I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 21 February 2024

5:00 pm

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office
Shop 17B
93 Bader Drive
Māngere

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

 

Deputy Chairperson

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Members

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo, JP

 

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacqueline Robinson

Democracy Advisor

 

16 February 2024

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: jacqui.robinson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre                                                           5

8.2     Deputation - Youthline                                6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     6

11        Governing Body member Update                       9

12        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                                              11

13        Chairperson's Report                                         15

14        Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-Management Committee                                                           19

15        Te Kete Rukuruku Tranche Three Site Selection                                                              39

16        Aorere Pocket Park gifted name Reporepo Park from Te Ākitai Waiohua                             61

17        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter two 2023/2024                                        67

18        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendars                                                           103

19        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

20        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                             107

17        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter two 2023/2024

b.      Operating performance financial summary                                                  107

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 6 December 2023, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 


 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Brett Young of Community Asset Solutions and Daniel Cork of Māui Tu Consultancy will be in attendance to present the final iteration of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre feasibility study, which was adopted by the new committee and to show accoutability to Council and Local Board as an interested party.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Brett Young and Daniel Cork for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Youthline

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Geoff Lawson, Funding Coordinator at Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust will be in attendance to show the Board how Youthline have utilised local board grant funding in the community.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Geoff Lawson for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

Governing Body member Update

File No.: CP2024/00241

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2024/00561

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allow the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead roles, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

2.       To make any appointments to vacant positions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Members have an opportunity to update the board on their activities as topic area leads.

4.       The table below outlines the current leads and alternates for topic areas of local board business meetings and organisations on which the board is represented through a formal appointment.

Topic Area

Lead

Alternate

Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee Appointments Committee

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Staff consultation over landowner approval applications (excluding applications for filming and events)

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Staff consultation on applications for filming

Christine O’Brien

Makalita Kolo

Liquor licence matters, to prepare and provide objections, if any, and speak to any local board views at any hearings on applications for liquor licences

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Resource consent matters to:

i)         provide the local board views, if any, on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

ii)        prepare and provide local board’s views, if any, on notified resource consents and speak to those views at any hearings if required

iii)       provide the local board’s views on matters relating to or generated by the COVID-19 (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020 while this legislation remains in force

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Christine O’Brien

Local Government New Zealand Auckland Zone

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Select shared representatives to council working groups, working parties and other internal bodies, where there is a limited number of local board representatives to be selected from amongst all 21 or clusters of local boards

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Manukau Harbour Forum joint committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Ara Kōtui (formerly Māori input into local board decision-making political steering group)

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Staff consultation on applications for events and other activities on local parks and local facilities that also require regulatory approval, or may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Approve the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, when timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Arts, Community and Events (including libraries)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Christine O’Brien

Local planning, housing, and heritage – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

1st half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

2nd half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Transport

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Economic development

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Makalita Kolo

Youth, Children, Seniors and Uniquely Abled

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Water care COMMUNITY

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Auckland Airport Community Trust for Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Ambury Park Centre

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Christine O’Brien

Department of Corrections - Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Māngere Bridge Business Association

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Christine O’Brien

Māngere East Village Business Association

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Māngere Mountain Education Trust

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Makalita Kolo

Māngere Town Centre Business Association

Makalita Kolo

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Ōtāhuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Christine O’Brien

Ōtāhuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated Society joint committee

Makalita Kolo

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

South Harbour Business Association

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Makalita Kolo

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-Management Committee

i) delegate authority to the Chair of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to agree changes of a minor nature to the Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-management Agreement in Attachment A of the agenda report 6 December 2023, in consultation with Te Ākitai Waiohua / Pūkaki Māori Marae Committe

ii) koupou / appoint the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board as an additional member to Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-management Committee, to come into effect on agreement with Te Ākitai Waiohua / Pūkaki Māori Marae Committee on a total Co-management committee membership of six.

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

The Southern Initiative (TSI) Steering Group

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal and written reports from local board members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2024/00569

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the chairperson’s verbal and written report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 February 2024: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Item 13 - Chairs Report -  Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

17

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-Management Committee

File No.: CP2024/01026

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update on the signing of a refreshed Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka agreement

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its business meeting of 6 December 2023 the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board discussed the co-management of Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka with Te Ākitai Waiohua and the Pūkaki Māori Marae Committee. The local board agreed to delegate certain Reserves Act 1977 powers and duties to the co-management committee and agreed to a refreshed agreement for the co-management of Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka. The local board also delegated the power to the Chair of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to make minor amendments to the refreshed agreement in consultation with Te Ākitai Waiohua and the Pūkaki Māori Marae Committee.  Various minor amendments were subsequently agreed between the parties.

