Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday 27 March 2024

4:00 pm

Local Board Chambers
35 Coles Crescent
Papakura
Auckland

 

Papakura Local Board

 

OPEN ATTACHMENTS

 

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

 

13        Auckland Transport - Project Kōkiri March 2024

A.      Papakura Local Board - Project Kōkiri Report March 2024                                  3

B.      Auckland Transport 2024/2025 forward work programme powerpoint from the 6 Dec 2023 workshop                                                                                                       9

C.      Auckland Transport update on the 2024/2025 work programme powerpoint provided at the 14 Feb 2024 workshop                                                                              79

14        Approval for a private road name at 241 Park Estate Road, Hingaia

A.      Report attachment A - Site Plan                                                                          91

B.      Report attachment B - Location Map                                                                   93

15        Investigation of local art service requirements and service property optimisation of 8-10 Averill Street

A.      Appendix A 8-10 Averill Street Property Overview                                              95

B.      Attachment B Papakura Arts Services Findings Report, February 2024            97

18        Local board feedback on freshwater management in Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland

A.      Consultation questions                                                                                       135

B.      Summary of consultation feedback, including feedback by local board aea    141

19        Local board input to Auckland Council Submission on the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024-34

A.      Draft Government Policy Statement on land trasnport 2024-34                       223

B.      Memo Consultation on the new draft GPS on Land Transport 2024                267

C.      GPS Land Transport - Local Board Feedback template                                   283

20        Update on Watercare and Eke Panuku work programmes for Quarter Three (Jan - Mar 2024) and CCO Engagement Plans

A.      Papakura Local Board Eke Panuku Development Auckland work programme update                                                                                                                            287

B.      Papakura Local Board Watercare work programme update                             289

21        Papakura Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar - March 2024

A.      Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar - March 2024           291

22        Papakura Local Board Workshop Records

A.      14 February 2024 Workshop Record                                                                 293

B.      21 February 2024 Workshop Record                                                                 297

C.      28 February 2024 Workshop Record                                                                 301

D.      6 March 2024 Workshop Record                                                                       303

E.      13 March 2024 Workshop Record                                                                     307


 


Papakura Local Board

27 March 2024

 

 






Papakura Local Board

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Papakura Local Board

27 March 2024

 

 












Papakura Local Board

27 March 2024

 

 


Papakura Local Board

27 March 2024

 

 


Papakura Local Board

27 March 2024

 

 

Appendix A

8-10 Averill Street property overview

Image 1 Aerial showing property boundary (blue) and encumbered area (red)

Image 2 Street view


Papakura Local Board

27 March 2024

 

 

Papakura Art Services Findings Report
Investigation of local art service requirements and service property optimisation of 8-10 Averill Street

Service Investment and Programming 

February 2024, Version 1.0
Service Investment and Programmingaucklandcouncil.govt.nz


Contents

·         1................................................................................................................................. Executive summary. 4

·         2............................................................................................................. Purpose, scope, and key drivers. 4

Purpose. 4

Project scope. 6

Key drivers. 6

·         3. How we got our information. 6

Desktop research. 6

Stakeholder engagement. 7

·         4. Strategic context. 7

Policies and plans. 7

Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) 9

The council’s role in the arts. 10

The local board’s role in arts provision. 10

Future trends for service delivery. 11

·         5. What we know about Papakura now and in the future. 12

There is a high proportion of younger, Māori and Pacific residents in Papakura. 13

There is high socio-economic deprivation in Papakura. 13

Projected population growth is below average. 14

·         6. What we know about Papakura Art Gallery. 15

History of the site. 15

Papakura Art Gallery building layout and location. 16

Papakura Art Gallery offers exhibitions and art programming. 20

Papakura Art Gallery has a low number of visitors. 20

Previous community feedback shows visitor satisfaction. 21

Art stakeholders appreciate PAG, have suggestions for improvement. 22

Building condition. 22

Operating and renewal costs. 22

·         7. Service property optimisation. 23

The land is owned by the Crown and held by the council 23

The site is constrained by easements. 24

The Eke Panuku board support proceeding with service property optimisation. 25

·         8. Network of community facilities. 25

·         9. Options for arts services in Papakura. 27

Financial assessment of options. 28

Critical success factors assessment. 28

Option nine is the best option. 30

Net sales proceeds to be spent on integration of arts services. 30

·         10. Integration of arts services. 30

Accent Point is a co-located facility with multiple services. 31

The library and museum are well used. 32

Accent Point could be further optimised. 32

·         11. Conclusion. 33



 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

1.   Executive summary

This report investigates the best approach for the future of arts services currently offered at Papakura Art Gallery (PAG), located at 8-10 Averill Street in Papakura.

The investigation found that there is an ongoing requirement for art services in the Papakura area and that these services are responding to current and future community demand. Papakura Art Gallery offers unique exhibition and arts programming services in Papakura, however visitor numbers are low.

Although 8-10 Averill Street has underlying Crown ownership and easements that limit options for the site, Eke Panuku has determined that disposal is a viable option. The recommended option for the continuation of arts services in Papakura is to proceed with service property optimisation of 8-10 Averill Street and to integrate arts services into Accent Point alongside the Sir Edmund Hillary Library at 209 Great South Road.

The benefits of integration into Accent Point includes integration of complementary services, a more accessible space, a staffed building, and better value for money for an existing investment by the local board. Any sale proceeds from the sale of 8-10 Averill Street are recommended to be ringfenced toward integration of arts services and any residual proceeds are to go towards identified projects in reserves and open spaces.

Te aronga, te kōrahi me ngā whakaawenga

2.   Purpose, scope, and key drivers

Purpose

The purpose of this investigation is to understand if service property optimisation of 8-10 Averill Street is feasible, and to understand the provision of community art services in Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura / Papakura Local Board. This investigation will inform recommendations for the local board’s consideration of the future of the facility and community art services.

Image 1 Papakura Art Gallery

Image of front doors to Papakura Art Gallery


 

Project scope

This assessment includes:

·    current delivery of arts services at Papakura Art Gallery

·    current state of the building at 8-10 Averill Street

·    the feasibility of using service property optimisation of 8-10 Averill Street

·    analysis of options for delivery of arts services in Papakura.

