I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 7 March 2024

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Komiti mō ngā Tūnuku me ngā Rawa Tūāhanga / Transport and Infrastructure Committee

 

OPEN ADDENDUM AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr John Watson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

Members

Cr Andrew Baker

Cr Mike Lee

 

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Kerrin Leoni

 

Houkura Member Billy Brown

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Mayor Wayne Brown

Houkura Member Pongarauhine Renata

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Chris Darby

Deputy Mayor Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Julie Fairey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

Cr Ken Turner

 

Cr Lotu Fuli

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Shane Henderson

Cr Maurice Williamson

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Lata Smith

Senior Governance Advisor

 

6 March 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 027 202 0586

Email: lata.smith@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 March 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

 

10        Implications of Removal of Regional Fuel Tax 5

11        Preparatory Work for the Auckland Integrated Transport Plan                                                      7

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 March 2024

 

 

Implications of Removal of Regional Fuel Tax

File No.: CP2024/01678

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive an update from Auckland Transport on the implications of the removal of the Regional Fuel Tax (RFT) and endorse the listed allocation priorities for the remaining RFT and the review of programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Government has introduced legislation to remove the RFT, four years earlier than planned. Approximately $600 million less RFT funding will be available for transport projects. Remaining RFT funds can be used only for certain projects as specified by the legislation.

3.       Auckland Transport proposes to:

·        continue to progress projects which are contractually committed and still eligible for RFT funding;

·        continue other contractually committed projects where the cost of breaking contracts would outweigh the benefits;

·        reassess the remainder of the programme in the light of feedback on the Long Term Plan and the direction in the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport (GPS – Transport);

4.       Auckland Transport recommend that the committee note the proposed approach and reprioritisation including endorsing the allocation approach for the remaining RFT funding;

5.       Further work on the implications on the removal of the RFT and transport programmes will be considered as part of the Long Term Plan and Regional Land Transport Plan;

6.       This is set out in more detail in the attached slides.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the update from Auckland Transport on the implications of the removal of the Regional Fuel Tax and proposed next steps for reprioritisation of Auckland Transport’s capital programme.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / notes the remaining Regional Fuel Tax funding available for allocation is approximately $360 million.

c)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / notes the legislation enables allocation to Eastern Busway, Electric Trains and Stabling, other City Rail Link Day 1 works and Road Corridor Improvement projects.

d)      ohia / endorses allocation of the Regional Fuel Tax funding to the following projects:

i).   Completion of Eastern Busway stages 2 and 3 ($210 million).

ii).  Electric Trains and Stabling ($75 million).

e)      ohia / endorses allocation of any remaining Regional Fuel Tax funding to other City Rail Link Day 1 works and Road Corridor Improvement projects and/or opex for new Eastern Busway and Electric Train services.

f)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / notes  that AT will carry out a rapid review of the capital programme, and will reprioritise implementation going forward, to reflect reduced capital funding and pending funding impacts from the GPS – Land Transport, which may result in non-RFT funded projects also being descoped, deferred or stopped.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Fuel Tax update - Presentation

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nicki Lucas, Head of Funding and Analysis

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

07 March 2024

 

 

 

Preparatory Work for the Auckland Integrated Transport Plan

File No.: CP2024/01603

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the scope of work to help Auckland Council reach a view of the medium to long-term transport network in preparation for discussions with central government on an Auckland Integrated Transport Plan (AITP).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Mayor and Chair of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have requested that Auckland Council staff undertake preparatory work to inform the pending development of an AITP with central government. This preparatory work will help inform an Auckland Council view of the major transport projects required in the medium to long-term. Initial work on the AITP was undertaken throughout 2023 but stalled during the 2023 pre-election period and with the change of government.

3.       The new Minister of Transport has indicated that he would like to work with Auckland Council on an AITP.

4.       The AITP will present a medium to long term view of the transport networks required to meet the transport outcomes we are seeking for Auckland, which will need to be funded through agreed investment plans.