3.       On 13 December 2023 representatives of the Auckland Council, Te Ākitai Waiohua and the Pūkaki Māori Marae Committee attended a pōwhiri ceremony to mark the signing of the refreshed agreement. Various dignitaries who have worked to support the co-management of Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka also attended. The ceremony was a special occasion for all parties. On behalf of the the local board and Auckland Council, Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich (Chairperson Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board) and Phil Wilson (Chief Executive Auckland Council) signed the refreshed co-management agreement for Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka alongside the chairs of Te Ākitai Waiohua Settlement Trust and the Pūkaki Māori Marae Committee (Attachment A).

4.       On behalf of the local board, Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich gave a taonga to Te Ākitai Waiohua and the Pūkaki Māori Marae Committee to mark the occasion and affirm the commitment to co-management of the site.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the refreshed Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-management Agreement provided in Attachment A of the agenda report

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-management Agreement

21

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dominic Wilson - Head of Co-governance

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 


















Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

Te Kete Rukuruku Tranche Three Site Selection

File No.: CP2024/00270

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo.

Purpose of the report

1.   To seek local board approval to invite mana whenua to provide Māori names for 27 parks and three libraries in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area as tranche three of Te Kete Rukuruku.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board invited mana whenua to name 123 parks as dual names in March 2019. Sixty-two names were adopted in February 2021 as tranche one and a further 21 adopted in June 2023 as tranche two. Eighteen sites were removed from the tranche as they were unsuitable for naming or no longer under the jurisdiction of the local board.

3.   Twenty-two parks remain from the original list for naming. An additional five parks and three libraries are now being recommended to be included for naming, see table two for details.

4.   A workshop was held in November where all potential tranche three sites were discussed except for Walter Massey Park. This was an additional site suggested by Parks and Community Facilities for consideration by the local board, given the development works planned for this site.

5.   If all sites are agreed then this would result in 27 parks and three libraries going forward to iwi for naming in tranche three, as outlined in Attachment A.

6.   All sites in tranche three are intended for naming as dual names where the Māori name is added to the existing name and nothing is taken away.

7.   Public consultation is not sought on the Māori names provided by iwi, however consultation on the selection of sites may be undertaken at the local board’s discretion. Should the local board consider that there are parties that may be affected by the addition of a Māori name, it is recommended that discussions with those parties occur prior to iwi being invited to name the site.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the addition of five parks and three libraries, shown in table one below, for Māori naming as part of Te Kete Rukuruku.

Table one

Existing Name

Address

David Lange Park

98R Bader Drive, Māngere

Luke Street East Esplanade Reserve 1

132 Luke Street East, Ōtāhuhu

Favona Road Esplanade Reserve

2R Favona Road, Favona

Norana Avenue Reserve

31 Norana Avenue, Favona

Walter Massey Park

10R Hain Avenue, Māngere East

Māngere Bridge Library

5-7 Church Road, Māngere Bridge

Māngere East Library

370 Massey Road, Māngere East

Māngere Town Centre Library

121 Bader Drive, Māngere

 

b)      whakaū / confirm the list of 27 parks and three libraries detailed in Attachment A for tranche three of Te Kete Rukuruku and invite iwi to provide Māori names as dual names for these sites

c)       acknowledge the intent for Auckland Council to enter a mātauranga agreement that commits to upholding the correct use of Māori names and to use them only for purposes that have a community outreach or educational purpose (non-commercial use)

d)      ohia / endorse the Te Kete Rukuruku programme and process for Māori naming of parks and facilities.

Horopaki

Context

8.       Te Kete Rukuruku is a culture and identity programme that collects and tells the unique Māori stories of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland. It is a partnership, led by iwi, between Auckland Council and all 19 mana whenua groups that have interests across the region.

9.       A key outcome of the programme is for te reo Māori to be seen, heard, learned and spoken. The programme contributes towards reclaiming Māori identity, and the restoration of mana and mauri (life force) to the whenua (land). This is done through the restoration of the Māori language, traditional names and associated narratives.

10.     Te Kete Rukuruku process, as agreed with iwi and local boards, is that te reo Māori names are provided by mana whenua. Public feedback on these names is not sought. Mana whenua have the mātauranga and the mana for deciding on appropriate Māori names for the whenua.