Key drivers

There are two key drivers for this investigation:

1.    Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) Action Plan – Action 82

In 2015 the Community Facilities Network Plan, and accompanying Action Plan, were approved by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee. Action 82 in the action plan was assessed as a priority and outlined the need to “investigate opportunities to improve existing facilities in Papakura, including Massey Park Grandstand, Elizabeth Campbell Hall, Takaanini Hall, Papakura (Sir Edmund Hillary) Library meeting room, Smiths Avenue Clubrooms, Hawkins Theatre, and Papakura Art Gallery.”

Action 82 was completed in 2016 with the creation of the Papakura Takaanini Community Needs Assessment and Library/Community Facility Location Analysis report. The report recommended the development of a new library and community space in Takaanini (completed in 2019) and service improvements for existing facilities that are underutilised and not fit-for-purpose within the local network.

2.   Service property optimisation investigation

In January 2020, Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland Council received an unsolicited development proposal from a property broker proposing the redevelopment of the Selwyn Centre Mall located at 182-188 Great South Road, 4-6 Averill Street, and the council-owned property located at 8-10 Averill Street. After the broker indicated it was no longer interested in the property, Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura confirmed its interest in Eke Panuku continuing to investigate the site as a potential service property optimisation opportunity.

Te huarahi i whai pārongo ai mātou

3. How we got our information

Desktop research

Desktop research was completed to provide an understanding of local demographics, community needs, existing service provision, and the condition of the art gallery.

The review included:

·    plans and strategies

·    demographics and population forecasts

·    service detail and usage data

·    building condition assessments

·    financial data

·    land status and site information

·    research and previous engagement on the council’s role in arts services.

Stakeholder engagement

A project team was established in 2021, with representation from council departments including Connected Communities, Eke Panuku, and Parks and Community Facilities. The project team gave input throughout the project including information on the services provided in the community, the facilities in scope, and they participated in options development and assessment.

A variety of stakeholders were engaged including the Papakura Arts Gallery facility manager, arts and culture programmer, and community broker in Papakura. Preliminary and informal conversations took place with some iwi representatives in the area about arts services in Papakura. More in-depth engagement with iwi will take place in later stages of the project.

Te horopaki whai rautaki

4. Strategic context

Key messages

·    The Papakura Local Board Plan 2023 includes objectives and key initiatives to strengthen arts and culture in Papakura. The plan also prioritises ensuring that services and facilities meet the need of the community, including through options to improve efficiency or reduce the asset portfolio.

·    Arts and culture services are valued services to which the local board and Auckland Council contribute significantly. The local board supports arts and culture through arts grants, community leases, museum and theatre services, and funding of arts and culture facilities.

·    Future trends in arts services indicate a shift towards delivering differently through integration of services, arts broker, pop-up delivery models, and working with partners.

Policies and plans

Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau has many strategic documents that inform and support the services that are being delivered for our communities. Relevant policies and plans relating to the provision of arts services in Papakura are included below in three categories: regional, local, and people and culture.

Table 1 Strategic direction from relevant regional plans and policies

Strategy

Direction

Auckland Plan 2050

Te Mahere mō Tāmaki Makaurau

Focus area 1: Create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in, and enjoy community and civic life.

Focus area 2: Provide accessible services and social and cultural infrastructures that are responsive in meeting people’s evolving needs.

Focus area 3: Recognise the value of arts, culture, sport, and recreation to quality of life.

10-year Budget 2021-2031

Te Tahua Pūtea Tau 2021-2031

Progress towards a new investment approach that is less reliant on council assets and focuses more on alternative service provision. This is guided by four key shifts.

·      We tailor services to different communities focusing on growing participation in areas of greatest need.

·      We invest in a range of delivery approaches so we can adapt and are responsive.

·      We contribute to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri through a sustainable and resilient service network.

·      We operate a fit-for-services and cost-effective service network.

Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032

Ngā Hapori Momoho

Objective 3: Increase access and participation

·      Ensure that council services, spaces, facilities, and our public spaces are inclusive, accessible, welcoming and culturally appropriate.

Objective 2: Improve Health Outcomes

·      Recognise the value of parks and open space, arts, culture, sports and recreation to health and wellbeing and ensure equitable access.

Objective 4: Grow community and intercultural connection

·      Ensure our local spaces and services facilitate connection and prioritise activities that build relationships between people of different ages, cultures and backgrounds.

·      Prioritise and resource local spaces, initiatives and events that support connection across diverse communities.

Objective 5 Enable local leadership and innovation

·      Support and enable Aucklanders to deliver more leisure, recreation and arts and culture activities that will activate and enrich local spaces.

Toi Whītiki Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan

Toi Whītiki sets out a strategic direction, goals, and key objectives for both the council and the creative sector to work together to grow arts and culture in Tāmaki Makaurau.

Goal 1 All Aucklanders can access and participate in arts and culture.

Goal 2 Auckland values and invests in arts and culture.

Goal 3 A network of vibrant arts and culture organisations and facilities.

Goal 5 Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity.

Local boards play an important role in supporting arts and culture activities in their communities, through:

·      supporting arts and culture programmes, events, and public art

·      funding local arts, cultural groups, and projects supporting local facilities.

Table 2 Strategic direction from relevant local plans and policies

Strategy

Direction

Papakura Local Board Plan 2023

Objective: ensure the asset portfolio is fit for the changing community needs.

·      Key initiative: Look at options to improve efficiency or reducing our asset portfolio over time by changing the way we deliver some services or combining them.

Objective: services and facilities meet the community’s needs now and into the future.

·      Key initiatives: ensure we can use new and existing facilities as multi-purpose community spaces, encourage library and community-led programmes to promote maximum use of… the Sir Edmund Hillary Library.

Objective: regular local cultural and arts experiences in Papakura.

·      Key initiatives: continue to carry out a programme of cultural, arts and other activities to enliven the business areas, support Papakura to be creatively rich by helping to showcase local artists and encouraging people’s participation in music, crafts and hobbies.