5.       The AITP does not replace the Auckland Regional Land Transport Plan which is a statutory document. Work on the 2024-2034 Regional Land Transport Plan is currently being developed by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

6.       Auckland Council now has the opportunity to consider key matters ahead of engagement with government on the AITP itself. This preparatory work will be undertaken by the council’s Transport Strategy Team and Auckland Transport and will set out: 

·    the challenges Auckland’s transport system faces over the next 10 and 30 years.

·    the major transport projects that need to be delivered by 2050, and their phasing, in order to meet Council’s vision for Auckland’s future transport network.

·    progress made with major projects over the last 15 years.

·    alignment between the desired future transport network and Council’s Future Development Strategy, its climate goals and other key transport priorities (where existing data enables it).

7.       Staff will report back to future Transport and Infrastructure Committee meetings (April and/or May 2024) with progress on this preparatory work. The timeframe for recommencing work with central government on the AITP itself will be determined by the Mayor and the Minister of Transport.    

 


 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      ohia / endorse the scope of work (as described in paragraphs 17 and 18 in this agenda report) to help Auckland Council develop its view of the medium to long-term transport network, in preparation for discussions with central government on an Auckland Integrated Transport Plan.

b)      note / tuhi ā-taipitopito that the existing Auckland Integrated Transport Plan Political Reference Group will provide direction to staff throughout the duration of this work.

 

Horopaki

Context and Background

Pre-election 2023

8.       The Mayor and Chair of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee have requested that Auckland Council staff undertake preparatory work to inform the pending recommencement of work with central government on an AITP.

9.       Initial work on an AITP was undertaken throughout 2023, with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee noting the scope of an Integrated Auckland Transport Plan in February 2023, focused on the long-term strategic integrated view of transport needs in Tāmaki Makaurau. The committee also endorsed the formation of a political reference group comprising the Mayor, Deputy Mayor, Chair and Deputy Chair of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, the appointed councillors on the Auckland Transport board, Chair of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee and an Independent Māori Statutory Board member to provide political oversight during the development of the Integrated Auckland Transport Plan.

10.     In August 2023 the Transport and Infrastructure Committee agreed to support legislative change that provides for decision-making between Auckland Council and the Crown on a long-term integrated transport plan for Auckland.

11.     A Transport and Infrastructure Committee workshop was held in June 2023, following a round of public engagement in April/May 2023. The results from the public engagement are summarised below and in appendix A. A round of engagement with local boards on the AITP was also undertaken around the same time. Local board resolutions in relation to this are summarised below and in Appendix B.   

12.     The views of iwi were sought and a hui was held in May 2023 between iwi representatives, the Mayor, and the Minister of Transport (see summary below).            

13.     Work on the Integrated Auckland Transport Plan stalled during the 2023 pre-election period and with the change of government.

 

Post-election 2023

14.     The new Minister of Transport has indicated that he would like to work with Auckland Council on an AITP.

 


 

 

15.     Auckland Council now has the opportunity to consider key matters ahead of engagement with government on the AITP itself. This preparatory work will be undertaken by the council’s Transport Strategy Team and Auckland Transport and will set out: 

·    the transport challenges within the Auckland context (10-year view)

·    the major transport projects that need to be delivered by 2050, and their phasing, in order to meet the council’s vision for Auckland’s future transport network.

·    progress with major projects over the last 15 years 

·    alignment between the desired future transport network and the council’s Future Development Strategy.

16.     Staff will work to update initial maps (produced by Auckland Transport at the request of the Mayor’s Office) showing the current and future freight, rapid transit, road, public transport and cycleway networks. A high-level spatial approach that sets out approximate corridors for key parts of the future network will be used, rather than pre-empting future processes by identifying specific routes. Similarly, the work will only identify specific modes where previous work has done so.