11.     Once received, the Māori names will be accepted and adopted by the local board. Communication and public notification of the Māori names will commence following this formal adoption.

Project Scope

12.     The scope of Te Kete Rukuruku, in relation to the Māori naming of parks and places, is defined as the naming, renaming or dual naming of parks and places throughout Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland.

13.     The programme recognises that there was a rich layer of Māori names that existed across the isthmus. It provides an opportunity for Aucklander’s to learn te Reo, Māori history and Māori values relevant to their communities.

14.     In most cases Māori naming through Te Kete Rukuruku is dual naming. Dual naming means that a Māori name is added to the existing name, thereby enriching the stories about that place or facility. The existing name is not removed. Signage will present both names with the English name following the Māori name. This is in accordance with the council’s Māori Language Policy and signage guidelines.

15.     Dual naming also means that a Māori name sits alongside another name that is not related in its meaning. In other words, the two names are not translations of each other but are independent and unique.

16.     The local board may choose to adopt a sole Māori name after the following considerations:

·     the history of the existing name

·     the community’s connection to the name

·     the usage of the name by the community

·     whether any impacts might arise from its removal.

17.     Where it is considered appropriate to replace a name, the local board will need to carefully consider who the affected parties are and determine if community engagement is required.

18.     Public consultation is not undertaken by Te Kete Rukuruku or mana whenua as part of the naming process. Any consultation with community groups, stakeholders or the public is at the local board’s discretion. It is recommended that engagement occur prior to the parks becoming part of the Te Kete Rukuruku programme and being put forward to iwi for naming.

19.     Te Kete Rukuruku is not a signage project. Once names are adopted, signage will be replaced only when due for renewal. Should the local board wish to upgrade signage sooner to reflect the new names, funding would be required from the local board’s Locally Driven Initiatives budget.

Gazettal

20.     The council, as landowner, can name parks and places by resolution through exercising its power of general competence under section 12 of the Local Government Act 2002. Local boards are the allocated decision-makers for the naming of local parks, as resolved by the Governing Body 28 June 2018 resolution GB/2018/106.

21.     Where the land is vested in council and held as reserve under the Reserves Act, the council may name or change the name of a reserve by notice in the Gazette (s16(10) Reserves Act).

22.     As part of Te Kete Rukuruku process, any sites subject to the Reserves Act 1977 will be gazetted once the local board has adopted the names.

Libraries

23.     The libraries team has been leading a programme to provide te reo Māori names for the 55 Auckland Council libraries across the Auckland region.

24.     Research has been conducted to determine a naming convention that would be appropriate for libraries, this has included consultation with mana whenua and historians.

25.     The preferred naming convention for libraries is Te Pātaka Kōrero o (Māori place name).

26.     The concept of pātaka kōrero was developed as a metaphor for libraries. The notion of a pātaka (food storehouse) has been used as an analogy of feeding the minds of people. It also refers to the historical and cultural importance of the pātaka as a central facility of marae. Kōrero refers to the crucial role of language, stories and discussion in the transferral of information. Therefore, the combination of all these concepts reveals “Pātaka Kōrero”.

27.     Te Kete Rukuruku have agreed to support the library process by engaging with mana whenua and local boards. The library names will be included as part of the park naming process. This will confirm the site-specific portion of the names and formalise them by resolution.

Background

28.     The rationale and benefits of the programme was agreed by Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board at its business meeting on 20 March 2019. This included the process for identifying and adopting names and narratives. At this meeting iwi were also invited to name 123 parks as dual names (resolution MO/2019/23).

29.     Sixty-two park names were adopted in February 2021 as tranche one (resolution MO/2021/10). Eighteen parks were removed from the tranche as they were either too insignificant, or no longer under the jurisdiction of the local board. Forty-three sites were carried forward into tranche two.

30.     There are four libraries in this local board area:

·     Māngere Bridge Library

·     Māngere East Library

·     Māngere Town Centre Library

·     Ōtāhuhu Pātaka Kōrero / Ōtāhuhu Library (which is part of Tōia).

31.     A workshop was held on 22 September 2021 where the local board supported the addition of three libraries to the list of 43 parks to be named. Ōtāhuhu Pātaka Kōrero / Ōtāhuhu Library already has a Māori name so is not included.

