I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Governing Body will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 29 February 2024

9.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Tira Hautū / Governing Body

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Wayne Brown

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Councillors

Cr Andrew Baker

Cr Mike Lee

 

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Kerrin Leoni

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Julie Fairey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

Cr Ken Turner

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Lotu Fuli

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Shane Henderson

Cr Maurice Williamson

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Sarndra O'Toole

Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

 

26 February 2024

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8152

Email: sarndra.otoole@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


Governing Body

29 February 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

4          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input                                                                           5

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input                                        5

6          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              5

7          Status Update on Action Decisions from Governing Body 14 December 2023     7

8          Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer Update                                     9

9          Recovery Office Update                                                                                              13

10        Request from Joint Governing Body / Houkura Meeting                                        25

11        Summary of Governing Body and Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 29 February 2024                              27

12        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

13        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public

 

Note:   The meeting will adjourn after consideration of the open items or at 11.45am whichever comes first.

The meeting will reconvene at 9.00am on Friday 1 March 2024 to consider the confidential items.

 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

14        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public        31

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Storm Recovery: Category 2C Community-Level Risk Mitigations                                                                                                                                       31

C2       CONFIDENTIAL:  "Local Water Done Well" -  Auckland water solution               31

C3       CONFIDENTIAL:  Update on the process for developing port options                 32

C4       CONFIDENTIAL:  Appointment of Group Recovery Manager for the January 2023 Floods and Cyclone Gabrielle                                                                                    32

 


1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

 

 

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

 

 

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

            Click the meeting date below to access the minutes.

  

That the Governing Body:

whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 14 December 2023, and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 8 February 2024, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input

 

 

 

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input

 

 

 

 

6          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

 


Governing Body

29 February 2024

 

 

Status Update on Action Decisions from Governing Body 14 December 2023

File No.: CP2024/00551

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To update the Governing Body on action decisions made at the last meeting.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         The information provided below is a status update on action decisions only that were made at the Governing Body meeting on 14 December 2023:

 

Resolution Number

Item

Status

GB/2023/234

2024/2025 letters of expectations to substantive council-controlled organisations

Letters attached to this agenda

GB/2023/236

Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan (TMRP)

TMRP published 25 Jan 2024. Progress reported to the Governing Body as part of the monthly Recovery report.

Recovery Office exit strategy on track to be reported to July Governing Body

GB/2023/237

Joint Governance Working Party update and recommendations for a local board reorganisation and Auckland Council representation arrangements for the 2025 elections

Joint Governance Working Party discussed on 2 February 2024

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)         tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the status of decisions made at the 14 December 2023 meeting.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Lisa Tocker - Executive Officer

Authoriser

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

29 February 2024

 

 

Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer Update

File No.: CP2024/00171

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a monthly update to the Governing Body on key matters from the Auckland Council Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer as at 31 January 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Chief Executive and Group Chief Financial Officer’s Update

2.       Phil Wilson, Chief Executive and Nicola Mills, Acting Group Chief Financial Officer (GCFO) will provide a summary of highlights and key activities and updates for the following:

·    Government relationships and reform

·    Service performance

·    Long-term Plan (LTP) update

·    Interim Report update

·    Financial performance for Auckland Council and the Auckland Council Group

·    Economic/market update.

Government relationships and reform

3.       The government has repealed the previous legislation implanting Three Waters/Affordable Water reform. It also announced their Local Water Done Well policy, which is intended to lay the foundation for a new system with stronger central government oversight, economic and quality regulation, and requirements for local authorities to use financially sustainable delivery models. The expectation is that councils self-determine their future water services arrangements.

4.       Two new pieces of legislation are expected to be introduced:

·    Bill 1 (to be introduced and enacted by the middle of calendar 2024) – provisions relating to council service delivery plans and transitional economic regulation, streamlined requirements for establishing CCOs under the LGA.

·    Bill 2 to be introduced December 2024 and passed by middle of calendar 2025 – will provide for the long-term replacement regime, setting out provisions relating to long-term requirements for financial sustainability, provide for a complete economic regulation regime, and a new range of structural and financing tools, including a new type of financially independent CCO. It will also establish regulatory backstop powers to be used when required to ensure effective delivery of financially sustainable or safe water services.


 

 

Fast-Track Consenting Bill

5.       The Government announced that it will introduce stand-alone fast-track consenting legislation for locally, regionally and nationally significant infrastructure and developments by 7 March 2024. It is expected to include:

·    a process for the responsible minister to refer projects for acceptance into the fast-track process, and the bill will also contain a list of projects that will be first to have their approvals granted.

·    referred projects will go to an Expert Panel, which will have limited ability to decline a project once referred and will apply any necessary conditions to ensure adverse effects of the project are managed.

·    "a 'one-stop’ processes that applies to approvals under a range of legislation, including the RMA.

6.       Council staff were invited to a working group, which provided initial, technical feedback to Ministry officials.

7.       Once the Bill is introduced, the council will have an opportunity to submit as part of the normal select committee process, through the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

Changes to the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPS-FM)

8.       The Government has announced its intention to review and replace the NPS-FM in this parliamentary term. This will be done through the RMA process for developing and amending national direction. In readiness, the Government previously extended the statutory deadline for notifying freshwater planning instruments to implement the NPS-FM to 31 December 2027.

 

Changes to National Transport Policy

9.       The government intended to introduce the Land Transport Management (Repeal of Regional Fuel Tax) Amendment Bill on 20 February under urgency. The Bill:

·    revokes the Land Transport Management (Regional Fuel Tax Scheme—Auckland) Order 2018, which provides for the 10-cents-per-litre Auckland regional fuel tax

·    removes the legislative framework that allows new regional fuel taxes to be created via the Land Transport Management Act 2003 and revokes the associated Land Transport Management (Regional Fuel Tax) Regulations 2018.

10.     The Bill will revoke the existing Auckland scheme on 1 July 2024. The Bill has significant implications for Auckland’s transport programme, which staff are still working through.

11.     The Long-term Plan (LTP) consultation document reflects governments intention to end the regional fuel tax (RFT) scheme four years earlier than it is legislated to run for. The council had initially budgeted for two more years of the RFT to support investment in specified transport infrastructure and services, but this funding is no longer available for this LTP. As a result, the central proposal in the plan has been updated with proposed RFT funding removed and a corresponding reduction in the level of investment in transport projects. The specific projects that would be affected have not yet been determined.

12.     The government has indicated its support for the introduction of Time of Use Charging in Auckland, although it has yet to announce timeframes for undertaking the necessary legislative change. In the meantime staff from Auckland Transport and Auckland Council have started work on options for scheme design and related policy issues. 

13.     Auckland Council made a submission on the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024 (GPS) developed by the previous government. A new version of the GPS is being drafted to reflect the incoming government's transport priorities. We expect to see some significant changes to the earlier draft particularly in relation to safety, active transport and the focus on climate.

Long-term Plan process 2024 - 2034

14.     The consultation document and supporting information for the Long-Term Plan 2024-2034 was adopted by the Budget Committee on 20 February 2024 for consultation. Public consultation will run from 28 February 2024 through to 28 March 2024.

Interim report update

15.     The council group is due to publish its interim report for the six months ended 31 December 2023 on 29 February 2024. The group's half-year performance information is not included in this agenda as the council group is subject to the NZX listing rules which require that material information be disclosed to the market via the NZX. As a result, details of the group’s half year performance must remain confidential until the review by Audit New Zealand is completed, and the interim report for the six months ended 31 December 2023 is published on the NZX on 29 February 2024.

Financial performance for Auckland Council and the Auckland Council Group

16.     The January and December financial dashboards for Auckland Council and the Auckland Council Group will be made available as confidential material prior to the meeting. Both results, are subject to the NZX listing rules which require that material information be disclosed to the market via the NZX. As a result, details of the group’s December and January results must remain confidential until the interim report for the six months ended 31 December 2023 is published on the NZX on 29 February 2024. A summary of the key highlights and results will be provided by the Acting Group Chief Financial Officer at the meeting.

Economic/ market update

17.     Key economic/ market activity and updates are:

·        Annual inflation rate – Consumer Price Index was 4.7 per cent at the end of December 2023 (updated quarterly, next due 17 April 2024).

·        Non-tradable inflation was at 5.9 per cent for the year to December 2023. Non-tradables are goods and services that do not face foreign competition and are an indicator of domestic demand and supply conditions. (updated quarterly, next due 17 April 2024)

·        Unemployment rate – 4.0 per cent to the end of December 2023, an increase of 0.3 per cent on the previous quarter (updated quarterly, next due 1 May 2024).

·        Gross Domestic Product decreased by 0.3 per cent in the December 2023 quarter, bringing annual growth to 1.3 per cent (updated quarterly, next due 21 March 2024)

·        The Official Cash Rate (OCR) rate remained at 5.5 per cent on 29 November 2023 (next update is 28 February 2024). A verbal update on the Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s February Monetary Policy Statement and Official Cash Rate announcement will be given at the meeting.

·        Auckland new dwellings consented numbers – 15,488,079 for the 12 months to December 2023 (38 per cent lower than the year ended December 2022).

·        International migration (national level) – net gain of 127,400 people for the 12 months to November 2023, comprising 249,500 arrivals and 122,100 departures (provisional estimates, subject to revision)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whiwhi / receive the information provided in this report, in the monthly financial dashboards circulated prior to the meeting and the verbal updates by the Chief Executive and Acting Group Chief Financial Officer.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Karuna Dahya - Manager Group Performance Reporting

Lisa Tocker - Executive Officer

Kerri Foote - Executive Officer : CFO Division

Authorisers

Nicola Mills – Acting Group Chief Financial Officer

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

29 February 2024

 

 

Recovery Office Update

File No.: CP2024/00172

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report  

1.       To provide an update on progress with the Tāmaki Makaurau recovery programme and seek approval for an operational budget increase for the Recovery Office, of an additional $12.1 million to accelerate work programmes in the 2023/24 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

2.       One year since the severe weather events of Auckland Anniversary weekend and Cyclone Gabrielle, the recovery effort is well advanced. Funding, policies and systems are now in place and delivery is accelerating. Progress is in line with other storm affected regions grappling with similar recovery challenges.

3.       Communities have chosen to acknowledge the anniversaries in their own ways, supported by funding from the Recovery Office. Various local events have been held across the region, including commemorations, shared meals, art projects and more.

4.       Since the last update report to the Governing Body in December 2023, the Recovery Office has completed recruitment of the final tranche of Storm Recovery Navigators. Community grants, Mental Wellbeing Fund grants and ‘Summer vouchers’ for impacted individuals, whānau and families have been distributed.

5.       By the end of January 2024, 2528 property owners had opted in to have their properties assessed as part of the storm recovery programme. This number continues to increase as more owners opt in to the programme. 494 categorisations have been finalised. Seven Category 3 buy-outs have been completed, with 90 more in the pipeline.

6.       The Making Space for Water Programme and Storm Response Fund have been progressing and are on-track to deliver their work programmes for this financial year. Quarterly updates are provided as Attachment A and B. There is a likelihood of some underspend in the Storm Response Fund, and staff are identifying opportunities to reallocate the underspend to other priority projects aligned to the same outcomes.

7.       Looking ahead, the categorisation process is expected to be largely complete by mid-year 2024. Deconstruction of the first buy-out properties dwellings is expected to begin in March. The deconstruction process is described in Attachment C. A policy to inform future use of land is being developed, and an update will be presented to the 28 March Governing Body meeting.

8.       Approval is sought for additional funding of $12.1 million to enable the Recovery Office to accelerate work programmes in the 2023/24 financial year. Provisional budgets for the 2024 – 2034 Long-term Plan (LTP) budgets for deconstruction, geotechnical and categorisation work will be reduced to reflect the accelerated delivery in this financial year.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Governing Body:

a)      tuhi-ā-taipitopito / note progress with the Tāmaki Makaurau recovery efforts.

b)      whakaae / approve an operational budget increase of $12.1 million for the Recovery Office which can be accommodated within the approved 2023/2024 budget for Auckland Council.  

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that provisional budgets in the proposed 2024 - 2034 Long-term Plan for deconstruction, geotechnical and categorisation work will be reduced by $12.1 million to reflect the accelerated recovery activity in 2023/2024. 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

One year, thousands of actions

9.       It is now more than one year since the severe weather events that devastated Auckland communities. The Auckland Anniversary Weekend floods and Cyclone Gabrielle happened in the context of a very rainy summer, with Auckland’s wettest January on record (nearly nine times a typical January). With heavy rain falling on already-saturated land, the effects of the storms were extreme and, for six Aucklanders and their friends and whānau, tragic.

10.     The severe weather events were felt across the region, affecting highly diverse communities and leaving impacted individuals, whānau and communities in situations of ongoing trauma and hardship. The impacts are likely to be long-term and hit those who were already struggling the hardest.

11.     Since January 2023, Auckland Council group has worked with government, NGO’s, iwi and community partners to support people and the region, to respond to the severe weather events and to begin their recovery journey. A summary of activity coordinated by the Recovery Office is included as Attachment D. Work includes deploying hundreds of teams to repair the roads, pipes and community infrastructure that keep Auckland working and, in uncharted territory for the council, setting up new systems and funding streams to support Aucklanders whose homes pose an intolerable threat to life. 

12.     Recovery takes time and is expensive. One international study has put Cyclone Gabrielle and the Auckland Anniversary Weekend floods as globally the fourth and fifth most expensive climate disasters per capita[1]. The Insurance Council has reported the two separate events were the two largest insurance weather events in New Zealand's history, with $2.7 billion of storm-related claims settled by December 2023[2].

13.     One year on, the Auckland Council group continues to work towards recovery, for the whānau, families and individuals who were directly impacted, and for Auckland as a whole. We have made good progress, but there is still much to do, and we acknowledge that for those most in need it can feel like we are taking too long.

14.     The progress reported below is in line with other storm affected regions grappling with similar recovery challenges. With funding, policies and systems now in place, the recovery effort is continuing to accelerate. Categorisation work will be largely complete by mid-2024. The resulting changes to Auckland’s urban fabric, with demolition of properties and construction of more flood-resilient blue-green networks will continue for many years yet.

Communities have commemorated the anniversary in their own ways

15.     The anniversaries of the Auckland Anniversary Weekend Floods and Cyclone Gabrielle have sparked a range of emotions for the people who were directly impacted.

 


 

 

 

16.     Feedback from communities in the lead up to the anniversaries was that they wanted to commemorate the days in their own way. Funding was made available from the Storm Response Fund (Local Preparedness Planning fund) and the Community and Social Recovery Placemaking and Activation budget, with the aim to enable Aucklanders to implement activities that connect, heal and build resilience. Forty-nine local groups and organisations have been funded across 36 locations to, a total of $31,450. This includes resident groups acknowledging the occasion with their members and other impacted residents. Activities ranged from commemorative to celebratory and restorative, with recognition ceremonies, community meals, art installations and more. Some examples include:

·   Muriwai Volunteer Rural Fire Service hosted a blessing and commemoration to unveil a memorial seat in memory of Craig Stevens and Dave van Zwanenberg with their whānau, the brigade and the Muriwai community.

·   Āwhi Shed, a small grass roots volunteer organisation in Massey, held a recognition event for their volunteers who provided home goods and food across west Auckland, including into Muriwai during all of the severe weather events last year.

·   Independent Living Service Trust held morning tea events at several pensioner housing villages across South Auckland that included entertainment such as tai chi and a show for their seniors. Milford Seniors Association also did a placemaking event to acknowledge volunteers and bring impacted senior residents together.

·   Rānui Baptist Community Care set up a photo gallery to give locals the opportunity to acknowledge and remember those affected by the floods today. They also consulted with tamariki in the area and compiled their stories into a children's book and shared a digitalised preview of the book before it gets published.

·   Te Ararata Stream team in Māngere held the Te Awa Ora hikoi which provided information about Making Space for Water, discussed stream restoration and flood mitigation and provided locals a chance to input into planning for Harania and Te Ara Rata waterways.

·   McLaren Park Henderson South (MPHS) Community Trust hosted the Flood Whakanui gathering to recognise volunteers who worked tirelessly during the early 2023 flooding events.

·   Global Hope Missions Mt Roskill had a shared lunch celebrating some of their volunteer network and a gathering to talk and reflect on the events a year ago. In March they will host a Neighbours Day family BBQ with affected families, and in June will host a second event during National Volunteer week.

17.     Extensive media coverage over the anniversary period has acknowledged the significance of the events, and the continued hardship impacted communities are facing. A total of 83 analysed media reports in January discussed the 2023 Auckland Anniversary floods, making up nearly one-quarter of the council’s media coverage for the month. Two-thirds of this reporting was positive or very positive in tone, helped by a proactive media approach that enabled a council perspective to be shared. Common themes in media commentary from affected homeowners included the ongoing mental impact of their experiences during the weather events, and the challenges dealing with council processes, private insurers and EQC, and a lack of financial support from government.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Recovery efforts are continuing

18.     The Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan has been published and is available at https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/recovery-extreme-weather-disasters/Pages/tamaki-makaurau-recovery-plan.aspx.

19.     A dashboard of recovery effort is included as Attachment E. The following sections provide a summary of activity over the December 2023 and January 2024 period.

Community and social recovery

20.     The Recovery Office has developed a draft Community and Social Recovery Roadmap with government agencies, community organisations, iwi and NGOs. Immediate focus areas are improved communication, regional enablers for local recovery, collaboration across council silos, and enhanced relationships with local communities and mana whenua for more effective emergency management. The draft is currently out with partners for feedback and will be shared with the Governing Body at the April meeting.

Community-led Recovery

21.        Storm Recovery Liaisons and Community Convenors continue to support communities to problem-solve and access information and resources to progress their recovery. A focus for December and January has been helping communities recognise the anniversaries, as outlined above.

22.     Funding agreements for Community Grants are currently being processed and disbursed. The final round of funding will open for three weeks in mid to late February 2024 as a contestable round.

Storm Recovery Navigator Service

23.     The Navigation Service is currently supporting 663 families, whānau and individuals. Partner recruitment is now complete, with twenty-one Partner Navigators embedded within Iwi and NGOs. Partners include Te Kawerau Iwi Tiaki Trust, Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust, Huakina Development Trust, Te Mahurehure Cultural Society Incorporated, Aunty Lou’s kitchen, Vahefonua Tongan Methodist Methodist Mission Charitable Trust (Siaola), South Seas Healthcare Trust, Affirming Works, Age Concern, Global Hope Missions, New Settlers Family and Community Trust (NFACT), McLaren Park Henderson South - MPHS Community Trust, I am Māngere, and Visionwest Community Trust.

24.     All teams are refreshing their outreach plans to engage with impacted whānau. More drop-in sessions have been promoted via Our Auckland. Other outreach approaches have included attending churches (Congregational Christian Church, Saturday 28 January and Methodist Church, Sunday 29 January 2024), door knocking (e.g. in Māngere, Pukekohe and Mt Roskill) and attending anniversary events.

25.     The Recovery Office is continuing to work through referrals and deliver vouchers weekly for the Summer Voucher Campaign funded by the Red Cross. The fund will remain open until all families, whānau and individuals who are connected through the Navigators have been contacted.

Mental Wellbeing

26.     A contestable round for the remaining Mental Wellbeing Fund (funded by the Ministry of Social Development and Te Whatu Ora, administered by the Recovery Office) closed on 14 February 2024, for grants between $10,000 and $100,000 for organisations who are providing vital services to those impacted by the weather events to continue and expand their services over the summer period. 46 applications have been received and evaluations are underway. Funding agreements will be drafted for successful applicants, with the aim of getting funds disbursed by the end of April.

27.     Te Whatu Ora has funded further “Weathering the Storm” workshops in Mt Roskill, Māngere, Henderson and online to provide communities with practical advice on how to support others, tips for reducing weather-related anxiety, and tools to help build resilience for the future.

28.     The Mental Health Foundation NZ has commissioned research to explore wellbeing within communities impacted by the North Island weather events. The aim is to understand the unique challenges communities face while also acknowledging their inherent strengths and perspectives on overall wellbeing. By actively listening to and reflecting on the experiences of communities, the findings from this research will help to shape wellbeing priorities as well as identify key psychosocial supports. The final report for Auckland is expected in April 2024.

Māori partnership and participation

29.     A hybrid workshop was held in early November 2023 with mana whenua groups to test the draft Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan. The workshop focused on the plan’s framing and content and identifying opportunities for more localised involvement of mana whenua and Māori communities in partnering on the development and delivery of work programmes. Feedback from mana whenua representatives at the hui was positive, with favourable responses from mana whenua on the direction of travel of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan and the engagement approach. Outputs from the workshop fed into a presentation and update from the Recovery Office lead team to the Te Rūnanga o ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau - Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum which was held virtually later that month.

30.     The Recovery Office lead team also attended the virtual Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Kaitiaki forum in December 2023 to provide an update on the Recovery Office and the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan, and further explore and discuss how mana whenua would like to be involved in the governance and monitoring of the plan going forward. Mana whenua at this forum expressed their expectations for partnership throughout the Recovery, and interest in having more specific involvement in individual projects as a forum.

