has less resource to allocate towards the successful establishment of the BID. This may have negative impacts for the Grey Lynn Business Association, noting they have sought BID establishment in previous years with the ongoing support of the Waitematā Local Board.

48.     The Victoria Park carpark commuter parking investigation project has been a work programme item in prior years, namely the 2021/2022 Work Programme (WTM/2021/128). Design options resulting in paid parking implementation and enforcement require approval from the Auckland Transport Traffic Control Committee. An appropriate design will need to be submitted to this committee, and design work is required by a specialist parking consultant to achieve this. The risk of not funding this project is that commuter parking challenges continue to arise at Victoria Park carpark with no viable solution, which prevents park users from equitable access to the park.

49.     The Infrastructure and Environmental Services requests are opportunities to enhance existing delivery within the respective programme lines. There is no identified risk should additional funding not be allocated.

50.     Filming revenue must be spent within the year in which it was collected, in this case the 2023/2024 Financial Year, otherwise it is lost.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three, 31 March 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Quarter 2 Reallocations Workshop Memo

 

b

Waitematā Local Board Work Programme 2023/2024 Quarter 2 Report

 

c

Quarter 2 Financial Appendix - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nick Palmisano - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Transfer of the Community Centre Management Agreement to a new trust established to manage the Grey Lynn Community Centre

File No.: CP2024/00357

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve management of the Grey Lynn Community Centre to be novated (transferred) from the current provider, Grey Lynn Community Centre Incorporated, to the Grey Lynn Community Centre Trust.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council currently partners with Grey Lynn Community Centre Incorporated (GLCCI) to manage access and to activate the Grey Lynn Community Centre for the benefit of the community under a Community Centre Management Agreement (CCMA). For the 2024 financial year, GLCCI was paid a total of $73,444.96 (excluding GST), through a mix of Asset Based Service and Locally Driven Initiatives budget to achieve this outcome. 

3.       Prompted by the new legislation for incorporated societies, GLCCI reviewed their legal structure to better reflect their activities. GLCCI settled on the charitable trust model due to its comparative simplicity. GLCCI have since established the new legal entity, Grey Lynn Community Centre Trust (GLCCT). Trust board members are made up of the existing incorporated society members and it is proposed that the manager of the centre will remain the same. GLCCI is seeking local board approval to novate (transfer) the CCMA to the new trust entity.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      whakaae/approve the management of the Grey Lynn Community Centre to be novated (transferred) to the Grey Lynn Community Centre Trust.

b)      tono/request officers to enter into a novation (transfer) agreement with Grey Lynn Community Centre Trust.

Horopaki

Context

4.       The Waitematā Local Board currently partners with Grey Lynn Community Centre Incorporated (GLCCI) to manage community access and activation for the Grey Lynn Community Centre at 510 Richmond Road, Grey Lynn, Auckland 1021.

5.       The Grey Lynn Community Centre is owned and maintained by Auckland Council.

6.       The local board pays GLCCI to manage community access to the Grey Lynn Community Centre and to activate it for the benefit of the community via relevant programming under a Community Centre Management Agreement (CCMA).

7.       The current term under the CCMA runs until 30 June 2027 and the annual management fee is $50,377 (excluding GST), funded from the local boards Asset Based Services (ABS) fund (resolution WTM/2022/123a). This amount is increased yearly via Consumer Price Index (CPI) adjustment at a maximum of 3 per cent. For the financial year 2023/2024, the management fee was adjusted to $53,444.96 (excluding GST).

8.       Since financial year 2016, the local board have paid a top up $20,000 (excluding GST) from the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget for the delivery of services as outlined in the CCMA. This amount and related conditions are documented annually by council officers via variation agreements. The total paid to GLCCI to manage the centre for financial year 2024, including the top up amount, is $73,444.96.

9.       Under the CCMA, GLCCI provides access to members of the public and other community groups. They also plan and deliver community workshops and programmes that provide accessible and inclusive opportunities, particularly focussing on older adults, families with young children and babies, and migrant communities.