Papakura Heritage Interpretation Strategy Te Rautaki Whakamaarama moo ngaa Waahi Tuku Iho 2022

This strategy identifies ways to support heritage storytelling in Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura which includes Drury, Papakura and Takaanini. Key goals include:

·      connect the people of Papakura to the land and this place

·      people understand the significance of Papakura to mana whenua and their unique relationship with this place as tangata whenua

·      engage our youth with Papakura’s heritage

·      ensure the diversity of Papakura is on display

·      tell stories of the people who have lived here, their connections to the land and with other people

·      celebrate the nationally recognised people, objects, and events from this area.

Table 3 Strategic direction from relevant people and culture plans and policies

Strategy

Direction

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau

Delivery of Māori outcomes are guided by Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau which directly contributes to the Māori identity and wellbeing outcomes and other outcomes of the Auckland Plan.

Pasifika Strategy Ara Moana

·      Empowers Pacific people to thrive and lead.

·      Recognises, values and celebrates Pacific cultures, identity and diversity.

·      Promotes effective engagement, meaningful participation and partnerships with Pacific people.

·      Provides services that meet the needs of Pacific people to enable prosperous, thriving and vibrant Pacific communities in Auckland.

Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP)

The CFNP classifies Papakura Art Gallery as a local arts and culture space. It is a standalone and single service facility. The network plan does not outline specific provision guidelines for local arts and culture spaces.[1]

There are a set of provisional principals to inform future planning of local arts and culture services.

·    Provide spaces and opportunities for local arts and culture activity within existing arts and cultural facilities and community spaces.

·    Enable local expression in arts and culture activity through outreach.

·    Integrate appropriate spaces within new local community facilities.

·    Partner with others to provide suitable spaces.

·    Improve the current network of local arts and culture facilities.

The council’s role in the arts

The council’s role in the arts and culture sector should ideally complement that of central government. Central government leads the support of the arts through funding creation, capacity and capability building, and the presentation and promotion of New Zealand work nationally and internationally.[2] Council’s purpose is to meet the current and future arts and culture needs of Auckland residents.

The Empowered Communities[3] approach defines the role of arts and culture at Auckland Council as:

·    planning, providing and/or supporting major and local arts and culture venues and facilities together with private providers

·    supporting the strengthening of communities and place-making initiatives through arts and culture activities.

In a report commissioned by Te Taumata Toi-a-Iwi,[4] it was found that Auckland Council invests significantly through the council and council-controlled organisations. Investment is made in public art and libraries, grants programmes, investment in major cultural institutions and organisations such as the Auckland War Memorial Museum and Auckland Theatre Company.

The local board’s role in arts provision

Many arts and culture facilities in Auckland have developed in an ad hoc way over time, and were not necessarily planned or designed to operate as a single network. [5] The location and scale of facilities is due to several historical factors.

·    Previous decisions around funding and asset provision by legacy councils. The varied delivery model of arts services provided by legacy councils under community-led approaches.

·    The characteristics of local communities.

·    How arts organisations within communities have developed over time.

·    The ability of communities to pay for arts and culture services.

The role of local boards in arts provision has historically included a wide range of activities such as provision of arts facilities, programming, grants, funding, and events.[6] Local boards deliver these outcomes through their work programmes and the outcomes that are set in the local board plans.

Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura supports several local initiatives for the arts such as the local board grants programme, funding agreements with arts organisations, support for the Papakura Museum and Papakura Art Gallery, and the Community Arts Programme.

The Papakura Local Board Plan 2023 supports continuing the same or similar levels of service, providing space for local community arts activity. The Papakura Local Board Agreement 2023/2024[7] confirms the board’s commitment to “fund, enable, and deliver services, programmes, and facilities (art facilities, community centres, hire venues, and libraries) that enhance identity, connect people, and support Aucklanders to participate in community and civic life.”

Community feedback received in the 2023 Papakura Draft Plan includes support for regular local cultural and arts experiences in Papakura and ensuring that council assets are fit for changing community needs.[8]

Future trends for service delivery

Council’s investment in community services is transitioning to an approach that is less dependent community buildings and delivering differently through:

·    tailoring services to the greatest needs of communities

·    using alternative ways of delivering services, through partnerships and digital channels and multi-use facilities

·    over time, divesting aging buildings that are not fit-for-purpose and reinvesting in services and facilities that better meet the needs of our communities.

Some specific examples of these alternative delivery methods, relevant to arts and culture service, include:

·    pop-ups / outreach services

·    arts broker model

·    integrated community facilities.

Library spaces are changing to become multipurpose community facilities that contribute to place-making and community connection.[9] To provide best value for residents and convenience for customers, it is council’s strategic approach to integrate services within other community or council facilities whenever possible. Trends internationally are positioning libraries as centres for their communities which include associated activities provided by partners. 

Ō mātou mōhiotanga mō Papakura o tēnei wā, o āpōpō hoki

5. What we know about Papakura now and in the future

The Papakura study area[10] defined for this project (Error! Reference source not found.) has a population of 28,560 as of the last census in 2018.[11]

Figure 1 Map of Statistical Area 2s of Papakura study area

A map of Papakura Local Board with the location of Papakura Art Gallery circled, and SA2 areas identified.

There is a high proportion of younger, Māori and Pacific residents in Papakura

The New Zealand European/Pākehā residents in the study area make up 49 per cent of the population, which is equal to the Papakura Local Board area but less than the Auckland average (54 per cent). The most significant information to note is the higher Māori (33 per cent) and Pacific (21 per cent) population in the study area, compared to the Papakura Local Board area and the Auckland region. Asian residents make up only 16 per cent of the population in the study area.

There is a slightly younger population (25 per cent under the age of 15) in the study area than that of the local board (24 per cent) and the wider Auckland region (20 per cent). All other age groups in the study area are not significantly different. It is projected that the proportion of young people 0-14 years in the study area will decrease from 25 per cent in 2018, to 20 per cent by 2048. There will be more residents 65 years and over, increasing from 10 per cent in 2018 to 15 per cent by 2048.

There is high socio-economic deprivation in Papakura

The study area has high socio-economic deprivation (Error! Reference source not found.), more than double that of Auckland (30 per cent), with 72 per cent of the study area in the highest deciles of the Deprivation Index (8-10).[12] It is also high compared to 52 per cent of the Papakura Local Board area falling in the 8-10 range.

