I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 18 April 2024

10.00am

Local Board Office
560 Mt Albert Road
Three Kings

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Ella Kumar, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Fiona Lai

 

Members

Roseanne Hay

 

 

Mark Pervan

 

 

Bobby Shen

 

 

Jon Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Selina Powell

Democracy Advisor

 

12 April 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 021 531 686

Email: selina.powell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Mr Qing Chao Wu - May Road War Memorial Park - lack of seating benches     5

8.2     Mark Michaels (YMCA) turn styles at the main entrance into Cameron Pools    6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              6

11        Puketāpapa Local Board Strategic Relationship Grants 2023/2024                        9

12        Puketāpapa Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025                                        23

13        ​​Community Lease renewal to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) for land at Mount Albert Reserve, 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill                 35

14        ​​Community Lease renewal to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) for land at 1325 Dominion Road, Bob Bodt Reserve, Mount Roskill                     43

15        Proposed new community lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust at Buckley Road Reserve, 50 Buckley Road, Epsom                                                                 51

16        ​​Proposed new community lease to Auckland United Football Club Incorporated for the old clubrooms at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill, Keith Hay Park              59

17        Review of the allocation table recording the allocation of decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities                                                              69

18        Local board appointments and delegations for the 2022-2025 electoral term     85

19        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Puketapapa Local Board meeting schedule         93

20        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                             97

21        Board Member Reports                                                                                             107

22        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                109

23        Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes                                          115

24        Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                   123

25        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 21 March 2024 as true and correct.

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Mr Qing Chao Wu - May Road War Memorial Park - lack of seating benches

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Mr Qing Chao Wu to address the local board on the lack of seating benches in May Road War Memorial Pak and to request a seating bench.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mr Qing Chao Wu wishes do address the local board on the lack of seating benches in May Road War Memorial Pak and would like to request a seating bench.

3.       When you are walking in May Road War Memorial Park and want to stop and have a rest or admire the view or have a chat with someone there are very few seating benches where you can sit down.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Mr Qing Chao Wu for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Mark Michaels (YMCA) turn styles at the main entrance into Cameron Pools

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Mark Michaels (YMCA) to address the local board on seeking funding for turn styles at the main entrance into Cameron Pools for safety reasons.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mark Michaels wishes to address the local board on seeking funding for turn styles to control people coming into Cameron Pools for safety reasons. The YMCA have experienced criminal activity happening in and around the pools and think this measure will go part way to address the matter.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Mark Michaels for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Board Strategic Relationship Grants 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/03805

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the allocation of funding for the Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grants 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Puketāpapa Local Board offers a Strategic Relationship Grant programme to support local community groups and organisations to build the capacity and capability required to support, delivery of local board priorities and outcomes.

3.       The last Expression of Interest round for the fund was held in 2022/2023 and these interests have been carried forward for consideration in 2023/2024.

4.       During the 2022/2023 grants round, three of the nine applications received were assessed as having high alignment with the criteria outlined in the Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grants programme terms of reference (Attachment A to the agenda report).

5.       The Strategic Relationship Grant programme is intended to be a three-year programme of funded support but was varied in 2022/2023 because of financial pressures. As a result, fewer groups received proportionately more investment in order to maintain the impact of the fund.

6.       In early 2024, the term of the grant programme reverted to three years following discussion with the local board during a workshop on 8 February 2024. This three-year funding period aligns with the objective to support recipients to increase their capacity, expand their activities and make faster progress towards financial sustainability.

7.       Two groups are recommended for the grant funding this year.  Staff recommend both these groups receive grants of $20,000 from the 2023/2024 budget.

8.       The 2023/2024 Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship grants work programme line 376 has a total budget of $120,000 of which $80,000 is required to support the implementation of the programme.

9.       Staff continue to work with the unsuccessful applicants to identify alternative opportunities for collaboration with the local board or to connect them with other funding sources to achieve their intended application outcomes.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the following applicants to receive Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grants for 2023/2024:

i)   Waikowhai Community Trust with $20,000 for their second year and a reduced grant of $7,500 in principle for their third year as the maximum funding amount a group can receive over three years is $60,000, outlined in the terms of reference (Attachment A to the agenda report)

ii)  Roskill Together Trust with $20,000 for their first year and $20,000 in principle for each of their second and third year

b)      whakaae / approve $80,000 to support the implementation of the Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grants programme in 2023/2024.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Puketāpapa Local Board provides three local grants programmes, identified in the table below.

Table one: Puketāpapa Local Board Grants programmes

Type of grant

Quick Response

Local Grant

Strategic Relationship Grants

Timeframes and activities

·    Short term

·    Events and one-off activities

·    Medium term

·    Annual or year long activity

·    Programming and larger scale events or activities

·    Longer term

·    1 – 3 years grants terms

·    Operational support

Amounts

$300 - $2,000

$2,000 - $10,000

$10,000 - $30,000

 

11.     The purpose of the Strategic Relationship Grant is to create a strong network of local community organisations across the Puketāpapa Local Board area by supporting them to:

·    build organisational capacity and capability

·    upskill staff and volunteers

·    become more sustainable

·    attract diverse funding opportunities

·    amplify the local board investment.

12.     Multi-year core funding was introduced in 2022/2023 with the previous grant applicants listed in Attachment B to the agenda report.

13.     Funding is allocated over three-year terms to support recipients to increase their capacity, expand their activities and make faster progress towards financial sustainability. The budget funds specialist services building governance, strategic and financial capacity, and capability for identified organisations, delivering funding workshops and drop-in sessions held across the local board area.

14.     Recipients are required to participate in the capacity and capability programme for the duration of the three-year term. This commitment will allow the development of a cohort of groups who will work together over the funding term, developing a stronger network and the opportunities to collaborate.

15.     Staff review progress each year to ensure grant recipients are reaching agreed-upon milestones.

16.     Local community groups and organisations can apply for up to $20,000 per year, and up to a total of $60,000 for multi-year funding for up to three years. This includes contributions to wages and salaries, ongoing operational costs and access to organisational capacity and capability building support throughout implementation.

17.     The 2022/2023 grant round opened for applications on 12 December 2022 and closed on 23  January 2023. Community organisations were invited to submit an expression of interest application.

18.     The applications were assessed by a panel of staff and an external expert for alignment to the criteria outlined in the Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grants programme terms of reference 2023/2024 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

19.     Of the nine applications received, three were identified as having high alignment with the criteria: Waikowhai Community Trust, Puketāpapa Business Voice and Roskill Together Trust. However, only Waikowhai Community Trust and Puketāpapa Business Voice were funded for one year in 2022/2023 due to financial pressures faced by Auckland Council (resolution PKTPP/2023/35).

20.     No grants round with expression of interest was opened in financial year 2023/2024 as there were sufficient suitable applications in the previous grant round that could be recommended for continued funding or a new grant. This was discussed with the local board at its February 8th 2024 workshop. 

21.     The Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship grants programme 2023/2024 work programme line 376 has a total budget of $120,000. An $80,000 allocation will support the implementation of the programme, the remaining amount of $40,000 will be available for allocation to the non-contestable grants.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.     A three-stage assessment process was used to assess applications:

i)        Applications were assessed against grant programme eligibility criteria.

ii)       An internal assessment panel comprising of two internal staff and one external specialist. The panel considered all applications against the outcome areas and recommended grant allocations based on application assessment and alignment with grant programme outcomes. The Puketāpapa Community Broker was part of the assessment panel and provided additional comments and insights.

iii)      Exploratory conversations were had with two top-scoring groups.

23.     Funding these organisations will enable the local board to:

·        strengthen its strategic relationships with more local community groups and organisations

·        invest in capacity and capability building so that the organisations are better able to deliver their services effectively, demonstrate impact, become more sustainable and strengthen their funding position to attract diverse funding opportunities

·        improve people’s connectedness and wellbeing so that they are engaged in the community and have access to a wide range of support

·        strengthen support to the voluntary and community sector

·        work in a holistic and integrated way

24.     Staff recommend allocating a total of $40,000: $20,000 for each organisation to the following applicants for 2023/2024, outlined in table 2.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2: 2023/2024 applications recommended for funding:

Applicant

Proposal

Recommended funding

Waikowhai Community Trust (WCT)

A contribution towards operational cost: wages for staff, rent/utilities/maintenance, resources for programmes.

 

Capacity building needs include support in the following areas:

1.    Planning:

-      Develop and support WCT with Community Engagement Survey to inform their programming

-      Continued support on reviewing their strategic plan

2.    Funding strategy and diversifying funding sources

3.    Connecting WCT to staff training opportunities

$20,000

(2023/2024

year 2)

 

$7,500 (2024/2025,

year 3)

Roskill Together Trust (RTT)

Contribution towards a part time community development manager, community development coordinator and operational costs.

 

Capacity building needs include support in the following areas: funding strategy and evaluation, staff development and succession planning

$60,000

(over years 1 to 3)

 

25.     In 2022/2023, the local board allocated $32,500 to Waikowhai Community Trust (WCT) as it entered the first year of a three-year funding cycle. Considering the maximum funding amount a group can receive over three years is $60,000, as outlined in the terms of reference (Attachment A to the agenda report), staff recommend allocating $20,000 for their second year in 2023/2024 and a reduced budget of $7,500 in principle for their third year in 2024/2025.

26.     Staff recommended providing greater direct funding to only two groups in year one due to the uncertainty in financial pressures, and therefore to increase the impact of the groups and provide more capacity building support in a shorter period of time.