32.     The naming convention currently being used for Ōtāhuhu is inconsistent with the agreed convention of Te Pātaka Kōrero o (Māori name). The libraries team will correct this digitally, and on signage as it comes up for renewal. The other three libraries will be named in accordance with the city-wide convention of Te Pātaka Kōrero o (Māori Name) as part of tranche three.

33.     In June 2023, the local board adopted 21 names that had been presented by three iwi, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaoho and Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua as tranche two.

34.     The remaining 22 parks and three libraries are able to go forward into tranche three. Eleven of those 22 parks are on hold, pending further discussion among iwi as to who will name them. This potentially could cause further delays with those 11 sites.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

35.     Analysis and adviceA workshop was held on 1 November 2023 where the remaining 22 tranche two parks were discussed, and additional sites considered for inclusion in tranche three. The additional sites discussed for inclusion were David Lange Park, Luke Street East Esplanade Reserve, Favona Esplanade Reserve, and Norana Reserve.

36.     The local board indicated that they would support these sites going forward for Māori naming in tranche three. They have consequently been added to the list for approval. Any known history behind these additional names is included in table two below.

37.      Parks and Community Facilities have advised that there is development planned in Walter Massey Park that will include new signage. Should the local board wish this park to have both a Māori and European name, it would need to be included in tranche three, for the name to be adopted prior to the new signage going in. Research about the history of Walter Massey is included in table two below.

Table two

Existing Name

Location

Known history

Comment

David Lange Park

Bader Drive

Minister of foreign affairs, MP for Māngere from 1977 to 1996 and prime minister from 1984-1987. His father was a well-respected doctor who lived and worked in the area and was remembered by some for forsaking payment for those in need.

Iwi do not want to detract from the existing name of a family that is well respected in the area. The addition of a Māori name will add to the mana of the site and the first family of David Lange have been contacted and advise this is supported. His second family have not been contacted.

Favona Esplanade Reserve

Favona Rd

Likely named after the road. The Favona Estate was subdivided in 1910. The name comes from favonius, Latin for the zephyr or west wind.

A popular and well used cycleway. Unlikely anyone knows the site is called Favona Esplanade Reserve. Functions as a coastal extension of Norana Avenue Reserve.

Luke Street Esplanade Reserve

132 Luke St East

Likely named after the street. Street named after Samuel Luke (1832 - 1906), a farmer who held several public offices including Chairman of the Auckland Education Board for over 30 years.

This reserve is contiguous with a site previously named. This could potentially be an extension of that existing Māori name.

Norana Avenue Reserve

Norana Avenue

Likely named after the street. The street was described in 1937 as 600 yards long, with 33 residences and named 20 years before (1917). Name in use from 1906, and possibly named by the local Nolan family.

A popular and well used cycleway runs through this site from Favona Esplanade Reserve.

Walter Massey Park

Hain Ave

Born in 1883 he was the son of William Ferguson Massey. His father was an early landowner, Reform Party leader and Prime Minister. Walter was a member of parliament from 1931 to 1935 and received the King George V Silver Jubilee Medal in 1935.

Jubilee medals appear to have been awarded for civil or military service as a personal souvenir from King George V on the twenty fifth anniversary of his accession to the Throne. 1,500 of the 80,000 medals were allocated to New Zealanders.

 

38.     Te Kete Rukuruku is not aware of any reason not to include Walter Massey Park in tranche three, as suggested by Parks and Community Facilities staff. The name Walter Massey would be retained. Many families support the addition of a Māori name and story to a park named after an ancestor, but not all do. Should the local board consider that engagement with family members, or any other stakeholders, is required before including the park for naming, then it should not be included in tranche three. This is to enable these conversations to occur.

39.     Consultation on local park naming is a local board decision. Under the Local Government Act 2002, Part 6, Section 78, a local authority must give consideration to the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by, or have an interest in, the matter.  It does not require any specific consultation process or procedure to occur, it is at the local boards' discretion.

40.     The majority of naming undertaken through Te Kete Rukuruku has not involved public consultation on site selection. Some engagement has occurred on a case-by-case basis, when English names are being removed, or when there is a strong interest from a community, volunteer organisation or family associated with the park or its existing name.

41.     All parks will go forward for dual naming in tranche three. A Māori name will be added, the existing name retained, and nothing is taken away.

42.     Te Kete Rukuruku and mana whenua do not routinely engage with the community as part of the naming process. If the local board feel that a site requires further community engagement prior to receiving a Māori name, then it should be removed from the list to allow this to occur.

