I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 14 March 2024

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Komiti mō te Whakarite Mahere, te Taiao, me ngā Papa Rēhia / Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Richard Hills

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Angela Dalton

 

Members

Houkura Member Edward Ashby

Cr Mike Lee

 

Cr Andrew Baker

Cr Kerrin Leoni

 

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Mayor Wayne Brown

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Chris Darby

Deputy Mayor Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Julie Fairey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

Cr Ken Turner

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Lotu Fuli

Cr John Watson

 

Houkura Member Hon Tau Henare

Cr Maurice Williamson

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Sandra Gordon

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua /

Senior Governance Advisor

 

11 March 2024

 

Contact Telephone: +64 9 890 8150

Email: Sandra.Gordon@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

14 March 2024

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5  

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input                                                                           5

5.1     Public Input: Omaha Residents Association / Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust - predation by cats of endangered shorebird species within the Omaha Shorebird Sanctuary, at the northern tip of the Omaha Spit                          5

5.2     Public Input: BlueFloat Energy - Offshore Wind Capacity Building              6

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input                                        6

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              6

8          Ngā Pānui mō ngā Mōtini | Notices of Motion                                                            6

9          Notice of Motion - Cr M Lee - Activity Status of Helipads                                         7

10        Regional Event Grants Allocation 2023/2024 Round 2                                             9

11        Priority submissions for Auckland Council Group                                                 17

12        Spatial Land Use Strategy Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones           21

13        Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) - delegating authority to confirm council's position for legal proceedings                                                                                   35

14        Auckland Unitary Plan - Making operative Private Plan Change 87 (301 and 303 Buckland Road, Pukekohe)                                                                                        41

15        Customer and Community Services update                                                             45

16        Summary of Planning, Environment and Parks Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 14 March 2024                                                                                                                                       47

17        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

 


1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

 

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

 

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

            Click the meeting date below to access the minutes.

 

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 15 February 2024 as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

 

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input

 

5.1       Public Input: Omaha Residents Association / Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust - predation by cats of endangered shorebird species within the Omaha Shorebird Sanctuary, at the northern tip of the Omaha Spit

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Richard Brabant of the Omaha Residents Association / Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust will address the committee relating to the predation by cats of endangered shorebird species within the Omaha Shorebird Sanctuary, at the northern tip of the Omaha Spit.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust are a group of trustees and volunteers who carry out a year-round trapping and surveillance programme at the Omaha Shorebird Sanctuary at the Omaha Shorebird Sanctuary, at the northern tip of the Omaha Spit.  The programme covers both inside and outside the predator fence which is intended to prevent predator intrusion.

3.       Representatives of the Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust and the Omaha Residents Association attended the Rodney Local Board meeting held in November 2021

4.       Attached is the response from the RLB Chairman to that request.

5.       Surveillance cameras have unequivocally established that the predation over successive years of all hatched dotterel chicks and most of their parents has been by cats. These cats have been identified, the property address also identified and their owners spoken to but to no avail. The nearest "equivalent" shorebird breeding area is at the Tawharanui Regional Park, where live cat capture is undertaken in recognition of the serious threat to shorebirds from this predator species.

6.       It appears almost certain now that this last breeding season will see all hatched chicks killed by cats and adult birds too as in previous years and as advised to the Local Board in 2021.

 

 

 

7.       The Omaha Residents Association (OBC) and the OSPT wish to ask the Committee to receive information concerning the continued loss of young and adult shorebirds from within the Omaha Sanctuary, and to address the current refusal by Council staff to allow cat capture. An associated issue is that the predator exclusion fence does not extend to LW at the Whangateau Harbour shoreline so predators are able to gain access around the end of the fence. The fence construction ends at the Coastal Marine Area boundary as a result of the terms of the resource consent which was granted in response to the application made by Council.

8.       Additional material has been received from the group – see Attachment A.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the public input from the Omaha Residents Association / Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust relating to the predation by cats of endangered shorebird species within the Omaha Shorebird Sanctuary, at the northern tip of the Omaha Spit; and whakamihi / thank them for their attendance.

 

 

5.2       Public Input: BlueFloat Energy - Offshore Wind Capacity Building

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Nathan Turner, Country Manager – BlueFloat Energy will address the committee on how their offshore wind project could support the Council’s goals in the Climate Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Information relating to the company’s projects and technologies can be found here.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the public input from BlueFloat Energy relating to how their offshore wind project could support the Council’s goals in the Climate Plan; and whakamihi / thank them for their attendance.

 

 

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input

 

 

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

 

8          Ngā Pānui mō ngā Mōtini | Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 a Notice of Motion has been received from Cr M Lee for consideration under item 9.

 

 


Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

14 March 2024

 

Notice of Motion - Cr M Lee - Activity Status of Helipads

File No.: CP2024/02142

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Councillor Mike Lee has given notice of a motion that he wishes to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Councillor M Lee and Councillor K Leoni as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

3.       A letter providing further information is appended as Attachment B.

 

Motion

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      while noting the memo provided to this committee on 20 December 2023 – in accordance with the resolved policy of, the Aotea Great Barrier Local Board, confirmed in March 2023; the Waitematā Local Board, confirmed in December 2023 (and again in January 2024); and the Waiheke Local Board, resolved on 28 February 2024 (all resolutions were carried unanimously)

i)        Request Council staff to progress a plan modification to the Auckland Council District Plan - Hauraki Gulf Islands Section - making private helipads in residential areas on Aotea / Great Barrier Island and on Waiheke Island a prohibited activity.

ii)       Request Council staff to initiate a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan to make private helipads in residential areas a prohibited activity.

iii)      Note that this plan modification for the Gulf Island District Plan would,

A)      For Aotea / Great Barrier Island, only apply to Settlement Areas as defined under the Great Barrier Strategic Management Area in the Hauraki Gulf Islands section.

B)      On Waiheke Island only apply to Residential Areas of the island.

C)     For areas outside residential areas, e.g. rural areas, the activity status would be modified to become non-complying, consistent with the Auckland Unitary Plan.

iv)      Note that for the Auckland mainland, the plan change would apply only to residential areas; the Unitary Plan status quo of non-complying activity would be retained for non-residential areas.

v)      Direct that this plan change be prioritised within the plan change work program to allow work to begin as soon as possible so this situation of growing public concern can be finally resolved.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of motion - Activity Status of Helipads, 6 March 2024

 

b

Notice of motion - Activity Status of Helipads - supporting information

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sandra Gordon - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

14 March 2024

 

Regional Event Grants Allocation 2023/2024 Round 2

File No.: CP2024/00223

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grant allocations for the 2023/2024 Regional Event Grants Programme Round Two.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2023/2024 Regional Event Grants Programme has a budget allocation of $600,000 which is distributed across two funding rounds. 

3.       The first funding round applications were considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023. The committee approved the allocation of $404,000 out of the budget of $600,000 to applications for regional event grants (PEPCC/2023/133). 

4.       Applications were sought for the allocation of the remaining budget of $196,000 through a second funding round which opened from 1 November 2023 to 30 November 2023. 

5.       Nine applications, totalling $330,084, were received and assessed using the criteria in the Events Policy 2013. 

6.       Staff recommend allocating grants to seven applicants totalling $113,000.  

7.       It is also recommended that the unallocated grant programme budget of $83,000, along with the value of any unpaid grants for the year, be put towards additional requests for regional event funding in accordance with the Events Policy, or to meet council savings targets. Staff request that the General Manager, Regional Services and Strategy be given delegation to apply these recommendations.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      whakaae / approve the following funding allocations for the 2023/2024 Regional Events Grant Programme Round 2:

Applicant 

Event 

Recommended funding allocation

The Korean Society of Auckland Inc 

2024 Korean Day 

15,000

YMCA North Incorporated 

Walk the Line 2024 

9,000

Auckland Region Outrigger Canoe Association 

Auckland Regional Sprint Regatta 

12,000

Auckland Rugby League Incorporated 

ARL College League Finals 

15,000

Te Pou Theatre 

Whānau Day - Kōanga Festival 2024 

12,000

Pacific Music Awards Trust 

Pacific Music Awards 

30,000

Te Whānau o Waipareira 

Matariki Ki Waipareira 

20,000

Total 

$113,000

 

b)      tautapa / delegate authority to the General Manager – Regional Services and Strategy to apply, in accordance with the Events Policy, the amount of any unallocated or unpaid Regional Events Grant Programme budget for the 2023/2024 financial year to:  

i)        requests from grant recipients, for additional funding due to increased costs or reduced revenue.  

ii)       short notice requests for funding from regional events in key priority areas such as supporting additional activities celebrating Matariki. 

iii)      meeting council savings targets for the current financial year.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The 2023/2024 budget includes an allocation of $600,000 for the contestable regional event grants programme.  

9.       The first funding round applications were considered by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee on 5 October 2023. The committee approved the allocation of $404,000 from the budget of $600,000, to applications for regional event grants (PEPCC/2023/133).