27.     During their first year, WCT received intensive capacity-building support from an external expert and staff, resulting in the successful achievement of key milestones. The organisation has a solid track record of service delivery in the area and continues to serve a community of geography and location, rather than interest or identity, with a focus on pre-schoolers and their families. The community who are participating in services are locals, some from lower socio-economic families. The grant will further support the organisation in strengthening its capacity and capabilities and to increase its impact in Roskill South.

28.     In 2022/2023, Puketāpapa Business Voice (PVB) also entered their first year of the funding cycle and have been working with staff and the external expert to consider their capacity needs and explore ways to meet them. While PVB has experienced some internal changes and is currently in the process of recruiting a new coordinator, there are remaining funds to be expended, and their reporting period for the funds received in 2022/2023 has been extended until 30 June 2024.

29.     Roskill Together Trust (RTT) did not initially receive funding in 2022/2023. However, as the application was noted as having a high alignment with the programme criteria, staff recommend entering a three-year funding cycle with them starting with 2023/2024 as year one.

30.     RTT is a key community organisation that facilitates community development and placemaking initiatives in Puketāpapa. Additionally, it extends assistance to networks of smaller groups functioning without a formal legal structure. RTT promotes collaboration, offers assistance, and amplifies the impact of smaller community groups that might otherwise struggle to operate effectively on their own.

31.     During RTT’s first year, an external expert will work with them to conduct a needs assessment to identify areas of support. Subsequently, support will be provided to address these needs, which may involve developing a funding strategy, evaluating impact of programmes, connecting to staff development opportunities and succession planning. 

32.     The two groups recommended for funding in 2023/2024 have limited resources, are working beyond their capacity, do not have the ability to upskill staff, and need to develop a strategy to improve their services and attract diverse funding opportunities.

33.     The recipients of the multi-year grants will provide progress reports to demonstrate key performance indicators met during the funding period. The local board will receive an accountability update at a future workshop, highlighting how the recipient has used the grant to achieve funded outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     Mana Taiao (Environment) is one of the key local board outcomes noted in the Strategic Relationship Grants Terms of Reference, including support for groups that promote active modes of transportation, reduction in carbon and other vehicle emissions and environmental and ecological sustainability.

35.     Building the capacity and capability of local community organisations will have a positive impact on climate change as it reduces the need for people to travel to reach the services they offer.

36.     The two applications recommended for funding are helping to develop community resilience and adaptation including in the kai space, and supporting initiatives that encourages local people and groups to take climate action.

37.     Local community engagement supported by local organisations also develops community resilience and adaptation. This will broadly contribute toward community readiness for changes in the future such as those caused by climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     The Puketāpapa Strategic Relations Grant programme is delivered in line with the Community Grants Policy 2014. This policy guides the allocation of local and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

39.     The Community Impact Team at Auckland Council was engaged in the development of this advice to ensure alignment with current processes, and best practice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     The local board is responsible for the decision-making and allocation of Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grants 2023/2024. The Puketāpapa Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grant 2023/2024 Terms of Reference (Attachment A to the agenda report).

41.     The aim of the strategic partnerships grant is to support local community groups and organisations to build capacity and capability, upskill staff and volunteers so that the entity becomes more sustainable, is able to leverage the investment and attract diverse funding opportunities to achieve outcomes identified in the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2023.

42.     The recommended applications for funding and delivery approach were presented to the local board at a workshop on 8 February 2024 to discuss their alignment with the local board’s priorities and outcomes for the grant round.

43.     Feedback received from the local board has informed the applications recommended to be funded.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori make up six per cent of the local board population.

45.     The Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grant programme 2023/2024 aims to respond to council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to local community groups and organisations who deliver positive outcomes for Māori.

46.     All three of the applicants recommended for funding demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the Treaty of Waitangi and Te ao Māori for inclusivity, connectedness and decision making and have identified outcomes for Māori. Their mahi is underpinned by values of aroha, manākitanga, rangatiratanga, kotahitanga, whanaungatanga and kaitiakitanga.

47.     The Waikowhai Community Trust has collaborated with local Māori to help define the strategic direction of their organisation. They operate from the Roskill South Hub and engage in collaborative efforts with agencies that support local rangatahi and whānau. Additionally, the hub provides space for Auckland District Health Board Māori Midwives. Tikanga and Mātauranga Māori are embedded in their programmes as a tool for wellness and transformation. They are also looking at building relationships with local iwi.

48.     Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi are supported and implemented in the Roskill Together kaupapa.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     The 2023/2024 Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship grants work programme line 376 has a total budget of $120,000. This includes $80,000 to support the delivery of the programme and $40,000 in grant allocation to successful applications.

50.     Staff recommend allocating the full $40,000 across two applications.

51.     There are no financial implications if the local board supports the recommended option of funding two applicants.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     The allocation of grants will occur within the guidelines and criteria of the refreshed Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grants Terms of Reference.

53.     The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the two recommended applications.

54.     In the assessment process took into consideration organisations history, structure, kaupapa, track record of successful delivery, and demonstration of partnering and collaboration and and recommendations were made accordingly.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Staff will notify all successful applicants of the outcome and create funding agreements.

56.     Staff will provide the local board with half-yearly progress reports on the funded local community groups and organisations. Grant recipients will be invited to present their mahi at a local board community forum or local board workshop annually during the term of the agreement.

57.     A report will be presented to the local board in 2024/2024 quarter four for approval of funding allocations for year three Waikowhai Community Trust and year two Roskill Together Trust.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A: Puketāpapa Strategic Relationship Grants Terms of Reference

17

b

Attachment B: List of applications received in 2023

21

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Daylyn Braganza – Specialist Advisor

Authorisers

Darryl Soljan - Manager Customer Experience - North & West Libraries

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 




Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/02838

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Puketāpapa Grants Programme 2024/2025.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Puketāpapa Grants Programme 2024/2025 for adoption (as provided in Attachment A to this report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whai / adopt the Puketāpapa Grants Programme 2024/2025 in Attachment A.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme includes:

· outcomes as identified in the local board plan

· specific local board grant priorities

· which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing         dates

· any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

· other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       Once the local board grants programme 2024/2025 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility will be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Puketāpapa Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board on the 29 February 2024 and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2024/2025 which includes:

·    outcomes and priorities as identified in the local board plan

·    high and low priorities

·    exclusions

·    investment approach (maximum and minimum amount) set for each grant type

·    the number of grant rounds and opening and closing dates

10.     The new grant programme includes the requirement for applications to provide quotes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2021 -2031 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Grants Programme 2024/2025

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 








Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

​​Community Lease renewal to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) for land at Mount Albert Reserve, 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill

File No.: CP2024/03223

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a renewal of the community lease to the Scouts Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) for land at Mount Albert Reserve, 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       ​The Scouts Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) (group) seeks a community lease renewal to continue occupation and operation from the group-owned building at Mount Albert Reserve, 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill. 

3.       ​The group currently holds the lease on the ground which has reached renewal on 15 August 2023. The lease provides for one five year right of renewal with final expiry on 15 August 2028. 

4.       ​The renewal of this lease was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023/2024 at their 20 July 2023 local board meeting (Resolution number PKTPP/2023/96). 

5.       ​The group aims to provide scout activities by empowering young people through adventurous experiences that lead lives that make a positive difference. These activities align with the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2023: 

·    Our Community - Our communities have the places and activities that enhance their lifestyles. Our investment in parks, facilities and programmes is focussed on growing neighbourhoods, with a focus on Wesley, Waikōwhai and Three Kings suburbs. 

6.       ​The group has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. The group has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place. 

7.       ​Staff have assessed the renewal application and all conditions of the renewal have been met by the applicant. A site visit was undertaken by staff on 16 November 2023 and the facility appears to be in good condition and is well maintained. 

8.       ​The lease renewal for the group was discussed at a workshop with the local board on 22 February 2024. The local board requested that a formal report be presented at a business meeting. 

9.       ​This report recommends that a community lease renewal be granted to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) for a term of five years commencing from 16 August 2023. 

10.     ​If the local board decides to grant the lease renewal, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement. 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      ​whakaae / grant, under Section 61(2B) of the Reserves Act 1977, a community lease renewal to the Scouts Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) for 1831 square metres (more or less) located at 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Albert Reserve, Mount Roskill on the land legally described as Lot Deposited Plan 29288 (as per Attachment A – Site Plan), subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i)        term – 5 years, commencing on 16 August 2023. 

ii)       rent – $1300 plus GST per annum as per the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated 2023). 

b)      ​whakaae / approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2021 (updated 2023) and the Reserves Act 1977.​ 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     ​Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters. 

12.     ​The Puketāpapa Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023/2024 at their 20 July 2023 local board meeting (Resolution number PKTPP/2023/96). 

13.     ​The renewal of this lease to the group at Mount Albert Reserve, 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill was part of the approved work programme.  

14.     ​Under the renewal provisions of the lease, the council has a contractual obligation to grant the renewal, if the tenant fulfils the renewal conditions of the lease.  

Land, building and lease 

15.     ​Mount Albert Reserve is located at 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill (refer to Attachment A Site Plan - Mount Albert Reserve, 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill). The land is legally described as Lot Deposited Plan 29288.  

16.     ​The land is held by the Auckland Council in trust as a classified local purpose (site for a scout hall) reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977. 

17.     ​The Scout Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) holds a community lease for group owned building on the council owned land situated at Mount Albert Reserve.  

18.     ​The leased area is 1831 square metres (more or less) as outlined in Attachment A – Site Plan – Mount Albert Reserve, 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill. 

19.     ​For a group owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee. These costs are funded from membership fees, fundraising and sponsorships. 

20.     ​The building is primarily used by the group to provide scout activities to the children within the community.  

21.     ​These programmes provide recreational, educational and health and well-being benefits from activities that are being delivered from the building. 