43.     Any contiguous sites will be considered for one Māori name, should mana whenua feel this is appropriate. An example of this is Luke Street Esplanade. This reserve is contiguous with the previously named Tūreititanga / Convoy Lane Esplanade Reserve 2.

Communications approach

44.     The local communications team will use local board and council channels to communicate the decision made by the local board for tranche three names. We will focus on when the new names will be adopted, what the community is gaining and being proud of what is being achieved for all Aucklanders.

45.     Information for park stakeholders including hirers, leases, volunteers etc, will also be developed. The information will inform them on the decisions and the new names once they have been adopted.

46.     Content will be developed in consultation with mana whenua.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

47.     There are no substantive climate change impacts relating to this matter.

48.     The inclusion of Māori names adopted through Te Kete Rukuruku is planned to align with signage renewal projects. This minimises environmental impacts and unnecessary wastage of resource.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

49.     Te Kete Rukuruku is a cross-organisational regional programme that delivers on council’s Māori Language Policy and Kia Ora Te Reo. The policies are a priority within Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, the organisation’s Māori Outcome Performance Management Framework.  It also delivers on Kia Ora Te Ahurea (the Māori culture and identity outcomes). The programme helps to reclaim Māori identity and our unique point of difference in the world.

50.     The Māori language policy acknowledges that te reo Māori is an official language of Aotearoa and should receive equal status to English and NZ Sign Language.

51.     Te Kete Rukuruku outcomes align with the aspirations of the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), as articulated in the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2017, Māori Plan.

52.     This local board work programme item is a partnership programme, with the naming and narratives being led by mana whenua. It seeks to bring rigour to the process of naming across the council group over time.

53.     The programme has also triggered the development of new bilingual signage templates that are now being used across the organisation.

54.     The Parks and Community Facilities department is responsible for renewal of existing signage and will incorporate the new dual name as and when signage is renewed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

55.     Through partnering with mana whenua on this project, it is envisaged that relationships between mana whenua and the local board will be strengthened.

56.     Māori names are considered and connected to the sites and the area. The names add depth and interest to the park for the community.

57.     Dual language naming signage and bilingual signage helps to enrich park user experience.

58.     Partnering with mana whenua through Māori naming and associated storytelling is directly aligned to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2023:

·    Ō Tatou Tāngata / Our people objective: Achieving Māori aspirations through partnership.

Ø Key Initiative: Strengthen partnerships with local mana whenua through project delivery including Te Kete Rukuruku.

·    Tō Tātou Hapori / Our community objective: Continue to work in partnership with hau kāinga

Ø Key Initiative: Continue to develop partnership opportunities with hau kāinga through project delivery, including Te Kete Rukuruku

59.     Once the names are adopted and their narratives received, the local board and Auckland Council are permitted to use them for community outreach and educational purposes (non-commercial).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     This programme helps to increase Māori identity and belonging and is aligned with outcomes in the Auckland Plan.

61.     The programme contributes towards outcomes from the Te Reo Māori Action Plan 2020-2023. The action plan brings to life the Māori Language Policy (2016). The plan also describes actions to champion a bilingual city where te reo Māori is seen, heard, spoken and learned.

62.     Adopting Māori names and narratives will increase the visibility of te reo Māori in the local board area. It will safeguard the stories and values of mana whenua and help ensure their survival.

63.     The adoption of Māori names is supported by iwi. All names submitted have considerable thought and research reflected through a Māori lens. 

64.     Te Kete Rukuruku enables the restoration of mana and mauri (life force) to the area through the return of the Māori language. It also raises the visibility of the traditional use and importance of this land to mana whenua.

65.     Te Kete Rukuruku has sought to establish a best practice approach to Māori naming, and the collection and sharing of stories.

66.     Mātauranga agreements are being developed to ensure that names and stories are protected by the council. It is important that the correct use is upheld and that they are only used for purposes that have a community outreach or educational purpose (non-commercial use).

67.     As a partnership programme, all aspects of providing names and narratives is led by the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau. This is appropriate as mana whenua are those with the mana in this area to carry the responsibility for Māori naming.

68.     There are a large number of resident mataawaka (Māori who live in Auckland and are not in a mana whenua group) who will have a great interest in these new names and narratives. This provides an opportunity to engage with mataawaka Māori organisations and invite them to embrace and help champion the names and narratives once the names are adopted. It provides greater opportunity for urban Māori to see themselves reflected in the area around them through the presence of the Māori language and their associated stories.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

69.     Māngere Otahuhu Local Board has two line items in their work programme for the 2023/2024 financial year

·   Sharepoint ID 2831: Carry forward of $3,000 to allow for a whakarewatanga / unveiling event at Te Taahuhu / Criterion Reserve.