10.     In 2023, GLCCI began exploring alternative operational models through which to deliver their activities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     In 2023, in response to the Incorporated Societies Act 2022 coming into force, GLCCI decided to establish a charitable trust through which to deliver their activities.

12.     Their new legal entity is now Grey Lynn Community Centre Trust (GLCCT), Charities Services registration number: CC61519.

13.     The decision was due to the increasing complexity and challenge of adhering to legal requirements related to running an incorporated society, including maintaining mandatory membership numbers alongside declining public participation.

14.     To inform their decision, GLCCI sought legal advice on the most suitable model for their operations. They also considered which structure would enable them to remain connected to their local community, robust and viable as a facility manager, and offer community leadership roles within their organisation.

15.     The charitable trust structure was decided upon as it meets the above criteria and responds to the challenges of recruiting volunteers at this time. An incorporated society requires a membership of at least 15 members whereas a charitable trust structure requires a minimum of five board members. Seven board members have been retained from the existing incorporated society.

16.     From time to time, our community partners shift legal structure to better fit their capacity and purpose. Such changes can ensure best practice and enable our partners to continue delivering community outcomes on behalf of Auckland Council.

17.     In this case, the move by GLCCI from an incorporated society to a charitable trust benefits the group as it simplifies legal requirements related to the former structure thus increasing capacity to concentrate on the day-to-day operations of running the centre.

18.     The partner’s self-review of their structure represents good practice as they are reflecting on which model will best enable them to deliver to the community. Trust board members have been drawn from existing incorporated society members, and it is proposed that the manager would remain the same. Therefore, Auckland Council interactions with the new trust will remain the same and the impact for the council neutral.

19.     The benefit to the community is that the new entity will be able to focus more time on community programming as opposed to spending time and resource attracting a full cohort of 15 society members.

20.     GLCCI continue to operate the centre while they work to sufficiently establish the trust to receive and administer local board funding. Accordingly, the incorporated society will hold a Special General Meeting (SGM) to vote on a resolution to dissolve the Incorporated Society. The SGM is set for Tuesday 30 January 2024 after which the incorporated society will be wound up by 28 February 2024. As a part of this process all the tangible assets of the Incorporated Society will be transferred to the GLCCT.

21.     The new GLCCT is comprised of the same people as GLCCI including the same members and the proposal for the same manager of the community centre, making it technically a new entity but not materially. GLCCI have the necessary skills and experience to carry out the relevant services under the CCMA and these same skills and experience will transfer to the new entity, GLCCT. The result is a that it is a low-risk decision for the local board to partner with the new trust.

22.     GLCCI has requested Auckland Council’s approval to novate (transfer) the CCMA to the GLCCT, with the effect that GLCCI will be replaced by the GLCCT and all rights and obligations will be transferred to the GLCCT and GLCCI will cease to be party to the CCMA.

23.     Table one provides the two options that have been identified.
Table 1 – options

Options

Option 1:

Status quo 

Option 2:

Partner with new trust

Recommended

Detail

Board does not agree to novate the CCMA to GLCCT.

Board agrees to transfer the CCMA to GLCCT.

Benefits

·     GLCCI would continue to be the provider under the CCMA

·     A novation agreement will not need to be drafted and signed by the parties.

·     Continuity of service levels at centre

·     Community experience of centre remains consistent

·     Board maintain positive relationship with a trusted community partner

·     Partner continues to deliver on local board plan objectives.

Implications

·     GLCCI would continue to be the provider under the CCMA but if GLCCI has migrated assets to the new legal structure, they may be unable and/ or unwilling to continue to provide the services under the CCMA

·     Relationship with partner and potentially community negatively impacted if the CCMA is terminated.