10.     Applications to a second funding round, for the remaining budget amount of $196,000, opened on 1 November 2023 and closed on 30 November 2023. 

11.     Staff received nine applications totalling $330,084 for the second round, as detailed in Attachment A.

12.     The 2023/2024 first and second round applications combined brings the annual total to 47 applications totalling $1,687,636. This compares with 49 applications totalling $1,416,054 in 2022/2023. 

13.     The role of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee, in relation to regional grants programmes, is described in the council’s Community Grants Policy (paragraph 17). The policy states “award grants to regionally significant organisations, services, events and activities that benefit residents across Auckland”.

14.     The policy also highlights (paragraph 145) the role of the committee in shaping the grant programme in terms of:

·    drawing on the relevant regional strategic documents to set funding priorities

·    considering staff assessments of grant applications and their recommendations for which proposals to fund

·    awarding grants

·    receiving reports to understand how the grants have benefited Auckland and Aucklanders.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Staff assessed each application against the regional event funding criteria outlined in the Events Policy 2013 (Attachment B). 

16.     Each application has been assigned an overall score to inform recommendations (Attachment C). 

17.     The scores are based on the criteria in table 1, which are weighted according to the percentages indicated for each area of consideration.


 

Table 1: Grant assessment criteria

Criteria 

Weighting (%)

Supports key priorities  

12

Delivers desired impacts  

12

Expands the variety or range of events on offer  

12

Level of positive community benefits generated  

12

Amount of community support, involvement and/or active partnerships  

12

How effectively the event was run in the past or how well planned  

12

Other considerations as outlined in the policy  

4

Alignment with Māori priority 

12

Alignment with youth priority  

12

TOTAL 

100%

18.     Staff also considered additional factors to determine the amount of funding recommended, such as: 

·    the event budget

·    event plans

·    organiser experience

·    accessibility

·    previous event outcomes alignment with key Auckland dates, such as Matariki, or Auckland Anniversary weekend. 

19.     Whether the applicant had received significant funding from other areas of council for the same event was also factored into the assessment process.

20.     The events recommended for funding:

·    include many that are free/low cost to attend, to support improved equity of access

·    deliver to a range of Auckland’s diverse communities

·    are distributed across the region

·    support a range of sporting, arts and cultural themes. 

21.     Of the seven events recommended for funding, two are sports related and five relate to arts and culture.  Chart 1 shows the geographic spread of applications recommended for funding.

Chart 1: Regional distribution of events recommended for funding

 

22.     The recommended funding allocations are based on the assessment scores against policy criteria and consideration of the additional factors outlined in paragraph 18.

Applications recommended for funding

23.     Of the nine applications received, staff recommend seven events to be approved for funding and two to be declined. 

24.     Some applications align with the criteria for event funding, as well as criteria for other council grant funds such as arts and culture, and sport and recreation. 

25.     Staff considered overlaps to ensure a coordinated approach is taken to the overall provision of council funding for these events. In some situations, grants will be provided from one grant fund, and in others, the total funding may be shared between two or more grant fund sources.

26.     In the case of events grants to sporting events, the focus is on audience interest and wider social outcomes of the activity, for example social cohesion, identity, and sense of belonging. This differs from other sports related grant programmes which may be more focused towards encouraging participation in, or development of, the sporting activity.

27.     Table 2 outlines the events that are recommended to be approved, including the funding amount and alignment with key priorities, as outlined in the funding criteria.

28.     The recommended funding amount is intended as a contribution to the total event cost, recognising that council is not the main funding provider in most cases.

Table 2: Strategic alignment for events recommended for grant funding

Event 

Alignment with key priorities 

Requested funding

Recommended funding

2024 Korean Day 

Cultural festival 

20,000

15,000

Walk the Line 2024 

Arts, youth, celebration of excellence 

15,000

9,000

Auckland Regional Sprint Regatta 

Māori, Pasifika, youth, sport, celebration of excellence 

15,000

12,000

ARL College League Finals 

Youth, sport, celebration of excellence 

20,000

15,000

Whānau Day - Kōanga Festival 2024 

Māori, families and children 

15,000

12,000

Pacific Music Awards 

Pasifika, celebration of excellence 

35,000

30,000

Matariki Ki Waipareira 

Māori, Pasifika, youth, families 

80,000

20,000

Total 

$200,000

$113,000

29.     The allocation of grants, totalling $113,000 from the available remaining 2023/2024 regional event grants budget of $196,000, leaves a residual balance of $83,000 unallocated.  

30.     It is recommended that delegation be given to the General Manager – Regional Services and Strategy to apply, in accordance with the Events Policy, this amount, along with the value of any unallocated grant funding, plus allocated but unpaid grants for the year due to event cancellations, to: 

·    requests from grant recipients, for additional funding due to increased costs or reduced revenue 

·    short notice requests for funding from regional events in key priority areas such as supporting additional activities celebrating Matariki

·    meeting council savings targets for the current financial year.

31.     Any additional funding allocations made under this delegation to regional events would be consistent with the regional event funding criteria. These criteria are outlined in the Events Policy 2013 and are used for standard grant applications.

32.     For the applications proposed for funding in this round, the total amount recommended represents 57 per cent of the total amount requested. This compares to proportions ranging from 44 per cent to 66 per cent for funding rounds over the preceding five years.

33.     The approach for determining funding levels reflects adaptation to our constrained funding environment, allowing a buffer of funding to be available for unexpected requirements or to contribute towards organisational savings targets. Opportunities often exist for event organisers to adjust content and/or scale of events to work within these financial constraints.

34.     The approach for determining funding levels for individual events has aimed to generally provide continuity of funding over a period of time. Despite not being a guarantee, this helps in providing a degree of certainty around future funding to event organisers.

35.     Where the recommended funding is significantly different to the requested funding, this may be due to staff taking into account other sources of council funding that the applicant has received. It may also be due to the recommended funding being set at a level similar to the funding provided in previous years in order to maintain distribution of grants to a range of events.

Applications recommended for decline 

36.     The most common reasons for declining applications are:

·    the activity is not within the scope of the grant programme

·    the activity is not considered to be of a regional scale

·    the activity does not align sufficiently with grant programme priorities

·    similar activities are already funded.

37.     In some cases, an application may not meet the criteria but may offer potential for a future successful application. Staff will offer to work with these applicants to assist in presenting a more fully developed event concept plan that demonstrates alignment with funding priorities.

38.     Table 3 indicates the applications staff recommend be declined with the key reasons.

Table 3: Events recommended to be declined

Event 

Reason for Decline 

Auckland International Cultural Festival 

Activity is a year-long series of monthly market-style events. Nature and scale of activity is outside focus of the regional event grant programme. 

Youth Circus Festival 2024 

Multi-day participatory activities with smaller audiences.  Does not reach regional event scale for funding. 

Event Evaluation 

39.     Staff evaluate the delivery of funded events through post-event reports prepared by organisers. When the evaluation is undertaken, the following is taken into consideration:

·    elected member feedback

·    experiences of the event facilitation/permitting team

·    attendance on the day of the event

·    media and online coverage of the event

·    attendee feedback.


 

40.     The evaluation also assesses whether:

·    the event is delivered largely in the manner described in the funding application

·    the event is well supported and enjoyed by participants, audiences and the wider community

·    the event aligns with council policy priorities.

41.     Staff attend some funded events to obtain insights into the event delivery and effectiveness. The observations inform feedback provided to organisers and future funding decisions. 

42.     Event evaluation is a cost-effective approach to ensuring council achieves value for money while meeting community outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     The main climate impacts of most regional events are with waste management and transportation to or from an event. 

44.     The event permitting process and grant funding agreements promote and encourage a range of zero waste and transport options. 

45.     The impact of climate change and severe weather events may result in event cancellations, greater costs to mitigate weather impact, and availability of certain sites for events.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     The council regional event grants have a focus on events for Aucklanders with audiences drawn from across the region. Outcomes sought from regional events are associated with community well-being across Auckland particularly in terms of identity, sense of belonging and connectedness, pride and spirit, and social cohesion.

47.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, in contrast, has an interest in larger scale major events, and has provided funding to a portfolio of events. These events have clear priority outcomes relating to visitor attraction and economic benefits.

48.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, in contrast, has an interest in larger scale major events, and has provided funding to a portfolio of events. These events have clear outcomes relating to visitor attraction and economic benefits.

49.     Some applications include events taking place in council venues or on council land or receive other council funding. In these cases, staff consult relevant departments or Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) that may have an interest in the events. This information is considered when presenting recommendations for funding.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

50.     Local boards provided formal feedback to inform the development of the Events Policy 2013, which guides application assessment and allocation of the regional event fund. 

51.     Regional event funding occurs in parallel with, and is complementary to, local event funding rounds operated by local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.     The Events Policy 2013 recognises a responsibility to engage and build relationships with Māori in designing, planning and delivering regional events of mutual interest. 

53.     The Events Action Plan, which forms part of the policy, places a particular focus on supporting Māori events, in the context of a diverse and balanced region-wide programme. This priority is indicated in the application information and guides to encourage applications for Māori events.