Scope of the Preparatory Work

17.     The preparatory work will:

a)    Outline the challenges Auckland’s transport system faces over the next 10 and 30 years.

b)    Provide a view of the major transport projects that should be delivered by 2050, and the phasing of them over the next few decades, in order to meet Council’s vision for Auckland’s future transport network, both aspirational and at a level that aligns with reasonably expected levels of transport funding.

c)    Comment at a high level on how the future transport network aligns with Council’s Future Development Strategy, its climate goals and other key transport priorities (where this is enabled by existing data).

d)    Include the updating of maps outlining:

·    major projects that have been delivered over the last 15 years or are currently under construction.

·    the strategic rapid transit and roading corridors that are required by 2050 based on previous work.

·    the current freight network, identifying key challenges and future initiatives to address these.

·    the current and planned bus network out to 2035.

·    the current and planned cycle way network out to 2035.

e)    Outline potential non infrastructure interventions, including Time of Use Charging, that could help address Auckland’s key transport challenges.

f)     An overview of current transport governance, planning and funding settings, including consideration of whether these are efficient and fit for purpose for achieving Auckland’s goals.

18.     Working within tight timeframes, the work will draw from, and provide an Auckland Council view on, existing pieces of work including previous Auckland Transport Alignment Projects (ATAP), the Rapid Transit Network Plan (RTN Plan), the Rail Investment Plan, business cases and other relevant transport planning work. No new work will be commissioned.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The preparatory work for the AITP will augment rather than replicate or replace the Auckland Transport led work (with Auckland Council support) to develop the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP). 

20.     There will be many common themes between the RLTP and AITP, however the two documents serve different purposes:

·    the AITP jointly developed with government will present a medium to long term view of the transport networks required to meet the transport outcomes sought for Auckland, which will need to be funded through agreed investment plans.

·    the RLTP is the region wide 10-year programme for transport investment by Auckland Transport, NZ Transport Agency and KiwiRail, with a particular focus on the first three years. Transport and Infrastructure Committee members will still be asked to input into, and endorse, the RLTP programme independently of the AITP work. 

21.     The preparatory work to be undertaken over the next few weeks will draw on the key themes identified by members of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee at the 28 June 2023 workshop held to discuss the key transport challenges facing Auckland, as well as public feedback gathered in April and May 2023, and previous rounds of engagement with iwi and local boards. 

22.     The focus of the preparatory work will be on regional strategic matters; it is not intended to detail the multitude of issues that exist at a local level across Auckland. A number of key strategic drivers have been identified from existing council direction and will underpin this work: 

·    doing more with less

·    making the most of our existing infrastructure

·    enabling mode shift and a significant reduction in transport emissions

·    enabling more efficient freight movement

·    focusing on non-investment interventions such as ‘Time of Use Charging’

·    aligning with Auckland Council’s long term land use intentions as set out in the Future Development Strategy

·    addressing the need for reform of transport governance, planning and funding systems in order to achieve Council’s priorities for transport in Auckland.  

23.     Formulating a 30-year vision for Auckland’s transport network should not be completely constrained by current funding challenges. However, nor can it be completely divorced from the realities around funding availability. The phasing of initiatives over the 30-year period will therefore need to take into account potential budget availability based on the extrapolation of current and historical funding levels.

Summary of feedback received during public consultation

24.     As part of the initial phase of joint work on the AITP in 2023 the public were asked for their views on different objectives and the types of projects they would like to see funded.

25.     In total 10,890 submissions were received. Submitters came from all local board areas but were not demographically representative of Auckland’s population – for example, 40 percent of submitters were males over the age of 45 and 79 percent of submitters were of European ethnicity.


 

 

 

26.     Four guiding principles were presented to submitters. All four were rated as important, very important or extremely important by a large majority of submitters. The four principles are:

·    make better use of our existing road and public transport networks (94% of individual submitters rated as “important” or higher)

·    target investments to the most significant challenges (92% rated as “important” or higher)

·    prioritise investments to achieve best value for money (89% rated as “important” or higher)

·    reduce carbon emissions from the transport sector (71% rated as “important” or higher).