·     A novation agreement will need to be drafted and signed by the parties.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Local community services and venues create a stronger sense of place and foster localism and place-based approaches. This has a positive impact on our resilience to climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Connected Communities manages the relationships and contracts with arts and community partners and Parks and Community Facilities are responsible for maintenance of the community centre. Subject to the outcome of this decision, staff will work with Parks & Community Facilities to manage the implications for council owned assets.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The partner currently delivers to Waitamatā Local Board Plan 2020 outcome: Provide accessible and inclusive opportunities and services that meet the needs of our diverse communities.

27.     GLCCI serve their local community by providing fair, easy and affordable access to a safe and welcoming venue. They are tasked with enabling and co-ordinating a wide range of activities that cater to the diversity of their local community.

28.     The purpose of the new GLCCT is to be “an integral part of Grey Lynn with values that reflect the diversity of the area, that supports cultural and creative expression and strengthens community by developing connections and networks. Delivered through: Facilitating a diverse range of activities to provide for the whole community. Enabling a safe environment for people to gather. Facilitating affordable spaces for community activities and presenting a clean & welcoming facility” (New Zealand charities register).

29.     Moving to a more the streamlined organisational structure of a charitable trust arguably allows the group to deliver even more effectively its service to the local community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

31.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan 2050, the 10-year Budget Plan 2021-2031 (Long-term Plan), the Auckland Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, the council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.  

32.     Partner-led arts and community services enable locally responsive activities, promoting participation, inclusion, and connection for all Aucklanders, including Māori.

33.     A CCMA includes Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), which require community partners to engage with Māori, and where appropriate support the delivery of programmes that local iwi may wish to run in the facility.

34.     When moving to a charitable trust, GCCLI’s reviewed their vision, mission, and values. The process facilitated GLCCI broadening their view towards Māori outcomes to include discussion of future programming of Te Tiriti and Te Reo classes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     There are no direct financial impacts associated with the decision to novate the CCMA to GLCCT. However, there could be a financial implication if consent to novate is declined and GLCCI decide to terminate the CCMA as GLCCI would be required to transition the management and operation of the community centre back to Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     There is no risk with novating the CCMA to the new entity, GLCCT. However, if the local board approve option 1, status quo, and GLCCI decide to discontinue providing the services under the CCMA, management and operation of the community centre would be transitioned to an incoming operator (whether Auckland Council or a third party).

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     If the local board approve recommended option 2, staff will administer a new CCMA with GLCCT.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lisa Waldner - Place & Partner Specialist

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Head of Community Delivery

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Proposed new community lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Society at 545 Parnell Road, Parnell

File No.: CP2024/00491

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Society (the group) for the upstairs office space within the Jubilee building located at 545 Parnell Road, Parnell.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Royal New Zealand Plunket Society seeks a new community lease to continue occupation and operation from a third party-owned building at 545 Parnell Road, Parnell.

3.       The group currently holds the lease on the building which has reached final expiry on 22 May 2022. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis on same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the local board to be part of the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023-2024 at their local board meeting on 18 July 2023 (resolution WTM/2023/117).

5.       The group aims to provide nursing services to new-borns via face to face through to home visits, clinics and mobile clinics and Parenting Education courses. They support the health and wellbeing of children aged up to five at the facility through providing:

• Well Child service

• Before School check service.

These activities align with the local board plan 2020 outcome 2 - Connected communities that are inclusive, accessible, and equitable.

6.       The group has provided all required information including financials, showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. The group has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

7.       This a third-party owned building. The group submitted their application to continue their service from the facility and through discussions with stakeholders, no concerns have been raised regarding the group’s continued service provision in the area.

8.       A site visit was undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained with acceptable wear and tear.

9.       A Community Outcomes Plan has been drawn up for the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement.

10.     Parks and Community Facilities - Area Operations and Maintenance are supportive of the proposed lease as it will allow for the continued provision of an important service. Additionally, the building wear and tear has been conveyed to the group and the group will be asked to reinstate these before they vacate.

11.     Staff also consulted with Panuku who holds the head lease. Panuku is supportive of the proposed lease as it will help contribute towards Opex Panuku incurs and Plunket’s lease will expire at the same time as theirs.