54.     Chart 2 shows comparative analysis of grants provided to events with a Māori focus, including having significant Māori content, participation and/or audience.

55.     The number of grants allocated to events with a Māori focus has reduced from seven last year to five this year. However, as a proportion of the total number of grants allocated (18 per cent) and total value of grants allocated (25 per cent) the level is consistent with longer term averages. Maintaining representation of Māori focused events within the grant programme continues to be a priority. 

Chart 2 – Regional funding provided to events with a Māori focus

(2023/2024 values include amounts proposed in this report)

56.     The three events recommended for funding, and considered to have a Māori focus in this 2023/2024 Round 2, are:

·    Auckland Regional Sprint Regatta

·    Whānau Day - Kōanga Festival 2024

·    Matariki Ki Waipareira

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     The total 2023/2024 contestable regional event grants budget is $600,000. Subsequent to the Round One allocations, a total of $196,000 remains available for allocation. Staff recommend confirming the allocation of Round Two grants totalling $113,000.  

58.     It is also recommended that the unallocated 2023/2024 budget balance of $83,000 be applied towards either additional requests for regional event funding or to meet council savings targets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

59.     There is a risk that events will not be successfully delivered in accordance with event plans submitted in grant applications. Staff mitigate this risk through the assessment process, considering the experience of event organisers, prior experience of successfully holding the event and by the attendance at events.

60.     In many cases council is one of several funders making independent assessments for funding of an event. The ability of event organisers to raise funding from multiple sources increases confidence in the event proposal.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     Following approval from the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee, funding agreements will be prepared, which will include conditions for payment of funding.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Application summaries

 

b

Prioritisation criteria

 

c

Summary schedule

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David McIntosh - Senior Advisor - Events

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services & Strategy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

14 March 2024

 

Priority submissions for Auckland Council Group

File No.: CP2024/00776

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for staff to prepare submissions to priority government consultations.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The new government’s proposed reform programme is significant and likely to require substantial resource from the Auckland Council Group.

3.       In early 2023 staff developed a process for identifying and prioritising government consultations. All upcoming submission opportunities are assessed against a set of criteria and a recommendation made to this Committee on the priority consultations relating to policy and legislative proposals.

4.       This report seeks approval to prepare submissions on the following consultations: draft GPS Land Transport 2024, Fast Track consenting, RMA Amendment Bill (Te Mana o te Wai provisions), Emissions Reduction Plan 2, Restoration of polls for Māori wards and Local Electoral (Abolition of the Ratepayer Roll) Amendments.

5.       Staff will prepare these submissions when consultations open and follow the usual committee procedures for approval.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      whakaae / approve Auckland Council Group to prepare submissions to the following consultations: draft GPS Land Transport 2024, Fast Track consenting, RMA Amendment Bill (Te Mana o te Wai provisions), Emissions Reduction Plan 2 – 2026-2030, Restoration of polls for Māori wards and Local Electoral (Abolition of the Ratepayer Roll) Amendments.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Responding to central government consultations is one important route for communicating the issues, risks, and opportunities of proposed policy and legislative changes on Auckland and Auckland Council Group functions and services.

7.       Central government has proposed a significant reform programme which includes numerous consultations, and opportunities for the council to submit. These take significant resource for the council to respond to and are not always equal in importance. The time taken to respond can distract from other priorities.

8.       In early 2023, Auckland Plan Strategy and Research (APSR) with input from staff across the Council group, developed a process for identifying and prioritising government consultations. All upcoming submission opportunities are assessed against a set of criteria and a recommendation made to this Committee on priority consultations which relate to political or legislative proposals.

9.       Staff applied this process to consultations expected in 2023, and this Committee approved submissions in the following areas: emergency management, climate change, transport, planning, waste, and fishing regulations in the Hauraki Gulf - resolutions PEPCC/2023/33 and PEPCC/2023/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The criteria have now been applied to consultations expected in 2024. Those consultations are in areas of transport, resource management, climate change, Māori wards and local elections.

11.     Since it is early in the term of the government, it is expected that other policy and legislative change will arise that the council group may want to respond to.  

12.     In the case of legislation that the government is repealing, there has to date been limited consultation opportunities. 

13.     The findings of the assessment on the policy related consultations are provided in full in Attachment A.

14.     In addition to government reforms, Auckland Council is working with the government on legislative change to enable the council to have a lead role in preparing and approving the Regional Land Transport Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     No adverse impact identified by using these criteria or approving priority submissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Staff have engaged with CCO Governance staff to bring the list of submissions to this Committee for approval.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Staff have engaged with Local Board Services to bring the list of submissions to this Committee for approval.

18.     Staff will engage with local boards when developing submissions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Many government consultations will be of interest to and/or have an impact on Māori. This was considered in the development of the criteria, with assistance from Ngā Mātārae. Input from iwi will be sought on all submissions made as timeframes allow.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     Prioritisation of government consultations expected in 2024 will enable submission work to be done within existing budget provision and as part of business-as-usual central government advocacy activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     Government priorities change from time to time and there are unexpected consultations. To mitigate this risk, in these cases the decision to prepare a policy related submission is delegated to the Chair and Deputy Chair (resolution PEPCC/2023/33). This is because short consultation timelines often do not allow for committee meeting dates and approval.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Prepare priority submissions when consultations open and follow the normal political procedures for approval with the relevant committee.

23.     Continue to review and assess the central government work programme and consultations.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Priority Submissions

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Adam Morris - Principal Strategic Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

14 March 2024

 

Spatial Land Use Strategy Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones

File No.: CP2024/01100

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt a Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Dairy Flat and Silverdale West area have been identified by the council as an area for future urban development since the adoption of the first Auckland Plan in 2012. During the previous council term, the Planning Committee established a working party to approve for consultation, a draft Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones (the draft Strategy). The working party comprised the chair of the Planning Committee, the Rodney Ward Councillor, the chair of the Rodney Local Board and a member of Houkura - Independent Māori Statutory Board.

3.       The draft Strategy was prepared to support the identification and protection of a future transport network for the area by Auckland Transport (AT) and the New Zealand Transport Agency Waka Kotahi (NZTA) (via Te Tupu Ngātahi/Supporting Growth Alliance (SGA)). The draft Strategy was approved for consultation by the working party on 22 June 2022.

4.       There were 134 pieces of feedback received on the draft Strategy. In terms of the feedback to the online questions, 55 per cent did not support the draft Strategy and 44 per cent did support it. In terms of the location of the proposed future town centre within the area (a key aspect of the draft Strategy), 63 per cent opposed it and 36 per cent supported it.

5.       The main themes of the feedback opposing the draft Strategy were:

·    opposition to the proposed location of the town centre extending from the proposed Rapid Transit Corridor alignment to Green Road Park and crossing flood plains.

·    there was no need for growth or such a large centre

·    opposition to urban development near Green Road Park

·    inadequate infrastructure.

6.       Based on the feedback and further discussions, particularly with the council’s Community Facilities department concerning the Green Road Park, and the Healthy Waters department in regard to flood levels, changes are recommended to the draft Strategy. The key change is that the proposed metropolitan/town centre has now been re-located on higher ground closer to the central Rapid Transit Corridor and away from more flood-prone land.

7.       Reporting to the committee on the feedback received on the draft strategy was delayed due to the release of the council’s draft Future Development Strategy (the draft FDS) in June 2023. The draft FDS had shown the Dairy Flat Future Urban Zone as “an area for further investigation”, which created uncertainty about the future of the Dairy Flat Future Urban Zone.

8.       The FDS was adopted by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee at its meeting on 2 November 2023. The FDS reviewed the Dairy Flat area and did not suggest removing it or “red flagging” it because of flooding. The FDS therefore no longer identifies the Dairy Flat area as an area for further investigation. However, it extends the timeframe for development out to 2050+ from 2038 due to funding constraints. The FDS also gives significantly more emphasis to addressing hazards such as flooding in the development of future urban land.

9.       Now that the FDS has been adopted, it is appropriate to finalise the Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones. AT and NZTA lodged notices of requirement (NORs) for the northern future growth transport projects on 20 October 2023. The development of the Strategy in parallel with SGA’s development of the detailed business case for the northern future growth transport projects will enable land use and transport infrastructure to be considered in an integrated way. The Strategy provides a high-level land use framework against which the NORs can be considered.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the public feedback received on the draft Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones and the proposed changes made as a result

b)      whai / adopt the Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones as shown in Attachment A.

c)      tautapa / delegate to the General Manager Plans and Places authority to approve any minor amendments that may be necessary prior to publication on the council website.

Horopaki

Context

Identifying and protecting the future transport network for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zone

10.     The Dairy Flat and Silverdale West area have been identified by the council as a significant area for future urban development since the adoption of the first Auckland Plan in 2012. In response to this, and the identification of other areas for future urban development in the northwest and south, AT and NZTA established an alliance (SGA) to carry out the work required to identify a multi-modal transport network to support future urban development in these areas. While some of this transport network is expected to be delivered in the short-term (i.e. parts of Drury and North-West within the next 10 years) the majority of the network (including this part of the region) will be delivered over a much longer timeframe (i.e. over the next 10 to 30 years).