·   Sharepoint ID 3461: Allocated $3,000 budget to complete phase one, shared interests for tranche three this financial year.

70.     Further funding of $4,500 is required and is expected to be approved as part of the local boards work programme for financial year 2024/2025. This funding provides a partial contribution to iwi for their time to research, ratify and submit the tranche three names.

71.     It is not expected that names will be received for these tranche three sites until next financial year.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     Several risks and issues were highlighted at the outset of this programme or added as the programme has progressed. These risks are carefully managed throughout the process and mitigated in a variety of ways, as outlined in table three below:

Table three

Potential Risks

Mitigation

Multiple mana whenua having an interest in the parks, with differing views on naming.

Timeframes are extended when required to allow robust discussion amongst iwi, should this occur. The approach of the programme has been to focus on a quality agreed outcome.

Extended delays in the adoption of Māori names, continuing the predominance of English only names and missing renewal opportunities.

Splitting the tranche to allow for adoption of names as they are finalised, rather than waiting for the completion of the entire tranche. This is particularly relevant when a high number of parks are being named.

Potential negative public reaction to Māori names.

The English name is retained should there be any known significance, with the Māori name being added. Communications once the Māori names are adopted to ensure a full understanding of the significance of the names and their meanings.

High costs of replacement signage.

Signage, with the exception of one exemplar park, will be replaced as it comes up for renewal so that no additional costs are incurred. Signage in good condition in the exemplar park will be reskinned rather than replaced.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     Once the sites have been resolved for naming iwi will begin the shared interest phase of the programme. This involves the following:

·   a formal invitation from the local board to name the list of sites is passed on to iwi

·   any background information or development plans for any of the sites is provided

·   consideration of each individual site is undertaken by iwi

·   identification of which sites are of interest or are in areas of importance is completed

·   multiple hui with other iwi who have also identified an interest in naming the sites may be necessary

·   agreement on who will name each site, either solely by one iwi or jointly by two or more iwi, is finalised

·   if jointly naming sites with other iwi, agreement on how that process will work is required.

74.     The local board communications team will liaise with the local board on any media releases, or information requiring dissemination in relation to the selection of the tranche three sites for naming.

75.     The local board will need to approve funding for the next phase of tranche three as part of their annual work programme for financial year 2024/2025.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Kete Rukuruku Site List for Māori Naming

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dawn Bardsley - Naming Lead

Authorisers

Anahera Higgins - Head of Māori Outcomes

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services & Strategy

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 












Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

Aorere Pocket Park gifted name Reporepo Park from Te Ākitai Waiohua

File No.: CP2024/00409

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the name Reporepo Park, gifted by Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority, as the new name for the pocket park in Kāinga Ora’s Māngere Aorere Development, currently referred to as Aorere Pocket Park.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       ​Kāinga Ora has worked in partnership with Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority through the design and construction of the Māngere Aorere Development. 

3.       ​Kāinga Ora’s Māngere Aorere Development will include approximately 471 additional dwellings, ranging in size from one to six bedrooms. 

4.       ​Aorere Pocket Park is a new parcel of open space within the development. 

5.       ​Once the residential development is completed, the park will predominately be surrounded by three-storey, walk-up apartments. The pocket park will provide ‘doorstep’ access to small amenity and socialising spaces and visual relief in intensified development areas. It will also serve as a through route to the surrounding streets. 

6.       ​Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority has gifted the name ‘Reporepo Park’ to the local board to use as the new name for Aorere Pocket Park.   

7.       ​Reporepo relates to the marshland that Aorere was built on.  

8.       ​As Kaitiaki has endorsed the gifted name Reporepo Park, council’s Te Kete Rukuruku naming process is not required.  

9.       ​The ancient narrative of Mataoho (the god of volcanic activity) was the inspiration for Aorere Pocket Park’s concept plan. Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority Storytelling was used to guide the design and placement of play elements throughout the park.  

10.     ​The concept plan for the park was approved by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board at their business meeting on 6 December 2023 (resolution number: MO/2023/189). No work has been completed to date on the park.  