12.     This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to the group for a term of five years commencing from 1 March 2024 with one right of renewal expiring 31 May 2032.

13.     If the local board decides to grant the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      whakaae / grant, a new community lease to the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society for an area comprising approximately 48.55m2 located at 545 Parnell Road, Parnell on the land legally described as Lot 3 DP 362696 (as per Attachment A – 545 Parnell Road, Parnell), subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i)    term – five years, commencing 1 March 2024, with one right of renewal expiring 31 May 2032.

ii)   rent – remaining at $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded, increasing to $1300 at the end of the third year

iii)  operational charge remaining at $250 plus GST per annum increasing to $2184.75 plus GST at the end of the third year

iv)  Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B – Community Outcomes Plan).

b)      whakaae / approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

15.     The Waitematā Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023-2024 at their local board meeting on 18 July 2023 (resolution WTM/2023/117).

16.     The progression of this lease to the group at 545 Parnell Road, Parnell was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building/s and lease

17.     The upstairs office space is located at 545 Parnell Road, Parnell (refer to Attachment A Site Plan - 545 Parnell Road, Parnell). The land is legally described as Lot 3 DP 362696 contained in RT 255816 and is held in fee simple by Foundation Properties Limited (Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind).

18.     Royal New Zealand Plunket Society holds a community lease for the third party owned office space at 545 Parnell Road, Parnell.  

19.     Subsidised maintenance/operational costs for a council owned building are charged to the lessee.

20.     Royal New Zealand Plunket Society’s property manager advised that they will be looking into the heating and air-condition options for the space and submit a landlord approval application prior to undertaking any physical works. 

21.     The building is primarily used by the group to provide the following services that support the health and wellbeing of children aged up to five:

·    Well Child service

·    Before School check service

22.     These services provide benefits to tamariki.

Royal New Zealand Plunket Society

23.     The group was established in 1907 and its primary purpose is to provide:

·    nursing services to new-borns via face to face through home visits; clinics and mobile clinics and Parenting Education courses.

24.     The group sees approximately 16 tamariki per day across its services three to four days per week. There is at least two nurses and a clinic leader- oversees this site and other sites in the CBD and Auckland Eastern Bays.

25.     Council is responsible for the maintenance of the office space and over the years have attended to jobs such as fixing the window. Council will also be renewing the carpets.

26.     The group’s current community lease with the council commenced on 1 May 2019 and has expired on the 22 May 2022. The lease to the group is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

27.     At the expiry of a lease for a council owned building- in this case an office space owned by a third party and leased to council, a review of alternatives for the use of the premises should be carried out as good practice. 

28.     An expression of interest process can be undertaken to gauge interest and best use. However, if the incumbent group is needed in the area and the group is performing well, the local board has the discretion to grant a new lease to the group without undergoing an expression of interest process. 

Public notification and engagement 

29.     Engagement with mana whenua is not required on third party owned asset.

Assessment of the application

30.     The national body has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request, including an operating surplus nation-wide. Upon hearing the recommended rent charges, the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society confirmed they would like to continue delivering services supporting the health and wellbeing of children aged up to five from the site

31.     The area proposed to be leased to the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society consists of approximately 48.66m2 and is outlined in Attachment A – 545 Parnell Road, Parnell.

32.     The group has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there is sufficient income to meet expenses.

33.     The group has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

34.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained- with acceptable wear and tear. All maintenance and operational costs are funded by council.

35.     The group provides a valuable service to the local community by providing services noted in paragraphs 22 and 23 above.

36.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been drawn up for the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement. (Attachment B) . 

37.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated July 2023) sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.  

38.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to Royal New Zealand Plunket Society for a term of five years commencing from 1 March 2024 with one right of renewal until 31 May 2032.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     It is anticipated that activation of the building will result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission. The office in question is nested within a larger building. This shared workspace/community space will however decrease overall energy use, as users will not consume energy at individual workspaces. The shared space will provide opportunity and enable people to enjoy positive healthy lifestyles and will increase capability and connections within local community.