 

 

Scout Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) 

22.     ​The Scout Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) was established in 1954 and its primary objective is to empower young people through adventurous experiences to lead lives that make a positive difference. 

23.     ​The group has a total membership of 71 scouts aged between six and fourteen years of age, operates on Monday to Friday evenings and makes their facilities available to nature kindergartens, birthday parties, weddings, and cultural groups. 

24.     ​The group has been operating from Mount Albert Reserve since 1988. Over the years the building has been painted by the group. The building and other improvements are owned by the lessee. 

25.     ​The group’s current community lease with the council commenced on 16 August 2018 for an initial term of five years and provides for one five year right of renewal with final expiry on 15 August 2028. The tenant is exercising this right of renewal. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

Assessment of the application 

26.     ​The group has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the lease renewal request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver scout services. 

27.     ​The group has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities. 

28.     ​The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place. The group have also undertaken maintenance including painting the building. 

29.     ​A site visit has been undertaken on 16 November 2023 by staff and the building is well managed and maintained.  

30.     ​The group provides a valuable service to the local community by delivering scout activities to children between the ages of five and eighteen years of age, by empowering young people through adventurous experiences that lead lives that make a positive difference. 

31.     ​Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated 2023) sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements. 

32.     ​Staff recommend that the community lease renewal be granted to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) for a term of five years commencing from date as per recommendations. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     ​It is anticipated that activation of the building will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission. A shared community space will however decrease overall energy use, as users will not consume energy at individual workspaces. The shared space will provide opportunity and enable people to enjoy positive healthy lifestyles and will increase capability and connections within local community. 

34.     ​To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder: 

a.   use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems 

b.   use eco labelled products and services 

c.   seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities. 

35.     ​All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are: 

a.   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

b.   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. 

36.     ​Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     ​Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. They are supportive of the renewal as it will include personal development, adventure and community engagement amongst the children within the community.t 

38.     ​The renewal has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     ​The renewal will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote scout activities that will be delivered from the Mount Albert Reserve. Scout activities focus on personal development, adventure, and community engagement for children within the Puketāpapa Local Board area and its surrounding communities. 

40.     ​The lease renewal was discussed with the local board at a workshop on 22 February 2024. The local board requested that a formal report be presented at a business meeting to decide the outcome of the application. 

41.     ​The delivered activities align with the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2023 priority area ‘Our Community - Our communities have the places and activities that enhance their lifestyles. There is strong local leadership, with resilient, safe and supportive communities, particularly through times of change and challenge. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     ​Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

43.     ​These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan (operative in part), individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

44.     ​Since this is a community lease renewal, iwi engagement was not required. However, the lessee will, via the agreed Community Outcomes Plan and through its activities, will deliver Māori outcomes reflective of the local community and support opportunities that celebrate Māori identity and heritage (eg: Matariki and Māori language week activities). 

45.     ​Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests, and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     ​The Governing Body, at its business meeting of 9 June 2023, approved the annual budget including amendments to the Community Occupancy Guidelines (GB/2023/101). The amendments increase the level of rent and maintenance fees for community occupancy.   

47.     ​The annual rent for community occupancy has been increased to $1,300 per annum plus GST. The increased rental charge reflects a standard subsidised charge for community occupancy. This works out to approximately $25 per week.  

48.     ​The lease agreement for the group contains a rent review provision. The rent review provision allows for the rental to be reviewed at renewal.  

49.     ​To align with the revised fees and charges under the Community Occupancy Guidelines (update July 2023), the recommendation is to review the rent in accordance with the lease provision, to $1,300 per annum. 

50.     ​While the governing body adopted the amendments to the guidelines, local boards still hold the prerogative to vary staff recommendations relating to the amount of rent and subsidised maintenance fees (if applicable) for leased premises.  

51.     ​If the board chooses to retain the level of rent at $1, there will be no requirement for the board to top up the community lease revenue budget. However, the board will not have the benefit of the additional revenue if rent is increased.  

52.     ​The cost recovery increases for community lessees and licensees will provide local boards with a financial lever to ease their respective budgetary constraints.  

53.     ​Staff recommend that the renewal of lease be granted and the rent be reviewed in accordance with the terms and conditions of the operative lease. The group has satisfied all the conditions for renewal. In addition, the financial accounts of the group have been assessed, and the group have the ability to meet the revised rental. 

54.     ​Ongoing maintenance of the asset will be covered by the group. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     ​Should the local board resolve not to grant the renewal of the community lease to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) of Mount Albert Reserve, 660 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome. 

56.     ​The lease renewal affords the groups security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility. Should the building remain unoccupied, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and possible improvements. Council will be liable for the asset regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     If the local board resolves to the grant the community lease renewal, staff will work with the Scout Association of New Zealand (Royal Oak) to finalise the lease renewal agreement in accordance with the local board decision. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Map Mount Albert Reserve

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Malinda Naidoo - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

​​Community Lease renewal to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) for land at 1325 Dominion Road, Bob Bodt Reserve, Mount Roskill

File No.: CP2024/03370

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Puketāpapa Local Board to grant a renewal of the community lease to the Scouts Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) for land at Bob Bodt Reserve, 1325 Dominion Road, Mount Roskill. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       ​The Scouts Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) (group) seeks a community lease renewal to continue occupation and operation from the group-owned building at Bob Bodt Reserve, 1325 Dominion Road, Mount Roskill. 

3.       ​The group currently holds the lease on the ground which has reached renewal on 15 August 2023. The lease provides for one five year right of renewal with final expiry on 15 August 2028.   

4.       ​The renewal of this lease was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023/2024 at their 20 July 2023 meeting (Resolution number PKTPP/2023/96). 

5.       ​The group aims to provide scout activities by empowering young people through adventurous experiences that lead lives that make a positive difference. These activities align with the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2023: 

·    Our communities have the places and activities that enhance their lifestyles. There is strong local leadership, with resilient, safe and supportive communities, particularly through times of change and challenge.  

6.       ​The group has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. The group has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place. 

7.       ​Staff have assessed the renewal application and all conditions of the renewal have been met by the applicant. A site visit was undertaken by staff on 7 November 2023 and the facility appears to be in good condition and is well maintained. 

8.       ​The lease renewal for the group was discussed with the Puketāpapa Local Board at a workshop on 22 February 2024. The local board requested that a formal report be presented at a business meeting. 

9.       ​This report recommends that a community lease be granted to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) for a term of five years commencing from 16 August 2023. 

10.     ​If the local board decides to grant the lease renewal, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement. 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      ​whakaae / grant, under Section 61(2B) of the Reserves Act 1977, renewal of the community lease to the Scouts Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) for an area of 182 square metres (more or less) located at 1325 Dominion Road, Bob Bodt Reserve, Mount Roskill on the land legally described as Lot 15 DP 17659 (as per Attachment A – Site Plan - Bob Bodt Reserve, 1325 Dominion Road, Mount Roskill), subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i)        term – 5 years, commencing on 16 August 2023. 

ii)       rent – $1300 plus GST per annum as per the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated 2023)

b)      ​whakaae / approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated 2023) and the Reserves Act 1977. 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     ​Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters. 

12.     ​The Puketāpapa Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023/2024 at their 20 July 2023 local board meeting (resolution number PKTPP/2023/96). 

13.     ​The renewal of this lease to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) at Bob Bodt Reserve, 1325 Dominion Road, Mount Roskill was part of the approved work programme.  

14.     ​Under the renewal provisions of the lease, the council has a contractual obligation to grant the renewal, if the tenant fulfils the renewal conditions of the lease.

Land, building and lease 

15.     ​Bob Bodt Reserve is located at 1325 Dominion Road, Mount Roskill (refer to Attachment A Site Plan - Bob Bodt Reserve, 1325 Dominion Road, Mount Roskill). The land is legally described as Lot 15 DP 17659.  

16.     ​The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council and is classified as local purpose (community building) reserve.  

17.     ​The Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) holds a community lease for group owned building on the council owned land situated at Bob Bodt Reserve.  

18.     ​The leased area is 182 sqm (more or less) as outlined in Attachment A – Site Plan - Bob Bodt Reserve, 1325 Dominion Road, Mount Roskill. 

19.     ​For a group owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee. These costs are funded from membership fees, fundraising and sponsorships. 

20.     ​The building is primarily used by the group to provide scout activities to the children within the community.  

21.     ​These programmes provide recreational, educational and health and well-being benefits from activities that are being delivered from the building. 

 

 

Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) 

22.     ​The Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) was established in 1958 and its primary objective is to empower young people through adventurous experiences to lead lives that make a positive difference. 

23.     ​The group has a total membership of 48 scouts between six and fourteen years of age, operates on a Tuesday and Friday evening and makes their facilities available to churches, martial arts groups, organised hospital groups, dancing lessons, training courses and birthday parties. 

24.     ​The group has been operating from Bob Bodt Reserve since the 1960’s. Over the years the building has been painted by the group. The building and other improvements are owned by the lessee. 

25.     ​The group’s current community lease with the council commenced on 16 August 2018 for an initial term of five years and provides for one five year right of renewal with final expiry on 15 August 2028. The tenant is exercising this right of renewal. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

Assessment of the application 

26.     ​The group has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the lease renewal request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver scout services. 

27.     ​The group has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities. 

28.     ​The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place. 

29.     ​A site visit has been undertaken on 7 November 2023 by staff and the building appears to be well managed and maintained. 

30.     ​The group provides a valuable service to the local community by delivering scout activities to children between the ages of six and fourteen years of age, by empowering young people through adventurous experiences that lead lives that make a positive difference. 

