I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 30 April 2024

1.00pm

Local Board Office
560 Mount Albert Road
Three Kings

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Maria Meredith

 

Deputy Chairperson

Debbie Burrows

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Chris Makoare

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jessica Prasad

Democracy Advisor

 

24 April 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 027 228 0253

Email: Jessica.prasad@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation: Pauline Laithwaite and Elle Bell - SpacetoCo                                          5

8.2     Deputation: Dr Gillian Stewart - Habitat for Humanity Northern Region                  6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

9.1     Public Forum: Terry Moore - Auckland East Community Network                          7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Governing Body Member's Update                    9

12        Chairperson's Report                                         17

13        Board Member's Reports                                   27

14        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025                                        29

15        Allocation of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grants 2023/2024                         39

16        Waiapu Precinct and Paynes Lane Public Spaces Concept Design                                     61

17        Review of the allocation table recording the allocation of decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities                            133

18        Long Term Pan 2024-2034: local board consultation feedback and input                    149

19        Local Board Views on Proposed Plan Change 96 - Open Space and Other Rezoning Matters (2024)                                                                  171

20        Urgent Decision - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board input into the Auckland Council submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill                                                                            219

21        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                             233

22        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                                        237

23        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 March 2024, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Pauline Laithwaite and Elle Bell - SpacetoCo

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Pauline Laithwaite (Community Spaces Director - SpacetoCo) and Elle Bell (Managing Director – SpacetoCo) to deliver a presentation during the Deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

2.       Pauline Laithwaite, Elle Bell from SpacetoCo will be in attendance to deliver a presentation on how SpacetoCo can help community venues increase their utilisation and engagement and help them reach their potential for enabling people to create community in their local spaces.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Thank Pauline Laithwaite and Elle Bell for their attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Deputation: Pauline Laithwaite and Elle Bell - SpacetoCo, presentation.......... 253

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Dr Gillian Stewart - Habitat for Humanity Northern Region

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Dr Gillian Stewart (Funding and Impact lead, Habitat for Humanity) to deliver a presentation during the Deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Dr Gillian Stewart from Habitat for Humanity will be in attendance to talk about the work Habitat for Humanity is carrying out in the local board area, in particular presenting on the Restore’s investment in the community of Panmure and the other ways they support local families access affordable housing.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Dr Gillian Stewart for her attendance and presentation. 

 

Attachments

a          Deputation: Dr Gillian Stewart - Habitat for Humanity Northern Region, presentation....................................... 259

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum: Terry Moore - Auckland East Community Network

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Terry Moore – Secretary, Auckland East Community Network, to deliver a presentation during the Public Forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Terry Moore – Secretary, Auckland East Community Network, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation on the plans for the Volunteer Expo coming up in September 2024.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Terry Moore for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2024/03814

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor Bartley March to April 2024 Local Board Report

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 






Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2024/03815

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson Maria Meredith's report

19

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 








Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2024/03816

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)   receive the board member’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/04535

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme 2024/2025.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme 2024/2025 for adoption (as provided in Attachment A to this report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      adopt the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme 2024/2025 in Attachment A.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme includes:

· outcomes as identified in the local board plan

· specific local board grant priorities

· which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing           dates

· any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

· other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       Once the local board grants programme 2024/2025 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility will be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2024/2025.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

12.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2021 -2031 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme 2024/2025

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 







Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Allocation of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grants 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/04197

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024 allocations.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board provides Strategic Partnerships Grants to support local community groups and organisations to build governance, strategic and financial capacity and capability, upskill staff and volunteers and become more sustainable.  This delivers on initiatives which align to the local board’s priorities and outcomes.

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2023/2024 work programme includes two Strategic Partnerships Grant budget lines that total $227,000. These lines fund four components of the grant programme: the grant round, community group support, a collaborative funding pilot and delivery by the partnerships broker.

4.       After the allocation of $107,000 supporting the implementation of the Strategic Partnerships programme, the residual amount available for allocation to grant recipients is $120,000.

5.       The 2023/2024 non-contestable grant round opened on 12 February 2024 and closed on 4 March 2024.

6.       Four applications were received and assessed by a panel of staff for alignment to the criteria outlined in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024 framework (Attachment A to the agenda report).

7.       The applications were presented to the local board at a workshop on 16 April 2024 to discuss their alignment with the local board’s priorities and the outcomes for the grant round.

8.       All four applications are identified as having high alignment with the criteria. The three top ranking applications are recommended for funding totalling $110,000.

9.       Staff recommend a smaller grant of $10,000 to the fourth ranking applicant to enable them to identify alternative opportunities for collaboration with the local board and connect them with other funding sources and support to achieve their intended application outcomes.

10.     Staff are currently providing implementation support to ten organisations through the Strategic Partnerships Grants of previous years (Attachment B to the agenda report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         whakaae / approve the following four applicants for strategic partnerships grants from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2023/2024 work programme:

i)        Glen Innes Family Centre for $18,000 for a third and final year in 2023/2024.

ii)       Te Papapa Onehunga Rugby and Sports Club for $52,000 over three years from 2023/2024 to 2025/2026.

iii)      Pukepuke 'o Tonga Limited for $40,000 over two years in 2023/2024 and 2024/2025.

iv)      Dolphin Theatre for $10,000 for capacity building in 2023/2024.

Horopaki

Context

11.     The purpose of the Strategic Partnerships Grant is to support local community organisations to deliver against one or more of the following priorities identified in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 and subsequently the Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024 framework (Attachment A to the agenda report). These are as follows:

·    Māori Outcomes: To respond to, progress and support Māori aspirations.

·    Climate Action: To respond to, progress and support the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Climate Action Plan

·    Our people feel a sense of belonging and our diversity is celebrated.

·    Our environment: Our arawai / waterways and whenua / land are healthy and thriving.

·    Our community: Our facilities and open spaces are accessible, cost-effective and fit-for-purpose.

·    Our places: Growth in our rohe is well-planned and environmentally aware.

·    Our economy: Our town centres are thriving, and our businesses are resilient.

12.     Local community groups and organisations were able to apply for up to $20,000 per year, and up to a total of $60,000 for multi-year funding for up to three years. This includes contributions to wages and salaries, ongoing operational costs and access to organisational capacity and capability building support throughout implementation. The previous grant recipients from 2019-2024 are listed in attachment B to the agenda report.

13.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grants programme is split over two 2023/2024 budget lines that total $227,000. In addition to the grant round funding of $120,000, the budget funds specialist services building governance, strategic and financial capacity and capability for identified organisations and the development of a collaborative funding pilot.

14.     Expressions of Interest for non-contestable 2023/2024 grant round were opened by invitation only on the 12 February 2024 and closed on 4 March 2024.

15.     Through a referral process with the local board and council teams, targeted community organisations were invited to submit an expression of interest application.

16.     Four applications were received (Attachment C to the agenda report) and following round table meetings with all the applicants, the applications were assessed by a panel of staff for alignment to the criteria outlined in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024 framework.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     The four applications received requested a total of $200,000 and have been assessed as having high alignment to the priorities in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 and the Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024 framework funding criteria.

18.     Funding these organisations will enable the local board to:

·        strengthen its strategic partnerships with more local community groups and organisations

·        invest in capacity and capability building so that the organisations are better able to deliver their services effectively, demonstrate impact, become more sustainable and strengthen their funding position to attract diverse funding opportunities

·        improve people’s connectedness and wellbeing so that they are engaged in the community and have access to a wide range of support

·        strengthen support to the voluntary and community sector

·        enable social innovation and enterprise

·        work in a holistic and integrated way.

19.     Staff recommend allocating a total of $120,000 to the following four applicants, outlined in table 1.

Table 1: Applications recommended for funding from the 2023/2024 work programme

Application ID and name

Proposal

Requested funding

Recommended funding

MTSG2024-101

Glen Innes Family Centre

·  Staff and board capacity building

·  Strategic planning finalisation

·  Capability lead hiring

$20,000

$18,000

For 2023/2024 (Year 3 only)

MTSG2024-102

Te Papapa Onehunga Rugby and  Sports Club

 

 

·  Contribute to the wages for a club employee

$60,000

$52,000

Year 1: $20,000

Year 2: $17,000

Year 3: $15,000

 

MTSG2024-103

Pukepuke 'o Tonga Limited

·  To train a paid staff member in business, arts management, and accountancy skills

·  To cover expenses including software and subscription upgrades

· To build website, develop business and marketing strategies, diversify revenue streams

$60,000

$40,000 

Year 1: $18,000

Year 2: $18,000

plus an additional $2,000 per annum for external capacity building support

MTSG2024-104

Dolphin Theatre

 

·  To strengthen organisational structure and internal communication, particularly around change management

·  To increase the hours of part-time office administrators to help cover the increased workload

$60,000

$10,000

For 2023/2024 Capacity building

 

Total

 

 

  $120,000                                                            

 

Glen Innes Family Centre

20.     In 2019/2020, the Glen Innes Family Centre received a total of $38,477.05 from the local board for the first two years of Strategic Partnership funding.  The programme was then paused for two years to provide time for the organisation to recruit and onboard a General Manager, prior to committing to partnering for a third and final year.

21.     Staff recommend funding the Glen Innes Family Centre for a third and final year due to its high alignment with the purpose of the grant. In particular, the centre is a community-based organisation who offers social work, counselling, budgeting, parenting support, youth programs, and seniors’ activities. It operates two social enterprises: Resource Rescue and Insight Tāmaki.

22.     The funding would be used to strengthen the Family Centre’s governance structure, train new board members, and ensure board and staff are aligned and accountable.

Te Papapa Onehunga Rugby and  Sports Club

23.     The Te Papapa Onehunga Rugby and Sports Club was established in 1947 and has been delivering rugby, squash, and gym, as well as community centred sport offerings, such as community touch, in-school sport coaching, and holiday programs, for a wide range of ethnicities, mainly Pasifika, but also includes Sri Lankan, Pakeha, Asian and Māori.

24.     Staff recommend funding Te Papapa Onehunga Rugby and Sports Club for $52,000 over three years from 2023/2024 to 2025/2026 due to its high alignment with the purpose of the grant.

25.     This funding will contribute to a club employee who can drive programmes to increase participation and community-club connection among male and female, across a range of ethnicities.

26.     This funding will enable the club to run a wide range of sporting and community programmes and events including community touch, social squash, holiday programmes, disability music festival, after-school care programme, girls’ fitness class, and in-school coaching.

Pukepuke 'o Tonga Limited

27.     Pukepuke 'o Tonga Limited set up as a Limited Liability Company in 2017 to focus on Tongan arts and heritage and offers cultural and heritage programmes for youth, support services for families, mentorship, and development opportunities.