Figure 2 Percentage of the area in high Deprivation Index of 8-10

Projected population growth is below average

The study area is projected to grow by 27 per cent over the next 30 years, which is less than the projected population growth for Auckland (47 per cent), and the Papakura Local Board area (41 per cent).[13] Two MSM[14] zones in the study area do see a projected increase of 313 per cent and 104 per cent between 2018 and 2051. These areas are centred around the Papakura town centre (MSM Zones 537 and 539).

Ethnicity projections anticipate a significant increase in the Asian population in the local board over the next 20 years, and it is projected to become the largest ethnic group in the area by 2043. The Māori and Pacific population are also projected to increase as seen in Figure 3.

Figure 3 Ethnicity projection in Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura

Ō mātou mōhiotanga mō Papakura Art Gallery

6. What we know about Papakura Art Gallery

Key messages

·    Papakura Art Gallery is a council-led arts facility offering mainly exhibitions and arts programming to the community.

·    Although a 2019 survey of gallery visitors indicates satisfaction with PAG services, visits to PAG been historically low, especially since gallery hours were reduced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

·    The building is not a purpose-built art gallery and has been retrofitted. The building is in good condition for its age and use but some maintenance and renewals are needed.

·    Papakura Art Gallery has an average annual operating cost of around $44,619 for repairs, maintenance, and utilities. It also incurs an average annual operating cost of around $86,267 for programming, staff, and exhibitions. In 2022/2023, the total net opex to operate Papakura Art Gallery was $116,689.

History of the site

Papakura Art Gallery is on a 1546m² site that originally housed the old Papakura Fire Station established in 1957 by the Papakura Town Board.

Papakura Art Gallery first opened at its current location in 1995, and was managed by the Papakura Community Arts Council until 2006, when the organisation dissolved, and management of the gallery was transferred to the Papakura District Council. Since Auckland Council formed in November 2010, PAG has been operated by the council.

Table 4 History of 8-10 Averill Street

Year

Description

1982

Papakura Fire Station (8-10 Averill Street) is utilised as Papakura Museum by the Papakura Historical Society.[15]

1987 

 

Creation of the Papakura Community Arts Council. The joint Franklin-Papakura Community Arts Council disbands. Papakura sets up its own District Community Arts Council.

1995

Papakura District Council invites the Papakura Historical Society to be part of a purpose built complex incorporating the Library, Museum and the Educational Resource Centre at Accent Point. The relocation was completed and the Museum opened in 1999 on level four.

1999

Papakura Community Arts Council move into the former fire station building to occupy it as a community art gallery and The Central School was given to them to run arts classes.

2001

Plans develop for an arts and cultural hub to be developed in Central Park.

2006

Papakura Community Arts Council have insufficient funds to operate, therefore dissolving and handing operations to Papakura District Council to run the community art gallery.

2009

The building is refurbished. Moving the gallery to a larger building is considered but put on hold due to amalgamation. Upgraded Papakura Art Gallery opens.

2010

Papakura District Council is amalgamated into Auckland Council and the Papakura Art Gallery is council-led and funded by Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura.

Papakura Art Gallery building layout and location

The interior of PAG consists of an office, reception, exhibition display area, window gallery, toilet facilities, kitchen, storage on ground floor and a breakout area. The building underwent a renovation in 2009 due to its poor condition.

Image 2 Papakura Art Gallery prior to renovation in 2009

An image of the front of Papakura Art Gallery prior to renovation.

The building has a concrete foundation, a small office for facility staff, and a small kitchen. There is storage on the ground floor which is used for storing artworks and equipment.

Image 3 Mezzanine and ground levels of PAG

The layout of the mezzanine level of Papakura Art Gallery, including one big room, a meeting room, office, storage.

The layout of the ground floor of Papakura Art Gallery including two big rooms, a store room, washroom, and office.

The facility (Image 4) is positioned on the western side of the Papakura train station near Great South Road. It is a central location, near a busy intersection, close to the Sir Edmund Library and Papakura Museum. The gallery is surrounded by car parking spaces for Selwyn Central Mall customers and the adjacent Countdown Supermarket.

Image 4 Papakura Art Gallery and the surrounding area

Map of the surrounding area of Papakura Art Gallery, including proximity to Selwyn Centre Mall, Countdown Supermarket, and Sir Edmund Hillary Library.

The site (blue outline Image 5) is encumbered by a right-of-way easement (red outline) that constrains most of the site.

Image 5 Site of 8 -10 Averill Street

Aerial map of site with detail of easements cutting through the car park.

Papakura Art Gallery offers exhibitions and art programming

Papakura Art Gallery is a council-led arts and culture facility funded by Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura and the service is delivered by the Connected Communities department. Its purpose is to provide opportunities for diverse local communities to actively engage with a range of creative and cultural experiences.[16] This is achieved through delivering arts programmes, including exhibitions, activities, and public programmes.

Core objectives for the gallery are to:

·    provide a caring and comfortable space for people to enjoy art and share cultural experiences

·    deliver a dynamic range of arts and culture experiences that respond to and reflect the diverse communities of Papakura

·    increase local young people’s access to and participation in the arts

·    support the development of Māori arts and artists in Papakura, and facilitate meaningful connections that encompass Te Ao Māori

·    support and mentor local artists in the development of their professional practice, and connect them to broader audiences, creative networks and opportunities

·    develop strong local partnerships, and to enable and support connections within the community

·    operate efficiently, effectively and in a sustainable manner.

Papakura Art Gallery has the following on-site staff resources.

·    0.33 FTE Facility Manager.

·    0.5 FTE Gallery Coordinator.

·    0.5 FTE Gallery Assistant.

Papakura Art Gallery is supported by the following technical staff.

·    Arts and Culture Programmer.

·    Arts and Culture Production Coordinators.

·    Place and Partner Specialist.

Papakura Art Gallery is currently open 23 hours per week.

·    Wednesday, 10am to 4pm.

·    Thursday, 10am to 5pm.

·    Friday, 10am to 4pm.

·    Saturday, 10am to 2pm.