11.     SGA is also tasked with carrying out the detailed investigations required to support long-term ‘route protection’ via the designation process under the Resource Management Act. In the past it has been difficult, and in some cases very expensive to retrofit transport routes once development has commenced. The work carried out by SGA aims to avoid this.

12.     In July 2019, AT and NZTA confirmed an ‘indicative strategic transport network’ for Auckland’s greenfield future urban areas. Since then, SGA has been working on a ‘detailed business case’ for the proposed transport network in the Dairy Flat and Silverdale West area and has recently lodged Notices of Requirement (NORs) with the council based on this work.

13.     The detailed business case includes a Rapid Transit Corridor (RTC), state highway upgrades and upgrades and new roads in the arterial road network. This has led to a specific route protection process with the lodging of the NORs to ensure that the land needed to build and operate the routes in the future is protected ahead of the transport projects being constructed and the land being developed.

14.     Of the projects for the north, the most critical in terms of the interrelationship with land use is the RTC. This is because the RTC route, combined with the proposed bus/train stations, will influence the establishment of centres and walkable catchments, and provide efficient and convenient transport access to other parts of Auckland.

15.     After an exhaustive analysis of many RTC route options, the final three consisted of the following:

·    immediately to the west of the existing motorway

·    close to Green Road Park to connect with a centre located adjacent to the park

·    a central route through the Dairy Flat Future Urban Zone area.

16.     SGA took preferred transport options to landowners and the community for consultation from 11 July 2022 to 19 August 2022. This was at the same time as the draft Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zone was released by the council for feedback.

17.     The RTC route to the immediate west of the motorway was not favoured by SGA as it would not access the bulk of the future urban area and a future centre. The route option close to Green Road Park was not favoured either as it was lower lying, involved more stream crossings, crossing Dairy Flat Highway twice, with additional costs, and was slightly longer meaning longer travel times.

18.     The preferred route for the RTC is the central route through the Dairy Flat Future Urban Zone area which is a new 16km corridor from Albany via Dairy Flat and on to Milldale. This was agreed after lengthy workshops with staff and mana whenua and arrived at using multicriteria analysis. This option enabled better access to more of the future urban area, involved fewer stream crossings, better followed the terrain and was not too long.

19.     The detailed business case recommended network is shown in Figure 1 below.

 

A picture containing map, atlas, text  Description automatically generated

Figure 1 Detailed Business Case Recommended Network

20.     The north detailed business case was adopted by the AT and NZTA boards in October 2023. NORs were lodged with the council on 20 October 2023 and publicly notified for submissions on 16 November 2023. A hearing is due to be held mid-year. The intention is that the Spatial Land Use Strategy will set out the general land use proposed, in the absence of a detailed structure plan.

The Draft Spatial Land Use Strategy

21.     In the normal course of events the council would prepare a structure plan based on economic, social, cultural and environmental consideration and taking into account proposed land uses integrated with appropriate infrastructure, prior to making decisions on transport routes. However, in this case, as has happened with the Kumeu-Huapai-Riverhead area, no such structure plan has been prepared as development is not sequenced to take place until at least 2050. The preparation of a structure plan would likely raise expectations from locals and developers that urbanization could be expected within the next 5-10 years, and this is not the case. Therefore, a more generalised spatial land use strategy is a more appropriate planning document.

22.     During the previous council term, the Planning Committee established a working party to approve for consultation, a draft Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones (the draft Strategy). The working party comprised the chair of the Planning Committee, the Rodney Ward Councillor, the chair of the Rodney Local Board and a member of Houkura - Independent Māori Statutory Board.

23.     The draft Strategy was prepared to support the identification and protection of a future transport network for the area by AT and NZTA (via SGA). The draft Strategy was approved for consultation by the working party on 22 June 2022.

24.     The draft Strategy identifies a proposed location for a future metropolitan/town centre that the transport network will support and impact upon, particularly the proposed RTC (whether that is a busway or rail corridor). A small metropolitan centre or a large town centre will be needed to provide services to and employment opportunities for the large future community (estimated at 60,000 to 70,000 dwellings) in Dairy Flat when fully built out.

25.     The preferred metropolitan/town centre option set out in the draft Strategy had the centre located on a central RTC alignment extending southwest to Green Road Park as shown in Figure 2 below.


Figure 2 Draft Spatial Land Use Strategy

26.     The initial proposal was that the centre should be located adjoining the Green Road Park and that there would be benefits for the park and the town centre, particularly for the location of civic facilities such as a library. It was also considered that there would be advantages if the RTC corridor could be located adjoining or even crossing Dairy Flat Highway to integrate the centre, the park and the RTC.

27.     However, as work on the RTC options progressed, the preferred RTC alignment was concluded to be the central location to the north-east of Dairy Flat Highway.

28.     Given the size of the centre required, it was considered that a centre option that combined a location adjoining the RTC and Green Park could still be achieved with benefits to the centre of being accessible to both the Green Road Park and the RTC. The distance from the RTC to the Park was approximately 1000m which is close to the edge of a walkable distance.

29.     The draft Strategy also showed a possible high density residential area extending for 800m adjoining the metropolitan/town centre and the Green Road Park to take advantage of the amenities of both.

30.     A local centre was also identified in the Pine Valley area south of Milldale associated with the RTC alignment. Residential zoning for the remainder of the area was not specified as this would require a more detailed assessment than is necessary at this very early stage in the overall planning and development process.

Consultation on the Draft Strategy

31.     The draft Strategy was open for consultation from 11 July 2022 to 19 August 2022. The consultation was publicised in conjunction with the SGA Programme for future transport plans for the north of Auckland. One open day was held in Dairy Flat on 13 August 2022 where both the future transport plans and the draft Strategy were presented.

32.     There were 134 pieces of feedback received on the draft Strategy. The majority of the responses used the council’s feedback form (114). Of these 16 included detailed attachments. A further 14 pieces of feedback were received via email to the dedicated email address set up for the engagement. It is noted that there were around 241 pieces of feedback on the SGA transport network consultation.

33.     In terms of the feedback on the Strategy and the online questions, 55 per cent of respondents did not support the Strategy while 44 per cent did support it. In terms of the location of the proposed town centre extending from Green Road Park to the RTC, 63 per cent opposed it and 36 per cent supported it.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Feedback on draft Strategy

34.     The main themes of the feedback and how the Strategy responds to them are outlined below. The detailed feedback is outlined in the revised Strategy’s Appendix 1 and its attachments (see Attachment A to this report).

35.     Themes in support of the Strategy and comments made by the public are as follows:

Centre location

Metropolitan/Town Centre located centrally within intended development and between Albany and Silverdale, other areas getting congested, (e.g. Silverdale and Albany), good access to transport if active modes provided.

Growth Management

The land is zoned for future development and is the next best area, more growth areas needed to support multi modal transport, needs to happen sooner, better than intensification in existing areas.

Green Road Park

Unlocks potential of Green Road Park, unique opportunity to integrate the park and the centre.

Infrastructure

Infrastructure will be improved.

36.     Themes in opposition to the Strategy and comments made are as follows:

Centre Location

Advantages of proximity of centre to Green Road Park overstated, too far from RTC, centre located on a floodplain, centre severed by Dairy Flat Highway and Bawden Road, there are other better locations for a centre and RTC, shape of centre will not achieve transport outcomes, land use transport integration and reduced vehicle kilometres travelled (VKT), transit-oriented development not mentioned.

Growth Management

No demand for a new centre, centre too large, intensify in existing areas, too close to Albany and Silverdale, creating urban sprawl, keep the area rural/green open space, disruption to existing residents’ lifestyles, leaves them in limbo for a long time, need to plan for other services required by the community (e.g. schools, hospitals etc).

Effects on Green Road Park

Oppose urban development adjacent to Green Road Park, not the intended use of the park, it is to be a rural park.

Infrastructure

Inadequate infrastructure and it will be expensive.

Response to feedback and key changes to the draft Strategy

37.     Detailed discussion in response to the feedback is provided in section 6.4 and Appendix 1 of the revised Strategy (see Attachment A). The key change from the draft Strategy is the location of the metro/town centre.

38.     Following public feedback, further discussions have been held with the Community Facilities department, the Healthy Waters department and SGA, with the result that the location of the centre has been moved eastwards to be centred solely on the RTC alignment and does not now extend toward Green Road Park (see Figures 3 and 4). This will reduce the risk of flooding within the centre and will retain the park as a predominantly open space recreation space rather than a park for urban civic amenities. This is in line with the Green Road Park’s adopted reserve management plan.

A picture containing text, map, screenshot, atlas  Description automatically generated

Figure 3 Spatial Land Use Strategy - Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones

Figure 4 Dairy Flat Metropolitan/Town Centre


 

39.     With the preferred location of the RTC being centrally located in the Future Urban Zone, the Community Facilities department now considers that the preferred location for community facilities is close to the RTC and any future stations, rather than on or close to the Green Road Park.