40.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

41.     Asset improvements and maintenance undertaken by the council will strive for maximum re-use and recycling of existing material. This will be in alignment with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle) to ensure minimum impact on greenhouse gas emission.

42.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

43.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. Parks and Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance is supportive of the proposed lease as it will:

·    allow for the continued provision of an important service and

·    the building wear and tear has been conveyed to the group and the group will be asked to reinstate these before they vacate.

45.     Panuku who holds the head lease have been consulted. Panuku is supportive of the proposed lease as it will:

·    help contribute towards Opex Panuku incurs and

·    expire at the same time as their head lease.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling the aforementioned services beneficial for the Waitematā Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

47.     The assessment of the application was workshopped with the Waitematā Local Board on 11 July 2023. The local board indicated its in principle support of the lease proposal given the group wished to continue serving from the space and no concerns raised about the group’s continued services provision in the area.

48.     The delivered activities align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020 outcome 2 and objective:

Table 1: 2020 Waitematā Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 2: Connected communities that are inclusive, accessible, and equitable

Provide opportunities to connect communities, through creative and diverse arts, sports, events, and community activities

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant a new community lease for 545 Parnell Road, Parnell is not required because the facility is third party owned.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. No concerns were raised regarding the financial implications for the new lease.

51.     On 8 June 2023, the Annual Budget 2023/2024 was approved by the Governing Body which included changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines of the rent fee for a community lease from $1.00 to $1,300.00 plus Goods and Services per annum.

52.     And the operational charge which covers, maintenance, building insurance, and electricity and water charges will be calculated at $45 p/m2.

53.     At the workshop with the Waitematā Local Board on 11 July 2023 and as the group submitted their application for a new lease prior to the update of the Community Occupancy Guidelines. The local board advised staff to retain the community lease charges at the current rates and increase to the updated rates after the third year.

54.     Ongoing maintenance of the asset will be covered by the council which is accounted for in current and future budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Society at 545 Parnell Road, Parnell, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome 2.

56.     The new lease affords the groups security of tenure, enabling them to provide essential services from a secure facility and attend to the day to day upkeep of the facility. Should the building remain unoccupied, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and possible improvements. Council will be liable for the asset/s regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     If the local board resolves to grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society to finalise the lease agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Location map and lease area

 

b

COP Royal NZ Plunket Society

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tsz Ning Chung - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Permanent changes to landowner approval process for filming activities

File No.: CP2024/00771

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve waiving the requirement for staff consultation with the local board on landowner approval for low and medium impact film shoot permit applications.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Screen Auckland, part of Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, is the film office responsible for attracting, advocating for, and facilitating filming activities across the Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland region. The approval process for filming permits is guided by the:

·     Auckland Film Protocol (2019) (Attachment A)

·     Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022

·     Local Board General Delegation to the Chief Executive and Delegation Protocols (2023).

3.       Screen Auckland staff are authorised to approve film permits with the requirement that officers consult the local board’s delegated lead when making landowner approval decisions.

4.       At the 16 August 2022 business meeting, the Waitematā Local Board agreed to partially waive the requirement in the Local Board Delegation Protocols for staff consultation with the local board on landowner approvals for low and medium impact film shoot permit applications for a 12-month period pilot trial (resolution #WTM/2022/147).

5.       At the Waitematā Local Board workshop on 14th November 2023, Screen Auckland informed the local board the pilot programme had ended and identified there was no risk to the quality of permit application decisions, as staff continue to rigorously apply the requirements of the Auckland Film Protocol and the Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022.