31.     ​Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated 2023) sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements. 

32.     ​Staff recommend that a community lease renewal be granted to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) for a term of five years commencing from date as per recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     ​It is anticipated that activation of the building will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission. A shared community space will however decrease overall energy use, as users will not consume energy at individual workspaces. The shared space will provide opportunity and enable people to enjoy positive healthy lifestyles and will increase capability and connections within local community. 

34.     ​To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder: 

a.   use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems 

b.   use eco labelled products and services 

c.   seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities. 

35.     ​All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are: 

a.   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

b.   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. 

36.     ​Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     ​Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. They are supportive of the lease renewal as it will include personal development, adventure, and community engagement amongst the children within the community. 

38.     ​The renewal has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     ​The renewal will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote scout activities that will be delivered from the Bob Bodt Reserve. Scout activities focus on personal development, adventure, and community engagement for children within the Puketāpapa Local Board area and its surrounding communities. 

40.     ​The lease renewal was discussed with the Puketāpapa Local Board at a workshop on 22 February 2024. This was in the form of a streamline memo. The local board requested that a formal report be presented at a business meeting to decide the outcome of the application. 

41.     ​The delivered activities align with the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2023 priority area ‘Our Community - Our communities have the places and activities that enhance their lifestyles. There is strong local leadership, with resilient, safe and supportive communities, particularly through times of change and challenge. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     ​Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

43.     ​These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan (operative in part), individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

44.     ​Iwi engagement for granting of this community lease renewal is not required. However, the lessee will, via the agreed Community Outcomes Plan and through its activities, will deliver Māori outcomes reflective of the local community and support opportunities that celebrate Māori identity and heritage (eg: Matariki and Māori language week activities). 

45.     ​Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     ​The Governing Body, at its business meeting of 9 June 2023, approved the annual budget including amendments to the Community Occupancy Guidelines (GB/2023/101). The amendments increase the level of rent and maintenance fees for community occupancy.   

47.     ​The annual rent for community occupancy has been increased to $1,300 per annum plus GST. The increased rental charge reflects a standard subsidised charge for community occupancy. This works out to approximately $25 per week.  

48.     ​The lease agreement for the group contains a rent review provision. The rent review provision allows for the rental to be reviewed at renewal.  

49.     ​To align with the revised fees and charges under the Community Occupancy Guidelines (update July 2023), the recommendation is to review the rent in accordance with the lease provision, to $1,300 per annum. 

50.     ​While the governing body adopted the amendments to the guidelines, local boards still hold the prerogative to vary staff recommendations relating to the amount of rent and subsidised maintenance fees (if applicable) for leased premises.  

51.     ​If the board chooses to retain the level of rent at $1, there will be no requirement for the board to top up the community lease revenue budget. However, the board will not have the benefit of the additional revenue if rent is increased.  

52.     ​The cost recovery increases for community lessees and licensees will provide local boards with a financial lever to ease their respective budgetary constraints.  

53.     ​Staff recommend that the renewal of lease be granted and the rent be reviewed in accordance with the terms and conditions of the operative lease. The group has satisfied all the conditions for renewal. In addition, the financial accounts of the group have been assessed, and the group have the ability to meet the revised rental. 

54.     ​Ongoing maintenance of the group owned asset will be covered by the group. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     ​Should the local board resolve not to grant the renewal of the community lease to the Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) for land at Bob Bodt Reserve, 1325 Dominion Road, Mount Roskill, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome. 

56.     ​The lease renewal affords the groups security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility. Should the building remain unoccupied, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and possible improvements. Council will be liable for the asset regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     ​If the local board resolves to the grant the community lease renewal, the staff will work with the Scout Association of New Zealand (Waikōwhai) to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Map of Bob Bodt Reserve

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Malinda Naidoo - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Proposed new community lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust at Buckley Road Reserve, 50 Buckley Road, Epsom

File No.: CP2024/03147

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Puketāpapa Local Board to grant a new community lease to the Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust located at Buckley Road Reserve, 50 Buckley Road, Epsom.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust (the trust) seeks a new community ground lease to continue occupation and operation from the group-owned building at Buckley Road Reserve, 50 Buckley Road, Epsom (Attachment A). 

3.       The trust currently holds a ground lease which reached final expiry 31 December 2023. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted. 

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the Puketāpapa Local Board as part of the: Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023/2024 at their 20 July 2023 local board meeting (resolution number PKTPP/2023/96). 

5.       The trust’s primary purpose is to provide for the health and wellbeing of tamariki under-five and their whānau. This activity aligns with the Puketāpapa Local Board plan 2023 outcome “Our communities have the places and activities that enhance their lifestyles”. 

6.       The trust has provided all the required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. The trust has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance in place. 

7.       As this is a group-owned building, they have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term.  

8.       A site visit has been undertaken and the building appears to be well managed and maintained.  

9.       The proposed new community lease to the trust for the land at Buckley Road Reserve was publicly notified. The notification appeared in the Central Leader on 17 January 2024 and the Auckland Council website with a submission deadline for 16 February 2024. No submissions or objections were received.  

10.     Iwi engagement is required and took place in December 2023 and no feedback has been received. 

11.     Staff engaged with internal stakeholders on the proposed new lease. They are all supportive of the proposed lease.  

12.     This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to the Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 January 2024 with one 10) years right of renewal.  A community outcomes plan will be worked through with the group. 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakaae / grant, under Section 61(2B) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease to the Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust for 582 square metres (more or less) located at 50 Buckley Road, Epsom on the land legally described as part of Lot 11 DP 38122 (as per Attachment A – Site Plan - Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust at 50 Buckley Road, Epsom), subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i.          term – 10 years commencing on 1 January 2024, with one 10 years right of renewal. 

ii.          rent – $1300 plus GST per annum if demanded as per the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated 2023).  

b)      whakaae / approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated 2023) and the Reserves Act 1977. 

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that iwi engagement for Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to the Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust located at 50 Buckley Road, Epsom has been undertaken. 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters. 

14.     The Puketāpapa Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023/2024 at their local board meeting on 20 July 2023 (Resolution number PKTPP/2023/96). 

15.     The progression of this lease to the trust was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme. 

Land, building and lease

16.     Buckley Road Reserve is located at 50 Buckley Road, Epsom (Attachment A Site Plan - Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust at 50 Buckley Road, Epsom). The land is legally described as part of Lot 11 DP 38122 and land is classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve. 

17.     The trust holds a community ground lease for the tenant-owned building on the council owned land situated at Buckley Road Reserve, 50 Buckley Road, Epsom. 

18.     The area proposed to be leased is 582sqm (more or less) as outlined in Attachment A.

19.     For a tenant-owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee.  These costs are funded from membership fees and fundraising. 

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

20.     The Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust was established in 1906 and its primary purpose is to provide for the health and wellbeing of tamariki under-five and their whānau. 

21.     The trust has been operating from the building at 50 Buckley Road, Epsom since 2009. 

22.     The trust is a bustling haven for families from all walks of life and cultures. The trust supports pepi and tamariki by providing free well child tamariki ora checks and free health and wellbeing parenting advice.

23.     During staff’s site visit, it was noted that the building is well managed and appears to be well maintained by the trust.

24.     The trust’s current community lease commenced on 1 January 2009 and expired 31 December 2023. The lease to the trust is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is formalised. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

25.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (updated July 2023), groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to re-apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The trust is exercising this right by applying for a new lease. 

26.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

Public notification and engagement

27.     Under the Local Government Act 2002, Auckland Council must publicly notify its intention to grant a new community lease if the term is longer than six-months in duration. 

28.     The proposed new community lease to the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society for the land at Buckley Road Reserve was publicly notified. The notification appeared in the Central Leader Newspaper on 17 January 2024 and the Auckland Council website’s Have Your Say webpage with a submission deadline for 16 February 2024.

29.     No submissions or objections to the notified proposal were received. 

30.     Prior to any lease being granted, iwi engagement is also required under the terms of section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987. Details of the iwi engagement are noted in the Māori impact statement section of this report.

Assessment of the application

31.     The trust has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to cater for the health and wellbeing of tamariki under-five and their whānau.

32.     The trust has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

33.     The trust has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance in place.

34.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the building is well managed and appears to be well maintained. 

35.     The trust provides a valuable service to the local community by providing health and well-being services of children up to the age of five. 

36.     A Community Outcomes Plan will be worked through with the group.

37.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to the trust for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 January 2024 with one 10 years right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     It is anticipated that activation of the buildings will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission. A shared community space will, however, decrease overall energy use, as users will not consume energy at individual workspaces. The shared space will increase capability and connections within the local community. 

39.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder use sustainable waste, energy, and water efficiency systems; eco labelled products and services and seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities. 

40.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are: 

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. 

41.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. They are all supportive of the proposed lease.  

43.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     The assessment of the application was discussed with the Puketāpapa Local Board at its workshop on 26 October 2023. The local board indicated its in principle support for the lease proposal. 

45.     The delivered activities align with the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2023 outcome “Our communities have the places and activities that enhance their lifestyles”. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant a new community lease for 50 Buckley Road, Epsom was undertaken in December 2023 with the iwi groups who are part of Central/West Mana Whenua Forum identified as having an interest in land in the Puketāpapa Local Board area. The engagement involved: 

·    an email to all iwi identified as having an interest in the area, containing detailed information on the land, the lessee, the lease proposal as per Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987. 

47.     Staff have not received any queries or responses by the close of business date 26 January 2023.  

48.     The trust has agreed to complete the Community Outcomes Plan which will deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through provision of health and well-being services of children up to the age of five for Māori including free parenting and child health helpline staffed by registered nurses.  