40.     Prior to the 2023 flood events, and then as part of recent wider investigations, the council’s Healthy Waters department carried out additional flood modelling to reflect the most up to date climate change and increased temperature scenarios (+2.1oC and +3.8oC). This has shown that the extent of the floodplains in the area will increase slightly, particularly the east west floodplain just north of Dairy Flat Highway. While the increases to the extent of floodplains from those identified in the draft Strategy are not that great, they could have made it difficult to connect the centre across them. The spatial land use plan has been amended to include the revised flood plains and the relocated centre.

41.     Given the public feedback received on flooding in the area and following the January and February 2023 flood events, recent investigations of the floods across Auckland show that the flood levels were likely to have been within the wider modelled floodplains referred to above for the +3.8oC scenario.

42.     The existence of floodplains in some parts of the area does not necessarily mean that the area is unsuitable for development. Development can be carefully integrated with the flood plains, for example though the open space and walking and cycling network. The extent of flooding and the nature of mitigation will also be considered at a future point in time when more detailed planning for the area (e.g. structure planning) is undertaken.

43.     Since the draft Spatial Land Use Strategy was released, the draft Tāmaki Makaurau Future Development Strategy (FDS) was released for public engagement in June 2023. The FDS is required by the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020. The draft identified the Dairy Flat and Wainui areas (including the Pine Valley area) as areas “Recommended for further investigation" due to uncertainty about the development capacity needed by the city, the infrastructure investment required, funding constraints, impacts on emissions and vehicle kilometres travelled, and potential natural hazards. It also proposed that development should not be enabled at Dairy Flat before 2050+ which is much later than identified in the council’s earlier Future Urban Land Supply Strategy.

44.     Reporting the Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones to the committee was therefore delayed due to the need to await the adoption of the FDS which occurred on 2 November 2023.

45.     The FDS 2023 has adopted a much stronger focus on adaptation, particularly in relation to flooding hazards and the protection of life and property and addresses the issue in some detail. In future urban areas, direction will be given for growth in hazardous locations to be avoided and it requires an integrated catchment approach to assessing and designing stormwater management and infrastructure provision.

46.     The FDS recognizes that while the degree of constraints vary, all future urban areas have some level of constraint on development which needs to be managed. Resilience and adaptation must be key considerations in all aspects of the planning and design of these areas. It states:

The value of this is shown by how well some modern, quality, and well-planned developments responded to the January and February 2023 weather events.

47.     The FDS also assessed the suitability of each future urban area for urban development, including Dairy Flat, against a range of criteria, including hazard constraints. The most hazard constrained parts of certain future urban areas are not considered suitable for urban development due to the risk to life and property and the approach to these is to remove them as future urban areas and these are:

·        Hatfields Beach stage 2

·        Parts of Kumeū-Huapai-Riverhead

·        Southern part of Takaanini

·        Parts of Drury-Ōpaheke

48.     The remaining parts of such future urban areas are ‘red flagged’ due to the impact urban development in these areas would have on increasing existing flood risk. In these ‘red flag’ areas, any future development proposals need to include structure plans that meet requirements as outlined elsewhere in the FDS.

49.     The Dairy Flat area was not considered unsuitable for urban development nor was it “red flagged”. It therefore is no longer an area for further investigation. However, Dairy Flat retains the time frame for development identified in the draft FDS of 2050+, extended from 2038 in the earlier Future Urban Land Supply Strategy. The draft Strategy provides further detail as to how the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zone should develop and is consistent with the growth and change principles which are core to the FDS.

50.     Work is also currently underway to strengthen the Auckland Unitary Plan in relation to how it manages risk from natural hazards. This was endorsed by the PEP Committee on 29 June 2023. The focus of this project is to identify and implement improvements so that the AUP is more effective at ensuring new development across the Auckland region is resilient to the natural hazard risk. Improvements to address identified gaps and issues may involve amendments to the plan itself (e.g. changes to zoning, new standards and/or rules and strengthened objectives and policies) as well as other supportive actions (e.g. staff training) and the use of non-regulatory methods. Changes to the AUP in this regard will impact on how the Dairy Flat area is developed in the future.

51.     If the Mixed Density Residential Standards (as set out in the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act 2021) are made optional by the new government and are not applied by the council, then the total number of households in the wider Future Urban Zone would be less and the centre could be smaller. If the centre is smaller there would be more higher density houses possible near the centre that are not impacted by flood plains.

52.     Given the public feedback, the further consideration of the location of community facilities and flooding, and the FDS, the Strategy has been amended to remove the centre’s direct connection with Green Road Park and avoid it spanning the updated floodplains. The Strategy now focuses the centre solely on the RTC alignment and its associated station. While parts of the surrounding higher density residential area adjoins flood plains, the centre location has the following advantages:

·        it is on the preferred RTC alignment

·        it is centrally located in the FUZ area meaning the center and its associated RTC station are more accessible to a larger population

·        it adjoins the future Bawden Road arterial with east west connections to the new Penlink motorway interchange and Dairy Flat Highway.

53.     There is still the opportunity to build strong connections between the centre and Green Road Park even if the centre does not need to directly connect with it. This matter can be considered further at the structure plan stage.

54.     In relation to the Pine Valley area to the north of Dairy Flat, a change that has emerged from the detailed investigations undertaken by SGA is that two station locations are now proposed in the Pine Valley area as opposed to the one shown in the draft Strategy. The more eastern of these is proposed to include a park and ride facility. This means that there is now the prospect of two local centres associated with the stations in the Pine Valley area (see Figure 3).

55.     Other changes have been made to the Strategy to address matters raised in the feedback and these are highlighted in section 6.5 of the Strategy and its Appendix 1.

56.     It is therefore now appropriate for the committee to consider the Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones. As previously discussed, SGA lodged NORs for the north transport projects on 20 October 2023. While the timeframes for development and delivery of the transport network extend into the long-term, it is important to have a spatial land use strategy now that provides a high-level land use framework against which the NORs can be considered.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

57.     Council declared a climate emergency in Auckland in June 2019. The decision included a commitment for all council decision-makers to consider the climate implications of their decisions. In particular, consideration needs to be given in two key ways:

·    how the proposed decision will impact on greenhouse gas emissions and the approach to reduce emissions

·    what effect climate change could have over the lifetime of a proposed decision and how these effects are being taken into account.

58.     There are several aspects of the Strategy that seek to inform future decisions in a way that will have a significant impact on mitigating the effects of emissions from vehicles. These include the following:

·    providing for a significant amount of employment in the proposed light industrial and smaller heavy industrial areas to the north of the Dairy Flat area to help reduce vehicle trips and travel distances

·    providing for a centre with services and employment close to a large residential catchment to help reduce vehicle trips and travel distances providing for high density residential development close to the proposed centre

·    providing a Rapid Transit Corridor through the centre of a future residential area

·    providing a walking and cycling network.

59.     As noted above, the issue of climate change and effects of flooding and the +3.8oC temperature increase scenario have also been recognised and taken into account in the Strategy. Flooding and the revised flood modelling were in part reasons for the recommended reconfiguration of the preferred location for the metro/town centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

60.     Auckland Transport staff have played a key role in developing the Strategy and ensuring good alignment and integration with the work undertaken by SGA in respect of the proposed future transport network.

61.     Watercare staff have not been involved in developing the Strategy as bulk water and wastewater servicing for the area are matters that were considered during the preparation of the FDS. Detailed water and wastewater servicing matters are more appropriately considered at subsequent stages in the planning and development process (e.g. at the time of structure planning).

62.     Various internal council departments (including Healthy Waters and Community Facilities) have been involved in developing the Strategy and provided additional comment following receipt of feedback on the draft. As noted above, Healthy Waters also provided additional analysis and comment following the flood events of January and February 2023 and in relation to the matters raised by the Rodney Local Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

63.     The Strategy was previously reported to the Rodney Local Board on 29 November 2023 with the intention of reporting it to the Planning, Environment and Planning (PEP) Committee in November 2023.

64.     However, due to several concerns raised by the Rodney Local Board it was decided that a further workshop be held with the local board to work through these matters prior to bringing the Strategy to PEP Committee.

65.     The local board workshop was held on 7 February 2024 where council staff and a representative of SGA attended the workshop and answered questions from the local board members on flooding and transport issues. The Strategy was formally reported to the Rodney Local Board at its meeting on 21 February 2024 and again council staff answered questions from the local board members, particularly on the flooding issue.

66.     The Rodney Local Board provided an amended resolution as set out in Attachment B. The key concerns can be summarised as follows in italics and staff comments are provided where appropriate:

·        Over a third of the high-density residential development has been identified as flood hazard -

The centre and medium-high-density residential activity will not be located “within” flood plains but will adjoin the flood plains. To integrate the centre and the preferred alignment of the RTC in the area is extremely difficult without encountering streams and their flood plains. As set out in the FDS an integrated catchment approach to assessing and designing stormwater management and infrastructure provision is required. The FDS reviewed the hazards of the area and did not “red flag” it and has retained it as a future development area. The structure plan and catchment management plan stage will define and manage this in more detail such as by accommodating flood prone areas in green spaces within the urban form.