6.       Accepting this process as permanent will contribute to promoting Auckland as a film friendly destination, reduce the workload on the Local Board and contribute to the Auckland economy.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      agree to permanently waive the requirement (in the Local Board Delegation Protocols) for staff consultation with the local board on landowner approvals, for low and medium impact film shoot permit applications, as defined in the Auckland Film Protocol 2019 Impacts Table.

b)      agree that as per pilot programme, Screen Auckland notify the local board film lead of all low and medium impact film permits granted in local parks and facilities, ahead of these activities taking place.

c)       agree that Screen Auckland continues to work with Parks & Community Facilities staff in assessing and determining conditions for the use of local parks and facilities, where appropriate, for all film shoot permit applications

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Screen Auckland follows a rigorous process when reviewing applications and considers all applicable national and local legislation. It also liaises directly with the wider Auckland Council Whanau and other decision makers, in the approval process – such as: mana whenua groups, Tūpuna Maunga Authority, Auckland Transport, Environment and Biodiversity, Regional Parks, Sports Parks, Closed Landfills and Heritage.

8.       The process for film approvals is currently controlled by:

Local Board Delegation to the Chief Executive (2023)

Auckland Film Protocol (2019)

 

Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw (2022)

 

·    Must receive landowner approval when filming is on a park or in a local facility

 

·    Consult with Local Board portfolio holder on applications where landowner consent is required

 

·    Must refer the landowner consent decision to the Local Board portfolio holder where required

 

·    That landowner approvals for film permits can be administered by Community Facilities staff without the requirement to consult with local board film representatives

 

·    Film facilitator issues the Application Summary document, summarising the information supplied by the filmmaker to the appropriate council local board(s) and external stakeholders for consideration.

 

·    Minimises public safety risks, nuisance and misuse of council-controlled public places by enabling council to prescribe conditions and requirements in relation to all filming.

 

9.       The impacts table for the different film permit categories can be found on page 14 of the Auckland Film Protocol 2019 document in the supplied attachments.

10.     To encourage economic activity, the Auckland Film Protocol and the Public Trading Events and Filming Bylaw 2022, provide detailed guidance and purposefully seek to enable filming where there is negligible impact on public facilities – i.e. low and medium impact categories, also known as Minor Categories. Being able to reflect this ‘film-friendly’ intention in our administration processes, supports the intention of this regional policy. 

 

 

11.     In addition to considerations on impact scale, local boards can also advise Screen Auckland of any specific location-based areas that staff should consider when processing permit applications, such as ecologically sensitive areas. These are added to Screen Auckland’s film permit processing software system, FilmApp, for the future reference of Screen Auckland facilitators.

12.     Minor Category Pilot (resolution #WTM/2022/147) was introduced to decrease the amount of time a small and medium sized permit takes to process whilst ensuring that there was still minimal impact upon the local environment and community.

13.     Minor Category Pilot (resolution #WTM/2022/147) refers to applications that are low or medium impact filming activities that do not contain sensitive content eg. Smoking, weapons, alcohol, drugs etc

14.     All minor category applications require a notification to the local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     At the 14 November 2023 workshop with the local board, Screen Auckland reported that there was a positive response to filming activity in the community, including minor category applications, with no detrimental effects. The June 2023 “People’s Panel” provided the following stats:

Perceptions of Filming (When asked about professional filming in general)

·    87% agree filming creates job opportunities

·    81% agree it is good for tourism

·    72% agree it influences our art and culture

·    71% agree it is great for my community

Aucklanders Experiences

·    3 in 5 have seen or encountered professional filming in public places

·    7 in 10 would like to see more filming in Auckland as well as in their local area.

16.     Since there is a strong perception of professional filming’s contribution to the community and economy, Screen Auckland is recommending that local boards waive the requirement to consult for low and medium impact permit applications.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     As this is a change in internal delegation processes, there are no impacts on the climate, however the screen sector does take improving climate impacts and sustainability seriously. Screen Auckland is working with the screen sector to identify ways it can help contribute to a more sustainable Aotearoa. The New Zealand Screen Sector Emissions Study, produced by Screen Auckland in partnership with Arup, seeks to understand the climate impacts of the sector so together, we can map out a transition to sustainability.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Implementing the Minor Categories Pilot as a permanent process will reduce the administration time and workload involved in processing and approving film permit applications

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     Screen Auckland workshopped the implementation of the minor categories pilot as a permanent process with the local board on Tuesday, 14 November 2023.

