I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 5 March 2024

10.00am

Room 1, Level 26
135 Albert Street
Auckland

 

Komiti mō te Ārai Mate Whawhati Tata me Te

Raru Ohorere / Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Andrew Baker

 

Members

Cr Julie Fairey

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr Ken Turner

 

Cr Mike Lee

Houkura Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Houkura Member Pongarauhine Renata

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Wayne Brown

 

 

Deputy Mayor Desley Simpson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Mike Giddey

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

 

27 February 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 027 221 7183

Email: mike.giddey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee

05 March 2024

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5  

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input                                                                           5

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input                                        5

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              5

8          Auckland Emergency Management Acting General Manager update                     7

9          Prioritised Plan update                                                                                                  9

10        Auckland Emergency Management: Mana whenua and mataawaka partnerships 11

11        Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan adoption              15

12        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

 


1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

An apology from Deputy Chairperson Cr A Baker has been received.

 

 

 

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

 

 

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

            Click the meeting date below to access the minutes.

 

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 November 2023, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

 

 

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input

 

 

 

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input

 

 

 

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee

05 March 2024

 

Auckland Emergency Management Acting General Manager update

File No.: CP2024/01136

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the Acting General Manager, Adam Maggs, to give an update on Auckland Emergency Management to the committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Acting General Manager Auckland Emergency Management will provide a presentation on the update – see Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the update from the Acting General Manager Auckland Emergency Management.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Presentation

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Casey Hart - Business Operations Lead Auckland Emergency Management

Authoriser

Adam Maggs – Acting General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

 

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee

05 March 2024

 

Prioritised Plan update

File No.: CP2024/00858

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee on the Auckland Emergency Management Prioritised Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Following the extreme weather events of early 2023, the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee approved a Prioritised Plan for Auckland Council’s emergency management function (Resolution CDEMC/2023/6).

3.       The Prioritised Plan contains 29 actions covering improvements to planning, leadership and governance, operational procedures, capability, partnerships, assets and systems, and communications. The plan is effectively the work programme for Auckland Emergency Management (AEM) until the end of the 2023/2024 financial year (30 June 2024).

4.       Of the 29 actions within the plan, 20 are complete, 5 are progressing and on track, and 4 are progressing but delayed in terms of the indicative timings set out in the Prioritised Plan. Attachment A provides commentary for each action, including a summary of progress made to date. All actions are on track for completion by the end of the financial year.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the update on the Auckland Emergency Management Prioritised Plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Prioritised Plan progress

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kristen Spooner - Principal Advisor Strategy and Planning

Authoriser

Adam Maggs - Acting General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

 

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee

05 March 2024

 

Auckland Emergency Management: Mana whenua and mataawaka partnerships

File No.: CP2024/00899

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Committee with an update and presentation on Auckland Emergency Management’s approach to working with mana whenua and mataawaka to strengthen disaster resilience in Tāmaki Makaurau.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In line with the National Disaster Resilience Strategy – Rautaki ā-Motu Manawaroa Aituā, Auckland Emergency Management (AEM) have been working hard to incorporate a Te Ao Māori worldview into our mahi to ensure greater recognition, understanding, and integration of iwi and Māori perspectives and tikanga in emergency management. The impacts on Māori from disasters can be significant and there are real strengths in integrating kaupapa Māori and tikanga Māori into resilience building for disasters.

3.       At a strategic level, our draft Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan acknowledges our partnership obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and acknowledges mana whenua mātauranga mai rā anō (traditional and historical lived-experience and knowledge of an area, place or space). Objectives and actions within the plan aim to:

·        coordinate with our partners and stakeholders to expand work to support mana whenua and mataawaka with disaster resilience through the Whakaoranga Marae, Whakaoranga Whānau and Kia Rite Kia Mau resilience building programmes; and

·        secure representation of mana whenua and mataawaka across the emergency management system.

4.       This paper and attached presentation describe how AEM engage with Iwi and Māori communities during a response and how resilience is supported through the Whakaoranga marae, Whakaoranga whānau and Kia Rite Kia Mau programmes.

Iwi / Māori liaison function in response

5.       When an emergency takes place and an Incident Management Team is activated, the Iwi/Māori liaison function role:

·        supports Māori communities by providing a conduit for information to flow into and from the coordination centre

·        coordinates, guides, and supports response efforts undertaken by local Māori communities, and

·        provides a Māori lens (language and tikanga) to support coordination centre engagement with Māori communities.