·        need to ensure future green field development is climate resilient -

See comment above.

·        locking in the centre location prior to catchment management planning and structure planning -

The Strategy is not a rezoning exercise. There will be future FDS reviews, structure plan preparation and plan changes to rezone the land at some time in the future. The proposed natural hazards plan change (for strengthening the Auckland Unitary Plan) which will impose stricter controls on flood prone land should also be completed. Therefore, there will be opportunities to reassess the growth needs for the area and the nature and extent of the centre in the future. There will also still be investment decisions to be made on building the RTC. The land remains zoned as Future Urban.

·        constraints in the area could result in fragmented development -

Consideration of constraints are part of the option assessment in the Strategy. Fragmented land is not an issue unique to this area and being on the fringe of the metropolitan area, is an issue that future developers will have to consider and look to amalgamate sites. It is considered that the constraints can be managed and will be assessed in detail and management strategies identified at the structure plan stage.


 

·        need to protect transport corridors -

Protecting and upgrading existing, and identifying new, transport corridors is exactly what the SGA process is doing e.g. Pine Valley Road, the new Wilks Road to Dairy Flat Highway arterial, the new Wilks Road Interchange at SH1 and upgrading Bawden Road and Dairy Flat Highway.

·        request the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee advocate to central government for a policy statement to prevent housing subdivisions in flood prone areas.

67.     It is considered that the issues that the Rodney Local Board have raised have been addressed and will be further addressed through future planning processes to rezone the land which may not occur for some time.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

68.     In 2020 at the start of the preparation of the draft Strategy the following iwi groups were advised of the project:

·    Ngāti Wai

·    Ngāti Manuhiri

·    Te Runanga o Ngāti Whātua

·    Te Uri o Hau

·    Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust

·    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·    Te Kawerau a Maki

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi Authority

·    Ngāti Te Ata

·    Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

·    Ngāti Paoa Iwi

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Incorporated

·    Ngaati Whanaunga

·    Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Nga Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara

69.     A draft Cultural Values Assessment (CVA) prepared by Ngāti Manuhiri in 2018 for SGA was available at the beginning of the process. In terms of future management and growth, the concerns/issues raised in the CVA included:

·    the ongoing degradation of waterways through further development, loss of habitat and stormwater runoff

·    growth exceeding current predictions

·    connectivity appropriate to growth, need and demand

·    unforeseen adverse impacts of the environment

·    sustainable development

·    unaffordability of dwellings for mana whenua.

70.     The draft Strategy was made available to 14 of the above iwi groups who had expressed an interest in being informed about the project. At that time, Ngāti Manuhiri advised that they did not have the resources to provide comment on the draft.

71.     Subsequently Te Kawerau ā Maki with Ngāti Manuhiri, prepared a further Cultural Impact Assessment (CIA) for SGA. This reached conclusions on the proposed transport network that are also relevant to the proposed future land uses outlined in the Strategy.

72.     The CIA concluded that the proposed transport network would result in a range of adverse cultural impacts including cumulative changes to the cultural landscape and urbanisation of waterways and flood prone areas. Positive impacts identified in the CIA related to transport efficiencies and opportunities for ecological and cultural interpretation and enhancement. It identified a number of significant adverse effects that will either need to be reduced further or require offsetting. These particularly related to effects of the proposed transport network on streams and significant areas of native vegetation.

73.     The CIA also indicated that the proposed RTC introduces the largest source of new impacts, and while Te Kawerau ā Maki with Ngāti Manuhiri are not opposed to the RTC in principle, they do have concerns about the unlocking of inappropriate development within flood prone areas and the impact on the landscape of introducing a parallel transit corridor to SH1 rather than integrating their footprints.

74.     However, this concern is prefaced on the RTC unlocking or coming prior to most development rather than the reverse where it is responding to existing development created within the Future Urban Zone over time. As noted above, an important issue identified by mana whenua through AT and NZTA’s detailed business case process (via SGA) is the impact on streams. The revised Strategy addresses this to the extent that the proposed metropolitan/town centre no longer spans streams in the area. The development of the rest of the area and its relationship with the stream network is an important matter that would be considered in detail at future stages of the planning and development process (e.g. through structure planning).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

75.     The costs of infrastructure required to support development in the Dairy Flat and Silverdale West areas will be significant. This is one of the key reasons why the timeframe for development of the Dairy Flat area has been pushed out in the FDS out from 2038 to 2050+. Development of the Silverdale West area for industry is not planned to begin before 2030.

76.     There is no council funding for either of these areas in the current or proposed Long-term Plan because they were not considered to be priority locations for investment. However, as discussed earlier in this report, the Strategy has been developed alongside the detailed business case that was approved by the boards of AT and NZTA for the northern growth areas identified in the council’s FDS and the Auckland Unitary Plan. The detailed business case has resulted in the lodgement of NoRs by AT and NZTA for the proposed future transport network. A key purpose of the NoRs is to avoid the significant additional costs that can occur when private development proceeds within optimal transport corridors, ahead of the land being acquired by the relevant transport agency and the transport infrastructure being delivered.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

77.     There is a risk that adopting the Strategy could raise developer and landowner expectations of particular land uses being absolutely confirmed in particular areas, or that the provision of bulk infrastructure will occur in the near future. To mitigate this risk, the Strategy makes it very clear that more detailed planning (e.g. structure planning) will need to take place in the future and refers to the timing for development set out in the FDS (i.e. 2050+). With respect to timing, it is also noted the FDS carries significantly more legal weight than the Spatial Land Use Strategy for the Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

78.     If adopted, the Strategy will be able to be considered as part of the NOR process for AT and NZTA’s northern future transport network projects. As noted earlier in this report, the northern NORs were recently notified for submissions. Submissions will be heard by independent hearing commissioners in the new year.

79.     The landowners that were initially advised of the draft Strategy, and those that provided feedback, will be advised of the response to the feedback and the adopted Strategy. The Strategy will then be published in the council’s website.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Spatial Land Use Strategy Dairy Flat and Silverdale Future Urban Zones

 

b

Spatial Land Use Stratgey Rodney Local Board Resolution 21 February 2024

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dave Paul - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

14 March 2024

 

Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) - delegating authority to confirm council's position for legal proceedings

File No.: CP2024/02147

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve delegated authority to a political sub-committee (for policy matters) and to the General Manager Plans and Places (for technical matters) to confirm the council’s position on any legal proceedings relating to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) where urgency is required in advance of and during mediation, settlement discussions and/or a hearing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Appeals and judicial review proceedings relating to policy and plan making under the Resource Management Act 1991 or declaration proceedings in relation to plan provisions and plan interpretation are managed by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

3.       There are a number of outstanding appeals to the Environment Court in relation to council decisions on plan changes, as well as one remaining submission to be heard before the Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel in relation to the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (notified in 2013).

4.       Given that independent hearings panels and court proceedings often involve urgent deadlines, having appropriate delegations of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee in place will help to ensure that any decisions on proposed policy shifts or technical changes are made in an effective, efficient and timely manner.

5.       We have used these delegations in the previous terms of this council, most recently to manage the legal proceedings for Plan Change 78 and the Auckland Unitary Plan.

6.       It is recommended that a smaller sub-committee of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee is delegated authority for policy matters, and the General Manager Plans and Places is delegated authority for technical matters where urgency is required in advance of and during mediation, settlement discussions and/or a hearing.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      tautapa / delegate to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee, two councillors and a member of Houkura, the authority to make decisions on the council policy position for the following matters:

i)        any appeals on council decisions relating to plan changes or plan variations

ii)       any appeals on decisions relating to designations

iii)      any declaration proceedings that seek to clarify the interpretation of provisions

iv)      the hearing on the remaining submission on the proposed Auckland Unitary Plan, and any subsequent appeals on council decisions  

v)      any judicial review proceedings.

b)      whakaae / agree that at least three of the members identified in clause a) above are required to be in agreement for a decision to be made on the council’s policy position.

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that the delegation in clause a) above excludes any matters relating to Plan Change 78 for which there is already a delegation in place (PEPCC/2022/5).

d)      whakaae / agree that the delegation in clause a) will only be applied for those decisions which are required under urgency.

e)      tautapa / delegate to the General Manager Plans and Places the authority to confirm the council position in respect of technical changes (as opposed to a change in policy position) in relation to the matters in clause a) above, for the purposes of expert conferencing, mediation sessions and/or hearings.

f)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that any decisions made by the delegations in clause a) and e) will be summarised and reported to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee via memorandum updates.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Planning, Environment and Parks Committee manages appeals and judicial review proceedings which relate to policy and plan making under the Resource Management Act 1991. The committee also manages any declaration proceedings in relation to plan provisions and plan interpretation.