11.     ​Within the Māngere Aorere Development, Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority also gifted the names ‘Reporepo Street’ and ‘Paneke Street’ (August 2021, resolution number MO/2021/101). 

12.     ​Kāinga Ora aim to have the park open to the community October 2025. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt Reporepo Park as the new name for Aorere Pocket Park.

 

Horopaki

Context

​Background information about Aorere Pocket Park. 

13.     ​Aorere Pocket Park is a new parcel of open space within Kāinga Ora’s Māngere Aorere Development (figure 1). Approximately 471 additional dwellings are proposed for the development, ranging in size from one to six bedrooms. 

Text BoxFigure 1: Aorere Pocket Park within the Māngere Aorere Development 

 

14.     The result of a land swap agreement between council and Kāinga Ora (resolution number MO/2020/174), the new park aims to enhance the surrounding development's open space and recreation opportunities, by providing playspaces, passive open space and connecting pathways. The land swap was finalised in December 2022. 

15.     ​Kāinga Ora are proposing to have the park fully developed and open to the community in October 2025.  

​Overview of the gifted name process  

16.     ​Kāinga Ora requested engagement with mana whenua on 29 September 2020, when it was agreed that they would work with Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority on the new park design. 

17.     ​Originally, Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority gifted the name Paneke Park, meaning to move forward or pass by. However, this name had previously been gifted to Radonich Park, Māngere East, as part of council’s Te Kete Rukuruku naming process. 

18.     ​Kaitiaki from the following iwi endorsed the name Reporepo Park:

·             ​Ngāti Te Ata 

·             ​Ngāti Tamaoho  

·             ​Ngāti Tamaterā  

·             ​Ngaati Whanaunga  

·             ​Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei  

·             ​Te Kawerau  

·             ​Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki 

·             ​Te Kawerau ā Maki. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     Consultation with the iwi listed in paragraph 18 was undertaken by Kāinga Ora and Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority.  

20.     ​The gifted name ‘Reporepo’ has been checked against the local board’s previous Te Kete Rukuruku tranche of gifted names. No duplication was identified. Once the local board approves the gifted name, ‘reporepo’ will be added to the Te Kete Rukuruku register to avoid future duplications.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     There are no substantive climate change impacts relating to this matter

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Apart from council’s Te Kete Rukuruku naming team, the decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     ​The local board’s decision sought through this report is consistent with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2023 objectives: 

​“Achieving Māori aspirations through partnership, project delivery, and increased co-governance across our projects”. 

24.     ​The decision is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     ​​Māori names are considered and connected to the sites and the area. The name adds depth and interest to the park for the community. 

26.     ​​Adopting Māori names and narratives will increase the visibility of te reo Māori in the local board area. It will safeguard the stories and values of mana whenua and help support their growth.  

27.     ​In September 2020, mana whenua agreed that Kāinga Ora would work with Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority on Aorere Pocket Park’s design and naming.  

28.     ​Kāinga Ora has confirmed that all mana whenua groups listed in paragraph 14 have endorsed the name gifted by Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority. The mana whenua consultation is therefore considered to be sufficient and completed.  

29.     ​Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority has expressed a desire to be involved and work with Kāinga Ora in the implementation of the park’s concept plan, having already sourced 34 kowhatu (rocks) for placement in the park as per the concept plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     ​The park naming process does not raise any financial implications for council.  

31.     ​Kāinga Ora has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for Aorere Pocket Park’s new name.  

32.     ​The location and design of the park’s naming signage have been included in the endorsed concept plan.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The decision sought through this report proposes no significant risks to council. The process followed is similar to the Te Kete Rukuruku naming programme, which the local board supports.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     ​The reserve is classified under the Reserves Act 1977 and gazettal of the park name will occur once the gifted name is approved. 

35.     ​The name will be entered into the council’s website, GIS and SAP systems. 

36.     ​Council staff recommend that the local board work with Kāinga Ora and Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority to confirm if an unveiling event is required to promote the renaming and opening of the park in October 2025.   

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emily Wagon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter two 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/00671

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·        Moana-Nui-a-Kiwi Pool and Leisure Centre continues to enable and co-ordinate a wide range of activities that cater to the diversity and needs of the local community.

·        The Economic Broker continued delivery of the Local Board’s economic objectives by working on the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund 2023.

·        The Seaside Park carpark construction completed, and asset handed over to operations.

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred, or merged). The following key activities were reported with some risk or issues, which are being managed:

·        Mangere Bridge Library - comprehensive renewal.