49.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

50.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan (operative in part), individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

51.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects. 

52.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests, and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     On the 8 June 2023 the annual budget was approved by the governing body which included changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines of the rent fee for a community ground lease from $1 per annum to $1,300 plus GST per annum effective from 1 July 2023. 

54.     If the local board chooses to retain the level of rent at $1, there will be no requirement for the local board to top up the community lease revenue budget. However, the local board will not have the benefit of the additional revenue of $1,299 per annum over the initial term of the lease. The level of rent can be reviewed on renewal of the lease and at the expiry of the initial term.     

55.     Ongoing maintenance of the group owned asset at 50 Buckley Road, Epsom will be covered by the lessee. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community ground lease to the trust at 50 Buckley Road, Epsom, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome. 

57.     The new lease affords the group security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facilities and to run their health and well-being services for children up to the age of five.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     If the local board resolves to grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust to finalise the lease agreement in accordance with the local board decision. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan for Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust 50 Buckley Road Epsom

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Malinda Naidoo - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

​​Proposed new community lease to Auckland United Football Club Incorporated for the old clubrooms at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill, Keith Hay Park

File No.: CP2024/03219

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Auckland United Football Club Incorporated for the tenant-owned building (old clubrooms) at Keith Hay Park located at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       ​Auckland United Football Club Incorporated (club) seeks a new community lease to continue occupation and operation from the tenant-owned building (old clubrooms) at Keith Hay Park located at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill. 

3.       ​The club held the lease on the ground which has reached final expiry on 31 December 2015. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.  

4.       ​The new lease was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023/2024 at their 20 July 2023 local board meeting (Resolution number PKTPP/2023/96). 

5.       ​The club aims to enhance the growth of skills, providing quality football development opportunities, and develop player confidence, all while establishing a fun, community environment. These activities align with the local board plan 2023: ‘Our community - People can access places and services that cater for their needs’. 

6.       ​The club has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds and is being managed appropriately. The club has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place. 

7.       ​As this is a tenant-owned building, they have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. 

8.       ​A site visit has been undertaken by staff on the 5 February 2024 and the facility appears to be well managed and maintained.  

9.       ​A community outcomes plan has been prepared and is attached to this report (Attachment B). 

10.     ​On the 08 June 2023 the annual budget was approved by the governing body which included changes to the Community Occupancy Guidelines of the rent/admin fee for a community ground lease from $1.00 per annum to $1300 plus GST per annum taking effect from 1 July 2023. 

11.     ​This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to the club for a term of five years commencing from 1 January 2024 with one five years right of renewal. 

12.     ​If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the club to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      ​whakaae / grant, under Section 54 (1) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease to Auckland United Football Club Incorporated for an area of 106.5 sqm (more or less) at Keith Hay Park located at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill on the land legally described as Part Allot 77 Section 13 Suburbs of Auckland (as per Attachment A – Site Plan) subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i)        term – five years, commencing 1 April 2024, with one five year right of renewal. 

ii)       rent – $1300 plus GST per annum 

iii)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B – Community Outcomes Plan). 

b)      ​whakaae / approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (Updated July 2023) and the Reserves Act 1977. 

c)      ​tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that no public notification and iwi engagement for Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Auckland United Football Club Incorporated is required as the lease is contemplated in the Keith Hay Park Management Plan April 1989. 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     ​Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters. 

14.     ​The Puketāpapa Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2023/2024 at their 20 July 2023 local board meeting (Resolution number PKTPP/2023/96). 

15.     ​The progression of this lease to Auckland United Football Club Incorporated at Keith Hay Park located at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme. 

Land, building and lease 

16.     ​Keith Hay Park is located at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill (refer to Attachment A Site Plan - Keith Hay Park located at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill). The land is legally described as Part Allot 77 Sec 13 Suburbs of Auckland held in fee simple by Auckland Council as classified recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977. 

17.     The club holds a community lease for the tenant-owned building (old clubrooms) on the council owned land situated at Keith Hay Park.

18.     ​The area proposed to be leased is 106.5 square metres (more or less) as outlined in attachment A – Site Plan - Keith Hay Park located at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill.

19.     ​For a tenant-owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee. These costs are funded from membership fees, fundraising and private hall hire fees.

20.     ​The building is primarily used by the club to provide soccer sporting activities.

21.     These programmes provide benefits to include a football skills centre, goalkeeper centre and community holiday programmes from football sport and recreation activities that are being delivered from the building.

 

 

Auckland United Football Club Incorporated 

22.     The club was established in 1985 and its primary objective is to enhance the growth of football skills, providing quality football development opportunities, and develop player confidence in a community environment. 

23.     The club has 1900 members, of which 1173 are children, 296 youth, 335 adults and 96 pensioners. Of the total membership, 75 per cent are male and 25 per cent female members.  

24.     The club has five full time staff and 10 part-time employed by the club and there are over 100 volunteers. 

25.     The club has been operating from Keith Hay Park since January 1985. The building and other improvements are owned by the lessee. 

26.     The club’s current community lease with the council commenced on 1 January 1985 and has expired on the 31 December 2015. The lease to the group is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.  

27.     The club has agreed to share the group-owned facility with other community groups and currently has a community gym also used for cheerleading, martial arts, meetings, and rehabilitation programmes. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

28.     ​Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2023, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The club is exercising this right by applying for a new lease.  

29.     ​The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms. 

Public notification and engagement  

30.     As there is an adopted reserve management plan, Keith Hay Park Management Plan - April 1989, and the proposed lease is intended in the plan, no public notification or iwi engagement is required.  

Assessment of the application 

31.     ​The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver football sport services. 

32.     ​The club has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities. 

33.     ​The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place. 

34.     ​A site visit has been undertaken by staff on 5 February 2024 and the facility appears to be well managed and maintained. 

35.     ​The club has also undertaken improvements including the refurbishment of the old clubrooms by renewal of entrance, stairway, floors, and doors. This has been completed after the 2023 flooding. 

36.     ​The club is aware of the possible Cameron Pools development which may require the demolition of the old clubroom building to accommodate the development when planned in future. 

37.     ​The club provides a valuable service to the local community by providing football sporting activities and by making its facility available for hire to help and support initiatives and activities within the local community, sport clubs and community organisations. 

38.     ​A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement as Attachment B.

39.     ​Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2023 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and the community outcomes plan will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board. 

40.     ​Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to the club for a term of five years commencing from 1 April 2024 with one five years right of renewal. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     ​It is anticipated that activation of the building will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission. A shared workspace/community space will however decrease overall energy use, as users will not consume energy at individual workspaces. The shared space will provide opportunity and enable people to enjoy positive healthy lifestyles and will increase capability and connections within local community. 

42.     ​To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder: 

a.   use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems 

b.   use eco labelled products and services 

c.   seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities. 

43.     ​All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are: 

a.   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

b.   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. 

44.     ​Climate change has a likely potential to impact the lease, as part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive zone. As such, floodplains could have the potential to impact the building. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.     ​Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate (Parks and Community Facilities Operational Management, Specialist Operations, Active Recreation and Community Empowerment) have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed lease as it will provide sports and recreation activities to benefit the community. 

46.     ​The feedback from parks specialist notes that the pool building could potentially be developed further to expand in size to respond to growth in the area. However, it is currently not included in the council’s long-term plan. 

47.     ​The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     ​The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote football sporting activities from Keith Hay Park for the Puketāpapa Local Board area and its surrounding communities. 

49.     ​The assessment of the application was discussed with the local board at their workshop on 26 October 2023. The local board indicated in principle support of the lease proposal. 

50.     ​The delivered activities align with the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2023: ‘Our community - People can access places and services that cater for their needs’. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     ​The lessee has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community as per Attachment B of this report. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through programmes, activities and services for sports, health and well-being. 

52.     ​Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

53.     ​These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan (operative in part), individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

54.     ​Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects. 

55.     ​Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.     ​Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. No concerns were raised regarding the financial implications for the new lease to Auckland United Football Club Incorporated for the land. 

57.     ​Ongoing maintenance of the tenant-owned asset at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill will be covered by the lessee. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     ​Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to the club at Keith Hay Park located at 53 Arundel Street, Mount Roskill, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome. 

59.     ​The new lease affords the groups security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility. Should the building remain unoccupied, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and possible improvements. Council will be liable for the asset regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

60.     If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the Auckland United Football Club Incorporated to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan for Auckland United Football Club

65

b

Community Outcomes Plan Auckland United Football Club

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Malinda Naidoo - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Review of the allocation table recording the allocation of decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities

File No.: CP2024/04123

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board input into the current review of the allocation table, which records the allocation of decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The “Decision-making responsibilities of Auckland Council’s Governing Body and local boards” document (Attachment A) records the allocation of decision-making responsibilities for the non-regulatory activities of Auckland Council, as determined by the Governing Body.   This document is also sometimes referred to as the “allocation table”.

3.       The allocation table is being routinely reviewed as part of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 process. In 2022, the allocation table was substantially reviewed to give local boards increased decision-making powers.

4.       There does not appear to be any need for substantive changes to the allocation table at this time. Feedback suggests that some parts of the current allocations are not clear, and minor amendments can be made to support a better understanding of the respective governance roles and responsibilities between the Governing Body and local boards.

5.       However, there is work needed on implementation actions to support the organisation to give better effect to the shared governance model. This is being advanced through the Joint Governance Working Party’s (JGWP) enquiry into the Mayor’s proposal for more empowered local boards.

6.       Local boards are being asked to provide feedback on the review of the allocation table that will go to the Governing Body for consideration, prior to being adopted for inclusion in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide its input into the current review of the allocation table, recording the allocation of decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 (LGACA) provides that both the Governing Body and local boards are responsible and democratically accountable for the decision-making of Auckland Council, and that where responsibility rests depends on the nature of the decision being made.

8.       Section 15 of LGACA sets out the classes of decisions that the Governing Body make, and section 16 sets out the classes of decisions that local boards make. Both sections include a  class of decisions in respect of non-regulatory activities of the council. LGACA requires that the Governing Body allocate decision-making responsibility for these non-regulatory decisions to either itself or local boards in accordance with the principles set out in section 17.

9.       The “Decision-making responsibilities of Auckland Council’s Governing Body and local boards” (also known as the “allocation table”) records the allocation of decision-making responsibilities for the non-regulatory activities of Auckland Council, as determined by the Governing Body. The allocation table is included in the long-term plan and each year’s annual plan. The current allocation table is attached at Attachment A.

10.     The overarching intent of the document is to empower local boards to make decisions that reflect the needs and preferences of diverse local communities while ensuring that the Governing Body is able to fulfil its statutory decision-making responsibilities and make decisions regionally, where to do so will better promote the well-being of communities across Auckland.

11.     The allocation table is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all allocated decision-making because of the broad range of Auckland Council’s activities and the nuances within those. Allocation of decision-making is therefore applied on a case-by-case basis, with the allocation table used as a starting point.

12.     The allocation table was last reviewed in 2022 where substantial updates were made to provide local boards with increased decision-making powers, in alignment with the Governance Framework Review work.

13.     The allocation table is routinely reviewed as part of every long-term plan process and included in the final long-term plan. However, changes to decision-making responsibilities can be made at any time via a new allocation decision (by the Governing Body) or a delegation.

Empowering Local Boards

14.     Consequently, allocated decision-making will continue to be considered in the context of the “More Empowered Local Boards” workstream, which is being led by the Joint Governance Working Party (JGWP) and reported recently to local boards. This recognises that empowerment includes allocated decision-making, but that there are other levers to consider, including:

·    delegated and statutory decision-making powers

·    how well information and advice enable governors to utilise their powers

·    the skills and knowledge staff need to give effect to the governance model

·    whether updates are required to other policies, systems and processes to reflect more empowered local boards.

15.     Local boards resolved their feedback related to empowerment at their March business meetings and this will be reported to the JGWP’s 6 May meeting. Feedback related to the allocation of decision-making responsibility will be considered within the scope of this current review.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Informal feedback on the current allocation table from elected members and relevant business units was used to identify the scope of the review. Feedback suggests that the allocation table is still leading to confusion around governance roles and responsibilities. In practice many activities require both regional and local decisions, and there is actual and perceived complexity in giving effect to allocated decision-making.

17.     Aside from an anomaly related to disposal decisions, the current review does not recommend any substantive changes to decision-making allocation. Some amendments are proposed to the text to help aid interpretation and flow. These include:

·    refining the introductory text

·    minor wording amendments to help make more explicit the governance roles and responsibilities

·    closely aligning activity descriptions to the Groups of Activities in the long-term plan.

18.     A key focus is on implementing the allocation table to help the organisation give better effect to allocated decision-making in practice. This includes:

·    reviewing other relevant documents that may require updates

·    considering training and guidance needs for staff

·    awareness raising through communications and engagement.

19.     Local board delegations are also scheduled to be reviewed separately.

Further consideration is required for some parks disposals

20.     An issue has been raised with decision-making around some parks disposals. Table 1 shows the current position in terms of decision-making around different types of parks-related decisions.

Table 1: Decision-making responsibility for asset acquisitions and disposals

Type of decision

Current decision-maker

Basis for decision-making

Current constraints / process

Acquisition

Acquisition of local community assets (e.g. local parks, local community facilities)

Local boards

Allocation

Subject to budget parameters agreed with Governing Body

Acquisition of regional assets (e.g. stormwater assets, regional parks, regional facilities)

Governing Body

Allocation

Decisions made by relevant committee (as per GB terms of reference)

Disposal

Disposal as part of land exchange

Needs to be clarified

Disposal of service properties

Local boards

Delegation (from GB – statutory responsibility)

Service property optimisation framework

Disposal of non-service properties

Governing Body

Statutory responsibility

Asset recycling programme

21.    The report to the Governing Body in 2021 [GB/2021/67] provided the policy intent of the changes to the current allocation table which was to allow local boards to make decisions relating to acquisition of new assets.

22.     Historically, disposal decisions have been treated as sitting with the Governing Body (as a statutory responsibility). But this is difficult in practice where local boards make acquisition decisions as part of a land exchange, but not the related disposal decision.

23.     Work is underway to consider whether, from a policy perspective, local boards should be able to make both the acquisition and disposal decision as part of land exchanges, and whether this should be allocated or delegated.

Clarifying decision-making over stormwater activities in relation to local parks activities

24.     Current landowner approvals processes for council-led stormwater activities do not align with the existing allocation table and the LGACA. This has contributed to inefficiencies where a part of council wants to undertake a stormwater activity on council land.

25.     Council’s stormwater, flood resilience and water quality activities are generally regional in nature. As per the current allocation table, decision-making for all these activities sits with the Governing Body to ensure a coordinated, consistent approach across the network and integration with other regulatory related decisions. This position remains the same regardless of how the land is held – whether as a regional or local asset.

26.     Under the allocation table, local boards are allocated decision-making responsibilities for local parks. Staff are not proposing any changes to the allocated responsibilities of local boards and consider that the explanatory note in the allocation table adequately explains how the overlap in responsibilities will be managed. This states “[t]he decision-making of local boards in relation to local parks may be constrained where decisions relate to council stormwater management activities, including the stormwater network”.

27.     Under the local board delegation protocols, Land Advisory staff have been delegated responsibility for land use consents. Staff have interpreted this mandate to be broad, because of the broad responsibilities of local boards for determining ‘use of and activities within local parks’. The delegation protocols require that staff consult with local boards before making these decisions and refer the matter to them if the local board calls the delegation in as the “landowner”.

28.     However, this is contrary to the LGACA, where decision-making responsibilities are allocated for particular activities (as opposed to categories of land) and the land remains owned by Auckland Council.

29.     Therefore, in line with the allocation table, Healthy Waters, instead of Land Advisory, will now seek the views of local boards before taking a decision on whether to proceed with the proposed stormwater works. The experience of local boards should not be different to consultations over landowner approval applications. The only difference will be the local board’s ability to ‘call in’ a decision.

30.     This revised process is consistent with the allocation of decision-making responsibility for stormwater activities to the Governing Body (and Healthy Waters under delegation).

31.     When a stormwater activity is proposed to occur on a local park, staff will carefully consider the views and preferences of local boards and will be mindful of other local activities on parks when making decisions, consistent with the process previously undertaken by Land Advisory. Similarly, there is still potential for escalation of decision-making where the proposal is not supported by the relevant local board. Diagram 1 outlines this process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagram 1: Decision-making process for stormwater activities

32.     Staff recommend that this process be reviewed with local boards in six months’ time. Any issues arising will be considered through the next annual review of the allocation table or, through the local board delegation protocols which are due to be reviewed later this year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     There are no climate impacts associated with local boards providing their feedback.

34.     Climate impacts for individual decisions by way of the application of non-regulatory decision-making are determined on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     Feedback was sought from relevant business units who give effect to the allocation of non-regulatory activities through provision of advice.

36.     Key themes from their feedback are as follows:

·    The need to be more explicit on the extent of the local board / Governing Body role, where there are overlaps and limitations are not made clear.

·    Some activities could be further specified e.g. priority locations for development, place-shaping vs place-making etc.

·    Work to ensure staff understand where decision-making responsibility sits, and how best to give effect to the shared governance principles in practice.

·    More guidance and definitions would help to understand the nature of decision-making.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     Local board views are being sought through this report.

38.     Local impacts for individual decisions by way of the application of non-regulatory decision-making are determined on a case-by-case basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     There are no Māori impacts associated with local boards providing their feedback.

40.     Māori impacts for individual decisions by way of the application of non-regulatory decision-making are determined on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     There are no financial implications associated with local boards providing their feedback.

42.     Financial implications for individual decisions by way of the application of non-regulatory decision-making are determined on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     There are limited risks associated with local boards providing their feedback. The main risks are outlined in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Risk identification and mitigation

Main risks

Consequence

Likelihood

Comments and risks management strategies

Delay in adoption of the refreshed allocation table

Medium

Low

The allocation table must be adopted by the Governing Body by the end of May to meet the LTP timeframes. Careful project management is in place to ensure milestones are met.

Local boards are not satisfied with the scope of their decision-making powers

Medium

Medium

Local board views will continue to be considered as part of the “Empowering Local Boards” workstream. A range of levers will be considered as to how to empower local boards. This includes, but is not limited to, allocated decision-making.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Local board feedback will be assessed to inform final recommendations on the review of the allocation table.

45.     All feedback will be reported to the Governing Body for their consideration, before the Governing Body is asked to adopt the refreshed allocation table at their meeting on 30 May.

46.     The allocation table will be included in volume two of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

47.     Staff will implement activities that support the organisation to give effect to the allocation table. These activities include developing guidance, considering learning and development needs, and outreach to relevant business units via communications and engagement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Decision-making responsibilities of Auckland Council's Governing Body and local boards

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Christie McFadyen – Principal Advisor – Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 









Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Local board appointments and delegations for the 2022-2025 electoral term

File No.: CP2024/03729

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To reconfirm internal appointments and delegations that were made at the 17 November 2022 meeting to manage the workload and enable the discharge of duties and responsibilities in a timely manner.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards are responsible for a wide range of council decisions. As per their legislative role, most of these decisions relate to non-regulatory responsibilities of the council allocated to local boards.

3.       In the first term of Auckland Council, all 21 local boards (and the Governing Body) made a general delegation to the Chief Executive of all their responsibilities, duties and powers subject to the exclusions, restrictions and clarifications set out in the Chief Executive’s Delegations Register. The exercise of responsibilities, duties and powers delegated from local boards is subject to the Local Board Delegation Protocols (Protocols). The Protocols require a range of decisions to be reported to the local board and require that certain decisions made by staff be subject to consultation with the local board, through a nominated local board member (or portfolio holder).

4.       Local boards have also been delegated some decisions relating to regulatory processes from the Governing Body. These include giving input into the resource consent process and making objections to liquor licence applications. Some of these decisions are subject to statutory timeframes so having individual members take the lead on such matters ensures the local board can participate effectively in these processes.

5.       To enable effective and efficient decision-making, it is appropriate that individual members undertake the following duties and responsibilities:

a)      Provision of local board views and feedback during staff consultation on general landowner approvals

b)      Provision of local board views and feedback during staff consultation on activities that are subject to regulatory approval e.g film applications and events

c)      Provision of formal feedback on resource consent-related matters, specifically input into resource consent notification decisions and provision of local board views, if any, on publicly notified resource consents; includes providing views, if required, on any council decisions relating to the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020

d)      Preparation of and submission of objections, if any, to liquor licence applications and authority to speak at relevant hearings, if required

e)      Representation at meetings of joint committees, working groups and other bodies which the local board is a party of or invited to.

6.       At the 17 November 2022 meeting, the Puketāpapa Local Board moved that the delegations confirmed (Resolution number PKTPP/2022/153) be reconfirmed at their April 2024 meeting. This report enables that decision.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint a nominated contact, and an alternate, for staff consultations over landowner approval applications (excluding applications for filming and events)

b)      kopou / appoint a nominated contact, and an alternate, for staff consultation on applications for filming, events and other activities on local parks and local facilities that also require regulatory approval;

c)      kopou / appoint a lead, and an alternate, for liquor licence matters and delegate authority to that member, including any alternate, to prepare and provide objections, if any, and speak to any local board views at any hearings on applications for liquor licences

d)      kopou / appoint a lead, and an alternate, on resource consent matters and delegate authority to that member, including any alternate, to:

i)    provide the local board views, if any, on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

ii)   prepare and provide local board’s views, if any, on notified resource consents and speak to those views at any hearings if required

iii)   provide the local board’s views on matters relating to or generated by the COVID-19 (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020 while this legislation remains in force

e)      kopou / appoint a representative, and an alternate, to meetings of the LGNZ Auckland Zone and to take the lead on matters relating to this forum

f)       tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson to work with other local board chairpersons to select shared representatives to council working groups, working parties and other internal bodies, where there is a limited number of local board representatives to be selected from amongst all 21 or clusters of local boards

g)      kopou / appoint a representative, and an alternate, to the Manukau Harbour Forum joint committee

h)      kohuki / consider any other appointments and delegations that may be appropriate, to manage the workload and responsibilities of the local board.

Horopaki

Context

7.       To enable the effective and efficient conduct of a local board’s business, the Local Government Act 2002 (the Act) provides that a local board may delegate to a committee, subcommittee, or member of the local board, or to an officer of council, any of its responsibilities, duties, or powers, except for the exceptions listed in clause 36D, schedule 7 of the Act. The responsibilities that cannot be delegated include the duty to identify and communicate the interests and preferences of the people in the local board area in relation to the content of the strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.

8.       It is standard practice for local boards to delegate responsibilities for specific tasks and duties to individual members, to enable those tasks and duties to be discharged in a timely manner.

9.       Local boards have also made general delegations to the Chief Executive which enable staff to make a range of other decisions on behalf of the local board. Some decisions delegated to the Chief Executive are conditional on consultation with the local board, so this report includes appointments of representatives with whom staff can consult and seek local board views from.

10.     At its meeting on 17 November 2022, the Puketāpapa Local Board resolved the following (Resolution number PKTPP/2022/153)

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)       kopou / appoint Chair E Kumar as a nominated contact, and Member J Turner as an alternate, for staff consultations over landowner approval applications (excluding applications for filming and events)

b)       kopou / appoint Chair E Kumar as a nominated contact, and Member J Turner as an alternate, for staff consultation on applications for filming, events and other activities on local parks and local facilities that also require regulatory approval;

c)       kopou / appoint Deputy Chair F Lai as lead, and Member B Shen as alternate, for liquor licence matters and delegate authority to that member, including any alternate, to prepare and provide objections, if any, and speak to any local board views at any hearings on applications for liquor licences

d)       kopou / appoint Member B Shen as lead, and Deputy Chair F Lai as an alternate, on resource consent matters and delegate authority to that member, including any alternate, to:

i)   provide the local board views, if any, on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

ii)  prepare and provide local board’s views, if any, on notified resource consents and speak to those views at any hearings if required

iii)  provide the local board’s views on matters relating to or generated by the COVID-19 (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020 while this legislation remains in force

e)       kopou / appoint Chairperson as a representative, and Deputy Chairperson as an  alternate, to meetings of the LGNZ Auckland Zone and to take the lead on matters relating to this forum

f)        tautapa / delegate authority to the chairperson to work with other local board chairpersons to select shared representatives to council working groups, working parties and other internal bodies, where there is a limited number of local board representatives to be selected from amongst all 21 or clusters of local boards

g)       kopou / appoint Member J Turner as a representative, and Member M Pervan as an alternate, to the Manukau Harbour Forum joint committee

h)       kohuki / consider any other appointments and delegations that may be appropriate, to manage the workload and responsibilities of the local board.

i)        note that the above delegations be reconfirmed April 2024.

 

CARRIED

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Local boards have been allocated decision-making responsibility for various non-regulatory activities including the use of and activities within local parks and local community and recreation facilities.  Considering and determining requests by the public and other third parties for the use of these parks and facilities is therefore within the allocated responsibilities of Local Boards. Auckland Council refers to these decisions as “landowner consents” or “landowner approvals”.

12.     Through the general delegation to the Chief Executive, all local boards have delegated landowner approval decisions to staff subject to consultation with the local board. This enables this customer-facing process to be administered efficiently.

13.     The Protocols provide that the nominated local board member can request staff (who are undertaking the consultation) to refer the landowner approval applications to a local board business meeting for a decision. This approach is typically exercised sparingly and in relation to controversial issues of particular interest to the Local Board or local community. Referring the matter to the local board for decision adds a considerable amount of time and resource to the process as it requires staff to follow the reporting timeframes for business meetings and slows down council’s response to the customer.

14.     Separately Auckland Council takes regulatory decisions in relation to applications made under its Bylaws and the Resource Management Act 1991. Regulatory decisions sit with the Governing Body and are often delegated to staff or to independent commissioners. Before taking decisions, the Governing Body must consider the views and preferences expressed by a local board where the decisions affect the local board area.

15.     This report recommends the appointment of local board members to take the lead on providing these approvals and views for the remainder of the 2022-2025 electoral term.

General landowner approvals

16.     The role of the local board’s nominated lead for general landowner approvals is to be the point of consultation for staff. The lead’s responsibility is to:

·        receive information about the proposed activity which requires landowner approval

·        provide views, if any, about the impact of the proposal on the local park and the local community

·        maintain a focus on governance matters noting that staff who maintain the park and undertake operational duties will be identifying the relevant operational issues

·        ensure that reasons are given to support the views based on relevant and not irrelevant considerations

·        consult other members of the local board, if appropriate, and collate their feedback, if any, to give to staff

·        provide views, if any, in a timely manner (staff recommend nominated leads strive to provide feedback within 5 days, if possible) and,

·        provide regular updates to the local board on landowner approval applications received as appropriate.

17.     The exercise of council’s general powers to make landowner decisions is not unconstrained. Whether taken by staff or at the full local board level, decision-makers must ensure decisions are made in accordance with statutory and common and public law principles.

Filming

18.     Screen Auckland (part of Tātaki Auckland Unlimited) is the agency in charge of permitting applications for filming in the Auckland region. They also facilitate the request for landowner approvals relating to film applications.

19.     Due to recent growth in screen industry activity, Screen Auckland is now processing approximately 1000 permit applications per year. This number is predicted to continue to increase as the film industry recovers from COVID-19 restrictions.

20.     Screen Auckland’s service level commitment is to process film applications within three to five working days. These timeframes reflect the nature of this industry and is line with the ‘film-friendly’ direction in the Auckland Film Protocols but it adds pressure to internal consultation processes.

21.     The recommended timeframe, for consulting with local boards on filming applications, is two working days. These tight timeframes also mean that referring the matter to the full local board will most likely result in cancellation of the application as applicants will likely just opt for a different location. In this regard, to meet council’s service level commitments, the local boards are being encouraged not to refer film applications to the full local board for consideration.

22.     The role of the local board’s film lead is to be the point of consultation for staff processing applications for film permits on local parks. The lead’s responsibility is to:

·        receive information about filming applications on local parks

·        provide views, if any, on how the activity may impact the local park and local communities

·        maintain a focus on governance matters noting that operational staff will be identifying any operational issues

·        ensure reasons are given to support the views and that these are based on relevant and not irrelevant considerations

·        respond within two working days (staff will assume the local board does not have any feedback to give if there is no response received within this timeframe) and,

·        provide updates to the local board on their nominated lead activities as appropriate.

Events

23.     The Protocols require that a nominated local board lead is consulted, on behalf of the local board, on event applications that meet certain triggers. These triggers are:

·        applications to hold events on council-owned land in the local board area that require regulatory approval and involve one or more of the following matters:

o   complete or substantial closure of the public open space

o   more than 500 people

o   road closure

o   liquor

o   ticketed event.

24.     The role of the local board’s events lead is to be the point of consultation for staff processing event permits on local parks. The lead’s responsibility is to:

·        receive information about event application on a local park, when the above triggers are met

·        provide views, if any, on how the event activity may impact the local park and local communities

·        maintain a focus on governance matters noting that staff who maintain the park and undertake operational duties will be identifying any operational issues e.g. need for traffic management etc

·        ensure reasons are given to support the views and that these are based on relevant and not irrelevant considerations

·        respond in a timely manner (staff recommend nominated leads strive to provide feedback within 5 days, if possible)

·        provide updates to the local board on their nominated lead activities as appropriate.

25.     Staff are also required under the Protocols to notify the nominated local board member of areas relating to the event that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk and decisions to approve events on council owned land in the local board area. The nominated lead will be the primary point of contact for these communications.

Liquor licence matters

26.     The District Licensing Committees consider and grant or renew applications for liquor licences and manager’s certificates. When a business applies for a new liquor licence (on-licence, off-licence, club licence, or special licence) or a renewal, these applications are publicly notified.

27.     The Governing Body has delegated to local boards the power to object to liquor licensing applications under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (GB/2014/103).

28.     Local boards have 15 working days from the date of a public notice of liquor licence applications (new or renewals) to provide an objection on the matter. The District Licensing Committee is required to convene a public hearing whenever an objection has been filed unless the application is withdrawn, the objector does not require a public hearing or it believes that the objection is vexatious and based on grounds outside the scope of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.

29.     As per the practice in previous terms, this report recommends delegating responsibility to an individual local board member to monitor public notices and lodge objections, if required, on time.

30.     The nominated member’s authority extends to representing the local board at any public hearing that considers the local board’s objection. Where the nominated member is not available to attend a public hearing to speak to the local board’s objection, the alternate member or chairperson or other member agreed by the local board can represent the local board.

Input to resource consent matters

31.     Decisions to grant resource consents are regulatory decisions of the council that sit with the Governing Body and are delegated to staff.

32.     Governing Body has resolved that Local boards will be given the opportunity, within the statutory timeframes, to provide feedback, if any, on whether resource consent applications should be publicly notified (GB/2011/156). 

33.     Local Boards can also provide views on resource consent applications once they have been notified (and may speak to these views at hearings). 

34.     Resource consent processes are subject to statutory timeframes. To ensure the local board can participate effectively in this process, it is recommended that the local board appoint and authorise an individual member to take the lead in developing and providing feedback when applications are received.

35.     Local boards, in previous terms, have identified a list of issues that automatically trigger their feedback on resource consent matters. When these issues or ‘triggers’ present themselves in a resource consent application, staff will email the nominated lead copies of applications for feedback. Local board leads are encouraged to provide comments on the matter within 3 working days.

36.     Considerations by the lead, on behalf of the local board, should include how or if the proposed activity may adversely affect people in the local board area.

37.     If the local board desires, the nominated lead for resource consent matters can also be the member in charge of assisting the local board in developing its feedback on other planning matters such as plan changes and notices of requirement. These matters cannot be delegated so feedback, if any, must be decided on by the full board.

Delegation to chairperson – selection of shared representatives

38.     From time to time during the term, local boards may be invited to appoint a limited number of representatives to working parties, advisory groups, and other groupings that the Governing Body may set up. The selection of a small number of people to represent many local boards requires local boards to work together.

39.     In the previous term, chairpersons were critical to reaching these joint decisions. Chairpersons can work as a selection committee (utilising their monthly Chairs’ Forum) to discuss and agree jointly on shared representatives for all local boards as and when required. In the previous term, this was also process authorised by local boards for the selection of the single local board representative to the Local Government New Zealand National Council and a representative to the Establishment Unit Board for the light rail project.

40.     As representatives of their local boards, chairpersons can also work together in clusters to select representatives from different parts of the region, where this is required.

Manukau Harbour Forum

41.     The Manukau Harbour Forum is a joint committee established by the nine local boards surrounding the Manukau Harbour. The joint committee structure of this forum enables these local boards to engage in collective and collaborative action to achieve improvements in water quality and the natural biodiversity of the Manukau Harbour and agreed joint actions that help improve the amenity value of the harbour.

42.     As appointing bodies of the Manukau Harbour Forum, the nine local boards and the forum itself work collaboratively with mana whenua, the government, non-government organisations, businesses and communities that live on the harbour and its contributing waterways and estuaries.

43.     Each local board appoints a member who represents the local board at meetings of the forum and takes the lead on all matters relating to the forum. Appointing an alternate can ensure the local board will be able to have a representative at meetings of the Manukau Harbour Forum should the appointed member not be available.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     This report recommends the appointment of nominated local board members to ensure that council can undertake its operational and statutory duties in a timely manner, while receiving local board input and decision-making in matters that are of local importance.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     This report seeks to appoint nominated local board members to perform specific functions.

46.     Any local board member who is appointed as a nominated board member should ensure that they represent the wider local board views and preferences on each matter before them.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have a positive or negative impact for Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have financial implications on Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     If local boards choose not to appoint a nominated board member for landowner approvals, film applications and events, staff will need to seek feedback from the chairperson. This could potentially lead to a busy workload for the local board chairperson, in addition to their existing duties.

50.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide views on notified applications, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to submission closing dates and miss the opportunity to have their feedback presented and heard at a hearing.

51.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide their views on liquor licences, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to closings dates for submissions not coinciding with political meetings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.     Nominated local board members providing feedback will engage with staff acting in accordance with the Local Board Delegation Protocols.

53.     Nominated local board members (and alternates) who are delegated the responsibility of preparing and providing objections and speaking to the local board’s objection at District Licensing Committee Hearings should sign-up to receive alcohol notices. This will ensure that they hear about new applications as soon as they are open for comment.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Puketapapa Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2024/03659

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board’s approval to reschedule the first recess week in 2024 to Monday, 30 September 2024 – Friday, 04 October 2024 from Monday, 22 April – Friday, 26 April 2024 in order to accommodate the timeframe for the work on the 10-year budget 2024-2034 (the Long term Plan) and the Annual Budget 2024/2025 (Annual Plan).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Puketāpapa Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Thursday, 17 November 2022 (PKTPP/2022/1)

3.       At the time the board resolved its meeting schedule it had included two recess weeks in 2024.  The dates are: Monday, 22 April – 26 April 2024 and Monday, 08 July – 12 July 2024.

4.       This report seeks approval to shift the first recess week in 2024 to Monday, 30 September 2024 – Friday, 04 October 2024 from Monday, 22 April – Friday, 26 April 2024, to accommodate the timeframe for the work on the local board agreement as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget 2024-2025.

5.       At the time the board resolved its 2022-2025 Puketāpapa Local Board meeting schedule the dates for the Local Board Agreement as part of the 10-year Budget 2024-2034 and the Annual Budget were unknown

6.       The table below reflects the recommended change to the meeting schedule up until the end of the 2022-2025 electoral term:

DATE

TIME

VENUE

Business Meeting

Thursday, 15 February 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

Business Meeting

Thursday, 21 March 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

Business Meeting

Thursday, 18 April 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

Recess week Monday, 22 April – 26 April 2024

Business Meeting

Thursday, 16 May 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 20 June 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Recess week Monday, 08 July – 12 July 2024

Business Meeting

Thursday, 18 July 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 15 August 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 19 September 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Recess week to 30 September – 04 October 2024

Business Meeting

Thursday, 17 October 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 21 November 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 05 December 2024

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 20 February 2025

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 20 March 2025

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 17 April 2025

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Recess week Monday, 21 April – 25 April 2025

Business Meeting

Thursday, 15 May 2025

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

Business Meeting

Thursday, 19 June 2025

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Recess week Monday, 30 June – 04 July 2025

 

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 17 July 2025

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 21 August 2025

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

Business Meeting

Thursday, 18 September 2025

10.00am

Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve to shift the local board first recess week in 2024 to Monday, 30 September 2024 – Friday, 04 October 2024 from Monday, 22 April – Friday, 26 April 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2024/03651

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Julie Fairey  - Ward Councillor Update

99

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 








Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Board Member Reports

 

File No.: CP2024/03652

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the local board members on the activities they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that Local Board members will speak to their reports at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the member reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2024/03653

 

  

 

Te take mō te p,ūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Chairperson, Ella Kumar, with an opportunity to update local board members on the activities she has been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that the Chairperson will speak to the report at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive Ella Kumar’s Chairperson’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ella Kumar, Chairperson's Report

111

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 




Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2024/03655

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) workshop notes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop notes provides a record of the Board’s workshops held in February 2024.

3.       These sessions are held to give informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

4.       For openness and transparency the Puketāpapa Local Board agreed to release their workshop material presentations.  The presentation material from workshops held can be viewed at this link https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/puketapapa-local-board/Pages/puketapapa-local-board-workshops.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Puketāpapa Local Board workshop notes for: 14 March 2024, 28 March 2024 and 04 April 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 14 March 2024

117

b

Workshop record 28 March 2024

119

c

Workshop record 04 April 2024

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

File No.: CP2024/03709

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Puketāpapa Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa/governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Puketāpapa Local Board is in Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa/governance forward work programme calendar as at 03 April 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Programme calendar

125

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

18 April 2024