27.     Submitters were also asked to rate the importance of five priorities for the plan. As with the guiding principles, a large majority of submitters rated all five of the priorities as important, very important or extremely important. The five priorities are:

·    Auckland’s transport network allows efficient movement of people and goods around our city (99% of individual submitters rated as “important” or higher)

·    Auckland’s transport system is able to cope with disruption from extreme weather events (92% rated as “important” or higher)

·    Improving transport access for Aucklanders that have poor access to jobs, education and services (89% rated as “important” or higher)

·    transport investment supports provision of new housing (83% rated as “important” or higher)

·    deaths and serious injuries are significantly reduced (82% rated as “important” or higher).  

28.     Levels of support for different transport types showed strong support for public and rapid transport:

·    upgrades to the rail network to allow trains to run more often (86% of individual submitters rated as “important” or higher - although only 58% supported the removal of level crossings to allow more trains and reduce traffic congestion)

·    a range of inexpensive and quick changes to optimise roads across Auckland to ensure the spaces we have available on our roads are used more efficiently (78% rated as “important” or higher)

·    upgrades to busy arterial roads to support increased traffic as well as public transport, walking and cycling (77% rated as “important” or higher)

·    faster and more frequent bus services through investment in bus lanes and more buses on existing routes (75% rated as “important” or higher)

·    investment in mass rapid transit projects (light rail and busways) to deliver fast, frequent and reliable public transport on major corridors across Auckland (72% rated as “important” or higher).

29.     The full results of the consultation are attached as attachment A to this report.

Summary of feedback received from Local Boards

30.     Seventeen local boards participated in the Integrated Auckland Transport Plan public consultation questionnaire in May 2023.


 

 

31.     In relation to the four guiding principles:

·    make better use of our existing road and public transport networks (13 local boards rated this as “important” or higher)

·    reduce carbon emissions from the transport sector (13 local boards rated this as “important” or higher)

·    target investments to the most significant challenges (12 local boards rated this as “important” or higher)

·    prioritise investments to achieve best value for money (11 local boards rated this as “important” or higher).

32.     In relation to the five priorities:

·    Auckland’s transport network allows efficient movement of people and goods around our city (13 local boards rated this as “important” or higher)

·    improving transport access for Aucklanders that have poor access to jobs, education and services (13 local boards rated this as “important” or higher)

·    Auckland’s transport system is able to cope with disruption from extreme weather events (12 local boards rated this as “important” or higher)

·    transport investment supports provision of new housing (12 local boards rated this as “important” or higher)

·    deaths and serious injuries are significantly reduced (12 local boards rated this as “important” or higher).  

33.     In relation to projects:

·        upgrades to our rail network to allow trains to run more often (13 local boards supported or strongly supported this project, with 11 local boards supporting or strongly supporting the removal of level crossings to allow more trains and reduce traffic congestion)

·        a range of inexpensive and quick changes to optimise roads across Auckland to ensure the spaces we have available on our roads are used more efficiently (supported or strongly supported by 13 local boards)

·        upgrades to busy arterial roads to support increased traffic as well as public transport, walking and cycling (supported or strongly supported by 13 local boards)

·        faster and more frequent bus services through investment in bus lanes and more buses on existing routes (supported or strongly supported by 13 local boards)

·        accelerating electrification of our bus and ferry fleets (supported or strongly supported by 13 local boards)

·        interventions to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries (supported or strongly supported by 13 local boards)

·        transport investments to support more housing (supported or strongly supported by 13 local boards)

·        investing in mass rapid transit projects (light rail and busways) to deliver fast, frequent and reliable public transport on major corridors across Auckland (supported or strongly supported by 12 local boards)

·        delivering increased numbers of safe cycleways in urban Auckland (supported or strongly supported by 11 local boards)

·        improvements to ferry services and terminals (supported or strongly supported by 11 local boards)

·        upgrades to roads in industrial areas to support the efficient movement of freight around Auckland (supported or strongly supported by 11 local boards)

·        sealing unsealed roads (supported or strongly supported by 7 local boards)

34.     The full results of the Local board resolutions on the Integrated Transport plan and their responses to the public consultation questionnaire are attached as attachment B to this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan identifies the transport sector as the greatest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the Auckland region (around 43 percent of regional emissions). The previous government’s legislatively mandated Emissions Reduction Plan also recognised this. The current government is working on its own emissions reduction plan which will set out how it intends to achieve New Zealand’s climate targets. Actions that Auckland takes in relation to transport are crucial for the nation’s climate future.

36.     There will be climate impacts, both positive and negative, associated with most of the transport projects likely to be included in the AITP. Where sufficient data exists this phase of the preparatory work will include a high-level commentary on the potential climate impacts of key projects and their alignment to council‘s existing commitments.  

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     Auckland Council will work with Auckland Transport on the development of the AITP and will draw on other council organisations as required. Note that no new work will be commissioned.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The focus of the preparatory work will be on regional strategic matters rather than issues that exist at the local level across Auckland.

39.     Feedback received from Local Boards on the Integrated Transport Plan and public consultation questionnaire is attached as Appendix B and summarised above. This will be a key input into the preparatory work. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     The then Minister of Transport and Mayor Brown met with mana whenua at a hui in May 2023 to discuss the AITP (Tāmaki Makaurau Transport Plan). Mana whenua were invited to input into the draft plan.

41.     Key themes from the hui related to equity of access, choice, climate change and location of public transport for Māori. Specific issues raised included improved access by public transport, walking and cycling to papakāinga, and poor access via public transport to employment areas around the airport.    

42.     Views gathered from the 2023 hui and other rounds of previous consultation with Māori on key transport priorities will inform this phase of the preparatory work. Further engagement with Māori will be undertaken as a key aspect of the joint work with government on the AITP itself.     

Ngā ritenga ā-pūte

Financial implications

43.     Although there are no immediate financial implications from this preparatory work, it will help to sequence and prioritise future transport investment. Findings from the work will inform other transport planning processes that will have financial implications for Auckland Council, such as the RLTPs and LTPs.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     Identified risks, in relation to the preparatory work, and their potential mitigation are set out below.

Risk

Mitigation

Timeframes for this work are not sufficient to enable an appropriate level of analysis and delivery within expected timeframes.

Carefully set the scope of the work so that it is manageable in envisioned timeframes.

Utilise existing work only, no new work on transport projects will be commissioned.

Engage project management expertise early in the work. 

Consider short extensions as required or reduce the scope of the work accordingly, with political approval.

Prioritisation of work programme within the council and AT.

Misalignment with key partners - identified key projects for council, and their phasing for delivery, are not aligned with central government agencies 

Note that this work is an opportunity for Auckland to determine its view of its collective transport future ahead of discussions with government. There is a potential for misalignment with central government priorities.  

Any such misalignment will be worked through as part of the subsequent work on the AITP itself. 

Nevertheless, outputs from the preparatory work will be developed with a view to government priorities as appropriate. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     The existing AITP Political Reference Group will provide direction for this work.

46.     Staff will report back to future Transport and Infrastructure Committee meetings (April and/or May 2024) with progress on this work.

47.     The timeframe for completing the AITP itself will be determined by the Mayor and the Minister of Transport.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Integrated Auckland Transport Plan Summary of feedback received during public consultation from 28 April to 14 May 2023

 

b

Local board resolutions on the Integrated Transport plan and public consultation questionnaire

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elise Webster - Principal Transport Advisor

Robert Simpson - Manager Transport Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services