Papakura Art Gallery has a low number of visitors

The visits to Papakura Art Gallery have, for the past four financial years, been the lowest of any venue hire, community centre, or arts and culture facility in Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura. 2021/2022 saw the lowest number of visitors and although there was an increase in visitor numbers in the following year, it is still low at 1815 visits in 2022/2023.[17]

Figure 3 Visits to Papakura Art Gallery 2020/2023

Facilities of similar size, in other local boards, offering gallery services include Fresh Gallery in Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board and Franklin Art Gallery at Franklin: The Centre. These galleries receive more visits per annum than Papakura Art Gallery. In 2022/2023, Fresh Gallery had 3191 visits and Franklin Art Gallery (co-located with other council services) had 13,748 visits.

The slight reduction in visitor numbers over from 2021-2022 can be partially attributed to the impacts of COVID-19 lockdowns, as well as reduced opening hours from 56 hours to 23 hours per week during this period.

Previous community feedback shows visitor satisfaction

An arts and culture facilities survey[18] was conducted by Gravitas in 2019. The purpose was to provide insight on visitor demographics, rationale for visits, satisfaction, and what would they like to see more of.

Papakura Art Gallery had the smallest sample size with 42 visitors responding to the in-person intercept survey which took place over a four-day period in June 2019.

The following key insights were captured.

·    95 per cent were satisfied (of these, 74 per cent reported it was due to what was being delivered, 21 per cent because of the facilities).

·    98per cent visited because of a specific programme or event.

·    67 per cent of visitors were over the age 45 years old and 76 per cent identified as female.

·    33 per cent were European, 49 per cent Māori, 11 per cent Pacific, 2 per cent Asian.

Community members would like to see more exhibitions by local visual artists, art classes and workshops for children and families, events and activities offered in the evenings and weekends including social events, and different types of art such as sculpture, performance art, music, dance, and artist demonstrations.

Many respondents reported being satisfied with their visit as they were impressed by the quality, variety, and creativity of the art as well as the warm and friendly welcome from staff, artists, and the general environment of the gallery.

Art stakeholders appreciate PAG, have suggestions for improvement

Staff approached key stakeholders in the arts sector in Papakura in 2022 to complete a survey. The goal was to understand their organisation’s involvement in the arts sector in Papakura, their thoughts on how council delivers arts services in Papakura, and their insights on how arts services could be offered locally in the future.

Surveys were completed by 11 arts organisations. The responses included:

·    good awareness of Papakura Art Gallery and appreciation for its good quality art exhibitions and the dedication of staff. Suggestions for improvement were to include different art forms and themes such as youth art, Māori art, local artists, interactive art, and learning about art for all ages

·    appreciation for the location of PAG with good parking and proximity to the train. Appreciation for the heritage value of the building

·    suggestions for improvement included relocation or sharing space with other facilities due to the limited space at PAG. Respondents wanted PAG to be open for opening hours on weekends, and improved accessibility to the building for the disabled community.

Building condition

An asset assessment was completed in April 2022. The assessment found the PAG building is in good condition for its age and use, but some general maintenance and minimum external renewals work have been identified. The other improvements are primarily general external roof and exterior building maintenance. An Asbestos Management survey report from February 2020 found that asbestos containing material was presumed in some building elements, however it is determined to be low risk.

Based on an Initial Seismic Performance assessment (IEP) conducted in May 2014, the building has a provisional seismic performance rating of 34% (grade C). The IEP assessment was carried out before the Earthquake-prone Buildings Amendment Act 2016 came into effect and as a result, the building would need to be re-assessed to confirm the current seismic rating. This building is not on the priority seismic assessment regional work programme.

Operating and renewal costs

Papakura Art Gallery has an average annual operating cost of around $44,619 for repairs, maintenance, and utilities. It also incurs an average annual operating cost of around $86,267 for programming, staff, and exhibitions. In financial year 2022/2023, the total net opex to operate Papakura Art Gallery was $116,689.[19]

Table 5 Repairs, maintenance, and utilities costs

FY18

FY19

FY20

FY21

FY22

FY23

Repairs and maintenance

$18,855

$35,328

$23,526

$42,227

$37,983

$33,465

Utilities

$5,402

$6,938

$7,577

$5,295

$7,769

$7,119

TOTAL

$24,257

$42,266

$31,103

$47,521

$45,752

$40,584

Table 6 Programming, staff, and exhibitions costs

 

FY18

FY19

FY20

FY21

FY22

FY23

Programming, staff, and exhibitions

$128,447

$68,238

$58,477

$91,520

$91,175

$76,105

Council’s renewals modelling indicates that the cost of renewals for PAG, over the next 16 years, to be around $345,580.

Table 7 Auckland Council renewals modelling

2025 to 2030

2031 to 2035

2036 to 2040

Expected renewals

$30,000

$118,580

$197,000

Te whakamarohitanga o te rawa wāhi tuku ratonga

7. Service property optimisation

Key messages

·    The service property optimisation framework was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee in March 2015 (FIN/2015/16). Service property optimisation seeks to maximise efficiencies from in service assets while releasing part or all of a property for sale or development. The net sale proceeds are reinvested back into a service asset or local project.

·    The site has underlying Crown ownership and is held under the Reserves Act 1977.  Despite this, the site meets the service property optimisation requirements and the Department of Conservation’s asset disposal guidelines. A reserve revocation process will need to be completed before any sale can progress.

·    Independent valuation advice has confirmed the financial viability of the project, which has considered the heavily encumbered nature of the site by easements to the adjoining owner.

The land is owned by the Crown and held by the council

8-10 Averill Street, held in record of title NA655/77 is legally described as Allotment 206 Section 11 Village of Papakura, is subject to the Reserves Act 1977 and has underlying Crown ownership (confirmed by LINZ Accredit Agent in July 2021).

In 2021, a LINZ Accredited Agent was engaged to verify ownership status of 8-10 Averill Street. It was confirmed that the land has underlying Crown ownership, which vested the reserve in the Papakura Town Board, in trust, for municipal purposes.

Typically, should the reserve status of land with underlying Crown ownership be revoked, the property reverts to the Crown and council is unable to retain any proceeds of sale. However, The Minister of Conservation advised the council in 2014 that the Crown is willing to consider properties on a case-by-case basis and that provided certain criteria are met, the council could retain the net proceeds from sale.   