8.       The council regularly issues decisions on plan change requests and these are subject to an appeals process. There are currently seven appeals to the Environment Court in relation to council decisions on plan changes PC21, PC73, PC75, PC80 and PC81.

9.       There is also one remaining submission to be heard before the Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel in relation to the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (notified in 2013), following the Court of Appeal decision [2018] NZCA 629 to set aside the Independent Hearings Panel recommendation and council decision.

10.     Mediations, settlement discussions and/or hearings are likely to be required on those matters discussed in paragraphs 7-9 above, and there may be a need for decisions to be made urgently to determine the council position in advance of and during these processes.

11.     The following table outlines the processes where urgent decisions may be needed, a description of what that entails and timing implications:

Item

Description (what is it?)

Implications (why is it time sensitive?)

Appeals on all council and private plan changes

One or more parties may appeal the council decision made on council or private plan changes because they do not agree with the decision. 

Given that Court proceedings can involve urgent deadlines, it is necessary to have delegations in place to enable a delegated group to make urgent decisions on any proposed policy shifts, or for technical changes to be approved in advance of mediation and/or hearings.

Appeals on designation decisions

One or more parties may appeal a requiring authority decision to the Environment Court.

Given that Court proceedings can involve urgent deadlines, it is necessary to have delegations in place to enable a delegated group to make urgent decisions on any proposed policy shifts, or for technical changes to be approved in advance of mediation and/or hearings.

Declaration proceedings

A party can apply to the Environment Court for a declaration, seeking to clarify the interpretation of provisions, including in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

Given that Court proceedings can involve urgent deadlines, it is necessary to have delegations in place to enable a delegated group to make urgent decisions on any proposed policy shifts, or for technical changes to be approved in advance of mediation and/or hearings.

Judicial review

A person or company challenges the legality of the decision made by the council.

Proceedings are considered at the High Court. Legal submissions and evidence must be prepared in support of the case. Alternatives to resolve the case may need to be considered urgently.

Independent Hearings Panel hearing on the remaining submission on the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan

Neil Group has an outstanding submission on the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan which must be addressed at a hearing before the Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel. The Panel will make a recommendation to the council, and the council will need to make a decision to accept or reject the recommendation.

Given that the Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel proceedings can involve urgent deadlines, it is necessary to have delegations in place to enable a delegated group to make urgent decisions on any proposed policy shifts, or for technical changes to be approved in advance of mediation and/or hearings.

12.     All the processes referred to in the table above are time-sensitive to the parties involved or because of external factors such as scheduling of expert conferencing, mediation, exchange of evidence, preparation of supporting legal submissions and hearings.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Auckland Council is the named respondent to any appeals that are filed in relation to council decisions on plan change requests. The council is also named as a party in relation to declaration proceedings that seek to clarify the interpretation of provisions, including in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

14.     The council can be the respondent or a section 274 party in relation to an appeal on a decision on designations. In addition, the decision making of the council can be the subject of judicial review proceedings. Finally, the council is still involved in the hearings before the Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel in relation to the Neil Group submission on the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan.

15.     To ensure that any decisions on proposed policy shifts or technical changes are made in an effective, efficient and timely manner, it is recommended that appropriate delegations are put in place for the following matters relating to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part):

·    any appeals on council decisions relating to plan changes or plan variations

·    any appeals on decisions relating to designations

·    any declaration proceedings that seek to clarify the interpretation of provisions

·    the hearing on the remaining submission on the proposed Auckland Unitary Plan, and any subsequent appeals on council decisions  

·    any judicial review proceedings.

16.     For decisions on council policy position, it is recommended that the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee delegate authority to a smaller sub-committee comprised of committee members. This smaller sub-committee is recommended because there is often not enough time for a decision-making report to be taken to a meeting of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee. The smaller sub-committee helps to ensure council’s policy position decision-making can be responsive to critical timeframes (as required by independent hearings panels and court proceedings) and is less demanding on the council’s limited resources.

17.     It is recommended that the sub-committee include the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee, two councillors and a member of Houkura.

18.     Should the required policy decision be of such significance that it should be considered by the full Planning, Environment and Parks Committee, the sub-committee can decide to escalate the matter back to the full committee for decision-making.

19.     It is also recommended that there be a delegation of authority to the General Manager Plans and Places to confirm the council position in respect of technical matters (as opposed to policy matters) for the purposes of expert conferencing, mediation sessions and/or hearings.

20.     Similar delegations were put in place by the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee in December 2022 relating to council’s position through the hearings process for plan changes 78 to 83 (PEPCC/2022/5), and for legal proceedings under the former Planning Committee (PLA/2020/23).

21.     Note that the council’s hearings have concluded for PC79, PC80, PC81, PC82 and PC83. Decisions have been issued for all except PC79 and the decisions on PC80 and PC81 were subsequently appealed to the Environment Court.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     This report does not seek any decisions that would impact climate or would be impacted by climate change. However, it is noted that plan changes address climate change to varying degrees.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     All relevant council departments and some Council Controlled Organisations contributed to preparing the Auckland Unitary Plan. Relevant experts from across Council are involved in evaluating and presenting evidence on all plan changes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Local boards receive briefings on all council initiated and private plan changes and have the opportunity to express their views prior to and following notification. Local boards have a statutory role in expressing feedback on Auckland Council policies including the Auckland Unitary Plan and changes to it. Delegation for making public policy decisions in the land-use area has been given to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     This report does not seek any policy decisions that would impact Māori. However, when confirming the council’s position prior to and during mediation and the hearings on the proposed plan changes, it is important to ensure that impacts on Māori are considered. To that end, it is recommended that a member of Houkura be included in the political sub-committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     This report does not seek any decisions that have financial implications beyond the budget set aside for these processes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     Many decision-making functions are delegated for efficiency and effectiveness. However, there is a risk that the sub-delegation functions recommended in this report are perceived as having less democratic accountability than a decision made by the full Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

28.     This risk is mitigated by only using the recommended delegations if the legal process requires urgent direction from the council. In addition, the sub-committee can escalate any decisions back to the full committee for decision-making. The delegation to the General Manager Plans and Places will only relate to technical changes. All decisions made under these delegations will be made publicly available via the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee summary of information regular agenda report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     If the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee resolve to agree the recommendations in this report, staff will distribute materials to the sub-committee (relating to relevant matters identified in clause a) of the recommendations) for their consideration.

30.     Any delegated decisions will be summarised and reported to the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee via memorandum updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Celia Davison - Manager Planning - Central/South

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

14 March 2024

 

Auckland Unitary Plan - Making operative Private Plan Change 87 (301 and 303 Buckland Road, Pukekohe)

File No.: CP2024/01125

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make operative Private Plan Change 87, to rezone 301 and 303 Buckland Road, Pukekohe in the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Plan Change 87 (PC87) is a private plan change request to rezone approximately 7.8 hectares of land at 301 and 303 Buckland Road, Pukekohe from Future Urban Zone (FUZ) to Business – General Business Zone (GBZ) in the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP).

3.       The private plan change also applies a new precinct called the Buckland Road Precinct, and applies the Stormwater Management Area Overlay – Flow 1 (SMAF1 Overlay) to the plan change area.

4.       PC87 was publicly notified on 27 October 2022 and six submissions and one further submission were received.

5.       The hearing on PC87 was held on 31 August 2023. The decision by a panel of Independent Hearing Commissioners to approve PC87 (the Decision) with modifications was notified on 26 October 2023. The commissioners were delegated authority to make this decision.

6.       The appeal period closed on 7 December 2023 and no appeals were received.

7.       The relevant parts of the AUP can now be amended to make PC87 operative in accordance with the Decision (and included in Attachments A and B of the agenda report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      whakaae / approve Private Plan Change 87 to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) under clause 17(2) of Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 as set out in Attachments A and B to the agenda report

b)      tono / request staff to complete the necessary statutory processes to publicly notify the date on which the plan change becomes operative as soon as possible, in accordance with the requirements in clause 20(2) of Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991.

 

Horopaki

Context

Overview of Plan Change 87

8.       Plan Change 87 to the AUP is a private plan change request from Pukekohe Limited (the Applicant) which relates to approximately 7.8 hectares of land at 301 and 303 Buckland Road, Pukekohe.

9.       The plan change area is located approximately 1.7km south of the Pukekohe Town Centre. The plan change area is bordered by Buckland Road to the east with Pukekohe Park located across the road, rural land adjoining to the west, FUZ land adjoining to the south and business land to the north.

10.     The plan change area is predominately in pasture, with a dwelling and several rural use buildings. No indigenous vegetation, streams or wetlands are present.

11.     The plan change area has two approved resource consents, allowing for a trade supplier (warehouse and distribution centre) on 301 Buckland Road, and an industrial service storage yard on 303 Buckland Road, which has been implemented.

12.     As notified PC87 sought to rezone the plan change area, from FUZ to GBZ. A map showing the area to be rezoned is included in Attachment A. No other changes to the AUP were initially proposed by the plan change request.