6.       The team is structured around four pou: Pou Āwhā, Pou Āwhina, Pou Tikanga, and Pou Whirinaki. Pou Āwhā can be considered the Function Manager, with the other pou being subfunctions. The team is typically staffed from within Auckland Council, however this may vary depending on the nature of the emergency event (Refer slide 2 Attachment A).


 

7.       Marae are an integral part of the community, often going out of their way to respond to community needs when disaster strikes. Marae that have activated to support response to date are listed below:

Manurewa Marae

Awataha Marae

Papakura Marae

THW o Orewa Marae

Papatūānuku Kōkiri

Motairehe Marae

Ngā Whare Wātea

Kawa Marae

Te Aroha Pā Marae

Piritahi Marae

Ruapōtaka Marae

Ōrākei Marae

Te Mahurehure Marae

 

 

Whakaoranga marae, Whakaoranga whānau

8.       Whakaoranga marae, Whakaoranga whānau was developed collaboratively with Ngā Mātārae, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, the National Māori Wardens Response Team, Nelson / Tasman emergency management, Ngai Tahu emergency management and Massey University. The programme is about sharing knowledge and expertise around hazards and the effects they may have on whānau, hapū and iwi. It also provides guidance on things to consider during the marae planning process and offers tools to help support marae in building resilience, responding to and recovering from, emergencies. The four key aspects of the framework are:

·        Whakawhanaungatanga – establishing, maintaining and strengthening relationships

·        Mātauranga – reciprocal sharing of knowledge around hazards and helping identify the range of impacts

·        Manawaroa – reciprocal sharing of knowledge and experience on what is required to build resilience to disasters

·        Whakapakiri – identify the strengths and assets of the marae and what else is needed to support the mahi. This includes gaining an understanding of the role a marae may be interested in playing to support others in response.

9.       The six central pou shown in slide 5 of Attachment A, provide guidance to support marae resilience planning.

10.     A wānanga was held in September 2023 in partnership with Te Kotahi a Tāmaki Marae Collective, attended by 15 marae. An introduction to the Whakaoranga Marae, Whakaoranga Whānau programme was provided. AEM is currently working with four marae on the programme (Motairehe, Kawa, Piritahi, Ruapōtaka).

11.     Training is being provided to the neighbouring Civil Defence Emergency Management Group to the south to support cross boundary resilience (Wharekawa and mangatangi marae in the Waikato region). AEM is also supporting marae resilience with hazard maps (Whaataapaka, Ngā Hau E Whaa o Pukekohe marae). Training and education will be provided to the 13 marae listed in paragraph 7 to strengthen their capability and enhance their disaster resilience.


 

Kia Rite, Kia Mau

12.     The Kia Rite, Kia Mau programme was developed to support tamariki and rangatahi in preparedness and disaster resilience, incorporating tikanga Māori. It has a focus on three key areas to support learning objectives:

·        Ngā Atua Māori - Māori gods: guardians of the natural environment. The five Atua in the programme represent the key hazards in Tāmaki Makaurau (refer slide 6 of Attachment A).

·        Kōrero mō ngā aweawenga: Impacts – understanding the potential impacts of an emergency can help people get through. The programme uses kōrero in groups to discuss what could be done in emergency situations.

·        Ngā tikanga whakarite mō te mōrearea: Preparedness – discussion of how to prepare yourself and your whānau for an event.

13.     The programme is delivered in schools and kura, and provides a range of engaging resources, such as a whānau readiness plan (hangaia he mahere) that can be used to share the learning at home. To date delivery has taken place in ten schools, reaching approximately 1,000 students across Tāmaki Makaurau. This education initiative is taught during a 90-minute session to a standard size class (up to 30 students) selected by the school and teachers.

14.     Development of a facilitators guide is underway to enable the programmes to be delivered across more schools in the region. AEM is also working with the Sustainable Schools team in Auckland Council to increase exposure of this programme to primary and intermediate schools in Auckland.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the update and presentation on Auckland Emergency Management’s approach to working with mana whenua and mataawaka to strengthen disaster resilience in Tāmaki Makaurau.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Presentation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Taipu Haunui-Taawhiao - Senior Iwi Māori Community Resilience Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Maggs - Acting General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

 

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee

05 March 2024

 

Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan adoption

File No.: CP2024/00908

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan 2024-2029 for adoption.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Emergency Management has progressed development of a new Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan to replace the current plan dated 2016-2021.