20.     At the workshop, the Waitematā Local Board signalled support for the pilot programme to become permanent.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The existing permit system requires consultation with mana whenua on sites identified in Auckland Unitary Plan section D21, Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua, as well as Tūpuna Maunga Authority spaces. The minor category programme does not change this requirement to engage with Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     This is an internal process change around decision making only, thus it will have no financial implications

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     Screen Auckland film facilitators work closely with the Auckland Council Whanau and other decision makers in rigorously applying the Auckland Film Protocol 2019, The Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022 as well as the Local Board Protocol 2023 when assessing film permit applications, to mitigate risks to businesses, residents and the environment.

24.     The local board film lead will still have oversight of all applications, so a risk increase is very unlikely. The only thing that is changing is that this process will shift from a consultation with a local board film representative to a notification. All information will still be supplied.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     If approved, the minor categories programme will become permanent from Friday, 01 March 2024.

26.     Local boards will be notified of all applications that are received. Feedback remains required for high and major impact category film applications; however the local board are welcome to provide feedback on minor category low and medium applications if deemed necessary.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Film Protocol

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Hayley Abbott – Screen Facilitation Team Lead

Jess Hansen – Film Facilitator – Engagement

Kelly Boyed – Film Facilitator – Process and Tech

Authorisers

Matthew Horrocks – Screen Auckland Manager


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Planning, Environment and Parks Committee - 20/12/2023 Memorandum on Helicopter activity

File No.: CP2024/00457

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive and provide a public record of a memorandum providing an update on Council’s response to helicopter matters that was provided to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee and distributed to the Aotea/Great Barrier, Waiheke, and Waitematā Local Boards for their information.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to local board members via memoranda where no decisions are required.

3.       The following memoranda/information has been sent:

Date

Subject

20/12/2023

Memorandum – Helicopter activity

4.       This document is Attachment A

5.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this memorandum.  Local Board members via their support staff should direct any questions to the authors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the 20/12/2023 Memorandum – Helicopter activity (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20/12/2023 Memorandum – Helicopter activity

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2024/00312

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for the Waitematā local board Chair to provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board Chair to update the local board on activities she has been involved in since the last regular meeting.

3.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the Chair may, by way of report, bring any matter to the attention of a meeting of the local board or its committees that is within their role or function to consider.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Waitematā Local Board Chairperson’s Report for December 2023 to 20 February 2024.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair G Sage Report February 2024

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2024/00313

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For local board members to update the public and other local board members of the events attended and activities undertaken throughout the month as a local board member. To inform members, the public, and staff of any relevant news or updates regarding any specific responsibilities that members may have on behalf of the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At each business meeting local board members have the opportunity to provide a written report to inform their colleagues and constituents about the work they have undertaken and the results they have achieved since the previous meeting as a local board member.

3.       This report will be on the published agenda and available to the public. Producing a board member report is optional, not a requirement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written reports from Member A Bonham and Member R Northey for December 2023 to 20 February 2024, and any verbal reports.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member A Bonham Report February 2024

 

b

Member R Northey Report February 2024

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2024/00646

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitematā Local Board with the updated Hōtaka Kaupapa/governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the Hōtaka Kaupapa, a schedule of items that will come before the Waitematā Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

4.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities;

·    clarifying what advice is required and when;

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

5.       The schedule will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the February 2024 governance forward work calendar as attached.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

February Hōtaka Kaupapa / Goverance Forward Work Calendar

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Katherine Kang - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 February 2024

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Waitematā Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

13        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2023/2024 - Attachment c - Quarter 2 Financial Appendix

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information related to the financial results of the Auckland Council group that requires release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.