The criteria requires that the net sale proceeds are to be reinvested in:

·    improving an existing reserve, or

·    acquiring a new reserve for recreation or amenity purposes for the benefit of the local community.

Department of Conservation (DOC) advised that 8-10 Averill Street would be subject to these disposal guidelines[20] and would have to meet criteria if the council were to retain net sale proceeds after its costs had been paid. These guidelines have not yet been tested for a disposal of this kind and there is a risk that currently unknown costs or processes may impact the process of disposal and reinvestment of proceeds.

The site is constrained by easements

The site is a rectangular piece of land with two street frontages.  A right-of-way easement providing access to the neighbouring property’s rooftop carpark[21] affects about 720m2 of the site.

The easement is a legal right that allows the owners and its visitors of the neighbouring properties to use the site for access to their land and buildings. It can be used at any time and for any purpose related to the enjoyment of the neighbouring properties. It is shared by both the council and the owner of the neighbouring properties who are both responsible for keeping it in good condition and preventing any problems.

The council, at any time during the term of the easement, may give the grantee six months written notice to determine this easement on the following basis.

·    Alternative access from 8-10 Averill Street is provided.

·    All costs associated with establishing alternative access are covered by the council.

·    A new easement over part of the land for the right of way is granted.

Image 6 Easement of 8-10 Averill Street

Aerial view of the site and detail of easements.

The Eke Panuku board support proceeding with service property optimisation

In January 2023, Eke Panuku commissioned an independent market valuation of the property on the open market (excluding synergistic value), assuming the reserve status has been revoked. This advice confirmed the financial viability of the project at the time, which includes the impact of existing encumbrances.

In June 2023, the Eke Panuku board approved the recommendation for Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura to utilise the service property optimisation framework for the disposal of 8-10 Averill Street. Should the local board not approve the recommendation, the disposal will not progress.

Te kōtuinga o ngā hanga whaitake ā-hapori

8. Network of community facilities

Staff undertook a network review of community facilities as part of the review of arts and culture provision in Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura and the identification of potential integration opportunities.

Image 7 Map of community facilities in Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura

Map of other community facilities in Papakura.

Papakura Art Gallery is a unique service that is not offered elsewhere in the local board area, as it provides arts and culture services with a focus on visual arts in a dedicated and facility-based space. Hawkins Theatre is the only other council delivered arts and culture venue in the study area, however its focus is on performing arts.

The Papakura Takanini Community Needs Assessment from 2016[22] concluded that there was no gap in the existing provision of community arts and culture facilities. The assessment recommended that there was a requirement to investigate opportunities to improve existing facilities including PAG.

Table 8 Detail of services offered at Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura community facilities

Community facility

Service(s)

Delivery

Massey Park Grandstand

Venue for hire

Council

Elizabeth Campbell Hall

Venue for hire

Council

Papakura Art Gallery

Arts and Culture – Visual arts

Council

Sir Edmund Hillary Library (Papakura Library) and Papakura Museum

Library, Museum, and Venue for Hire

Council

Smiths Avenue Community Hall

Venue for Hire

Partner

Hawkins Theatre

Arts and Culture – Performance and Theatre

Council

Massey Park Pool

Pools and Leisure

Council

Papakura Leisure Centre

Pools and Leisure

Council

Old Central School Hall

Venue for Hire

Council

Ngā kōwhiringa ratonga ā-toi i Papakura

9. Options for arts services in Papakura

Service and Asset Planning conducted an options assessment with assistance of an internal project team. A long-list of options, to continue to deliver art services in Papakura, was developed (see Table 9).

Options include opportunities to continue arts services at 8-10 Averill Street at different levels of investment, to lease out 8-10 Averill Street as a community lease and deliver arts services using different delivery models, or to optimise 8-10 Averill Street and integrate arts services into Accent Point.

Table 9 Options for arts services in Papakura

Option

Title

Description

Cost over 15 years (opex + capex)

1

Status quo

Arts services continue to be delivered at 8-10 Averill Street

$3.3 million

2

Reduce hours

Arts services continue to be delivered at 8-10 Averill Street with reduced hours

$2.9 million

3

Increase hours

Arts services continue to be delivered at 8-10 Averill Street with increased hours

$5 million

4

Community led

Arts services continue to be delivered at 8-10 Averill Street led by a community partner

$2.8 million

5

Integrate art services

8-10 Averill Street becomes a community lease + arts services integrated into Accent Point

$4.0 million

6

Art broker

8-10 Averill Street becomes a community lease + arts services funding redirected to an arts broker

$2.8 million

7

Art grants

8-10 Averill Street becomes a community lease + arts services funding redirected to arts grants

$2.8 million

8

Other local board priorities

8-10 Averill Street becomes a community lease + funding redistributed to other local board priorities

$1.1 million

9

SPO + arts integration (2 years)

Service property optimisation of 8-10 Averill Street after two years + arts services integrated into Accent Point

$1.8 million

10

SPO + arts integration
(10 years)

Service property optimisation of 8-10 Averill Street after 10 years + arts services integrated into Accent Point

$2.5 million

 

 

Financial assessment of options

Staff undertook a high-level financial assessment of the ten options as the recommended option must represent value for money to the local board and to the council. The cost of each of the ten options was investigated including the opex and capex over a 15-year period.

Option eight (8-10 Averill Street becomes a community lease and funding is redistributed to other local board priorities) is the lowest cost option, however with this option, the services currently offered from PAG are no longer funded by the local board.

Option nine (service property optimisation of 8-10 Averill Street and arts services integrated into Accent Point after two years) is the second lowest cost option. This option still enables the continuation of an asset-based delivery of arts services in Papakura.

With option nine, some costs to the local board will likely be lower than current state as there would be a reduction in the level of capex spending on renewal requirements for 8-10 Averill Street. There would also be reduced opex costs after two years on the repair, maintenance, and utilities costs currently spent on PAG. It is anticipated that the net sale proceeds from disposal will be sufficient (including a cost inflation allowance) to cover the integration of art services and capital fit out required. Any remaining funds can be used for other approved projects.

Critical success factors assessment

Staff identified critical success factors as assessment criteria to determine the best option for the future of arts services in Papakura.

Table 10 Critical success factors

Critical success factor

Questions to support analysis of options

Strategic fit

Should we be doing this?

Which options align with council’s strategies, programmes, and projects?

Business need

Do we need to do this?

How well does each options fulfil the needs identified in the needs’ assessment?

Value for money

What is the best value way to do this?

Which option has the lowest long-term costs?

Supplier capacity and capability

Can we get others to do this?

How well does each option match the ability of potential suppliers to deliver the required services?

Which options are likely to result in a sustainable arrangement that optimises value for money over 15 years?

Affordability

Can we afford this?

How well does each option meet with available funding?

Achievability

Can we do this?

Enable our communities

How well does each option allow communities to influence decisions that affect them?

Which options brings our communities together?

Focus on communities that need us most

How well does each option use our resources to serve our communities that need us most?

Fit for purpose

Which option ensures the arts services are fit-for-purpose?

How flexible is the space?

Population growth

Which option supports population growth and the provision of art services?

Support local board priorities

Which options supports the local board priorities for arts and culture investment?

Each of the ten options were then assessed against the critical success factors, rating them to be strong, medium, or weak in alignment.

Table 11 Critical success factor assessment of ten options

Critical success factors

One

Two

Three

Four

Five

Six

Seven

Eight

Nine

Ten

Strategic fit

Business need

Value for money

Supplier capacity and capability

Affordability

Achievability

Enable our communities

Focus on communities that need us most

Fit for purpose

Population growth

Support local board priorities

Total

 Strong  Medium  Weak

Option nine is the best option

Staff recommend option nine: integration and service property optimisation over two years. This option is the lowest cost option and has the strong alignment with critical success factors, while still offering delivery of arts services in Papakura.

This option also has the following benefits.

·    Aligns with local board plan outcomes

·    Increases participation through increased visibility of arts services

·    Efficient use of a third-party lease

·    Retains ability to undertake service property optimisation

·    Opportunity to explore community-led delivery

·    Continued investment in arts and culture services in Papakura.

This option includes the following assumptions.

·    Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura continue to support and fund arts services through LDI funding.

·    Both PAG and Accent Point remain in service during service property optimisation and integration planning.

·    Staff to investigate community-led model of delivery at PAG.

Net sales proceeds to be spent on integration of arts services

Net sale proceeds from the proposed sale are recommended to be spent on the integration of art services at Accent Point. Based on a similar project, it is estimated that the cost to fit out the space would be approximately $300,000.[23] Any remaining proceeds can be put towards projects that meet the service property optimisation criteria and DOC‘s guidelines. The following projects listed below in order of importance, based on priorities workshopped with Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura in December 2023 have been identified.

·    Ōpaheke Park: sports field drainage improvements opposite the toilet facilities.

·    Hingaia Park: concept plan.

·    Bruce Pulman Park: destination playground on Kuaka Drive.

·    Keri Downs Park: shared path network to connect to Redcrest Avenue.

·    Ray Small Park: sports field drainage improvements.

·    Smiths Avenue Reserve: concept plan stage two.

Te whakauruurutanga o ngā ratonga toi

10. Integration of arts services

Key messages

·    Accent Point is the only site that fit the criteria for the integration of arts services in Papakura.

·    The main benefits of integration at this site include its central and accessible location close to other services and near the town centre, the presence of complementary services to arts and culture such as library and venue hire, and that it is an in-service staffed facility that would allow for better activation and operation.

·    The local board already contribute significantly to this site and there are underutilised spaces that could be used. This will lead to greater value for money for the local board.

Accent Point is a co-located facility with multiple services

Accent Point level 3 (located at 1/209 Great South Road) hosts several council-aligned services including the Sir Edmund Hillary Library, venue hire, Papakura Museum, and council services. Council is one of the tenants on site, holding a third-party leased space with an expiry of September 2030.

There is 1185m2 of public library and community space, and an additional 3213m2 for commercial spaces, a community lease (Papakura Museum), a large storage space on level 2, car parking, and a goods lift. The commercial leases (a café kiosk and small shop space) on level 3 have been vacant since COVID-19 and there has been little interest in these commercial leases. A view of the level 3 library and community space configuration of level 3 is pictured below (see Error! Reference source not found.).

In 2009, the Papakura District Council undertook a significant upgrade to Accent Point.[24] The council sold its shares in the building and relocated the library and museum from level 4 to level 3 to have main street access to Great South Road.

Image 8 Current configuration of library, venue hire, and community spaces at Accent Point level 3

Current configuration of library, venue hire, community spaces at Accent Point level 3.

The library and museum are well used

The Sir Edmund Hillary Library and Papakura Museum are co-located services and are well used by the community. In 2022/2023 the library had 123,120 visits.[25] The library is experiencing a similar trend to other libraries in Auckland of declining visitors however visits have rebounded from a low in 2021/2022.

Figure 4 Visits to Sir Edmund Hillary Library

There is a meeting room available for bookings in the library that has a capacity of 40 people. There were 6078 visitors to the meeting room in 2022/2023, representing 1811 booking hours. The Papakura Museum reported 6078 visits in 2022/2023.

Human Mobility Insights (HMI) data supports the finding that the library and museum are well-used. [26] It was the most visited facility in the Papakura Local Board area with 294,446 visits over January 2020 to April 2022. In comparison, PAG had 28,616 visits over the same period. This data also indicates that the library and museum and PAG are visited mainly by local residents with 62 per cent of visits originating from Te Poari ā-Rohe o Papakura, and the majority of the remaining visits coming from Franklin Local Board.

Accent Point could be further optimised

There are significant benefits to the community and to the local board through integrating arts services into Accent Point. These include:

·    increased access to the community to arts services in Papakura through being located at a central site that is accessible, located with other council-aligned services, and open with more staffed hours

·    synergies and opportunities for service providers to increase activation of space through the integration of arts services into the site, including shared site amenities and a more cohesive customer experience

·    value for money for a better use of an existing council asset to which the local board contributes significantly by better use of underutilised space.

Engagement with the Connected Communities department and site tours of Accent Point indicate that there is likely to be an underutilisation of some spaces in Accent Point that could be reconfigured for the integration of arts services. The commercial space, the library reading room and café, commercial space, and the void space in the back of the library and research area have been identified as potential spaces to reconfigure (Image 9).

Image 9 Potential spaces for integration of art services at Accent Point level 3

View of spaces at Accent Point and potential spaces for integration highlighted.

The integration of services and configuration of space will be further investigated in the next phase of the project, with the local board as the decision-maker.

Te whakatepenga

11. Conclusion

The investigation found that there is an ongoing need for arts services in Papakura, and that current services at PAG are responding to community demand. The recommended option for the future of arts services in Papakura is for 8-10 Averill Street to be divested through the service property optimisation process and arts services to be integrated, after two years, into Accent Point.

Next steps are for the local board to resolve on service property optimisation and the use of proceeds to integrate art services. Should this proceed, more detailed planning for the integration of services can be undertaken in an indicative business case process.


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[1] Source: Auckland Council. (2015). Community Facilities Network Plan. Retrieved from https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/topic-based-plans-strategies/community-social-development-plans/docscommunityfacilities/community-facilities-network-plan.pdf

[2] Source: Waitematā Local Board. (2018). Waitematā Local Board Arts and Creative Industries Needs Analysis and Stocktake of Community Space. Retrieved from Waitematā Local Board - Arts and creative industries needs analysis, and stocktake of community space 2018 (aucklandcouncil.govt.nz)

[3] Source: Auckland Council. (n.d.). Empowered Communities Approach Quick Guide. Retrieved from https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/grants-community-support-housing/grants/regional-grants/docsregionalcommunitydevelopment/empowered-communities-approach-quick-guide.pdf

[4] Source: Te Taumata Toi-a-iwi. (2022). Mapping the Auckland funding ecosystems for Ngā Toi. Retrieved from 2022 Update: Mapping the Auckland Funding Ecosystem for Ngā Toi – Culture, Creativity and the Arts - Te Taumata Toi-a-Iwi (tetaumatatoiaiwi.org.nz)

[5] Source: Auckland Council. (2019). Governance Framework Review on Service levels and funding stock take of existing local community service levels. Retrieved from

https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/Kotahi/Reports/Forms/AllItems.aspx?id=%2Fsites%2FKotahi%2FReports%2F20190701%2DGFR%2D%2D%2DStocktake%2Dof%2DExisting%2DLocal%2DCommunity%2DService%2DLevels%2DReport%2DFinal%2Epdf&parent=%2Fsites%2FKotahi%2FReports

[6] Source: Auckland Council. (n.d.). Appendix A: Auckland Council’s roles in arts and culture. Retrieved from https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/topic-based-plans-strategies/community-social-development-plans/docsplanappendices/arts-culture-strategic-action-plan-roles.pdf

[7] Source: Auckland Council. (2023). Papakura Local Board Agreement 2023/2024, pg.137. Retrieved from https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/Documents/papakura-lb-agreement-2023-2024.pdf

[8] Source: Auckland Council. (2023). Papakura Local Board Plan 2023 Summary of Feedback, pg. 11. Retrieved from https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/externalcontentdelivery/consultations/local-board-plans/lbp-2023/papakura-lbp-2023-summary-feedback.pdf

[9] Source: Auckland Libraries. (n.d.) Te Kauroa- Future Directions 2013-2023. Retrieved from https://www.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/Documents/te-kauroa-full.pdf

[10] SA2 areas Papakura Central, Papakura East, Papakura Industrial, Papakura Kelvin, Papakura Massey Park, Papakura North, Papakura North East, Papakura West, Red Hill and Pahurehure. This is slightly larger than the 15-minute walking distance from a town centre provision.

[11] Source: NZ Stats. (2018). 2018 New Zealand Census. Retrieved from https://nzdotstat.stats.govt.nz/wbos/Index.aspx?_ga=2.28391548.1319836719.1686706032-818448060.1686706032

[12] Source: Deprivation Index 2018. University of Otago.

[13] Source: LTP 21-31 Growth Assumptions (i11V6).

[14] Macro Strategic Model, Auckland Council Growth Scenario i11v6

[15] Source: Papakura and Districts Historical Society Inc. (n.d.). Papakura Museum Blog. Retrieved from https://papakuramuseumblog.wordpress.com/papakura-districts-historical-society/

[16] Source: Auckland Council. (2016). Papakura Art Gallery Business Plan 2017 – 2020. Retrieved from https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2017/03/PPK_20170322_AGN_7129_AT_files/PPK_20170322_AGN_7129_AT_Attachment_51767_1.PDF

[17] Source: CP VH Arts Performance Report. CC Insights Sharepoint. Extracted in October 2023.

[18] Source: Auckland Arts and Culture/ Corey Walden. (2019). Papakura Art Gallery – Managers Report 2019. Retrieved from https://issuu.com/aucklandartsandculture/docs/pag_managers_report_2019_digital

[19] Source: OP201, Finance Business Partner.

[20] Department of Conservation. (2014). Reserve Revocation and Disposal Policy. Retrieved from  https://www.doc.govt.nz/globalassets/documents/about-doc/role/legislation/guide-for-reserve-administering-bodies.pdf

[21] Subject to a right of way over part marked L on DP 326191 created by Easement Instrument 5817632.3, Subject to a right of way over part marked L on DP 326191 created by Easement Instrument 5824792.1

[22]Source: Auckland Council / Rachael Butler and Adrian Field (2016). Papakura Takanini Community Needs Assessment and Library/Community Facility Location Analysis Final Report. Retrieved from https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2016/06/PPK_20160615_ATT_4989_EXCLUDED.htm

[23] Current value.

[24] Source: Infonews. (2009) Papakura confirms upgrade for Accent Point. Retrieved from https://www.infonews.co.nz/news.cfm?id=45341

[25] Source: Power BI, Libraries Regional and Local Board KPIs Report, extracted October 2023.

[26] Source: Human Mobility Insights. HMI data is an estimate of the number of visits based on counting GPS signals from mobile devices that use selected apps. HMI data also includes the Statistical Area 2 where the device spends the night, which allows us to see which neighbourhoods the visits come from.