3.       The draft Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan was submitted to the Minister for Emergency Management and Recovery (the Minister) for comment under section 49 (1) of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 (the CDEM Act) on 27 November 2023. The Minister provided comment on 20 February 2024 (Attachment A).

4.       The Minister’s comments suggest five minor amendments to the plan (Attachment B) that have been incorporated into the final Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan 2024-2029 (Attachment C).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee:

a)      whai / adopt the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan 2024-2029 (Attachment C of the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The CDEM Act requires Civil Defence Emergency Management Groups to develop Group Plans. Group Plans are strategic documents that set out the strategic vision and action plan for achieving disaster resilience in an area.

6.       The current Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan is dated 2016-2021. It remains in force until replaced. Development of a new, replacement Group Plan has followed the prescribed process set out in the CDEM Act and Director’s Guidelines for Group Plans produced by the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA). The process of developing the plan has been reported to the Committee during April, July and October 2023.

7.       The final stage in the development of the Group Plan was submission to the Minister for comment under section 49(1) of the CDEM Act. The plan was submitted to the Minister on 27 November 2023. The Minister provided comment on 20 February 2024. Attachment C contains a final Group Plan, as amended by the Minister’s comments. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Minister’s comments are contained in Attachment A. The comments are largely supportive of the plan. Of particular note, the Minister:

·        notes that the plan appears to strike a good balance between strategic direction and operational readiness with a good level of detail incorporated into the various action plans

·        acknowledges the inclusion of Māori engagement throughout the plan with the intent to enable greater iwi and Māori participation in emergency management in the region

·        notes that the Group has consulted with agencies involved in Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) and the communities of Auckland

·        commends the Group’s enthusiasm and commitment to CDEM and the work undertaken to respond to the recommendations of recent reviews and reports

·        encourages the CDEM Group office to ensure operational documents are regularly reviewed, kept up to date and publicly available where possible

·        concludes that the work the Group carries out is fundamental to achieving a resilient Auckland and New Zealand as a whole.

9.       Based on advice from NEMA, minor recommended changes are noted in a table that accompanied the Minister’s letter (Attachment B). The changes relate to:

·        describing the consultation process that was undertaken to inform the plan

·        providing more detail on how Auckland Council coordinates with other CDEM Groups to better understand and plan for shared hazards and risks

·        providing clearer linkages between the National Disaster Resilience Strategy objectives and the Auckland CDEM Group Plan objectives

·        clarifying the link between exercising and improving planning and preparedness

·        ensuring all externally referenced documents are hyperlinked in the plan.

10.     The table in Attachment B provides comment regarding how the Minister’s suggestions have been addressed in the final plan. Attachment C contains the final Auckland CDEM Group Plan, that is recommended for adoption. Amendments to address the Minister’s comments are shown as tracked changes. Minor subsequent changes to the plan have also been reflected, such as updated Appendix numbers. A new action has also been added to the operational readiness action plan, to ensure the full suite of monitoring and maintenance activities for operational systems are captured in the plan.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change[1] declares the scientific evidence is unequivocal; climate change is a grave and mounting threat to human wellbeing and the health of our planet. People’s health, lives and livelihoods, as well as property and critical infrastructure, including energy and transportation systems, are being adversely affected by hazards from heat waves, storms, drought, and flooding, as well as slow-onset changes including sea level rise.


 

12.     The evidence for warming in New Zealand continues to build. 2023 was New Zealand’s second warmest year on record, just short of the record set in 2022. Annual rainfall patterns are also expected to change, with eastern portions of the North Island likely to see more summer rainfall, and rainfall intensities accompanying sub-tropical systems and airmasses expected to increase. Marine heat waves and drought are also set to become more frequent and intense. Climate change is likely to increase the chances of strong El Nino and La Nina events.

13.     The Group Plan contains actions that intend to reduce the risk of hazards (including those influenced by climate change), and to support operational and community readiness, response to and recovery from emergencies. Climate change considerations were enhanced through the public submission process.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     A Project Advisory Group was established to support development of the Group Plan comprised of subject matter experts across the council whānau regarding strategy, the four environments (natural, built, social and economic), sustainability, hazard risk, infrastructure and statutory land use planning.

15.     Council Controlled Organisations were connected to the Group Plan review through both the Coordinating Executive Group and the Auckland Lifelines Group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards have an important role to play in supporting disaster resilient communities through their knowledge of local communities and local government. The Group Plan sets out the roles and responsibilities of local board members before, during and after emergencies. Actions to support response communication, local board plans, and community resilience plans are also included.

17.     All 21 local boards provided feedback on the draft Group Plan through their business meetings in August 2023, as described in reporting to the Committee in October 2023.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     In line with the National Disaster Resilience Strategy- Rautaki ā-Motu Manawaroa Aituā, AEM have been working hard to incorporate a Te Ao Māori worldview into our mahi to ensure greater recognition, understanding, and integration of iwi/Māori perspectives and tikanga in emergency management. The impacts on Māori from disasters can be significant and there are real strengths in integrating kaupapa Māori, mātauranga Māori and tikanga Māori into resilience building for disasters.

19.     Engagement with iwi and Māori on the draft Group Plan began with a presentation to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki forum in late 2022. The forum was encouraging and supportive of the kaupapa. AEM continues to build relationships with iwi and Māori at all levels, from the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) secretariat, to individual marae through their resilience planning work via Whakaoranga Marae, Whakaoranga Whānau.


 

20.     The draft Group Plan acknowledges our partnership obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and acknowledges mana whenua mātauranga mai rā anō (traditional and historical lived-experience and knowledge of an area, place or space). Objectives and actions within the plan aim to:

·    coordinate with our partners and stakeholders to expand work to support mana whenua and mataawaka with disaster resilience through Whakaoranga Marae, Whakaoranga Whānau and Kia Rite and Kia Mau (a resilience programme focused on tamariki and rangatahi), and

·    secure representation of mana whenua and mataawaka in the emergency management system.

21.     Whakaoranga Marae, Whakaoranga Whānau was developed collaboratively with Ngā Mātārae, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, the National Māori Wardens Response Team, Nelson / Tasman emergency management, Ngai Tahu emergency management and Massey University. These parties were also involved in the development of Ngā Mātāpono, values and principles that underpin ways of working with iwi and Māori in Auckland that form part of the strategic framework for the Group Plan.

22.     The engagement period in August 2023 provided an opportunity for mana whenua and mataawaka to consider the Group Plan content (that has been developed collaboratively as described above) and advise if there are any areas that could be further enhanced from a Te Ao Māori perspective. Opportunities to support mana whenua submissions on the draft Group Plan included an online hui with iwi representatives on 17 August 2023, and representatives from the Te Kotahi a Tāmaki marae collective on 23 August 2023.

23.     Submissions were received from Te Kotahi a Tāmaki Marae collective, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua and Komiti Marae Orākei Trust of Ōrākei Marae. These submissions informed the final plan, as described in the summary of consultation to the Committee in October 2023.

24.     In their feedback on the draft plan, NEMA noted that the plan has Māori considerations and Te Tiriti woven throughout the document. The Minister acknowledges the inclusion of Māori engagement throughout the plan with the intent to enable greater iwi and Māori participation in emergency management in the region.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The Group Plan actions can be implemented within existing operational budgets. Should any additional funding be required over the five-year life of the plan, this would be subject to the normal council budget processes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The Bush Report, Office of the Auditor General Report and Toa report all recommend that the Group Plan review is progressed as soon as possible. These recommendations have heightened media interest in the Group Plan, and therefore public expectation that the review will be completed quickly.

27.     To date, the review has progressed ahead of the timeline approve by Committee in April 2023 (resolution number CDEMC/2023/7). Public communication regarding adoption of the plan will support public confidence in Auckland Council’s commitment to building disaster resilience in Tāmaki Makaurau.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     The Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan will undergo final design and will be published on the Auckland Council website. The plan will be implemented from the beginning of the 2024/2025 financial year (July 2024). Reporting will be provided to the Committee in accordance with chapter 11 of the plan, Monitoring and Evaluation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Minister's letter

 

b

Minister's comments and staff response

 

c

Final Auckland CDEM Group Plan for adoption

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kristen Spooner - Principal Advisor Strategy and Planning

Authoriser

Adam Maggs - Acting General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

 



[1] IPCC. (2022). Climate Change: A Treat to Human Wellbeing and Health of the Planet. Retrieved from https://www.ipcc/2022/02/28/pr-wgii-arG/ [date accessed: 19 August 2022].