28.     Pukepuke 'o Tonga Limited was an applicant in the previous round and was declined. Staff have been working to support the group and now recommend funding the group for $40,000 over two years from 2023/2024 to 2024/2025 due to its high alignment with the purpose of the grant.

29.     This funding will contribute to a paid staff member to dedicate more time to programme delivery, and provide Tongan children, youth and families the opportunity to preserve culture, arts, and heritage.

Dolphin Theatre

30.     Dolphin Theatre is a community theatre based in Onehunga for over sixty years. It is run almost entirely by volunteers. Audience numbers have dropped almost 25 per cent due to Covid-19.

31.     The theatre needs to do some pre-work focusing on enabling leadership and innovation, and increasing financial security, resilience and sustainability to enable them to pathway successfully into the Strategic Partnerships Grant programme.

32.     Staff recommend funding a smaller grant would give them the opportunity to focus on this work over the coming year in preparation for reconsideration for a larger grant in financial year 2024/2025.

 

33.     All grant recipients receive implementation support from the council to utilise ‘The Community Impact Toolkit’. This is a five-step process from planning for change through to reporting. This will form part of the funding agreement to ensure good practice measures and evaluation processes are in place and to enable full accountability and reporting back to the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050, and 

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. 

35.     Building the capacity and capability of local community organisation will have a positive impact on climate change as it reduces the need for people to travel to reach the services they offer.

36.     The four applications recommended for funding are helping to develop community. This will broadly contribute toward preparing the region through community readiness for changes in the future such as those caused by climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     In the lead up to and during the grant round process, staff collaborated with the following council teams to ensure a coordinated approach, best utilisation of the budgets available and a shared commitment to the outcomes and success of the programme:

·    Community and Social Innovation

·    Māori Outcomes

·    Place and Partner Specialists

·    Community Programme Delivery Central/ East.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The local board is the decision maker for the allocation of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnership Grant Framework 2023/2024 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

39.     The aim of the strategic partnerships grant is to support local community groups and organisations to build capacity and capability, upskill staff and volunteers so that the entity becomes more sustainable, can leverage the investment and attract diverse funding opportunities to achieve priorities identified in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023.

40.     The recommended applications for funding and delivery approach were presented to the local board at a workshop on 16 April to discuss their alignment with the local board’s priorities and outcomes for the grant round.

41.     Feedback received from the local board has informed the applications recommended to be funded.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan (operative in part), Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework.

43.     Māori make up 13 per cent of the local board population, which is higher than the Auckland average by two per cent.

44.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024 aims to respond to council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to local community groups and organisations who deliver positive outcomes for Māori.

45.     All four of the applications recommended for funding demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the Treaty of Waitangi and Te Ao Māori for inclusivity, connectedness and decision making and have identified outcomes for Māori. Their mahi is underpinned by values of aroha, manākitanga, rangatiratanga, kotahitanga, whanaungatanga and kaitiakitanga.

·    Glen Innes Family Centre is based in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and has strong focus on working with Māori and Pasifika whānau. Tikanga, Mātauranga and Reo are embedded in their programmes as a tool for wellness and transformation.

·    Te Papapa Onehunga Rugby and Sports Club provides wide ranging sporting programmes to approximately 200 club members, of which many participants are of Māori decent. They are also looking to grow this through more opportunities of participation.

·    Pukepuke 'o Tonga Limited demonstrates willingness to have more exchange with Māori communities and inspire community cohesion through hui facilitation, artistic and cultural programming.

·    Dolphin Theatre Incorporated is run almost entirely by volunteers - this includes producers, directors, designers, and performers, of which there is strong Māori involvement in the design and concept of performances.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grants work programme 2023/2024 budget lines 3949 and 3950 total $227,000. After the allocation of $107,000 supporting the implementation of the Strategic Partnerships programme, the residual amount available for allocation to the strategic partnerships grant round is $120,000.

47.     Staff recommend allocating the full balance of $120,000 across four applications for the grant round.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024 framework.

49.     The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the four applications in this round. Considerations included the organisations’ history, structure, Kaupapa, capability and capacity to deliver. This is evidenced by a relevant track record of successful delivery, planning and evaluation measures in place, along with demonstration of partnering and collaboration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     Staff will notify all successful applicants of the outcome of the application process and create funding agreements.

51.     Staff will provide the local board with half-yearly progress reports on the funded local community groups and organisations. Grant recipients will be invited to present their mahi at a local board community forum or local board workshop annually during the term of the agreement.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024 framework

47

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant Rounds 2019-2023 recipients

49

c

Summary of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2023/2024 applications

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Yongjie Li – Specialist Advisor

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Head of Community Delivery

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 




Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 









Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Waiapu Precinct and Paynes Lane Public Spaces Concept Design

File No.: CP2024/03971

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s approval on the concept design for the Waiapu Precinct and Paynes Lane public spaces, Onehunga.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiapu Precinct is identified in the Onehunga High-Level Project Plan (2017) as being a key council owned development block to be redeveloped in the Onehunga town centre. The precinct is bordered by Onehunga Mall, Arthur Street, Selwyn Street and Church Street.

3.       A masterplan for the Waiapu Precinct was endorsed by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on 24 November 2020. The masterplan sets out the plan to develop this block into high-quality mixed-use developments, with improved connections and new public spaces.

4.       The public space within the Waiapu Precinct will:

-     strengthen the east-west walking link that connects the Waiapu Precinct across Onehunga Mall to Paynes Lane.

-     create a north-south walking and cycling green link across the block connecting Onehunga Primary to the north and the library to the south. More broadly the link strives to establish a north-south green link through Onehunga connecting Maungakiekie to the north and Te Hopua A Rangi and Onehunga Wharf to the south.

-     create a community pavilion, a canopy providing a place to meet, rest, or take shelter, near the intersection of the north-south green link and the east-west link. 

-     create a new family play space to increase the opportunity for play within Onehunga and replace the current play space.

5.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has given feedback during the development of the Waiapu Precinct and Paynes Lane public realm concept design through workshops. At the November 2023 business meeting the local board approved the community engagement approach of taking the concept plan out for consultation.

6.       Eke Panuku undertook community consultation between 12 February and 10 March 2024, seeking local views and feedback on the concept design of the public realm (public spaces) of Waiapu Precinct and Paynes Lane. 

7.       A total of 201 completed surveys were gathered with many submitters supportive of the proposed design.

8.       Feedback from the submissions is set in detail later in this report. In summary, all feedback able to be delivered through the design of this space will be addressed in the next stage of design. Receiving this detailed feedback now is useful as the design team can incorporate these aspects into the design going forward.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the Waiapu Precinct and Paynes Lane Public Realm Concept Design as per Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.      The Waiapu Precinct was identified in the Eke Panuku 2017 Onehunga High-Level Project Plan (HLPP) as a key redevelopment precinct in Onehunga town centre.

10.    The HLPP outlines the plans for future-proofing Onehunga, building upon its existing character to accommodate increased growth through infrastructure investments, enabling new homes, the addition of public spaces and walking/cycling connections whilst enhancing and restoring the natural environment. 

11.     Onehunga will continue to evolve into a thriving neighbourhood, with more homes located close to the town centre, which means more customers with easy access for businesses. With more public space and a new play space located centrally, and safer walking connections through the precinct, more people, especially families, will be drawn to the area and have more reasons to spend time there.

12.     Significant private investment, for example improvements to Dress Smart and a new proposed supermarket, will complement public investment, leading to greater options for locals.

13.     The Waiapu Precinct is made up of road, car parking, and a tenant operated mini golf course. The area in its current form consists of under-utilised council property and its redesign would achieve better urban regeneration outcomes for the future.

14.     In 2020, Eke Panuku undertook a public consultation to gather community ideas and views to contribute to the masterplanning of the Waiapu Precinct.  Key themes that emerged included the need for improved safety, better connectivity around the town centre, more green space, parking, quality housing and buildings, and an improved supermarket. 

15.     The focus on Waiapu Precinct is to facilitate a new supermarket, create residential development sites, and make public realm improvements. Relocating the existing supermarket will act as a catalyst for further redevelopment in the southern part of the precinct. Supporting residential-led mixed use development blocks that builds on the existing character of Onehunga and supports Onehunga Mall as the town centre spine.

16.     The redevelopment of the site is to assist in the regeneration of other privately owned sites within the block, primarily the existing supermarket site on Church Street and other adjacent commercial properties on Selwyn Street.

17.     The Waiapu Precinct masterplan was endorsed by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on 24 November 2020. The masterplan includes the following components:

-    A public realm space – as discussed in this report.

-    A proposed new supermarket. Under negotiation with design involving mana whenua input.

-    Five development sites surrounding the public realm. The timing and strategy for these sites going to market is being prepared.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Design principles

18.     Onehunga has a rich history and strong community identity. The design references the connection through the public realm concept design. Eke Panuku and Resilio have been working with mana whenua to establish a set of guiding principles to inform the planning and design including:

-    Partnership and tikanga to be given effect throughout the Waiapu Precinct

-    Provide safe movement throughout the Waiapu Precinct

-    Visually celebrate mana whenua kōrero and history in Onehunga

-    Design process to be informed by mātauranga Māori

-    A coherent mana whenua cultural footprint to be established

19.     The design of the Waiapu public realm concept design has been undertaken by Resilio Studio in partnership with mana whenua appointed artist, Graham Tipene.

Concept Design

20.     The Waiapu Precinct public realm concept design addresses the themes from the 2020 community engagement as follows:

-    Improved north-south walking / cycling connection with additional planting through the Waiapu Precinct public realm to encourage active modes of transport between Onehunga Primary School and Onehunga Library.

-    Improved accessibility through the east-west link from Waiapu Precinct through Onehunga Mall to the expanded Dress Smart development at Paynes Lane, to make it safer and easy to navigate for all abilities.

-    Creation of a public play space that strengthens a sense of community, identity, and local character. The new 530m2 play space will include Māra Hūpara, physical movement, problem solving and imaginative space play as well as catering to all ages, abilities and preferences. 

-    Creation of seating and gathering spaces including a sheltered pavilion which provides a place to meet, rest or shelter between the proposed new supermarket and play space.

-    Realign the existing street network to reduce rat-running and improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists.

21.     The options around the spatial arrangement of the public realm and residential development sites were limited due to the position of existing mature native trees, the site topography and the Auckland Council open space policy which defines the upper limit of space that can be created as new public realm in this location. The subdivision consent was approved by council in December 2024, confirming the layout of the development sites, roading and public space.

22.     The existing planting will be complemented by additional native planting more appropriate for the location, requiring minimal maintenance and providing shading for the public realm spaces including the future play space.

 

Public engagement and consultation process

23.     On 28 November 2023, the Local Board endorsed the public engagement approach for Eke Panuku to take the public realm concept plan out for community consultation.

24.     As part of the engagement approach, Eke Panuku also created an awareness campaign of their role in Onehunga, sharing the wider Waiapu Precinct plans, including the proposed supermarket and future development sites, and outlining how delivery could take place such as car park changes, wayfinding and construction disruption plans. 

25.     The consultation sought views and feedback on the following questions:

-    Is there any type of play that you and your whānau would like to see included in the family play space?

-    We want to create spaces for people to meet, gather and spend time in Onehunga.  What would encourage you to spend time in these outdoor spaces?         

-    We want to make it easier and safer to walk between the school, library, supermarket and town centre. What are the main challenges you want addressed to make it safer and easier to access the town centre?

-    We want to keep many of the current trees and add new native plants.  Is there anything else you would like to see in these green spaces?

-    Is there anything about the proposed layout of parking and streets that you want to tell us?

26.     A total of 201 survey forms were gathered from: in-person events including two community info drop-in sessions and one business focused session; online feedback via the council ‘Have Your Say’ platform and from email, as well as hard copy feedback gathered via the Onehunga library display. Of the 201 gathered, 97% were submitted by individuals and 3% from businesses/organisations.

27.     Eke Panuku engaged with local stakeholders through the following methods:

-    targeted stakeholder sessions – particularly with surrounding businesses and property owners, Onehunga Primary School and the Onehunga Business Association.

-    print media advertising including posters, advertising in local newspapers, a flyer drop to residents, businesses and business owners in the neighbourhood.

-    information provided via the Auckland Council ‘Have Your Say’ platform and the Eke Panuku website.

-    distribution and display of a video through Eke Panuku and Local Board channels, the Dress Smart website, stakeholder websites and e-newsletters. It was also displayed on screens within Onehunga Library and Dress Smart.

-    drop-in sessions were held at Onehunga library, Dress Smart and a focused business session.

-    information displayed at Onehunga Library (hard copy information and video).

 

28.     Engagement occurred with a range of stakeholders through emails and meetings including:

-    Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

-    Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Ward Councillor

-    Maungakiekie MP

-    Aotea Sea Scouts

-    Be. Lab

-    Bike Auckland

-    CCS Disability Action

-    Dress Smart

-    Living Streets Aotearoa

-    Onehunga Business Association

-    Onehunga Community House

-    Onehunga Community Patrol

-    Onehunga District Council of Social Services (ODCOSS)

-    Onehunga Primary School and Onehunga High School

-    St Peter’s Anglican Church

-    The Onehunga Enhancement Society (TOES)

 

29.     The analysis of the feedback received is summarised below into key themes. See Appendix B for the full report.

Key Themes  

Feedback received  

Proposed response  

Play  

There is a desire to see the space activated through play for a range of ages, including children and older people. Inclusion of a water play feature was also raised. 

 

Protection from the sun and rain, particularly over seating and play areas. 

This playspace is part of a network of open spaces in Onehunga. We understand play for older ages will be primarily accommodated at Onehunga Bay Reserve, with the opportunity to add some to our future project, Te Pu Manawa Precinct (civic precinct).  

 

Water play features are not included in Waiapu Precinct given cost and maintenance requirements but could be explored for integration into the Te Pūmanawa  Precinct, enhancing the recreational offerings and opportunities.

Integrating the playspace within the existing tree canopy has the benefit of providing a shaded green edge and encourages natural play. We also acknowledge this has some challenges, in terms of leaf litter and appropriate play surfaces.   

Safety and Security 

Improvements to lighting for security and personal safety at night. 

 

Improved sight lines through the Precinct.  

The streets and laneways will have improved passive surveillance and sightlines aligned with CPTED principles. 

 

New lighting will be delivered to meet AS/NZS 1158 Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces that will improve current lighting and sense of safety. 

 

Investigations into the current CCTV town centre operations is planned, as well as exploring the possibility of linkages with the Onehunga Business Association’s CCTV sites, to assess feasibility and potential implementation strategies.

Amenities 

Many submitters were keen for adequate seating, tables, a water fountain and other facilities to enable them to have a picnic or catch-up with their friends in this area. 

A range of seating opportunities are proposed within the precinct. Within the central plaza or pavilion area, and playspace, bespoke seating will encourage picnics and social seating whereas the streetscapes will adopt bench style seating.   Benches with hand rests and backs will be situated under designated trees. 

 

Water Fountains will be provided near to the playspace and central plaza/pavilion space. 


Collaboration with council’s universal design team will ensure seating design caters to  wheelchair users and considers inclusivity aspects such as seating height, materials, and placement in the next design stage.

  

Access and parking 

Of the 161 submitters, 50 cited inadequate car parking and 17 supported its removal.  Comments also addressed street accessibility and desired reduced vehicle speeds.

One of the main design moves was to improve the way people can navigate through the precinct by improving the walking connections East-West and North-South to meet Universal Design accessibility.  As well as making it more simplified to access via a vehicle.

As residential development in the precinct may take time, some of the sites will have some interim works undertaken and will return to temporary car parks until required housing construction starts. 

Trees and planting  

More planting and colour to brighten the space. 

 

Submitters also want to see trees and green space prioritized.  Access to a grassed area was also raised.

Native trees are proposed for the design with low growing native planting proposed to avoid maintenance concerns.

  

While grass won't be included for maintenance reasons, there will be designated areas under trees where people can comfortably sit and enjoy the surroundings, creating a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere.

 

Once the project is completed and the asset is transferred to council, regular pruning and canopy lifting will be part of their scheduled maintenance to ensure tree health, safety standards, as well as sightlines are clear and unobstructed.

Toilets 

A desire for toilets near the play space particularly for families 

An assessment of the area indicates that toilet facilities can be accessed at the local library, the public toilets located on Onehunga Mall and through the future supermarket.   

 

We recognise the importance of providing facilities that cater to diverse needs and abilities. Consideration will be given to including an accessible bathroom, such as a Changing Places Bathroom, in the Te Pūmanawa Precinct project.

Unwelcoming space due to maintenance and being unclean  

Concern around the amount of rubbish, cleanliness and lack of maintenance within the Precinct. 

The design team will design a low maintenance space and will work with Council to ensure a suitable maintenance schedule is implemented.

  

Social problems and antisocial behaviour 

Majority of submitters raised the need to address social problems and antisocial behaviour occurring within the Precinct. 

Crime Prevention through Environmental Design Report (CPTED) is part of the design. The design will discourage these behaviours by creating a bright, refreshed space which will encourage positive activity. 

 

30.     Other themes raised that are not part of this project and will be considered in future project, or require wider discussions with other agencies: 

Safety concerns at the intersection of Arthur St and Selwyn St 

Safety concerns for all ages whether walking, cycling or travelling by vehicle 

This concern has been raised with Auckland Transport who are currently investigating possible solutions to improve this intersection 

Social problems and antisocial behaviour  

Many submitters expressed concern around the need to address vagrancy, begging and to improve safety  

Crime Prevention through Environmental Design Report (CPTED) is part of the design.  

Long-term solutions for these issues require a collaborative approach across government agencies, council family, community groups and the community.  

 

31.     The Onehunga Business Association is supportive of the Transform Onehunga programme and the proposed improvements in Waiapu Precinct and has advocated for delivery to get underway. Eke Panuku regularly engages with the business association.  During the public consultation, the business association’s feedback focused on the need for a balanced approach to parking, prioritisation of pedestrian needs through wider walkways and improved crossings, and the preservation of Onehunga's unique character. Other suggestions included the consideration of community gardens and public art installations to enrich green spaces, alongside measures to improve pedestrian safety and accessibility. Additionally, they advocated for upgrades to footpaths, traffic management solutions, clear signage, ample seating and shade, attractive landscaping, and the provision of essential amenities, all contributing to a more welcoming environment for residents, businesses, and visitors.

32.     Eke Panuku engaged with Onehunga Primary School, adjacent to Waiapu Precinct.  Their feedback emphasized their interest in having pedestrian safety prioritized around the school area, highlighting concerns such as dangerous intersections (Selwyn St), heavy traffic (Arthur St) and the need for well-maintained walkways.  This feedback will be provided to Auckland Transport for their consideration. The school also expressed a desire to collaborate in discussions around the school’s future capacity as planning and development evolves. Other feedback included consideration of education signage, seating areas and drinking fountains.

33.     Eke Panuku has engaged directly with affected property owners/tenants around the precinct, including St Peters Anglican Church, the mini golf operator and other local businesses.  Engagement has also occurred with organisations within the vicinity.

34.     In April 2024, Eke Panuku discussed the key findings from the community consultation and how these will be incorporated into the revised concept design with the local board at a workshop.

35.     The feedback received either confirms the approach we are taking with the design or are elements that can be incorporated into the design in the next phases.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     Eke Panuku programmes support regeneration of existing town centres by developing council under-utilised sites within urban areas close to transport links. A key element of this is ensuring improved access to public transport and enabling low carbon lifestyles. This project contributes to that by preparing under-utilised council sites for future residential development whilst improving connections to the town centre.

37.     Climate change is likely to subject the Onehunga area to higher temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought. We are seeking to future-proof our communities by accounting for climate change, factoring adaptation and resilience into the creation of buildings and space. Our infrastructure and developments will be designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events. This includes use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design for increased flood resilience, ecological and biodiversity benefits and provisions of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days. A significant number of existing trees will be retained to maintain canopy cover and proposed new plantings will contribute to the urban ngahere.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     This project is being developed with Auckland Transport input using workshops to ensure the design of streets and transport network changes meets their requirements, for those assets being vested to Auckland Transport.

36.     Community Facilities has been engaged from the beginning and have had input to the design outcomes for the public realm, including the play space, which will be vested with council.

37.     Eke Panuku has used the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to ensure that the design achieves the outcomes sought by the HLPP and the role of the Waiapu precinct development in supporting the transformation of the Onehunga Town Centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     Feedback on the Waiapu Precinct concept design was provided by the local board at workshops in March and November 2020, November 2021, March 2022, October 2023 and April 2024. The local board expressed support for the project at these workshops.

39.     In early engagement, the local board identified the following areas which were addressed in the public realm concept plan that was consulted on:

-    provision for public car parking.

-    a development that supports existing uses along Onehunga Mall and existing businesses within the area.

-    maintain the vehicle connection between Gerrard Beeson Place and Waiapu Lane.

-    relocate the play space closer to public gathering spaces.

-    provide a visual connection to the Te Pūmanawa o Onehunga Precinct (surrounding the library) that will form the “heart” of the Onehunga Town Centre.

-    Making the spaces easier for people with accessibility requirements.

40.     In the April 2024 Local Board workshop, Eke Panuku presented the key findings from the community consultation and how these will be considered in the developed design stage.  The following additional areas were also raised as areas for consideration: linkages to existing CCTV operations, access to electrical power, inclusion of accessible design, consideration of an education component within the landscaping, regular tree maintenance, way finding signage, possibility of grass, accessible bathrooms, and water play feature.  All of these items have been covered within this report.

41.     The public engagement report summarising the feedback received is located in Appendix B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     From the outset, Eke Panuku has worked with mana whenua to develop Māori design principles for this precinct. A cultural narrative was prepared and presented as well as a hikoi around Onehunga to give a wider historical context to the Waiapu Precinct. Workshops were also held with mana whenua to receive feedback.

43.     Extensive investigations of the site including the use of ground penetrating radar was utilised to ensure no significant artifacts or remains are likely to be disturbed.

44.     Mana whenua were involved in the appointment of mana whenua artist Graham Tipene (Ngati Whatua Orakei) to join the design team to allow local cultural narratives to be woven into the design detail. Eke Panuku will continue to ensure that cultural narratives and identity are reflected in public realm spaces. The natural environment has been captured in the design narratives with references to nearby lava caves and natural springs being worked into the design.

45.     Mana whenua have a keen interest in storytelling and are very supportive of the use of Kohatu Markers, sourced from within the site, for wayfinding.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     Project funding is being provided by Eke Panuku as part of the Onehunga programme.

50.     Subject to consenting approval, construction is programmed to start in November 2024.

Ng raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.    There were no known risks in consulting on the proposed design of the Waiapu public realm. Due to the more online format for consultation and engagement further measures and additional time was included in the approach so that these stakeholders and community members could be heard.

52.    The community was eager to understand some of the wider implications in delivering the masterplan, such as:

-    changes to car parking

-    any changes to mature trees

-    continuous supermarket offering

-    mini-golf operation

53.    Car parking will gradually change over time. During the phased delivery of the proposed supermarket, road infrastructure, public realm and development sites, car parking will be available throughout construction. The supermarket operator intends to include a significant number of car parking spaces within its basement facility. There is no express provision or control by council around this parking. Additionally, the supermarket operator will designate surface (forecourt) parking, primarily for parents, individuals with mobility needs, and on-line pick-up services, outside the main entrance of the supermarket and accessed off Gerrard Besson Place. Short-term surface car parking with also be available within the precinct, though the number will transition over time as development sites are sold.  Long-term or un-restricted car parking will be facilitated within the existing town centre, as identified in the Onehunga parking survey and subsequent Onehunga comprehensive parking management plan. Once the concept design is approved, Eke Panuku will move forward with the developed design, consenting and detailed design phases of the project.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.    The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will continue to be updated regularly on project progress through the development of design and construction. The construction start date is planned for late 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiapu Precinct Public Realm Concept Design

73

b

Waiapu Precinct Public Engagement Report

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Stewart Andrews – Senior Project Manager

Authorisers

Kate Cumberpatch - Priority Location Director

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

     

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 














































Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 















Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Review of the allocation table recording the allocation of decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities

File No.: CP2024/04101

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board input into the current review of the allocation table, which records the allocation of decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The “Decision-making responsibilities of Auckland Council’s Governing Body and local boards” document (Attachment A) records the allocation of decision-making responsibilities for the non-regulatory activities of Auckland Council, as determined by the Governing Body.   This document is also sometimes referred to as the “allocation table”.

3.       The allocation table is being routinely reviewed as part of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 process. In 2022, the allocation table was substantially reviewed to give local boards increased decision-making powers.

4.       There does not appear to be any need for substantive changes to the allocation table at this time. Feedback suggests that some parts of the current allocations are not clear, and minor amendments can be made to support a better understanding of the respective governance roles and responsibilities between the Governing Body and local boards.

5.       However, there is work needed on implementation actions to support the organisation to give better effect to the shared governance model. This is being advanced through the Joint Governance Working Party’s (JGWP) enquiry into the Mayor’s proposal for more empowered local boards.

6.       Local boards are being asked to provide feedback on the review of the allocation table that will go to the Governing Body for consideration, prior to being adopted for inclusion in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide its input into the current review of the allocation table, recording the allocation of decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 (LGACA) provides that both the Governing Body and local boards are responsible and democratically accountable for the decision-making of Auckland Council, and that where responsibility rests depends on the nature of the decision being made.

8.       Section 15 of LGACA sets out the classes of decisions that the Governing Body make, and section 16 sets out the classes of decisions that local boards make. Both sections include a class of decisions in respect of non-regulatory activities of the council. LGACA requires that the Governing Body allocate decision-making responsibility for these non-regulatory decisions to either itself or local boards in accordance with the principles set out in section 17.

9.       The “Decision-making responsibilities of Auckland Council’s Governing Body and local boards” (also known as the “allocation table”) records the allocation of decision-making responsibilities for the non-regulatory activities of Auckland Council, as determined by the Governing Body. The allocation table is included in the long-term plan and each year’s annual plan. The current allocation table is attached at Attachment A.

10.     The overarching intent of the document is to empower local boards to make decisions that reflect the needs and preferences of diverse local communities while ensuring that the Governing Body is able to fulfil its statutory decision-making responsibilities and make decisions regionally, where to do so will better promote the well-being of communities across Auckland.

11.     The allocation table is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all allocated decision-making because of the broad range of Auckland Council’s activities and the nuances within those. Allocation of decision-making is therefore applied on a case-by-case basis, with the allocation table used as a starting point.

12.     The allocation table was last reviewed in 2022 where substantial updates were made to provide local boards with increased decision-making powers, in alignment with the Governance Framework Review work.

13.     The allocation table is routinely reviewed as part of every long-term plan process and included in the final long-term plan. However, changes to decision-making responsibilities can be made at any time via a new allocation decision (by the Governing Body) or a delegation.

Empowering Local Boards

14.     Consequently, allocated decision-making will continue to be considered in the context of the “More Empowered Local Boards” workstream, which is being led by the Joint Governance Working Party (JGWP) and reported recently to local boards. This recognises that empowerment includes allocated decision-making, but that there are other levers to consider, including:

·    delegated and statutory decision-making powers

·    how well information and advice enable governors to utilise their powers

·    the skills and knowledge staff need to give effect to the governance model

·    whether updates are required to other policies, systems and processes to reflect more empowered local boards.

15.     Local boards resolved their feedback related to empowerment at their March business meetings and this will be reported to the JGWP’s 6 May meeting. Feedback related to the allocation of decision-making responsibility will be considered within the scope of this current review.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Informal feedback on the current allocation table from elected members and relevant business units was used to identify the scope of the review. Feedback suggests that the allocation table is still leading to confusion around governance roles and responsibilities. In practice many activities require both regional and local decisions, and there is actual and perceived complexity in giving effect to allocated decision-making.

17.     Aside from an anomaly related to disposal decisions, the current review does not recommend any substantive changes to decision-making allocation. Some amendments are proposed to the text to help aid interpretation and flow. These include:

·    refining the introductory text

·    minor wording amendments to help make more explicit the governance roles and responsibilities

·    closely aligning activity descriptions to the Groups of Activities in the long-term plan.

18.     A key focus is on implementing the allocation table to help the organisation give better effect to allocated decision-making in practice. This includes:

·    reviewing other relevant documents that may require updates

·    considering training and guidance needs for staff

·    awareness raising through communications and engagement.

19.     Local board delegations are also scheduled to be reviewed separately.

Further consideration is required for some parks disposals

20.     An issue has been raised with decision-making around some parks disposals. Table 1 shows the current position in terms of decision-making around different types of parks-related decisions.

Table 1: Decision-making responsibility for asset acquisitions and disposals

Type of decision

Current decision-maker

Basis for decision-making

Current constraints / process

Acquisition

Acquisition of local community assets (e.g. local parks, local community facilities)

Local boards

Allocation

Subject to budget parameters agreed with Governing Body

Acquisition of regional assets (e.g. stormwater assets, regional parks, regional facilities)

Governing Body

Allocation

Decisions made by relevant committee (as per GB terms of reference)

Disposal

Disposal as part of land exchange

Needs to be clarified

Disposal of service properties

Local boards

Delegation (from GB – statutory responsibility)

Service property optimisation framework

Disposal of non-service properties

Governing Body

Statutory responsibility

Asset recycling programme

21.    The report to the Governing Body in 2021 [GB/2021/67] provided the policy intent of the changes to the current allocation table which was to allow local boards to make decisions relating to acquisition of new assets.

22.     Historically, disposal decisions have been treated as sitting with the Governing Body (as a statutory responsibility). But this is difficult in practice where local boards make acquisition decisions as part of a land exchange, but not the related disposal decision.

23.     Work is underway to consider whether, from a policy perspective, local boards should be able to make both the acquisition and disposal decision as part of land exchanges, and whether this should be allocated or delegated.

Clarifying decision-making over stormwater activities in relation to local parks activities

24.     Current landowner approvals processes for council-led stormwater activities do not align with the existing allocation table and the LGACA. This has contributed to inefficiencies where a part of council wants to undertake a stormwater activity on council land.

25.     Council’s stormwater, flood resilience and water quality activities are generally regional in nature. As per the current allocation table, decision-making for all these activities sits with the Governing Body to ensure a coordinated, consistent approach across the network and integration with other regulatory related decisions. This position remains the same regardless of how the land is held – whether as a regional or local asset.

26.     Under the allocation table, local boards are allocated decision-making responsibilities for local parks. Staff are not proposing any changes to the allocated responsibilities of local boards and consider that the explanatory note in the allocation table adequately explains how the overlap in responsibilities will be managed. This states “[t]he decision-making of local boards in relation to local parks may be constrained where decisions relate to council stormwater management activities, including the stormwater network”.

27.     Under the local board delegation protocols, Land Advisory staff have been delegated responsibility for land use consents. Staff have interpreted this mandate to be broad, because of the broad responsibilities of local boards for determining ‘use of and activities within local parks’. The delegation protocols require that staff consult with local boards before making these decisions and refer the matter to them if the local board calls the delegation in as the “landowner”.

28.     However, this is contrary to the LGACA, where decision-making responsibilities are allocated for particular activities (as opposed to categories of land) and the land remains owned by Auckland Council.

29.     Therefore, in line with the allocation table, Healthy Waters, instead of Land Advisory, will now seek the views of local boards before taking a decision on whether to proceed with the proposed stormwater works. The experience of local boards should not be different to consultations over landowner approval applications. The only difference will be the local board’s ability to ‘call in’ a decision.

30.     This revised process is consistent with the allocation of decision-making responsibility for stormwater activities to the Governing Body (and Healthy Waters under delegation).

31.     When a stormwater activity is proposed to occur on a local park, staff will carefully consider the views and preferences of local boards and will be mindful of other local activities on parks when making decisions, consistent with the process previously undertaken by Land Advisory. Similarly, there is still potential for escalation of decision-making where the proposal is not supported by the relevant local board. Diagram 1 outlines this process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagram 1: Decision-making process for stormwater activities

32.     Staff recommend that this process be reviewed with local boards in six months’ time. Any issues arising will be considered through the next annual review of the allocation table or, through the local board delegation protocols which are due to be reviewed later this year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     There are no climate impacts associated with local boards providing their feedback.

34.     Climate impacts for individual decisions by way of the application of non-regulatory decision-making are determined on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     Feedback was sought from relevant business units who give effect to the allocation of non-regulatory activities through provision of advice.

36.     Key themes from their feedback are as follows:

·    The need to be more explicit on the extent of the local board / Governing Body role, where there are overlaps and limitations are not made clear.

·    Some activities could be further specified e.g. priority locations for development, place-shaping vs place-making etc.

·    Work to ensure staff understand where decision-making responsibility sits, and how best to give effect to the shared governance principles in practice.

·    More guidance and definitions would help to understand the nature of decision-making.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     Local board views are being sought through this report.

38.     Local impacts for individual decisions by way of the application of non-regulatory decision-making are determined on a case-by-case basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     There are no Māori impacts associated with local boards providing their feedback.

40.     Māori impacts for individual decisions by way of the application of non-regulatory decision-making are determined on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     There are no financial implications associated with local boards providing their feedback.

42.     Financial implications for individual decisions by way of the application of non-regulatory decision-making are determined on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     There are limited risks associated with local boards providing their feedback. The main risks are outlined in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Risk identification and mitigation

Main risks

Consequence

Likelihood

Comments and risks management strategies

Delay in adoption of the refreshed allocation table

Medium

Low

The allocation table must be adopted by the Governing Body by the end of May to meet the LTP timeframes. Careful project management is in place to ensure milestones are met.

Local boards are not satisfied with the scope of their decision-making powers

Medium

Medium

Local board views will continue to be considered as part of the “Empowering Local Boards” workstream. A range of levers will be considered as to how to empower local boards. This includes, but is not limited to, allocated decision-making.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Local board feedback will be assessed to inform final recommendations on the review of the allocation table.

45.     All feedback will be reported to the Governing Body for their consideration, before the Governing Body is asked to adopt the refreshed allocation table at their meeting on 30 May.

46.     The allocation table will be included in volume two of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

47.     Staff will implement activities that support the organisation to give effect to the allocation table. These activities include developing guidance, considering learning and development needs, and outreach to relevant business units via communications and engagement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Decision-making responsibilities of Auckland Council's Governing Body and local boards

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Christie McFadyen, Principal Advisor – Governance Strategy

Authoriser

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 









Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Long Term Pan 2024-2034: local board consultation feedback and input

File No.: CP2024/04729

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive consultation feedback from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area on:

·    proposed priorities, activities and advocacy initiatives for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Agreement 2024/2025

·    regional topics for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

2.       To recommend any local matters or advocacy initiatives to the Governing Body, that they will need to consider or make decisions on in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 process.

3.       To provide input on the proposed regional topics in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       Local board agreements set out annual funding priorities, activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and initiatives for each local board area. Local board agreements for 2024/2025 will be included in the Council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

5.       Auckland Council publicly consulted from 28 February to 28 March 2024 to seek community views on the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034. This included consultation on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s proposed priorities for 2024/2025 to be included in their local board agreement, and key priorities and advocacy initiatives for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

6.       Auckland Council received 27,600 submissions in total across the region and 1073 submissions from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area.

·    52 percent of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki community supported the central or pay more, get more scenarios, with 38 per cent supporting the pay less, do less scenario.

·    69 per cent of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki community supported all or most of the local board priorities for 25/24 and advocacy initiatives for the Long-term Plan.  

7.       In the Long-term Plan process there are matters where local boards provide recommendations to the Governing Body, for consideration or decision-making. This includes any local board advocacy initiatives. The Governing Body will consider these items as part of the Long-term Plan decision-making process in May/June 2024:

·    any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·    any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds

·    any other local board advocacy initiatives.

8.       Local boards have a statutory responsibility to provide input into regional strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive consultation feedback on the proposed Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board priorities and activities for 2024/2025 and key advocacy initiatives for 2024-2034.

b)      receive consultation feedback on regional topics in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 from people and organisations based in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area.

c)       recommend any new or amended Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates to the Governing Body.

d)      provide input on regional topics in the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034 and advocacy initiatives to the Governing Body.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Each financial year Auckland Council must have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board) for each local board area. The local board agreement sets out how the Council will reflect priorities in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2023 in respect of the local activities to be provided in the local board area, and also includes information relating to budgets, levels of service, and performance measures.

10.     The local board agreements 2024/2025 will form part of the Auckland Council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

11.     Auckland Council publicly consulted from 28 February to 28 March 2024 to seek community views on the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.  The consultation content included information on regional proposals to be decided by the Governing Body, and information on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s proposed priorities for 2024/2025 to be included in their local board agreement, and key local board priorities and advocacy initiatives for 2024-2034.

12.     Auckland Council is facing key financial challenges including adapting to economic fluctuations, paying for growth, the rising cost of asset ownership, storm response and resilience and a limited funding system. To address this, strategic choices and direction must be made in the council’s proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

13.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility to identify and communicate the interests and preferences of people in their local board area in relation to the content of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This report includes analysis of consultation feedback, any local matters to be recommended to the Governing Body and seeks input on regional topics in the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

Consultation feedback overview 

15.     As part of the public consultation for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Auckland Council used a variety of methods and channels to reach and engage a broad cross section of Aucklanders to gain their feedback and input into regional and local topics.

16.     In total, Auckland Council received feedback from 27,960 people in the consultation period. Approximately 22,000 was from individual submissions, with over 5,000 from pro forma campaigns, over 350 organisations and over 20 Māori entities. This feedback was received through:

·    written feedback – 27% hard copy and 42% online forms, 2% emails and letters 29% other.

·    in person – at Have Your Say events (one of which was held in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area).

17.     All feedback will be made available on an Auckland Council webpage called “Submissions on the Long-term Plan 2024-2034” and will be accessible after 24 April 2024 through the following link: https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/long-term-plan-2024-2034-consultation-feedback 

 

Feedback received on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s priorities for 2024/2025 and the Long-term Plan 2024-2034

18.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board consulted on the following priorities for 2024/2025:

·    Local community grants. Support community groups and community-led activities by continuing to provide local community grants

·    Supporting community and sporting groups to succeed. Building the capacity and capability of local community and sporting groups towards long-term sustainable funding models and independence through our strategic partnerships programme

·    Community delivered events. Empowering community groups and organisations to deliver community events through sustainable funding models

·    Protect and restore our waterways. Collaborate with mana whenua and neighbouring local boards to protect and restore our waterways through Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum and Manukau Harbour Forum

·    Community and rangatahi / youth led climate action. Encourage our rangatahi / youth and community to be leaders in climate action. For example, through programmes like Tiakina te taiao and Ope (biodiversity and climate action education programme in schools), Love Your Neighbourhood (environmental volunteer grants) and Songbird programmes (community pest control and biodiversity initiative)

·    Support local business associations. (Support business associations to continue supporting local businesses and ongoing growth, development and liveliness of town centres, including assisting Onehunga Business Associations proposed BID expansion)

19.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board consulted on the following local priorities for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034:

·    prioritise developing local plans and implement when funding allows

·    investigate options to progress upgrades of our precincts, delivering quality mixed-use areas for our community, including partnering with external organisations to leverage funding

·    continue to deliver local climate action programmes, enabling Māori, community and rangatahi to lead

·    support local groups to lead programmes and initiatives for the community

·    support building capacity and capability of community and sporting groups, brokering opportunities for sustainable funding

·    support community-led and externally funded initiatives that empower and upskill local rangatahi and people who are not yet in education, employment, or training

·    support social enterprise and innovation projects that have a positive social or environmental impact and promotes a circular economy, such as Onehunga and Tāmaki Community Recycling Centres

·    work with business associations to encourage business resiliency and business continuity planning, and to support the ongoing growth, development and liveliness of town centres.

20.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board also consulted on the following key advocacy initiatives that sit outside local board decision-making:

·    Equity and accessibility to guide Auckland Council’s decision-making, focusing our investment on areas that have infrastructure gaps and supporting the communities that need it most

·    Enabling effective increased decision-making for local boards, with appropriate staffing resources, more regional demolition funding and ability to determine how renewals funding is utilised and how growth funding is allocated across our community

·    Confirmation in the 10-year Budget for funding to redevelop:

Panmure multiuse facility

Onehunga Recreation Centre

Ruapōtaka Marae

·    Long-term continuation of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund with funding restored to previous levels

·    Equitable investment for Manukau Harbour and Tāmaki Estuary

·    Support infrastructure upgrades to mitigate flooding

·    Remove the residential Onehunga KiwiRail designation for the Avondale Southdown connection to give the Onehunga community certainty that there will not be significant disruption of the Onehunga community through this designation.

21.     1073 submissions were received on Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s priorities for and key advocacy initiatives. There is majority support for all six local board priorities with feedback indicating that the priorities were Very Important or Fairly Important.

22.     Consultation feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the local board when approving their local board agreement between 11-14 June 2024. Local board key advocacy initiatives will be considered in the current report.

Information on submitters

Key themes

23.     Key themes of note across the feedback received (through written and in-person channels) included:

·    support for the local boards community and youth focus

·    request for focusing spending on core local board and council business

·    support for environmental priorities

·    request to reduce costs and rates

 

Overview of feedback received on regional topics in the Long-term Plan from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area

24.     The proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034 sets out Auckland Council’s priorities and how to pay for them. Consultation on the proposed Long-term Plan asked submitters to respond to key questions on the following:

1.   Overall direction for Long-term Plan

2.   Transport plan

3.   North Harbour Stadium

4.   Major Investments:

a.   Creating an Auckland Future Fund using the Auckland International Airport shareholding

b.   Options relating to the future of Port of Auckland (includes options c. and d.)

5.   Port Land

6.   Changes to other rates, fees and charges.

 

25.     Submitters were also encouraged to give feedback on any of the other matters included in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 consultation document.

26.     The submissions received from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area on these key issues are summarised below, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

Key Question 1: Overall direction for Long-term Plan

27.     Aucklanders were asked about the overall proposed direction for council services and investment over the next ten years. This included the ‘central proposal’ alongside alternative options of ‘pay more, get more’ and ‘pay less, get less’ in seven areas of council-funded service and activities. These seven areas are their associated options are described in detail in the consultation document available at Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Consultation Document from pages 22-27 and included:

·    Transport - Roads, public transport and safety improvements across the transport network

·    Water - Managing stormwater to minimise flooding and protect waterways

·    City and local development - Delivering urban regeneration and lead development of the city centre

·    Environment and regulation - Protecting and restoring the natural environment

·    Parks and community - A wide range of arts, sports, recreation, library and community services including a fair level of funding for local boards (see section on fairer funding for local boards below)

·    Economic and cultural development - Major events funding and economic development

·    Council support - Supporting the delivery of services, enabling effective governance, emergency management and grants to regional amenities.

28.     The central proposal would see annual rates increases for the average value residential property set at 7.5 per cent in year one, 3.5 per cent in year two, 8.0 per cent in year three and no more than 3.5 per cent for the years after that. Over the 10-year period 2024-2034, the central proposal would provide for a capital investment programme of $39.3 billion and $72.0 billion of operational spending.

29.     The central proposal, and alternative options of ‘pay more, get more’ and ‘pay less, get less’ scenarios are outlined in Table 1 below.

Table 1 - The central proposal and the ‘pay more, get more’ and ‘pay less, get less’ scenarios

Annual rates increase for average value resident property

Pay less and get less

Central proposal

Pay more and get more

Year 1

5.5 per cent

7.5 per cent

14 per cent

Year 2

3.5 per cent

3.5 per cent

10 per cent

Year 3

3.5 per cent

8.0 per cent

10 per cent

Later years

No more than 1 per cent above CPI inflation thereafter

No more than 3.5 per cent for the years after that

5 per cent for the years after that

CAPEX

$33.5b

$39.3b

$52.0b

OPEX

$69.2b

$72.0b

$76.5b

30.     The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

31.     Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area gave feedback as follows:

Do less (reduce council services/ investment), with lower rates increases and some debt

 

 

Proceed with the central proposal

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

Do more (increase council services/investment), with higher rates increases, and some debt

·     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Trust

·     Te Kawerau Iwi Tiaki Trust 

Other

 

·     Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

·     Ngātiwai Trust Board

I don’t know

 

 

Key Question 2: Transport Plan

32.     Aucklanders were asked for feedback on a proposal to work with government to make progress toward an integrated transport plan for Auckland with a proposed total capital spend of $13.4 billion for Auckland Transport over 10 years.

33.     This would include:

·    making public transport faster, more reliable and easier to use by investing in rapid transit network actions, such as making it easier to pay, including introducing capped weekly public transport passes

·    network optimisation, reducing temporary traffic management requirements and introducing dynamic lanes

·    stopping some initiatives previously planned such as some raised pedestrian crossings and cycleways.

34.     The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

35.     Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area gave feedback as follows:

Support all of the proposal

 

 

Support most of the proposal

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

Do not support most of the proposal

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

Do not support any of the proposal

 

I don’t know

 

 

Key Question 3: North Harbour Stadium

36.     Aucklanders were asked for feedback on options for the future of North Harbour Stadium precinct. The options set out were:

1.   to keep the stadium precinct as it is now, and maintain it at a cost of $33 million over 10 years

2.   redevelop the stadium precinct funded through reallocation of this $33 million, the sale of some stadium precinct land while retaining the existing community playing fields and any other external funding available

3.   change the operational management of the stadium to ensure greater use by the community (noting that this option could be considered in addition to either option 1 or 2).

37.     The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

38.     Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area gave feedback as follows:

Keep the stadium precinct as it is

 

 

Consider redeveloping the stadium precinct

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

Change the operational management

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

Other

·     Te Kawerau Iwi Tiaki Trust

I don’t know

 

 

Key Question 4a: Major Investments: Auckland Future Fund and Auckland International Airport Limited shares

39.     Aucklanders were asked to provide feedback on a proposal to establish a diversified investment fund for Auckland (the Auckland Future Fund) in order to spread the risk of council’s investments over a range of different assets in different locations. The proposal includes the transfer of council’s shareholding of just over 11 per cent in Auckland International Airport Limited (AIAL) to the fund to enable the subsequent sale of any or all the shares by the fund manager.

40.     The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

41.     Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area gave feedback as follows:

Proceed with the proposal

 

Don’t proceed with establishing an Auckland Future Fund and transferring AIAL shareholding

·     Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

Other

 

I don’t know

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Key Question 4b: Major Investments: Port of Auckland

42.     Aucklanders were also asked for their feedback on options for the future of Port of Auckland.  The two options identified were:

1.   retain underlying ownership of the port land and wharves, and lease the operation of the port for a period of about 35 years with the upfront payment from the lease invested in the proposed Auckland Future Fund.

2.   retain underlying ownership of the port land and wharves with the Port of Auckland Limited continuing to operate the port and  implement their plan to deliver improved profitability and dividends.

Key Question 4c: Major Investments: Port of Auckland

43.     It was noted that if the council group continues to operate the port through Port of Auckland Limited, it could continue to use the profits and dividends from the port to fund council services, or it could invest the profits and dividends in the proposed Auckland Future Fund.

Key Question 4d: Major Investments: Port of Auckland

44.     People were also encouraged to give feedback on other aspects of the proposal, including in relation to self-insurance, and implementation options for the proposed Auckland Future Fund and possible changes to the council’s shareholding in Port of Auckland Limited and to the ownership of the Port Land.

45.     The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

Key Question 4b

Key Question 4c

46.     Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area gave feedback as follows:

Key Question 4b

Retain underlying council ownership of port land and wharves, and continue council group operation of the port (through Port of Auckland Limited), and implement the plan to deliver improved profitability and more dividends to council

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

Retain underlying council ownership of port land and wharves, and lease the operation of the port for a period of about 35 years and use the upfront payment from the lease to invest in the proposed Auckland Future Fund

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

Other

 

I don’t know

 

Key Question 4c

Continue to use it to fund council services

 

Invest in the proposed Auckland Future Fund

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

Other

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

I don’t know

 

 

Key Question 5: Port Land

47.     Aucklanders were asked for their feedback on a proposal whereby some land and wharves currently used for port operations could be transferred to Auckland Council and used for something else that provides public benefit. This could include the creation of some new public spaces and/or new waterfront residential or commercial developments.

48.     Captain Cook and Marsden wharves could be transferred to council within 2-5 years provided that resource consent can be obtained for work at the Bledisloe Terminal. These works are required to allow some port operations to be moved and would cost around $110 million, but otherwise there would be no significant impact on the operations or value of the port.

49.     The Bledisloe Terminal site could be freed up and transferred to council for use in another way within 15 years. However, this would significantly reduce the scale of port operations in Auckland with many shipments needing to be transported into the Auckland by truck or rail. It would also lower the value of the proposed port lease by an estimated $300m or reduce the future profits and dividends the council earns from the port.

50.     The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

Captain Cook and Marsden wharves

Bledisloe Terminal

51.     Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area gave feedback as follows:

Captain Cook and Marsden wharves

Proceed with the proposal to transfer Captain Cook and Marsden wharves from the port to Auckland Council so they can be used for something else that provides public benefit

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

No change – leave Captain Cook and Marsden wharves to be managed as part of the port operations

 

Other

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

I don’t know

 

Bledisloe Terminal

Keep Bledisloe Terminal as a Port of Auckland operational area

 

Transfer Bledisloe Terminal to council to be used for something else, that provides public benefit, within 15 years

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

Other

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

I don’t know

 

 

Key Question 6: changes to other rates, fees and charges

52.     Aucklanders were asked for feedback on proposed changes to business rates, targeted rates and charges as set out below.

Waste management rates changes

53.     Auckland Council is proposing to continue the planned roll out of rates funded refuse collections to the North Shore, Waitākere and Papakura in 2024/2025, and Franklin and Rodney in 2025/2026 replacing the current pay as you throw service, and consequent rates change. During the rollout it is proposed the refuse targeted rate will be applied to properties in these areas based on the approximate number of months the rates funded service is available to them.

54.     It is also proposed to adjust the Waste Management Targeted Rates in 2024/2025 to maintain cost recovery levels and to re-introduce recycling charges for schools.

Changes to other rates, fees and charges

55.     Other proposed changes to rates and fees and charges included in the consultation document for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 include:

·    Resuming the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) and extend it to 2034/2035 to continue to invest in the protection of native ecosystems and species

·    Resuming the full Water Quality Targeted Rate (WQTR) and extend it to 2034/2035 at a level that only covers the annual programme operating and interest costs. This ensures water quality improvements in harbours and streams across the region can be funded but at a lower amount for next year than previously planned

·    Broadening the description of bus services funded by the Climate Action Transport Targeted Rate (CATTR) to reduce the need to consult each year for minor changes to the bus programme

·    Discontinue the Long-Term Differential Strategy which gradually lowers the share of general rates paid by businesses and raises the share paid by other ratepayers, and raise the share of the NETR, WQTR and CATTR paid by businesses to align to the share of general rates paid by businesses

·    Changing the Rodney Drainage Districts Targeted Rate to reflect public feedback and updated analysis of the benefits to properties and boundaries

·    Increasing the Waitākere Rural Sewerage Targeted Rate from $296.75 to $336.80 (per year) for the 2024/2025, 2025/2026, and 2026/2027 years to maintain cost recovery in the three-year contract cycle, and avoid an annual subsidy of around $117,000 from general rates.

56.     The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

NETR

WQTR

CATTR

Long Term Differential Strategy

Re-introducing recycling charges for schools

Rates funded refuse collection roll out

57.     Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area gave feedback as follows:

Proposal

Support

Do not support

Resuming the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) and extending it to 2034/2035

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

·     Te Kawerau Iwi Tiaki Trust

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

Resuming the Water Quality Targeted Rate (WQTR) and extending it to 2034/2035

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

·     Te Kawerau Iwi Tiaki Trust

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

Broadening the description of bus services funded by the Climate Action Transport Targeted Rate (CATTR) to reduce the need to consult each year for minor changes to the bus programme

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

·     Te Kawerau Iwi Tiaki Trust

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

Discontinuing the Long-Term Differential Strategy and raising the share of NETR, WQTR and CATTR paid by businesses to align with their share of the general rate

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

Applying the Recycling Targeted Rate to all schools

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

Continuing the planned roll out of rates funded refuse collections to the North Shore, Waitākere and Papakura in 2024/2025, and Franklin and Rodney in 2025/2026

·     Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

·     Ngāti Tamaoho

 

58.     In addition to most other fees and charges which will be adjusted in line with inflation, there are also specific changes to the fees outlined below:

·    new fees to recover the cost of processing new requirements under the Building (Dam Safety) Regulations 2022

·    increased deposit levels for a number of consenting fees

·    an increase to film-permitting fees to adjust for cumulative inflation since 2015. It is also proposed that this fee is adjusted for inflation yearly

·    adjusted fees for all services provided from pool and leisure centres to ensure an appropriate level of cost recovery

·    baseline fees across similar venue hire and bookable spaces so that they are charged appropriately. This includes community halls, community centres, art centres and bookable library spaces.

59.     There was one submissions from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area which referenced these fees and it was against an increase.

Other matters for feedback

60.     The following proposals were also included in the consultation in the Long-term Plan:

Draft Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025

·    Aucklanders were asked to feedback on the draft Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025 which sets out a framework in which the council must carry out the routine management of 14 Tūpuna Maunga it asked not to fund the removal of trees from maunga.

Fairer funding for Local Boards (Local Board Funding Policy)

61.     Auckland Council is proposing to shift to a fairer funding model, where some local boards will receive additional funding to deliver for their communities. Other local boards, where there is a disparity of funding, would need to make changes in their priorities to manage within a reduced budget. The proposal is to address local board funding equity through the first three years of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

62.     The central proposal is to achieve this through a 50/50 combination approach, i.e., reallocating some existing funding between local boards and providing some new funding ($20 million opex and $30 million capex) over the first three years of the LTP 2024-2034.

63.     As the extent of funding disparity between local boards is significant, and the council’s capacity for new funding is limited, the proposal is for 18 local boards to be within 5 per cent of their equitable funding levels (opex and capex) by year three of the LTP 2024-2034. Of the 21 local boards, three local boards will remain funded above their equitable levels but to a lesser degree than current levels.

64.     A fixed funding allocation is proposed for Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Island Local Boards, who will be allocated 1 per cent and 2 per cent of the available funding respectively, given their smaller population sizes.

65.     These changes would require an amendment to the Local Board Funding Policy.

66.     In addition to the central proposal being put forward, there are also scenarios to 'pay more, get more' and 'pay less, get less'. Under the ‘pay more, get more’ scenario no reallocation among local boards would be required. A funding uplift would be provided to get all local boards to their equitable funding levels. To achieve full equity under this option, close to $900 million would be required in additional operating funding and about $1 billion in capital funding over 10-years.

67.     To achieve local board funding equity under the ‘pay less, get less’ scenario, where no additional funding would be available, a significant reallocation would be required from local boards that are currently funded above their equitable level of funding to boards who receive lesser funding. Local boards that could lose funding may not be able to deliver projects previously agreed, asset renewals or services without increasing fees, imposing local targeted rates or rationalising assets.

68.     There were seven submissions from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area which referenced and supported fairer funding.

Any other feedback

69.     Aucklanders were asked if they had any other comments. Key themes of note across other areas of feedback received included:

·    concerns regarding safety, security and neighbourhood tidiness

·    value for money, focus on the core services and infrastructure

·    continue investment in sport and recreation

·    Council needs to be more local, but avoiding duplication and bureaucracy

·    downsize CCOs / provide better accountability.

 

Recommendations on local matters 

70.     This report allows the local board to recommend local matters to the Governing Body for consideration as part of the Long-term Plan process, in May 2024. This includes:

·    any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·    any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds

·    local advocacy initiatives.

Local targeted rate and business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals

71.     Local boards are required to endorse any new or amended locally targeted rate proposals or business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals in their local board area. Note that these proposals must have been consulted on before they can be implemented.

72.     Local boards then recommend these proposals to the Governing Body for approval of the targeted rate. 

73.     An expansion of the Onehunga Business Improvement District (BID). (Note a separate business meeting report will be coming to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for feedback).

Funding for Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

74.     Local boards are allocated funding for local driven initiatives (LDI) annually, to spend on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. Local boards have decision-making over the LDI funds but need approval from the Governing Body where:

·    the release of local board specific reserve funds is requested, which are being held by the council for a specific purpose

·    a LDI capital project exceeds $1 million.

75.     These conditions do not apply to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Local board advocacy

76.     Local boards can also agree advocacy initiatives which considers the consultation feedback above. This allows the Governing Body to consider these advocacy items when making decisions on the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 in May. 

77.     The advocacy initiatives approved by the local board will then be included as an appendix to the 2024/2025 Local Board Agreement

Local board input on regional topics in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034

78.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws, and any proposed changes to be made to them. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

79.     Local board plans reflect community priorities and preferences and are key documents that guide the development of local board agreements (LBAs), local board annual work programmes, and local board input into regional plans such as the Long-term Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

80.     The decisions recommended in this report are part of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 and local board agreement process to approve funding and expenditure over the next 10 years.

81.     Projects allocated funding through this Long-term Plan process will all have varying levels of potential climate impact associated with them. The climate impacts of projects Auckland Council chooses to progress, are all assessed carefully as part of council’s rigorous reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

82.     The Long-term Plan 2024-2034 is an Auckland Council Group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

83.     The local board’s decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. The local board has a statutory role in providing its feedback on regional plans.

84.     Local boards play an important role in the development of the council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034. Local board agreements form part of the Long-term Plan. Local board chairs have also attended Budget Committee workshops on the Long-term Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

85.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact Māori. Local board agreements and the Long-term Plan are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori Outcomes.

86.     Local board plans, developed in 2023 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local board area priorities.

87.     There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations enable local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and areas of mutual interest. Ongoing relationships influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

88.     Some projects approved for funding could have discernible impacts on Māori. For any project or programme progressed by Auckland Council, the potential impacts on Māori, will be assessed as part of relevant reporting requirements.

89.     Analysis of consultation feedback received on the proposed Long-term Plan includes submissions made by mana whenua, matawaaka organisations and the wider Māori community who have interests in the rohe / local board area.

90.     Ngā Mātārae led the council-wide approach to engagement with Māori entities.  This included:

·    Two information sessions for mana whenua

·    One information session for mataawaka organisations

·    Two submission workshops (to provide help with developing submissions)

·    A hearing style event for mana whenua, Māori organisations and community groups.

91.     Nineteen mana whenua entities have interests in the Auckland Council rohe. 14 of the 19 responded to the Auckland Council’s proposals for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

92.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board engaged locally with Māori through direct email contact and via the centrally led engagement.

93.     Māori comprise 14% of the population in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.  51 submissions from people who identify as Māori were received from people residing in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area. 

94.     The following mana whenua and mataawaka organisations gave feedback on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board priorities:

·    Wāhine Relative Limited (Wāhine Māori)

·    Rangatahi Ora Submission, organisation: Mad Ave Community Trust

·    Te Kaha O Te Rangatahi

·    The Synergy Projects

·    Panama Riverside Friends Society Incorporated

95.     Key themes in feedback received from Māori entities:

·    supported local board priorities, indicating that they were all ‘very important’ or ‘fairly important’

·    highlighted alignment of priorities in environment, cultural recognition, heritage, community

·    expressed a need to focus on:

for Māori to have a voice and have a say in decision making

importance of te reo Māori

access for Māori to funding opportunities and technology

homelessness.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

96.     The local board provides input to regional plans and proposals. There is information in the council’s consultation material for each plan or proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

97.     The council must adopt its Long-term Plan, which includes local board agreements, by 30 June 2024. The local board is required to make recommendations on these local matters for the Long-term Plan by mid May 2024, to enable and support the Governing Body to make decisions on key items to be included in the Long-term Plan on 16 May 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

98.   Recommendations and feedback from the local board will be provided to the relevant Governing Body committee for consideration as part of decision-making for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

99.     The local board will approve its local content for inclusion in the final Long-term Plan 2024-2034 (including its local board agreement) and corresponding work programmes in June 2024.

100.   The final Long-term Plan 2024-2034 (including local board agreements) will be adopted by the Governing Body on 27 June 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mal Ahmu - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Local Board Views on Proposed Plan Change 96 - Open Space and Other Rezoning Matters (2024)

File No.: CP2024/03767

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite local board views on the Council initiated Proposed Plan Change 96 – Open Space and Other Rezoning Matters (2024).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on plan changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan change, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       The Plan and Places Department prepare open space plan changes every two to three years to update the zoning of open space in the AUP. Proposed Plan Change 96 – Open Space and Other Rezoning Matters (2024) (PC96) is the latest such plan change.

4.       Typically, there are four categories of change included in these plan changes:

i)           Rezoning of recently vested or acquired open space

ii)          Rezoning to correct zoning errors or anomalies

iii)         Rezoning to better reflect the current or future intended use and/or development of land

iv)         Rezoning to reflect approved land swaps between Kainga Ora and Auckland Council and/or to enable approved land rationalisation and disposal.

5.       PC96 involves 32 changes/groups of changes in 13 Local Board areas. A copy of the proposed plan change is in Attachment A. The changes on Maps 7, 11, 14, 25 and 30 are relevant to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

6.       A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board. This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on Proposed Plan Change 96.  Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on Proposed Plan Change 96 – Open Space and Other Rezoning Matters (2024).  

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on Proposed Plan Change 96 – Open Space and Other Rezoning Matters (2024).

c)       delegate authority to the chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the plan change hearing.

 

Horopaki

Context

Decision-making authority

7.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents (ss15-16 Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009).

8.       Local boards must have the opportunity to provide their views at the hearing on proposed plan changes. 

9.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. The hearing report will address issues raised in local board views and submissions by themes. 

10.     If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the plan change.

11.     This report provides an overview of the plan change, and a summary of submissions’ key themes relevant to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. 

12.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey, if the local board expresses its views on Proposed Plan Change 96 – Open Space and Other Rezoning Matters (2024). The planner must include any local board views verbatim in the evaluation of the private plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Plan change overview

 

13.     The Plan and Places Department prepare open space plan changes every two to three years to update the zoning of open space in the AUP.

14.     Typically, there are four categories of change included in these plan changes:

i)           Rezoning of recently vested or acquired open space

ii)          Rezoning to correct zoning errors or anomalies

iii)         Rezoning to better reflect the current or future intended use and/or development of land

iv)         Rezoning to reflect approved land swaps between Kainga Ora and Auckland Council and/or to enable approved land rationalisation and disposal.

15.     Proposed Plan Change 96 involves 32 land parcels or groups of land parcels from across the region. Thirteen local boards are affected. A copy of Proposed Plan Change 96 is in Attachment A.

16.     The proposed changes that have received submissions are outlined below, along with the relevant local boards.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1- Proposed changes in PC96 that have received submissions & local boards

Submissions Received on PC96 Maps/Topics

Local Board

Map 1

Franklin

Map 2

Franklin

Map 3

Hibiscus and Bays

Map 4

Puketapapa

Map 5

Waitemata

Map 7

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Map 8

Kaipatiki

Map 9

Mangere – Otahuhu

Map 10

Mangere – Otahuhu

Map 11

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Map 12

Puketapapa

Map 14

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Map 15

Upper Harbour

Map 18

Howick

Map 19

Howick

Map 21

Rodney

Map 22

Rodney

Map 23

Albert – Eden

Map 25

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Map 28

Papakura

Map 29

Albert – Eden

Map 30

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Map 31

Henderson – Massey

Map 32

Franklin

 

17.     No submissions were received for Maps 6, 13, 16, 17, 20, 24, 26, & 27

18.     The proposed changes relevant to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board are:

Map 7 – rezones 40 Maybury Street, Point England (Ruapotaka marae) from Open Space – Informal Recreation Zone , Open Space – Community Zone and Residential – Terrace Housing and Apartment Building Zone to Special Purpose – Māori Purpose Zone.

 

 

Map 11 – rezones 33 Allenby Road, Panmure from Open Space – Informal Recreation Zone to Residential – Mixed Housing Suburban Zone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map 14 – rezones 2-8 Maurice Road, Penrose from Road to Business – Light Industry Zone.

 

Map 25 – rezones 528 Ellerslie – Panmure Highway, Mount Wellington from Road to Business – Town Centre Zone.

 

Map 30 – rezones 1,3 & 5 Olea Road, Onehunga from Residential – Mixed Housing Suburban Zone and Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation Zone to Residential – Mixed Housing Suburban Zone and Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation Zone (i.e swaps the zoning around).

 

19.     In the Section 42A Hearing Report, the Council’s planner, and other experts, will evaluate and report on:

·   Submissions and further submissions

·   views and preferences of the local board, if the local board passes a resolution.

 

Themes from submissions received

20.     Key submission themes are listed below.   

Map 7 - if the proposed rezoning of Ruapotaka Marae and various Maybury Street addresses (Map 7) is not declined, then amend the zoning to Open Space Community Buildings or Open Space Community zone

Map 11 - accept the proposed plan change for Map 11 - 33 Allenby Road, Panmure; ensure the zoning of 33 Allenby Road, Panmure (Map 11) is consistent with the zoning of adjacent properties should proposed Plan Change 78 proceed; accept the proposed plan change for 33 Allenby Road, Panmure (Map 11) with amendments outlined (confirm boundaries/ownership, only 33 Allenby Road to be zoned as residential, property owner to remove brick wall so public has access to the reserve)

Map 14 - seek that the plan change be approved for 2-9 Maurice Road, Penrose - Map 14

Map 25 - oppose the rezoning of 528 Ellerslie - Panmure Highway, Mt Wellington (Map 25)  to a Business - Town Centre zoning (consider THAB or open space zone or retain as road)

Map 30 - retain as notified in PC96 Map Number 30; ensure the zoning of 1,3 & 5 Olea Road, Onehunga (Map 30) is consistent with the zoning of adjacent properties should proposed Plan Change 78 proceed

 

21.     Submissions were made by:

 

Map 7 – a member of the public

Map 11 – the landowner, Auckland Council, Panmure Committee Action Group

Map 14 – the landowner

Map 25 - Panmure Committee Action Group

Map 30 – Kainga Ora, Auckland Council

 

Table 2: submissions received on plan change 96 for Maps 7, 11, 14, 25 & 30

Submissions

Number of submissions

In support

Map 7 - nil

Map 11 -1

Map 14 - 1

Map 25 - nil

Map 30 - 1

In support, if modifications are made

Map 7 - nil

Map 11 – 2 (1 submission has 4 submission points)

Map 14 - nil

Map 25 - nil

Map 30 - 1

In opposition

Map 7 - 1

Map 11 - nil

Map 14 - nil

Map 25 – 1 (5 submission points)

Map 30 - nil

Neutral

Map 7

Map 11 - nil

Map 14 - nil

Map 25m - nil

Map 30 - nil

 

22.     Information on the summary of all decisions requested by the submitter is in Attachment 2.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

Context

 

23.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out Auckland’s climate goals:

·    to adapt to the impacts of climate change by planning for the changes we will face (climate adaptation)

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050 (climate mitigation).

24.     The rezoning of 40 Maybury Street, Point England will enable a community facility (marae) within a town centre location which has good access to public transport (both bus and train). The rezoning of 33 Allenby Road, Panmure corrects a zoning error and is therefore neutral in terms of climate change. The rezoning of 2-8 Maurice Road, Penrose and 1, 3 & 5 Olea Road, Onehunga both involve minor changes to zoning and are likewise neutral in terms of climate change.  The rezoning of 528 Ellerslie – Panmure Highway, Mount Wellington extends the Panmure town centre. Provide flooding and overland flow path issues can be addressed, this will have  a minor positive effect on climate change by enabling additional development within the town centre.

Implications for local board views

25.     Table 2 provides guidance as to what the local board may wish to consider in forming any view.

Table 2 Relevance of climate change to RMA decision-making

In scope for RMA decision-making

Out of scope for RMA decision-making

Climate adaption issues such as:

How should land be allocated to different activities when considering how climate change may affect our environment? How and where should physical resources be constructed?

For example:

·    will sea-level rise cause inundation of land where development is proposed? 

·    is the land in an area susceptible to coastal instability or erosion?

·    will Auckland be less- or better-prepared for flooding, stress on infrastructure, coastal and storm inundation?

·    is ecosystem resilience improved through ecological restoration or reduced by the loss of indigenous habitats?

Climate mitigation issues such as:

·        release of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere

·        increase in emissions from private car use, use of coal fired or natural gas burners

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Council departments and Council-Controlled Organisations involved in open space acquisition and disposal (e.g. Community and Social Policy (Parks and Recreation Policy), Healthy Waters, Eke Panuku and the Development Programme Office) have identified either land purchased for open space that has not gone through a vesting or gazetting process or land that is identified to be disposed of or swapped that requires an alternative zoning.

27.     Both Parks and Recreation Policy and Healthy Waters (in the case of stormwater reserves) have provided input into the proposed zoning changes.

28.     WaterCare Services Limited have been involved in the nomination of sites for rezoning.

29.     Healthy Waters (where they are not the requester of part of the plan change) and Parks will review relevant submissions and provide expert input to the hearing report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The proposed changes on Maps 7, 11, 14, 25 and 30 are within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area. 

31.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·    interests and preferences of people in local board area

·    well-being of communities within the local board area

·    local board documents, such as local board plan, local board agreement

·    responsibilities and operation of the local board.

32.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on the plan change it includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori worldview).   

34.     A draft copy of the plan change was sent to all Auckland’s 19 mana whenua entities on 3 November 2023, as required under the Resource Management Act. No feedback was received from iwi.

35.     In addition, no iwi authorities made a submission on the plan change.

36.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the Resource Management Act which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.      In terms of 40 Maybury Street, Point England, the rezoning will enable a more straight forward resource consent path for the redevelopment of the marae. The proposed change to 33 Allenby Road, Panmure corrects a zoning error for the land owner. The proposed rezoning of 528 Ellerslie – Panmure Highway, Mount Wellington will enable the subsequent development of this lot in accordance with the Business – Town Centre Zone.  The proposed rezoning of 1, 3 & 5 Olea Road enables land swaps between Auckland Council and Kainga Ora to occur thereby facilitating redevelopment in this area.

38.     With respect to the cost of the plan change itself, this is planned expenditure within the Plans and Places Department’s budget.  Cost associated with the plan change hearing are covered by the Democracy Services Department’s budget.

39.     The bundling together of several rezoning proposals (there are 32 separate changes in the plan change) assists in reducing the costs per land parcel of the plan change and hearing processes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change, if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·    the mechanism for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to express its views and preferences

·    the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

41.     The local board however, may choose not to pass a resolution at this business meeting. 

42.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s) (Local Government Act 2002, Sch 7, cls 36D(a))This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the Section 42A hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose. 

44.     A hearing date and the appointment of Independent Hearing Commissioner’s has yet to occur.

45.     The planner will advise the local board of the hearing date and the decision on the plan change by memorandum, once the decision has been released.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment 1 - Proposed Plan Change 96 - Open Space and Other Rezoning Matters (2024)

183

b

Attachment 2 - Information on the summary of all decisions requested by the submitters (Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board)

215

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

































Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 





Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Urgent Decision - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board input into the Auckland Council submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill

File No.: CP2024/04627

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note that an urgent decision was made to provide Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board feedback to be incorporated into the Auckland Council submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Boards 22 November 2022 business meeting, the local board considered the urgent decision-making process and passed resolution MT/2022/162:

a)   delegate authority to the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board, if the local board is unable to meet

b)   confirm that the Local Area Manager, chairperson, and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the use of the local board’s urgent decision mechanism by approving the request for an urgent decision in writing

c)   note that all urgent decisions made, including written advice which supported these decisions, will be included on the agenda of the next ordinary meeting of the local board. CARRIED

2.       An urgent decision was required in this instance because the feedback needed to be provided by 12 April 2024 to be incorporated into the council’s submission. The Board’s next scheduled meeting was 30 April 2024. Delaying the feedback would result in the Board’s input not being able to be considered.

3.       On 12 April 2024 the chairperson and deputy chairperson made an urgent decision on behalf of the Board to provide feedback on the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

4.       The urgent decision is included in this report as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the urgent decision made on 12 April 2024 to provide feedback to be incorporated into the Auckland Council submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board input into the Auckland Council submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill

221

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 













Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2024/03817

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa/ governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar - April 2024

235

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2024/03818

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board (the Board) workshop records.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   The attached summary of workshop notes provides a record of the Board’s workshops held in February and March 2024.

3.   Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshop records for: 19 March, 26 March, 2 April, 9 April and 16 April.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshop Record - 19 March

239

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshop Record - 26 March

241

c

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshop Record - 2 April

243

d

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshop Record - 9 April

245

e

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshop Record - 16 April

247

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Prasad - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

 


 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Deputation: Pauline Laithwaite and Elle Bell - SpacetoCo, presentation  Page 253

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Deputation: Dr Gillian Stewart - Habitat for Humanity Northern Region, presentation  Page 259


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024

 

 






Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

30 April 2024