13.     PC87 was publicly notified on 27 October 2022, and six submissions and one further submission were received. Auckland Transport submitted on the plan change. The council group impacts and views section of this report includes more information about the Auckland Transport submission.

14.     A panel of Independent Hearing Commissioners was delegated authority to hear and make the decision on PC87. A hearing on the plan change was held on 31 August 2023.

15.     In response to submissions the Applicant further proposed that the plan change area be subject to a precinct to address transport and roading matters. Through the hearing process the Buckland Road Precinct was developed and the Applicant and Auckland Transport agreed on the new precinct’s transport provisions.

16.     Through the hearing process the SMAF1 Overlay was also applied to the whole plan change area to manage the effects of stormwater runoff generated by increased impervious areas. The new precinct also includes provisions encouraging the re-use of stormwater where practical.

17.     The Decision by the Commissioners to approve PC87 (with modifications) was notified on 26 October 2023, and the appeal period closed on 7 December 2023.

18.     No appeals were received, therefore PC87 can now be made operative in accordance with the Decision, and included in Attachments A and B of this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     Schedule 1 of the RMA sets out the statutory process for plan changes.

20.     Clause 17(2) states that ‘a local authority may approve part of a policy statement or plan, if all submissions or appeals relating to that part have been disposed of’. Decisions were made on all submissions and no appeals were received on those decisions. On this basis the plan change can now be approved.

21.     Clause 20 of Schedule 1 sets out the process that is required to be undertaken for the notification of the operative date. Plans and Places staff will notify the operative date as soon as possible following the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee’s resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

23.     As a procedural step, impacts on climate change are not relevant to the recommendation to approve PC87.

24.     While this report is procedural only it is noted that intensification of the plan change area may have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions given the use of private vehicles and lack of public transport to and from the site. Modelling of greenhouse gas emissions was not undertaken as part of the plan change process. However, it is a reasonable assumption that any increases in emissions to and from the site would be largely or wholly offset by the provision of local employment opportunities (reducing the need to travel further afield for employment), improving access to business services and helping to sustain Pukekohe as a self-sufficient rural community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     As a procedural step, there are no council group impacts associated with the approval of PC87, therefore no views from the council group were sought.

26.     While this report is procedural only it is noted that through the plan change process input from Healthy Waters was sought. Healthy Waters recommended the SMAF1 Overlay be applied to the plan change area. The Applicant supported the application of the SMAF1 Overlay, and the Decision includes the application of the SMAF1 Overlay to the whole plan change area.

27.     Auckland Transport submitted on the plan change, initially opposing it unless their matters raised were adequately addressed. The primary relief sought by Auckland Transport was the introduction of a precinct and precinct plan for the site to provide certainty that all the necessary transport upgrades will be delivered. Such upgrades included a new collector road, walking and cycling facilities, intersection upgrades and urbanisation of rural roads.

28.     Through the hearing process the Applicant proposed a new precinct – the Buckland Road Precinct, addressing Auckland Transport’s concerns. The Applicant and Auckland Transport came to an agreement on the transport related precinct provisions for the plan change area, resulting in Auckland Transport no longer opposing the plan change. The Decision on the plan change includes the precinct’s transport provisions supported by Auckland Transport.

29.     Watercare Services did not submit on the plan change. Based on the Applicant’s infrastructure report it was concluded that water supply and wastewater services can be developed within the plan change area and integrated with the broader Watercare Services Limited network.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     As a procedural step, there are no local impacts associated with the approval of the plan change.

31.     While this report is procedural only it is noted that the Franklin Local Board provided its views on the proposed plan change at its 25 July 2023 business meeting.

32.     In its views the local board generally supported the plan change, although preferred that the plan change area accommodate ‘light industrial versus general business’. The local board also raised the matter of reverse sensitivity and an appropriate buffer between ‘urban business and food production (rural business) activities’.

33.     These local board views were included in the council’s hearing report and were considered in the Decision on the plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The Applicant indicated that they engaged with mana whenua to discuss the merits of the proposal and to get advice on cultural matters. A Cultural Values Assessment (CVA) was prepared by Ngāti te Ata and Ngāti Tamaoho for the plan change area.

35.     A number of iwi groups (Ngāti Maru, Ngāti te Ata, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaoho, Waikato - Tainui and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki) were provided direct notice of the plan change upon notification.

36.     No submissions were received by iwi on this private plan change.

37.     The matters raised by Ngāti te Ata and Ngāti Tamaoho in their CVAs were addressed in the hearing report and by the Commissioners in the Decision. The Decision noted that the plan change area has no sensitive environments, and therefore many of the concerns listed in the CVAs are unlikely to arise. However, the CVAs also contain concerns on broader sustainability matters, including water re-use. In response in part to the matters raised in the CVAs the Commissioners included additional precinct provisions encouraging the re-use of stormwater where practicable.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     There are no financial implications arising from this procedural decision. Approving plan changes and amending the AUP is a statutory requirement and is budgeted expenditure for the Plans and Places Department.

39.     Private plan change costs associated with processing the plan change, including making it operative, are cost recoverable from the applicant who requested the private plan change.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     There are no risks associated with making the plan change operative.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The final step in making PC87 operative is to publicly notify the date on which the plan change will become operative, and to update the AUP.

42.     Plans and Places staff will undertake the actions required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to make PC87 operative, including the public notice and seals.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Plan Change 87 maps

 

b

Plan Change 87 Decision

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katrina David - Senior Policy Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

14 March 2024

 

Customer and Community Services update

File No.: CP2024/01299

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update of quarter one service trends, financial performance, highlights and focus areas within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The chair of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee has requested a regular update on key service and operational matters relating to Customer and Community Services, in order to provide more visibility of matters important to communities of Tāmaki Makaurau.

3.       Customer and Community Services is comprised of five departments:

·        Connected Communities

·        Active Communities

·        Parks and Community Facilities

·        Community and Social Innovation

·        Regional Services and Strategy

4.       Dr Claudia Wyss, Director Customer and Community Services, will provide information on key service trends, financial performance, service highlights and 2024 focus areas.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the update from Customer and Community Services.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maryke Fouche - Advisory Lead

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Planning, Environment and Parks Committee

14 March 2024

 

Summary of Planning, Environment and Parks Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 14 March 2024

File No.: CP2024/01107

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To whiwhi / receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda, workshop and briefing papers that may have been held or been distributed to committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to committee members via memoranda/workshops and briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       As noted previously decisions on the Annual Budget may well affect the forward work programme.  The work programme underpinning the long-term scope of work as a result of the flooding events will also mean that this work programme will need to be reprioritised and updated.  Items raised at committee where work continues, as well as items from departmental work programmes, are being worked through and in coming iterations will be highlighted on the forward work programme as appropriate.

5.       The following memoranda/information have been sent:

Date

Subject

27/2/2024

Referral – Aotea/Great Barrier Local Board – Item 11 - Aotea / Great Barrier Island International Dark Sky Sanctuary 2023 Annual Report, 27 February 2024

28/2/2024

Referral – Waitematā Local Board – Item 18 - Planning, Environment and Parks Committee - 20/12/2023 Memorandum on Helicopter activity

29/2/2024

Memorandum - Regional Historic Heritage Grant Programme allocations for 2023/2024 financial year

4/3/2024

Auckland Council’s submission on extending the duration of existing consents for marine farming

6/3/2024

Memorandum – Seismic Strengthening Programme

 


 

6.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place for the committee:

Date

Subject

28/2/2024

Principles for capital investment in parks and community

6/3/2024

New Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua - Tranche 2a – Confidential, no attachment

Reasons for confidentiality:

s7(2)(c)(i)
The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the workshop identifies wāhi tapu sites and other sites of cultural sensitivity. Māori cultural heritage information is specific to the mana whenua involved and the council team is under an obligation to treat the material as 'in confidence' in accordance with agreed tikanga. Confidentiality is maintained up until notification to avoid degradation or damage to culturally significant sites. It also protects the relationship with mana whenua to maintain the supply of similar information in the future.

These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:
http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/te hui “Governing Body” from the drop-down tab and click “View”;

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

7.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      whiwhi / receive the Summary of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings – 14 March 2024.

 

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Planning, Environment and Parks Committee - Forward Work Programme

 

b

Referral – Aotea/Great Barrier Local Board – Item 11 - Aotea / Great Barrier Island International Dark Sky Sanctuary 2023 Annual Report, 27 February 2024 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Referral – Waitematā Local Board – Item 18 - Planning, Environment and Parks Committee - 20/12/2023 Memorandum on Helicopter activity (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Memorandum - Regional Historic Heritage Grant Programme allocations for 2023/2024 financial year, 29 February 2024 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Auckland Council’s submission on extending the duration of existing consents for marine farming (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Memorandum – Seismic Strengthening Programme, 6 March 2024 (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Principles for capital investment in parks and community Workshop, 28 February 2024 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sandra Gordon - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy