I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 4 April 2024

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Komiti mō ngā Tūnuku me ngā Rawa Tūāhanga / Transport and Infrastructure Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr John Watson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

Members

Cr Andrew Baker

Cr Mike Lee

 

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Kerrin Leoni

 

Houkura Member Billy Brown

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Mayor Wayne Brown

Houkura Member Pongarauhine Renata

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Chris Darby

Deputy Mayor Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Julie Fairey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

Cr Ken Turner

 

Cr Lotu Fuli

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Shane Henderson

Cr Maurice Williamson

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Lata Smith

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua /
Senior Governance Advisor

 

28 March 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 027 202 0586

Email: lata.smith@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

04 April 2024

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5  

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input                                                                           5

5.1     Public Input:  Surface Light Rail - Plans for surface light rail in Auckland   5

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input                                        5

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              5

8          Update on preparatory work for the Auckland Integrated Transport Plan             7

9          Auckland Transport Update - April 2024                                                                   13

10        Reducing Traffic - Auckland's VKT Reduction Programme                                   15

11        Kāinga Ora Update - April 2024                                                                                  25

12        Transport Deliberative Forum                                                                                    27

13        Summary of Transport and Infrastructure Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 4 April 2024 35

14        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

 


1          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

 

 

2          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

 

 

3          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

            Click the meeting date below to access the minutes.

 

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 7 March 2024 including the confidential section, and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 27 March 2024, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

 

 

5          Ngā Kōrero a te Marea | Public Input

 

5.1       Public Input:  Surface Light Rail - Plans for surface light rail in Auckland

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Connor Sharp will address the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, on behalf of Surface Light Rail, regarding their surface light rail plans, route and built infrastructure to support plans.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the public input from Surface Light Rail in relation to surface light rail plans in Auckland and whakamihi / thank Connor Sharp for attending the meeting.

 

 

 

 

6          Ngā Kōrero a te Poari ā-Rohe Pātata | Local Board Input

 

 

 

7          Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

 

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

04 April 2024

 

Update on preparatory work for the Auckland Integrated Transport Plan

File No.: CP2024/03236

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on progress made on developing Auckland Council’s medium to long-term transport network view that will inform a future Auckland Integrated Transport Plan (AITP).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Transport and Infrastructure Committee (TIC) endorsed the scope for the preparatory works for the AITP on 7 March (CP2024/01603).

3.       Staff were requested at this meeting to report back to the 4 April TIC on progress made on delivering this scope. Progress to date is that:

·    Auckland Council staff are progressing the workstreams needed to deliver a view on the medium to long-term transport network and other changes (e.g., legislative) that Auckland needs.

·    A series of maps showing Auckland’s transport progress to date, network deficiencies and challenges have been produced to inform this work and can be found in Attachment A.

4.       Staff will provide another progress update at the TIC meeting on 9 May.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive this progress report on the preparatory works for the Auckland Integrated Transport Plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Chair of the TIC and the Mayor requested staff in February 2024 to undertake work that would be used to support the development of the AITP with the new government. The aim of this preparatory work is to determine an Auckland Council view of the medium to long-term transport network needed in Auckland. This will allow Auckland Council to have a well-informed position prior to working with central government to develop an AITP.

6.       The March TIC meeting requested staff to undertake preparatory work that would seek to inform a future AITP. The TIC resolved at this meeting, resolution number TICCC/2024/17 (CP2024/01603):

          a.  ohia / endorse the scope of work (as described in paragraphs 17 and 18 of the 7 of March agenda report) to help Auckland Council develop its view of the medium to long-term transport network, in preparation for discussions with central government on an Auckland Integrated Transport Plan.

b.       note / tuhi ā-taipitopito that the existing Auckland Integrated Transport Plan Political Reference Group will provide direction to staff throughout the duration of this work.

7.       Staff were also asked to report back on progress made at the April TIC meeting. 

8.       Auckland Council staff have worked closely with the Mayor’s Office and AT staff to progress work as outlined in the scope agreed by TIC. The AITP preparatory work will be informed by existing transport planning processes and information. Auckland Council and AT staff will not undertake new transport planning or modelling during this work.

9.       It is anticipated that any future AITP, which this preparatory work will inform, will be an important input in the development of future Regional Land Transport Plans (RLTPs), Auckland Council’s Long-term Plans (LTPs) and National Land Transport Programmes (NLTP), and will inform decisions regarding transport projects of national significance that reside within Auckland. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Preparatory works progress update

10.     Project planning is now complete. 

11.     The major workstreams needed to deliver the AITP preparatory work are shown in table 1 below.

#

Workstream

Description

1

Auckland’s transport challenges

Identification of Auckland’s transport system challenges in 10 and 30 years

2

Visualisation of Auckland’s current and future transport network (maps)

·    Major projects delivered in the last 15 years

·    Current Freight Network (with challenges)

·    Current roading, rapid transit, public transport and cycling network

·    Future (2035) rapid transit, public transport and cycling network

·    Future (2050) rapid transit and roading network

3

Development of a 30-year transport view

·    Major transport projects by 2050

·    Staged development of network 2050

·    Network 2050 strategically and financially assessed (where data allows)

4

Strategic alignment assessment

·    Alignment of network 2050 with FDS and other relevant strategic plans

5

Identification of necessary non-infrastructure interventions

·    Identification of time of use charging and other non-infrastructure solutions that can help address Auckland’s challenges

6

Overview of transport system

·    Provide an overview and a fit-for-purpose assessment of the current transport governance, planning, and funding settings in place

·    Undertake analysis of how current settings can help (or not) to achieve Auckland’s goals

Table 1: Summary of scope for AITP preparatory works

12.     The workstreams noted above are now established and work is being undertaken in all of them. These do present a significant amount of work and staff will progress them as fast as possible, given other competing requirements such as the GPS submission process.

13.     The visualisation of Auckland’s current and future transport network (i.e. the maps) have progressed to a point that the majority of these can be presented to the TIC and are shown in appendix A. The findings from other workstreams will be presented at future TICs. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     There will be climate impacts, both positive and negative, associated with most of the transport projects that will be included in Auckland Council’s medium to long-term transport network view. Where sufficient data exists, the AITP preparatory work will include a high-level commentary on the potential climate impacts of key projects and their alignment to Auckland Council‘s existing policy positions. Emissions reduction will also be a key factor considered when prioritising the projects that will be proposed as part of this work.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     AT and Auckland Council staff are jointly working on the development of the AITP preparatory work. 

16.     While the anticipation is that the AITP will inform the development of future RLTPs and LTPs, it does not replace the statutory decision-making responsibilities of AT and Auckland Council associated with the RLTP and LTP, which are also consulted on publicly.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     The AITP process, before it was put on hold last year, included consultation with local boards, which occurred in May 2023. The feedback received from that process will be a key input to the AITP preparatory work. To summarise, Local Boards stated that the following was important:

·        Ensure adherence to Auckland Council’s Climate Plan

·        Concern with a lack of local board involvement and governance in developing the AITP

·        More clarity is needed on the roles of New Zealand Transport Agency, KiwiRail and AT

·        Minimise climate impact and lower emissions 

·        Improve customer experience, reliability, and confidence in public transport

·        Avoid out of sequence development if transport infrastructure isn't funded/delivered

·        More consultation needed with Māori, Pacific, young adults, and Asian communities. 

18.     As this phase of the work is primarily technical in nature and preparatory, no additional consultation with Local Boards will be undertaken.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The preparatory work will be informed by the results of a hui between the Mayor, the then Minister of Transport, and iwi representatives in May 2023 as part of the initial phase of joint work on the AITP.  In line with the scope agreed by TIC, no additional consultation with Māori or iwi will be undertaken during the development of the preparatory work.

20.     As part of reviewing existing work, staff will endeavour to review the possible outcomes for Māori, as described in Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, as part of this preparatory work. In line with the terms of the scope, no new work on potential outcomes for Māori will be undertaken.

21.     The development of the preparatory work for the AITP will be overseen by a Political Reference Group, which includes the Chair of the Independent Māori Statutory Board.    

22.     It is anticipated that work undertaken jointly with Government later in the year on the AITP itself will seek to engage with Māori.       

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The preparatory work for the AITP is primarily focused on the medium and longer-term (i.e.,10 to 30 years) and it is anticipated that its findings will influence future RLTPs and LTPs.

24.     Given its medium to long-term nature, it is not anticipated that this work will have any significant impact on Auckland Council’s forthcoming LTP or have any immediate financial implications. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     Critical risks for this work that were identified during project planning are set out below.

Risk

Description

Mitigation

Rating

Staff resourcing constraints

Other commitments such as the GPS submission impact on available staff resourcing.

Project planning and a technical working group has been undertaken/established.

 

Medium

Misalignment with key transport partners and existing plans

The Auckland Council medium to long-term view is not aligned with existing Government/partners’ views.

This work informs Auckland Council’s initial position and any difference with Government/partners would be worked through in a future AITP process.  

Medium

Lack of quality information about transformational projects

There are varying levels of information about large scale projects, which is of differing quality.

Use the latest and best information available. Where information is missing this will be taken into consideration within the multi-criteria assessment process.

High

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Staff will seek direction from the AITP Political Reference Group during the development of the strategic framework, setting of priorities/criteria for the 30-year assessment, and during the process of defining the emerging medium to long-term view.

27.     Auckland Council staff will continue to work with AT on completing the AITP preparatory work and involve other agencies as required.

28.     Auckland Council staff will provide the next update on the findings from the AITP preparatory work at the May TIC meeting.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

AITP Evidence Base - Maps

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jose Gonzalez - Principal Transport Advisor

Robert Simpson - Manager Transport Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

04 April 2024

 

Auckland Transport Update - April 2024

File No.: CP2024/03009

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive the April 2024 update from the Chief Executive of Auckland Transport on the performance of the organisation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Transport and Infrastructure Committee has responsibility for the oversight of major transport and infrastructure matters that affect the Auckland region.

3.       Auckland Transport is a Controlled Organisation of Auckland Council. Auckland Transport designs, build and maintains Auckland’s roads, ferry wharves, cycleways and walkways, coordinates road safety and community transport initiatives such as school travel, and plans and funds bus, train, and ferry services across Auckland.

4.       An update (attached) will be provided by the Chief Executive on strategic issues, operational updates and key performance metrics for the most recent reporting period.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the update from Auckland Transport’s Chief Executive on the performance of the organisation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport Update - April 2024 - Presentation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mara Bebich - Executive Officer

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

04 April 2024

 

Reducing Traffic - Auckland's VKT Reduction Programme

File No.: CP2024/02670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present an overview of the findings of Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme (VKT-RP).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 16 March 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee (TIC) noted that Auckland was required to produce an urban Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme (VKT-RP) as part of central Government’s Emission Reduction Plan (ERP). The TIC also requested that staff report back at key milestones during the development of this programme.

3.       The Ministry of Transport set a regional target to reduce light vehicle kilometres travelled by 29% by 2035, which Auckland’s regional VKT-RP was required to achieve.

4.       The development of the VKT-RP included the examination of a variety of transport and land use interventions, community engagement, potential regulatory changes, shared and active transport network improvements, urban intensification opportunities, and road pricing/demand management.

5.       Work to develop Auckland’s VKT-RP was completed in February 2024, at which time Auckland Transport, Auckland Council, and the New Zealand Transport Agency received the final report.

6.       As requested by the TIC, officers are now presenting the findings of the final VKT-RP to the committee. The final report and appendices will also be made publicly available.

7.       The VKT-RP focuses on rapid, low-cost adaptation of existing assets to meet Auckland’s growth needs while reducing regional light vehicle travel and associated greenhouse gas emissions, without the need for additional large-scale transport projects.

8.       The final programme proposes a range of communications, engagement, legislation, policy, transport, land-use, and road-pricing mechanisms that would all need to be delivered in sequence to achieve the scale of change needed to meet the 29 percent VKT reduction target.

9.       The VKT-RP, if funded and delivered, would transform Auckland’s transport system and urban form to provide multiple economic, environmental, and social co-benefits.

10.     While the delivery of the VKT-RP is currently unfunded, the VKT-RP report provides useful information on the potential outcomes of a package of transport and land-use interventions delivered using rapid, low-cost adaptation of Auckland’s existing transport system. This work will help to inform future transport, land-use and communications planning and programme development, and provides a useful comparator for considering future transport investment options for the Auckland region.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the findings of Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme (VKT-RP).

b)      tuhi-ā-taipitopito / note that Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme sets out the changes to legislation, policy and regulation, transport system, urban form, and funding that would be required to achieve a 29 percent reduction in light vehicle travel across the Auckland region by 2035.

c)      tuhi-ā-taipitopito / note that if funded and delivered, Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme would also support regional growth, reduce traffic congestion, improve transport network safety and address transport equity across the region.

d)      ohia / endorse using the findings of Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme to inform Auckland Council and Auckland Transport in their transport, land-use and communications planning and programme development.

Horopaki

Context

11.     In May 2022 central government published Aotearoa New Zealand’s first Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) that included three key actions for transport:

a)      Reduce reliance on cars and support people to walk, cycle and use public transport

b)      Rapidly adopt low-emissions vehicles

c)      Begin work now to decarbonise heavy transport and freight.

The VKT-RP deals primarily with the first of these actions, while other work programmes were anticipated to focus on actions 2 and 3.

12.     The 2022 ERP also established four targets for the transport sector, the first of which was ‘Reduce total kilometres travelled by the light fleet by 20 per cent by 2035 through improved urban form and providing better travel options, particularly in our largest cities.’ This target was supported by action 10.1.2 of the ERP, ‘Develop VKT reduction programmes for Aotearoa New Zealand’s major urban areas (Tier 1 and 2) in partnership with local government, Māori and community representatives.’

13.     “Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT)” is a unit of measure that describes a vehicle travelling on a transport network. Within the context of the VKT-RP, VKT refers only to travel from light vehicles such as cars, vans, and utes; and not to heavy vehicles such as trucks and buses or other vehicles such as motorcycles.

14.     Recognising that it is more difficult to provide alternative transport options in rural areas, sub-regional VKT targets were set by the Ministry of Transport that reflected the potential of different regions to achieve VKT reduction. Auckland’s regional target was determined to be a 29% reduction (against the forecast baseline) by 2035.

15.     On March 16 2023, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee noted that Auckland was required to produce an urban VKT reduction programme, and requested for staff to report back at key milestones during the development of the programme.

16.     A political reference group consisting of the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, the Chair of the Planning and Parks committee and three Auckland Transport board members was established to oversee development of Auckland’s VKT Programme.

 

17.     The key task of the Auckland VKT-RP was to identify a potential programme of initiatives and investment that would achieve the 29% reduction in light vehicle travel across Auckland by 2035 determined by the Ministry of Transport. There was an anticipation that the findings of this work would inform other relevant strategic and statutory transport planning, such as the Integrated Transport Plan and the Regional Transport Plan.

18.     Under direction from the Ministry of Transport, and with funding provided by the Climate Emergency Response Fund (CERF), Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and NZTA  jointly began work on Auckland’s urban VKT reduction programme in March 2023.

19.     The development of the programme included examination of a variety of transport and land use interventions, community engagement, potential regulatory changes, shared and active transport network improvements, urban intensification opportunities, and road pricing/demand management. Comprehensive modelling of the impacts of different intervention scenarios/packages, an evidence-based literature review, and full costing of the programme are included within the final report.

20.     On 15 November 2023 the interim findings and programme development of Auckland’s VKT-RP were presented in a workshop with the Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

21.     In December 2023, the incoming Minister of Transport provided direction to NZTA to stop work on VKT reduction programmes. At this stage, Auckland’s VKT-RP was near completion and delivery of a final report was under contract. Therefore, the work was completed and a final report produced.

22.     The final report on Auckland’s urban VKT programme was received by Auckland Transport, Auckland Council, and the New Zealand Transport Agency in February 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     The outputs of Auckland’s VKT-RP provide information on the potential costs and outcomes of transport planning and investment that aligns with the 2022 ERP action to reduce reliance on cars and support people to walk, cycle and use public transport.

Summary of outcomes

24.     The VKT-RP found that a significant transformation of Auckland’s transport, if funded and delivered, would achieve:

·    A world-leading public transport system capable of moving over 400 million passengers annually by 2035, with turn-up-and-go (<15 minute) frequencies across much of the region, seven days a week.

·    A reduction in traffic congestion alongside an increase in accessibility to jobs by both private vehicle and public transport. The number of jobs accessible within 30 minutes travel by car during the morning peak would almost double (increases from ~250,000 to ~460,000 jobs), access to jobs within 45 minutes by public transport increases by over 250% (from ~98,000 to ~265,000 jobs).

·    A transport system capable of supporting significant growth and productivity improvements by optimising transport assets within existing urban areas, avoiding the need for expensive additional infrastructure.

·    Seventy-five percent of Aucklanders living within 400 metres of safe, connected cycleways and accessible footpaths, including safe routes for most children to walk, scoot, or cycle to school.

·    Through large uptake of safer modes and mass roll out of infrastructure which protects road users from harm, serious injuries and fatalities resulting from crashes are modelled to reduce by 27 percent.

·    Over 5,000,000 tonnes of carbon emissions being avoided by 2035, with a carbon payback period of only five years for embodied emissions created during construction and implementation of the programme.

·    Significant network resilience improvements by providing high levels of access across multiple complimentary networks and modes, as opposed to being heavily dependent on private vehicle travel alone.

·    A five percent reduction in freight emissions due to improved network performance on strategic routes.

·    By providing improved transport options region-wide, the programme effectively addresses multiple transport equity and universal accessibility concerns, particularly around barriers to access by age, disability and income.

25.     The programme emphasises necessary key enablers of community engagement and legislative change which must be implemented to ensure ongoing programme success. The key enablers are closely followed by mass-action programmes of rapid, low-cost adaptation and optimisation of existing assets to:

·    support active and public transport options;

·    enable a quality compact urban environment, and;

·    motivate people to travel differently through road pricing and behaviour change initiatives.

26.     The Auckland VKT-RP was developed on a modelled baseline that assumed delivery of the 2021 RLTP for Auckland (including completion of the City Rail Link and Eastern Busway), but discounted additional large-scale projects such as Auckland Light Rail or an additional Waitematā Harbour Crossing. These large-scale projects were discounted due to uncertainty around project completion and contribution to VKT reduction by 2035. A major finding of Auckland’s VKT-RP was that the results outlined above could be achieved through investment in lower cost, smaller projects, coupled with demand management approaches and land use change.

27.     The VKT-RP does not include a focus on vehicle fleet electrification or heavy vehicles and freight as this was guided by separate actions within the ERP. However, due to network optimisation and resulting improvements in travel time reliability, some benefits for freight have been identified.

Key enablers: Communications and legislation

28.     To deliver on a region-wide transformation programme, community engagement and communications are identified as an essential enabling component. The VKT-RP recommends delivery of a communications and engagement programme which:

·    Builds understanding of how a transport and land-use system which emits less pollution can protect and enhance Aucklander’s lives;

·    ensures Aucklanders are familiar with a shared vision for the region and the ability to achieve it and;

·    builds support from Aucklanders for the types of projects and policies that will achieve the shared vision and create a lower-emissions transport system.

29.     Regulatory changes are identified as a key enabler for delivery of the VKT-RP. Specifically, legislative changes relating to road pricing, infringement penalties, time of use charging, funding mechanisms (including developer contributions) and road user types and behaviours are identified as being necessary to achieve the outcomes of the programme. These findings reinforce many of Auckland Council’s existing policy positions and demonstrate the potential beneficial impact of such change would have on Auckland’s transport network.

 

Sustainable transport options and urban form

30.     The VKT-RP identifies a need for broad-scale programmes of rapid, low-cost adaptation of existing assets to provide minimum-standard bus priority lanes and cycle networks primarily by repurposing existing road corridor space. The VKT-RP includes 770km of bus priority lane and 880km of protected cycleway across the region, as well as supporting infrastructure for active and public transport use and access.

31.     Spatial transport modelling was applied to consider ways that population growth and urban development could occur while reducing carbon emissions from transport. The report finds that people who live nearer to the city centre are likely to travel less distance by private motor vehicle (and therefore contribute less to total VKT in the region). By providing for much more opportunity for new development nearer to the city centre and minimising development at the urban periphery, land-use planning and zoning can make a significant contribution to reducing Auckland’s carbon emissions.

32.     Many trips made, region-wide, are for purposes other than work and education. By enabling mixed-use development in more locations, Aucklanders will be enabled to make shorter local trips to achieve daily needs. The VKT-RP recommends enabling low-impact mixed use activities (such as hair salons, childcare centres, convenience stores etc.) to be permitted activities within Terrace Housing and Apartment Building (THAB) zones.

Pricing and behaviour change

33.     Alongside improvements to active and public transport networks and enabling a more compact urban form, road pricing mechanisms are likely to be required to achieve a significant reduction in private vehicle use and corresponding carbon emissions.

34.     To address equity concerns, the programme recommends that alternative options for driving would be implemented prior to road pricing schemes becoming operative. This is in line with the findings from other comprehensive studies on road pricing such as Auckland Congestion Question Project. Further work is needed to understand the network-wide economic and cumulative generalised cost changes included in the VKT-RP report.

35.     Auckland’s VKT-RP was modelled under the assumption that Auckland’s regional fuel tax would remain in place throughout the course of the programme. The programme also includes three hypothetical additional road pricing mechanisms:

·    Motorway tolls, inbound only, at three locations on the network (Auckland Harbour Bridge, Northwestern Motorway near St Lukes Interchange, and Southern Motorway near Penrose), of $4.06 on-peak and $1.76 off-peak.

·    A city-centre cordon charge (where all vehicles which enter the cordon—defined by the central motorway junction—are charged upon entry) of $4.06 on-peak and $1.76 off-peak.

·    A general cost of driving price increase of 10 cents per kilometre. This could represent price increases resulting from future adjustments to the emissions trading scheme (ETS) or other driving-related costs such as road user charges, fuel price increases and vehicle registration.

Estimated programme costs and benefits

36.     Auckland’s VKT-RP presents a cost estimate for a region-wide transformation of the transport system without the need for large-scale transport infrastructure projects. As such, the VKT-RP may act as a useful value-for-money comparator for consideration of future transport investments in the Auckland region.

37.     The capital costs of the VKT-RP are estimated to be $20.6 Billion (P50) to $28.8 Billion (P95) over the ten years 2025 to 2035.

 

 

38.     Once fully delivered and operational, the additional operating cost compared to existing (excluding changes to asset renewal and replacement costs), is estimated to be $1.0 Billion (P50) to $1.1 Billion (P95) per annum. With staged delivery of additional services once essential enabling infrastructure is in place, the cumulative additional operating cost over the delivery period to 2035 is an additional $4.9 Billion (P50) to $5.1 Billion (P95) above baseline estimates.

39.     The final VKT-RP report includes a recommendation for an independent peer review of costings, a cost-benefit analysis, and evaluation of potential revenue streams such as additional public transport farebox recovery and road tolling.

40.     Due to improved access to economic opportunities and improved performance of the transport network, significant increases in active travel and subsequent health benefits, a reduction in road harm, and a reduction in carbon emissions, the programme is likely to result in significant economic benefits.

41.     Auckland’s VKT-RP offers a useful comparator for transport planning and investment pathways. The programme demonstrates that significant emissions reductions can be achieved alongside improvements in safety, network performance and access, without the need for additional large-scale transport projects.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.     If delivered, Auckland’s VKT-RP would make a significant contribution towards Auckland’s emissions reduction commitments. When compared to a modelled 2035 baseline, tailpipe emissions are estimated to reduce by 30% for non-freight and by 5% for freight journeys. This reduction is in addition to the current forecast reduction in emissions achieved through vehicle electrification.

43.     The embodied construction emissions associated with the programme are estimated to be 1,519,000 tCO2e, and a 5-year payback could be achieved if the programme is implemented by 2026, resulting in a rapid reduction in user emissions. This equates to a modelled net carbon reduction from Auckland’s land transport system of 5,002,900 tCO2e by 2036.

44.     The actions of Auckland’s VKT-RP would contribute significantly towards Auckland’s Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP) and regional emissions reduction commitments as described in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. However, the actions and associated costs contained within the VKT-RP are not of themselves sufficient to achieve the level of emissions reduction detailed in Auckland’s climate plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.     Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme (VKT-RP) was co-developed by Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and the New Zealand Transport Agency.

46.     While the delivery of the VKT-RP is currently unfunded, the VKT-RP report may be used to inform transport, land-use and communications planning and programme development across the wider Council group.

47.     Any future implementation of the VKT-RP would require significant resourcing and involvement from Auckland Transport and the wider Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     Local boards were provided with a memorandum update on Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme (VKT-RP) in July 2024. It was expected that further progress on Auckland’s VKT-RP would be shared with local boards in October 2024.

49.     Due to delays in developing Auckland’s VKT-RP, providing an update to local boards was suspended until sufficient programme information was available to be shared constructively.

50.     Following direction from the Minister of Transport to stop work on vehicle kilometres travelled reduction programmes, further updates to local boards were suspended indefinitely.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     Development of Auckland’s VKT-RP involved a specific Māori engagement and consultation workstream intended to include and represent Māori within the programme.

52.     A series of roopu arotake (Māori focus groups) with targeted groups of people from Māori communities across Tāmaki Makaurau were followed by more randomised kanohi ki te kanohi (face-to-face) interactions in an informal setting to provide information on how Māori think and feel about VKT reduction, the current transport system, and the different scenarios for the program.

53.     Four key themes emerged from engagement with Māori. These were centred around whānau wellbeing; the lived experience of being Māori (including identity, culture, and access to the Māori world); the relationship between transport behaviour in the built and natural environment; the link between transport and healthy daily lives; and the ability to participate fully in society both economically and alongside the wider family.

54.     Insights from Māori participation include:

·    All participants agreed that engagement with Māori communities should be Māori-lead, with resourcing to provide “by Māori, for Māori” communications and consultation.

·    95 percent of participants reported that they were not generally provided with sufficient understanding of how the transport system in Auckland was planned, funded, and operated.

·    90 percent of participants had safety concerns for children travelling independently to and from kura/school. Most safety concerns were not transport related.

·    86 percent of participants supported investment into improved public transport, including the removal of on-street parking to provide for bus priority lanes.

·    83 percent of participants supported subsidies for e-bikes, and maintenance and education programmes at marae and kura.

55.     Development of Auckland’s VKT-RP was designed to align with Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – Auckland’s Māori outcomes framework, and to address Māori concerns and ambitions. The programme includes recommendations for specific engagement and communications with Māori, Māori-lead transport initiatives, strong consideration of transport equity outcomes and region-wide improvements to the transport system which support community health and wellbeing.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.     Development of the report detailing Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme was fully funded by the New Zealand Transport Agency through the Climate Emergency Response Fund.

57.     Work to develop the programme report is now complete and there are no additional associated costs or financial implications.

58.     No funding is currently allocated for delivery of Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme.

59.     While the programme indicates significant investment (and benefits), this information can inform statutory processes, such as the RLTP and the LTP, which will underpin decision making on the investment that Auckland Council will make into Auckland’s transport system

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     Auckland is currently not on-track to achieve emissions reduction targets in the transport sector. As transport is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the region, a failure to achieve sufficient emissions reductions from transport creates additional risks related to Auckland’s broader climate commitments and responsibilities.

61.     While Auckland’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme (VKT-RP) is currently unfunded, the package of interventions detailed in the VKT-RP report are currently the most credible and well-evidenced pathway to reduce transport-related greenhouse gas emissions in the Auckland region.

62.     Achieving the outcomes of Auckland’s VKT-RP will require strong alignment between Auckland Council group and Central Government to ensure the availability of funding as well as supporting policy and legislative changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     If endorsed by the Transport and Infrastructure committee, the findings of Auckland's Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme will inform Auckland Council and Auckland Transport in their transport, land-use and communications planning and programme development

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

VKT-RP Final Report Auckland (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

VKT-RP Appendix A - Modelling Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

VKT-RP Appendix B - Developing the Plan from Longlist to Preferred (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

VKT-RP Appendix C - Intervention Research Evidence Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

VKT-RP Appendix D - Engagement (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

VKT-RP Appendix E - Land Use (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

VKT-RP Appendix F - PCT Analysis (Under Separate Cover)

 

h

VKT-RP Appendix G - Costing (Under Separate Cover)

 

i

VKT-RP Appendix H - Programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

j

VKT-RP Appendix I - Delivery Dependencies (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Robert Simpson - Manager Transport Strategy

Tim Adriaansen - Senior Transport Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

04 April 2024

 

Kāinga Ora Update - April 2024

File No.: CP2024/01054

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on Auckland’s large-scale project areas.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Transport and Infrastructure Committee has responsibility for the oversight of infrastructure funding mechanisms and agreements, including agreements with the Crown.

3.       Kāinga Ora is partnering with Auckland Council, alongside developers, iwi, and government agencies to deliver urban development projects in Auckland. The large-scale project (LSP) areas within Auckland include the precincts of Tāmaki, Māngere, Mount Roskill along with the smaller areas of Oranga and Northcote.

4.       In September 2022 Auckland Council and the Crown signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) relating to the Auckland large-scale project areas. The purpose of this MoU is to facilitate aligned strategic planning, investment and delivery of the bulk and local infrastructure required to enable housing growth in these areas.

5.       An update on the Auckland large-scale projects was presented to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee on 20 July 2023. Staff from Kāinga Ora and the council will provide an update on progress of the large-scale projects, including a joint infrastructure programme, at the Transport and Infrastructure Committee’s 4 April 2024 meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the update on Auckland’s large-scale project areas from Kāinga Ora.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Kāinga Ora Update - April 2024

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mara Bebich - Executive Officer

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

04 April 2024

 

Transport Deliberative Forum

File No.: CP2024/00184

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To whiwhi / receive the outcomes of the deliberative forum held to gain greater understanding of community views on the future of our transport system.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A deliberative forum was conducted by Koi Tū, the University of Auckland Centre for Informed Futures, in partnership with Auckland Council, Auckland Transport (AT) and the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA).

3.       This deliberative democracy process utilised a civic lottery to generate a representative population sample of 100 participants for the purpose of engaging in learning and deliberation over two full Saturdays two weeks apart plus on-line sessions.

4.       Polling of the participants was conducted pre and post the deliberative forum sessions to gauge the views of participants and how these views changed as a result of learning and deliberation with fellow citizens.

5.       At the start of the forum there was already support for some (but not all) changes and interventions that would help to reduce the negative impacts of Auckland’s transport system. After deliberation, support for all such interventions increased.

6.       The deliberative forum showed the capacity of an ‘average’ group of citizens to reason through problems and moderate their views about some contentious issues when given the opportunity to consider a range of evidence, perspectives, and trade-offs.

7.       The most favoured transport solutions were:

·        Upgrade Auckland’s rail network so that trains run faster and more frequently.

·        Make it safer, easier and more comfortable for everybody to walk around their local area.

·        Provide more bus services so that buses turn up frequently at all times of the day.

·        Provide a safe and connected bike path network across the Auckland region, including removing car parking spaces where required.

·        Build more homes closer to the city centre, public transport stations and main bus routes.

8.       The options showing the largest change (increase) in support following deliberation were:

·        Charge a fee for on-street car parking which varies in price depending on the area where people live and park.

·        Charge a fee for driving on all main roads when traffic is heavy.

·        Charge a fee for driving into the city centre.

·        Build more homes closer to the city centre, public transport stations and main bus routes.

·        Provide a safe and connected bike path network across the Auckland region, including removing car parking spaces where required.

9.       The findings and insights from the deliberative forum will be used by Auckland Council to help inform transport strategy and planning. Staff also recommend that the findings are shared with the Auckland Transport Board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that a deliberative forum was conducted in partnership with Koi Tū and funded by NZTA through the Vehicle Kilometres Travelled Reduction Programme.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that following the deliberative forum, support amongst participants for a range of transport interventions strengthened considerably, suggesting acknowledgement of the difficult trade-offs required to improve travel options for Aucklanders

c)      whakaae / approve that officers share the outcomes of the deliberative forum with the Auckland Transport Board so that relevant insights can be incorporated into transport strategy and planning as well as submissions to government.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Mayor’s Letter of Expectation (2023) to AT discussed the need for AT to regain social licence for its activities and to “deeply understand and respond to what matters most to Aucklanders”.

11.     AT were advised to consider how deliberative democracy techniques could inform their understanding of the factors that shape Aucklanders’ transport decisions and that generalised consultation is not enough and is often not effective.

12.     NZTA made funding available to Auckland Council and AT to develop an Auckland Urban Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) Reduction Programme.

13.     Auckland Council included a proposal to conduct a deliberative democracy project in the joint Expression of Interest with AT. To ensure independence, the project was delivered by Koi Tū in partnership with Council, AT and NZTA. 

14.     The aim was to understand the viewpoints of a diverse cross-section of citizens before and after their exposure to expert knowledge, interactions with fellow participants, and examination of the trade-offs associated with various choices through structured exercises.

15.     Koi Tū provided the final report to Council and AT for incorporation into the Auckland Urban VKT Reduction Programme on 1 December 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A deliberative democracy approach

16.     The ‘deliberative polling’ format entailed administering a baseline poll and running the deliberative process over two full Saturdays two weeks apart. This allowed for a full ‘learning day’ and a full ‘deliberation day’, as well as an online session in-between for experts to answer questions raised on day one. At the completion of day two, participants re-took the poll.

17.     Providing unbiased, evidence-based information resources for the participants was critical. Koi Tū and Auckland Council arranged for many experts to present to the participants and made their presentations, as well as answers to the most-raised questions, publicly available. The experts and stakeholder representatives are all listed in the attached final report.

18.     The group of nearly 100 Aucklanders was selected using a two-step randomised civic lottery process known as sortition, ensuring they broadly represented all of Auckland.

19.     The question that was put to the participants was: What changes do you think are needed to ensure that everyone can get around Auckland efficiently, affordably, safely and sustainably, well into the future?

20.     The primary measure of the impact of the deliberative process was the change in survey responses obtained before and after the deliberation, regarding participants' perspectives on the existing transport system and its impacts, and their level of support for various possible changes. The survey asked how much they agreed or disagreed with a set of statements, using a Likert rating scale from 0 (strongly disagree) to 10 (strongly agree). The difference in responses between the two surveys revealed shifts in views after learning and deliberation. Qualitative data on participants views during deliberation was also collected and analysed.

Deliberative Forum results and analysis

21.     Results of the pre- and post-deliberation surveys are in the table below. At the start of the forum there was already support for some (but not all) changes and interventions that would help to reduce the negative impacts of transport. After deliberation, support for all such interventions increased, as indicated by the mean level of support across all participants. From the start, the participants understood that building more road lanes was not a particularly effective way to alleviate congestion and other problems, with low support in the first survey reducing further after learning and deliberation. The data indicate that the most favoured interventions were:

·        Upgrade Auckland’s rail network so that trains run faster and more frequently

·        Make it safer, easier and more comfortable for everybody to walk around their local area

·        Provide more bus services so that buses turn up frequently at all times of the day

·        Provide a safe and connected bike path network across the Auckland region, including removing car parking spaces where required

·        Build more homes closer to the city centre, public transport stations and main bus routes

22.     One interesting finding related to the level of support for establishing a network of cycle lanes across the city, including the removal of car parking spaces where necessary. Support for this intervention in the first survey was approximately 65 per cent, which increased to 85 per cent after deliberation. The percentage of individuals who were strongly against the idea dropped from an initial 17 per cent to only 3 per cent between the first and second survey. This support is notable given that nearly three quarters (73 per cent) of participants indicated that they cycled infrequently (if at all), and most surveying suggests that people are reticent to lose access to car parking.

23.     There were several interventions that originally scored negatively but gained support such that the mean moved from negative (disagreement) into the positive (agreement). These interventions were all associated with pricing and charging, including on-street parking fees, peak-time driving charges, and fees for driving into the city centre. The intervention with the largest change in the percentage of supporters after deliberation was about charging for on-street parking, which went from net negative (-19 per cent) to net positive (44 per cent) support. While these interventions still do not rank among the most supported, the change in viewpoints is notable and suggests that many understand that some unpopular decisions are required.

24.     The changes in levels of agreement on some interventions were substantial, particularly for those relating to pricing. The five options showing the largest change (increase) in support following deliberation were:

·        Charge a fee for on-street car parking which varies in price depending on the area where people live and park

·        Charge a fee for driving on all main roads when traffic is heavy

·        Charge a fee for driving into the city centre

·        Build more homes closer to the city centre, public transport stations and main bus routes

·        Provide a safe and connected bike path network across the Auckland region, including removing car parking spaces where required.

25.     Overall, the deliberative forum showed the capacity of an ‘average’ group of citizens to reason through problems and moderate their views about some contentious issues when they have the opportunity to consider a range of evidence, perspectives, and trade-offs.

Extending the outcomes

26.     The attached report provides a solid base of public attitudes to inform Auckland Council and AT’s strategy and planning.

27.     An extension project being undertaken by Koi Tū is comparing the findings with a broader on-line citizen engagement process, to be completed in the following months.

28.     The process and content has been documented on film, to serve several purposes:

·        to reach a broader audience of Auckland stakeholders and socialise the outputs

·        to reach community audiences who may be interested in the identified transport solutions

·        to reach a broader policy audience so they can consider the potential of deliberative democracy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     There have been concerted local and central government efforts towards reducing transport emissions in recent years. Auckland Council unanimously declared a climate emergency in 2019, endorsed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in 2020 and adopted the Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP) in 2022. Central government released its first Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) in 2022 and new advice is expected from government in the coming months on how they intend to meet New Zealand’s legislated emission reduction commitments.

30.     The Deliberative Forum informs the development of Auckland’s transport strategy and is well-aligned with Auckland Council’s climate policies and strategies, including Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri and TERP.

31.     Transport emissions currently constitute more than 40% of Auckland’s total emissions profile, with 86% of the sector’s emissions coming from road transport. Reducing Auckland’s transport emissions will also unlock a range of other key benefits such as public health and economic productivity.

32.     In line with many instances of public consultation and surveys undertaken in the past, forum participants supported many of the interventions needed to reduce Auckland’s transport emissions. This support grew throughout the course of the forum as participants were exposed to a range of expertise, data and perspectives from other people.   

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The Deliberative Forum informs a range of Auckland Council and AT processes such as policy development, strategy, planning, business cases and prioritisation. This can influence the development of the 2024 RLTP, which will be led by Auckland Transport.

34.     The outcomes when implemented should contribute toward Auckland Transport and the Council Group more broadly being able to establish social licence for some of the required changes to the transport system such as the proposed Time Of Use Charging project.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     The Deliberative Forum used a civic lottery process to ensure that the participants were representative of Auckland’s adult population. The process is designed to be a mini-public or a representative group of people who go through a process of learning and deliberation so they develop a more comprehensive understanding of the complexities and trade-offs required when making complex decisions.

36.     The process has an Auckland-wide focus so did not engage with specific local boards but it did ensure that all local areas were represented by the participants.

37.     Local boards have consistently been supportive of the need to reduce Auckland’s transport emissions through the provision of sustainable transport choices and better approaches to land use planning, as highlighted during the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri and TERP.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Auckland Council and Koi Tū partnered with Māori during the development and delivery of the Deliberative Forum. The process built on the valuable partnerships established through the development of previous climate-related policy including Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri and TERP.

39.     One of the draft principles identified by NZTA to guide the VKT Reduction Programme development is that ‘Te Tiriti o Waitangi underpins our approaches.’ Another relevant principle is that ‘We will reduce inequities, not reinforce them,’ which includes addressing the inequities faced by Māori as a result of Auckland’s past transport decisions.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     The Deliberative Forum was funded by NZTA as a component of Auckland’s Urban VKT Reduction Programme. Auckland Council staff provided their time to ensure the project was delivered successfully. 

41.     The Deliberative Forum generated insight into what actions are required to deliver a better transport system. These will have financial implications but any further implementation will be subject to normal funding processes and considerations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     The Deliberative Forum was completed on schedule with a successful result.

43.     The following risks and mitigations have been identified:

Risk

Proposed Mitigation

The Deliberative Forum outcomes are different to the existing plans and research conducted by Council and AT

The participants were advised of existing plans and research outcomes related to transport futures. Where their outcomes are contradictory, this informs how Council and AT should deliver future work in order to gain social license.

Auckland Council and AT fail to incorporate outcomes into future processes

The community views expressed through the forum align well with council’s high level transport priorities such as mode shift and emissions reduction. These views must be weighed against other considerations such as government policy and funding constraints.

Transport and Infrastructure Committee recommendations will add impetus to Council and AT’s efforts to improve our transport system.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport will publish the deliberative forum outcomes.

45.     Outcomes from the project will be incorporated into relevant transport strategy and planning processes and submissions to government.

46.     Council and AT will compare the alignment and contrasts of the deliberative forum with our surveys and community insight work to consider the value of the deliberative process and how it informs our understanding of community sentiment.

47.     Deliberative processes will be utilised for the Time Of Use Charging project and other complex policy issues where appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deliberative Forum Interim Report

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Roth - Lead Transport Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 


Transport and Infrastructure Committee

04 April 2024

 

Summary of Transport and Infrastructure Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 4 April 2024

File No.: CP2023/19996

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To whiwhi / receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda or briefing papers that may have been distributed to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility and openness and transparency of information circulated to Transport and Infrastructure Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following items were distributed:

Date

Subject

5/3/2024

Draft government policy statement on land transport (GPS) 2023-34

6/3/2024

Extraordinary Business - Brief Update on the Draft Government Policy Statement on land transport 2024 – 7 March 2024 Meeting

11/3/2024

Information Consultation on the new draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024

22/3/2024

CONFIDENTIAL Information only: Transport and Infrastructure Committee, Draft Submission on Draft GPS 2024

 

5.       The following workshop/briefings have taken place:

 Date

Subject

6/3/2024

Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024 Briefing

20/3/2024

CONFIDENTIAL:  Development of an Auckland Council submission on the draft Government Policy Statement (GPS) on Land Transport.

(Presentation now released subsequent to the Draft submission published at the Transport and Infrastructure Committee Extraordinary Meeting 27 March 2024 - Attachment F).

 

6.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Transport and Infrastructure Committee. members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Transport and Infrastructure Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      whiwhi / receive the Summary of Transport and Infrastructure Committee information memoranda and briefings – 4 April 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Transport and Infrastructure Forward Work Programme

 

b

Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024-34

 

c

Brief Update report on the Draft Government Policy Statement on land transport 2024

 

d

Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024 Briefing - Workshop Notes

 

e

Consultation on the new draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024

 

f

Draft Submission on Draft GPS 2024 - Presentation

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lata Smith - Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services