31.     The Recovery Office has now developed a draft action plan for the Māori Partnership and Participation whenua, that sets out some Māori focussed KPIs. We intend to test and further develop these with mana whenua.

Natural and built environment

Residential property assessments are progressing

32.     2528 property owners have opted to have their properties assessed as part of the storm recovery programme. This number continues to increase as more property owners seek assessment. The Recovery Office is continuing to reach out to homeowners who may have been affected by the severe weather events, via mailouts, phone calls and door knocking in highly impacted areas. 

33.     1280 flood and geotechnical assessments are now complete. 494 categorisations have been communicated to property owners: 381 Category 1, four Category 2P, five Category 2A, and 104 Category 3.

34.     Seven Category 3 buy-outs have been completed, with 90 more in the pipeline. The time for completion of the buy-out process is 12 weeks. Buy-outs are currently tracking close to cost estimates, however further purchases are needed to provide an accurate forecast of programme costs.

35.     The Category 2P process is now live and discussions have started with the first property owners. More applications are expected in the coming weeks.


 

 

36.     33 property owners have applied for reviews, either of their categorisation or applying for consideration of special circumstances relating to insurance or personal circumstances. Most of the categorisation reviews are from Category 1 properties, with owners seeking a change to Category 2 or 3 where they consider the damage to their properties to warrant it or seeking ‘no category’ where they are concerned about having categorisation information recorded on their property file.  Staff are currently developing further communications to support homeowners to understand the details of the categorisation process. This includes explaining the high threshold of ‘intolerable risk to life’ necessary to qualify as Category 2 or 3, and that property file information is a legal requirement recording activities undertaken by the council regarding the property. For Category 1, this will document that the property was reviewed as part of the storm recovery process and that no further action was necessary under the scheme. 

37.     The first tranche of $9.8 million Crown funding has been received from Crown Infrastructure Partners. With the coalition government in place, several meetings have been held between elected members and ministers, including a visit from the Minister for Cyclone Recovery Mark Mitchell to Ventura Street, Māngere and Clover Drive, Henderson on 22 January 2024. A weekly report on categorisation numbers is being provided to the Prime Minister’s office and the Minister for Cyclone Recovery.

Deconstruction of dwellings is about to get underway

38.     Once Category 3 property purchases are finalised, the properties will enter into the deconstruction process. This removes dwellings and other buildings from sites that pose an intolerable risk to life, and to remediate the site. The process is described in Attachment C.

39.     The approach to dwellings will be determined on a site-specific basis, depending on the type of building, for example whether it can be relocated, deconstructed or must be demolished. Properties will be managed in clusters where possible, to minimise disruption to communities. Most buildings will have a reasonable element of deconstruction or salvage, unless being relocated. The first site works will get underway in March 2024.

Policy for the future use of land is being developed

40.     Council staff are developing a policy framework for the future use of severely affected land purchased as part of the recovery effort. This will set objectives and a process for determining the most appropriate use of sites, considering site locations and risk mitigations. Options for future use could include council service needs (e.g. blue-green network, Watercare stormwater reserves, parks, reserves and sports grounds) or redevelopment where it is safe. These decisions will take time to investigate and finalise, especially where there is potential for Category 2 Risk Mitigation Projects which require detailed engineering assessment and business cases.

41.     An update will be provided to the 28 March Governing Body meeting, with the draft future land use policy to be presented to the Governing Body at the 30 May meeting.

Making Space for Water is entering the design phase (quarterly update)

42.     The Making Space for Water programme was approved, subject to funding, on 26 October 2023 following engagement with elected members, mana whenua and the public (GB/2023/203). The programme has been designed to prioritise flood readiness in stormwater operations and support communities, households, and businesses to build their resilience to the impacts of increased rainfall and extreme weather events.

43.     Following programme approval by the Governing Body, the Making Space for Water programme team has established its working structure and programme execution plan. Attachment A summarises the work completed between October 2023 and February 2024, focus areas until the next reporting deadline in May, and the targets that each initiative has set for the period to end of June 2024. Overall, the initiatives are on-track to meet targets.

 

44.     Key deliverables this quarter have included visiting 50 properties in Rānui to discuss overland flow path hazards with residents, and the launch of a regionwide flood risk awareness campaign, viewable at https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/cbde7f2134404f4d90adce5396a0a630.

45.     Work delivered to date for each initiative is via existing departmental budgets and staff resources, and some funding from the Storm Response Fund. Substantive programme delivery will begin from the 2024/2025 financial year, subject to adoption of the LTP.

Transport, Parks and Community Facilities infrastructure repairs continue

46.     75 per cent of transport recovery projects have been completed, with works expected to continue for another 18 months to two years.

47.     64 per cent of Parks and Community Facilities works are completed. Out of the 1,459 entries, 933 have been completed. Teams continue working to remediate and reopen storm affected assets.

48.     There are 71 water and wastewater projects in delivery with permanent solutions in planning or needing funding through business cases.

Storm Response Fund (quarterly update)

49.     The Storm Response Fund, approved by the Governing Body in June 2023, is fully operational and delivering tangible results for Aucklanders. A full quarterly update for the Storm Response Fund is provided as Attachment B. Activities of note in quarter two of the year include:

·   increased compliance activity responding to public complaints over flooding

·   grants awarded to support community preparedness and resilience projects

·   new recruits and renewed equipment for AEM volunteer response teams

·   equipment procured for early warning flood systems and deployed for coastal monitoring

·   Devonport-Takapuna Response Plan is complete, 19 other local boards underway

·   continued development of shoreline adaptation plans.

50.     Actual spend of the Storm Response Fund for the year to date is $2,764,239. This is higher than the planned spend of $1,611,073 due to the full draw-down of allocated funding to two programmes led by Auckland Transport. These programmes are on track delivering:

·   increased network maintenance and proactive monitoring – doubling catchpit cleaning ($1.5 million allocated)

·   transport network monitoring, early warning systems, internal training and system improvement and integration with AEM ($700,000 allocated).

51.     Total forecasted spend for FY24 is $18,816,000.  Staff are identifying opportunities to reallocate the underspend to other projects aligned to the same outcomes.

Climate impact statement

52.     Climate change remains a key consideration for the Recovery Office. The risk of more frequent and extreme weather events is rising with the effects of climate change. The impacts of individual events compound – making communities more vulnerable to crises and undermining resilience building efforts. This compound risk puts our communities, natural environment, infrastructure, utilities, and services under further pressure. Responding and recovering from extreme weather events becomes harder if communities are still coping with the impacts of the last event.

53.     The Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan sets out specific actions and describes work at a regional level that will contribute to Auckland’s ability to adapt to the impacts of climate change. This includes elements of the Resilient Auckland programme which will help to ensure Auckland’s resilience in the long-term and also prioritise adaptation planning for communities that have less adaptive capacity.

Council group impacts and views

54.     The Recovery Office is working across the council group to ensure alignment with council policy and priorities, and to deliver necessary work programmes. Recognising the all-of-council group effort required for recovery, a Senior Executive Group was established to:

·   provide strategic input and guidance for significant recovery policy and decisions

·   provide a cross-council lens, ensuring that Recovery Office efforts are integrated and aligned with Auckland Council’s strategic priorities and operations

·   monitor progress and compliance with the Crown funding agreement, and support central government engagement relating to recovery  

·   ensure a smooth transition to business as usual by approving a transition plan and supporting transition of recovery activities into Auckland Council’s regular operations by 31 December 2024

·   help resolve issues and remove obstacles, particularly where a cross-organisational approach or decisions are required.

55.     A Recovery Office transition plan will by prepared by June 2024 to ensure a seamless transition of recovery activities into business as usual by the end of 2024.

Financial implications

Recovery Office – Managing budget requirements 

56.     An operational budget of $14.2 million was approved for the Recovery Office as part of the adopted Annual Budget 2023/2024.  

57.     The Governing Body approved an increase to the Recovery Office budget of $9 million for 2023/2024 to meet increased operational costs, increasing the approved budget to $23.2 million at the October 2023 meeting (GB/2023/202).   

58.     In-principle approval for up to an additional $7.5 million unbudgeted expenditure for Category 3 deconstruction related costs was also provided, subject to the Recovery Office reporting back with an updated cost estimate once expected volumes and timing had been refined (CP2023/15370).     

Updated budget requirements 

59.     Recovery efforts have been progressing ahead of plan. An updated financial position has been developed that indicates additional budget of $12.1 million is required for FY2023/2024. The key drivers are: 

·   the site assessment programme has been accelerated to enable categorisation decisions to be made as quickly as possible to provide certainty for impacted homeowners. Additional homeowners continue to opt into the categorisation programme, increasing the volume of technical assessments that need to be completed.  

·   costs for key land stability hazard management investigations in the Waitākere region have increased due to the scope and complexity of work being greater than initial expectations. This work informs categorisation processes as well as future land-use planning decisions. 

·   in addition to the increased funding approved for the Customer Relationship Management System (CRM) in October 2023, further funding is required. Additional system requirements to ensure effective management of customer and recovery-related data, enable informed conversations with impacted homeowners and to minimise risk of data loss are needed. This includes expanding the scope to include information on the scheduling of site visits, the sale and purchase process for Category 3 buyouts and the disputes process, as well as additional licenses to ensure staff supporting various aspects of recovery are using the CRM system. The CRM system will continue to be used for the implementation of the risk mitigation projects over the LTP. 

 

 

·   deconstruction and related costs for this financial year are now estimated at $3 million (a reduction from the $7.5 million previously signalled). It is expected that 30-40 Category 3 houses will be deconstructed between March and 30 June 2024. 

 

Table One: Updated Recovery Office budget forecast for 2023/24 

 

Description

Current Budget ($,000)

Forecast FY24 ($,000)

Shortfall ($,000)

Staff Costs

10,665

10,665

 

Grants, community-led activities

780

780

 

Communications & Engagement

1,642

1,642

 

Geotechnical & Engineering

3,322

5,522

-2,200

Property Categorisation

3,125

7,725

-4,600

Security & Traffic Mgmt.

2,500

2,800

-300

CRM costs

500

2,500

-2,000

Other unavoidable Expenses

650

650

 

Total Operating expenditure

23,184

32,284

-9,100

Deconstruction costs - Capital Expenditure

 

3,000

-3,000

Total Budget Request

23,184

35,284

-12,100

 

Financial Implications current year 

60.     The additional $9.1 million operating expenditure and $3.1 million capital expenditure exceeds the approved budget for the Recovery Office and requires approval from the Governing Body. The additional expenditure is proposed to be funded within the existing overall 2023/2024 Auckland Council budget. Based on current year forecasts, this would come from a mix of remaining contingency and business change funds and areas of forecast spending below budget, such as depreciation and other expenditure. This solution is based on current financial forecasts, which will continue to be updated and if there is any change we will come back to the committee at a future date. 

Funding the additional spend forecast 

61.     Provision has been made in the draft LTP for deconstruction costs, geotechnical projects and property categorisation.  Increased recovery costs for FY2023/2024 in these areas will result in reduced costs in future years: 

·    the full deconstruction programme (700 homes) has been budgeted for across FY2024/2025 and FY2025/2026. The LTP will be updated to reflect the most up to date phasing for deconstruction and reduce future year budgets by $3 million. 

·   LTP funding for geotechnical work and categorisation will be reduced by $4.5 million in FY2024/2025. 

 


 

 

Risks and mitigations

62.    The ongoing risks and mitigations for the recovery effort are identified in Table Two.  

Table Two. Priority Risks for the Recovery Office

 

Risk

Mitigation

1. Sufficient funding

Assumptions had to be used to develop the co-funding agreement with the Crown, at a time where information was limited. There is a risk that the number of Category 3 and Category 2 properties is higher than expected over time.

Modelling is in place to track actual progress and updated assumptions against the current funding agreement envelope. The Recovery Leadership Team have monthly commercial forecasting and expenditure meetings with finance to track costs and forecasts, supported by a dedicated Recovery finance business partner. There is a good faith provision in the co-funding agreement with government to re-enter discussions if it proves the funding for the Voluntary Buy-out Support Scheme is insufficient.

2. Delivery timeframes

There is a strong community expectation that categorisation and risk mitigation projects will be implemented quickly. The balance between speed and accuracy means that sometimes decisions take longer than the community expects.

This report seeks additional funding in the 2023/24 financial year to accelerate delivery. Further work is underway to improve the speed of decisions on Category 2C, reported under separate cover to this meeting.

3. Fit for purpose systems

Recovery Office operations are beyond business as usual for the council and have required rapid deployment of systems and projects. These systems need to be fit for purpose, demonstrate value for money, and able to be transitioned back into the council’s regular business when the Recovery Office is wound down.

Recovery Office staff are focused on improved data management and reporting systems, working with relevant staff in the wider council group to ensure smooth transition and to manage further risk of cost escalation.

4. Further severe weather events

Another severe weather event could occur before recovery efforts are complete.

 

Storm Response funding is being used to increase proactive maintenance and improve the council’s ability to respond quickly to events. Recovery continues to focus on the most vulnerable communities (Category 2 and 3) and developing community interventions to reduce risk.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka living in Auckland were impacted by the January Floods and Cyclone Gabrielle as individuals and whānau and through impacts on marae and sites of cultural significance. Many marae acted as community hubs providing support to those impacted by the weather event.

64.     The recovery is an opportunity to partner with iwi, mataawaka, marae and Māori businesses. Regular contact from Auckland Council will be important moving forwards to strengthen relationships with mana whenua, and ensure they are able to meaningfully participate in the recovery effort. Staff are considering the feedback provided in the November and December hui and exploring options for further partnership.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

65.     Local boards have been engaged with throughout the recovery process, including development of the Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery Plan. Further targeted engagement with local boards will happen throughout the implementation of the Recovery Plan, particularly in areas with impacted communities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     The proposed Future Use of Land policy will be presented to the March 2024 Governing Body Meeting.

67.     A Transition Plan, covering the closure of the Recovery Office and integration of remaining recovery activities into the council’s regular operations, will be presented to the Governing Body in June 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Making Space for Water quarterly update

 

b

Storm Response Fund quarterly update

 

c

Outline of deconstruction process

 

d

Recovery Office year in review

 

e

Recovery Office Dashboard 31 Jan 2024

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tanya Stocks - Recovery Office Strategic Support

Mace Ward - Deputy Group Recovery Manager

Authorisers

Mat Tucker - Group Recovery Manager

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

29 February 2024

 

 

Request from Joint Governing Body / Houkura Meeting

File No.: CP2024/01189

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request the Mayor write to Government seeking that the Government pay rates on its properties, transfer revenue equivalent to the GST charged on council rates, and return a portion of the GST collected from new-build houses.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 19 February Joint Governing Body / Houkura Independent Māori Statutory Board meeting discussed Auckland Council’s engagement with central government.

3.       The meeting suggested the Governing Body be asked to formally request the Mayor write to central government seeking the transfer of revenue equivalent to the GST collected on rates.

4.       This policy was recommended by the 2023 Future for Local Government review. That review found that the current local government funding and finance system is already under pressure and is not sustainable. In addition to returning the GST on rates, it recommended central government pay rates on its own property.

5.       All three parties in the coalition Government made relevant promises at the General Election, acknowledging funding challenges for local government:

·    The ACT Party promised to share 50% of the GST collected on new residential builds with councils. This was agreed for consideration in the National-ACT Coalition Agreement.

·    The NZ First Party promised to undertake a Select Committee Inquiry into the sharing of GST on council rates (a situation it called “double-taxation”) with the local authorities they originate from.

·    The National Party promised to provide councils with $25,000 for every dwelling they consent above average of new consents in the previous five years. It said that in the case of Auckland this means the Council would have been eligible for a payment of $152 million in 2022.

6.       Auckland Council Finance staff estimate the total value of GST collected on rates in 2023/24 as $415,350,000 (excluding internal rates and CIP charges).

7.       If the government returned that amount to Auckland Council, that would enable a reduction of 6.5% in rates for the average-value Auckland residential property in financial year 2024/25, rather than the 7.5% increase proposed in the central LTP option.

8.       The government does not pay rates on much of its own property (including health, education, conservation and transport) despite using council infrastructure, but does pay rates on office buildings, Kāinga Ora properties and defence land.

9.       The total value of rates that the government is exempt from is estimated at $36,331,007 in 2023/24 values.

10.     If the Governing Body agree, the Mayor will write to the Minister of Finance, copied to the Prime Minister, Minister for Auckland and coalition party leaders, requesting the government implement policy enabling the transfer of revenue equivalent to the GST charged on rates, and sharing a portion of the GST collected on new residential builds.

 

 

 

11.     Other legislative priorities agreed with the Governing Body, including legislative change to bring the Regional Land Transport Plan back into Auckland Council (Resolution GB/2023/172), time of use pricing and an integrated transport plan are also being progressed with government.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      request Mayor Wayne Brown write to the government on behalf of the Governing Body, seeking the transfer of revenue equivalent to the GST charged on rates, and sharing a portion of GST collected on new residential builds.

b)      request the Mayor report back to Governing Body and Houkura when a response is received.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mayor Wayne Brown

 

 


Governing Body

29 February 2024

 

 

Summary of Governing Body and Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 29 February 2024

File No.: CP2024/00169

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda or briefing papers that may have been distributed to the Governing Body or its committees.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to Governing Body members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

3.       The following memos or information were circulated to members of the Governing Body:

Date

Subject

14.12.23

Letter from Hon Simeon Brown regarding new direction for water services delivery

20.12.23

Action from Whau Local Board Meeting of 13 December 2023 relating to the Israeli / Palestine Conflict

20.12.23

Action from Upper Harbour Local Board Meeting of 7 December 2023 relating to the Israeli / Palestine Conflict

20.12.23

Memorandum:  Summer Weather Preparedness Update

23.12.23

Letter of Expectations for Statement of Intent 2024-2027 Watercare

23.12.23

Letter of Expectations for Statement of Intent 2024-2027 Auckland Transport

23.12.23

Letter of Expectations for Statement of Intent 2024-2027 Eke Panuku

23.12.23

Letter of Expectations for Statement of Intent 2024-2027 Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

16.1.24

November 2023 Financial Results

21.2.24

Memorandum:  FIFA Women's World Cup 2023 Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland Host City Programme - close out reports

 


 

 

4.       The following workshops/briefings or working groups have taken place for the Governing Body:

Date

Subject

19.2.24

CONFIDENTIAL Category 3 Storm Recovery Political Advisory Group (no attachment)

Reasons for confidentiality:

s7(2)(i)
The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the political advisory group meeting materials may contain information related to negotiations with Government on the co-funding agreement established between the Crown and Auckland Council for storm recovery activities.

21.2.24

Representation Project Initial Options

21.2.24

CONFIDENTIAL:  “Local Water Done Well” Auckland Implications (no attachment)

Reasons for confidentiality:

s7(2)(h)
The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

s7(2)(i)
The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the workshop materials may contain information related to negotiations with Government on proposed changes to legislation on water reform and/or to discussions on alternative financial structures for council.

 

 

5.       This document can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/Te hui “Governing Body” from the drop-down tab and click “View”;

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

6.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Summary of Governing Body information memoranda and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) – 29 February 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

 

b

Letter from Hon Simeon Brown regarding new direction for water services delivery (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Action from Whau Local Board Meeting of 13 December 2023 relating to the Israeli / Palestine Conflict (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Action from Upper Harbour Local Board Meeting of 7 December 2023 relating to the Israeli / Palestine Conflict (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Memorandum:  Summer Weather Preparedness Update (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Letter of Expectation for Statement of Intent 2024-2027 Watercare (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Letter of Expectation for Statement of Intent 2024-2027 Auckland Transport (Under Separate Cover)

 

h

Letter of Expectation for Statement of Intent 2024-2027 Eke Panuku (Under Separate Cover)

 

i

Letter of Expectation for Statement of Intent 2024-2027 Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (Under Separate Cover)

 

j

November 2023 Financial Results (Under Separate Cover)

 

k

Workshop:  Representation Project Initial Options (Under Separate Cover)

 

l

Memorandum:  FIFA Women's World Cup 2023 Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland Host City Programme - close out reports (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authoriser

Phil Wilson - Chief Executive

 

 


Governing Body

29 February 2024

 

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Governing Body

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Storm Recovery: Category 2C Community-Level Risk Mitigations

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report materials may contain information related to negotiations with Government on the co-funding agreement established between the Crown and Auckland Council for storm recovery activities.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2       CONFIDENTIAL:  "Local Water Done Well" -  Auckland water solution

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report discusses matters currently under negotiation with the Crown

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


 

 

C3       CONFIDENTIAL:  Update on the process for developing port options

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains information which is commercially sensitive.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C4       CONFIDENTIAL:  Appointment of Group Recovery Manager for the January 2023 Floods and Cyclone Gabrielle

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains information that relates to an employment contract.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Christian Aid report, cited in The Guardian, 27 December 2023, ‘2023’s costliest climate disasters show poor lose out in ‘global postcode lottery’’ Available at https://www.theguardian.com. Accessed 14 February 2024.

[2] Radio New Zealand, 12 December 2023. ‘Cyclone Gabrielle, Auckland Anniversary floods insurance bill at $2.7 billion so far.’ Available at rnz.co.nz. Accessed 14 February 2024.