·        David Lange Park - upgrade suburb park.

·        Achieving Māori Outcomes Māngere-Otahuhu: Tuia Programme.

·        House Park - demolish and rebuild toilet block and changing rooms.

5.       Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the New Zealand, Singapore and Swiss Debt Markets (Quoted Bonds). As a result, the Council is subject to continuous disclosure obligations, which it must comply with under the listing rules of the NZX (Listing Rules), the listing rules of other exchanges and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). This policy has been implemented by Council to ensure it complies with its continuous disclosure obligations.  These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 28 February 2024.

Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this report is excluded from the public. 

6.        The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2023.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the agenda report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group half-year results for 2023/2024 are released to the New Zealand Exchange (NZX), which are expected to be made public on 28 February 2024.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        External Partnerships

·        Customer and Community Services

8.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph. [standard paragraph]

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

9.       The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).


 

 

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

 

10.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates

11.     Activation of community-led venue partners: Moana-Nui-a-Kiwi Pool and Leisure Centre continues to enable and co-ordinate a wide range of activities that cater to the diversity and needs of the local community. The customer satisfaction score for the quarter is 80%.

12.     Community Delivery of Economic activities: the Economic Broker continued delivery of the Local Board’s economic objectives by working on the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund 2023. A total of $59,950 had been allocated to 31 successful applicants.

13.     Seaside Park - renew carpark and accessway: the Seaside Park carpark construction completed, and asset handed over to operations. Additional scope of work has been identified to include two side carparks along the accessway due to asset deterioration. Design and planning currently underway.


 

14.     Completed activities in this quarter included:

·        Mangere Town Centre Building and Library - renew roof and refurbish interior: the upstairs offices have been refurbished.

·        Mangere Arts Centre/ Nga Tohu o Uenuku -renew roof cladding and internal gutter: the contractor has completed the roof refurbishing.

·        Kiwi Esplanade (Bird Refuge & Pump House) - renew toilet and changing room facilities: the contractor has completed the refurbishment to the Kiwi Esplanade toilet and changing room facility.

Activities on hold

15.     ID20552: Mangere Bridge Library - comprehensive renewal. This project on-hold, as this project is funded in 2024/2025, this project has been approved as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme which means this project can progress earlier than anticipated should resource allow.

16.     ID31720: David Lange Park - upgrade suburb park. There is no funding allocated in FY24 for this project.

17.     ID3557: Achieving Māori Outcomes Māngere-Otahuhu: Tuia Programme. For 2024 this project is on hold due to uncertainty surrounding funding and the Governing Body decision in 2023 to withdraw from membership of Local Government NZ and the Mayor’s Taskforce for Jobs.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

18.     These activities are deferred from the 2023/2024 work programme:

·        ID28682: House Park - demolish and rebuild toilet block and changing rooms.This project will be scoped for works to commence in future years.

Cancelled activities

19.     These activities are cancelled:

·        ID3509: Hibiscus Mahi Programme. There is no local board funding in this financial year that has been allocated to the Hibiscus Mahi Programme. The programme continues to be run by IAM but with a much smaller number of Hibiscus Mahi hosts within and around the Māngere town centre due to funding constraints.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

21.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     This report informs the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of the performance for ending 31 December 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The local board remains committed to integrating and supporting work that contributes to outcomes for Māori. This includes enhancing partnerships and collaborative ways of working with mana whenua and mataawaka.

25.     Some of the activities in the local board’s 2023/2024 work programme (Attachment A) have specific impact on the wider Māori community, these activities include:

·        ID253: Māori Responsiveness Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

·        ID243: Local implementation of Ngā Hapori Momoho (Thriving Communities) councils social wellbeing strategy – Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

·        ID30687 and ID24064: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu - renew signage -Te Kete Rukuruku - Māori naming of parks and places

·        ID1042: Pukaki Crater Co-Management Committee

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     This report is provided to enable Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report. 

Financial Performance

27.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of half-year financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX on 28 February 2024.

Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g., building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

29.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three, 31 March 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Work Programme 2023/2024 Q2 Report

73

b

Operating performance financial summary - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nicole Braganza - Advisor Plans & Programmes

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 































Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendars

File No.: CP2024/00571

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa for February 2024 for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is provided in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Hōtaka Kaupapa.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

 


 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 February 2024

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

17        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter two 2023/2024 - Attachment b - Operating performance financial summary

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information related to the financial results of the Auckland Council group that requires release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.