I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Papakura Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 1 May 2024

4:00 pm

Local Board Chambers
35 Coles Crescent
Papakura
Auckland

 

Papakura Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Brent Catchpole

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jan Robinson

 

Members

Felicity Auva'a

 

 

George Hawkins

 

 

Kelvin Hieatt

 

 

Andrew Webster

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

 

Sital Prasad

Democracy Advisor

 

26 April 2024

 

Contact Telephone:  027 325 5719

Email: sital.prasad@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Papakura Local Board

01 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                           5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                            5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                        5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                               5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                        5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                    5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                          5

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                               6

11        Approval to partially rescind PPK/2017/2011, and to name a new private road at 31 Te Napi Drive, Conifer Grove (Waiata Shores Development, Stage 6A2)                                                7

12        Long-Term Plan 2024-2034: local board consultation feedback and input                                                                      19

13        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Papakura Local Board:

whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 24 April 2024, as true and correct.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Papakura Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Papakura Local Board

01 May 2024

 

 

Approval to partially rescind PPK/2017/2011, and to name a new private road at 31 Te Napi Drive, Conifer Grove (Waiata Shores Development, Stage 6A2)

File No.: CP2024/04514

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval from the Papakura Local Board to partially rescind resolution PPK/2017/2011, and to name a new private road at 31 Te Napi Drive, Conifer Grove.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Thirteen road names were approved in 2017 by the Papakura Local Board under resolution PPK/2017/2011. Since this resolution, the roading layout within the Waiata Shores development has changed, and PPK/2017/2011 now needs to be partially rescinded to reflect these changes.

3.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

4.      The developer and applicant, Fletcher Residential Limited, has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

5.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

6.      The proposed names for the new public road (Road 3) at 31 Te Napi Drive are:

·    Pohorama Lane (applicant’s preference)

·    Waitawhio Lane (alternative)

·    Papahinau Lane (alternative).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      partially rescind PPK/2017/2011 in relation to resolution (a) which approved the name ‘Neilds Close’ for Road 12 created by way of subdivision undertaken by Fletcher Residential Limited at 35 Te Napi Drive

b)      partially rescind PPK/2017/2011 in relation to resolution (a) which approved the name ‘Paraone Crescent’ for Road 5 created by way of subdivision undertaken by Fletcher Residential Limited at 35 Te Napi Drive

c)      approve the name ‘Paraone Crescent’ for the new alignment of the public road created by way of subdivision undertaken by Fletcher Residential Limited at 31 Te Napi Drive, Conifer Grove, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60408909, SUB60408961 and road naming reference RDN90113772)

d)      approve the name Pohorama Lane (applicant’s preferred name) for the new public road created by way of subdivision undertaken by Fletcher Residential Limited at 31 Te Napi Drive, Conifer Grove, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60408909, SUB60408961 and road naming reference RDN90113772).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.      Resource consent reference BUN60408909 (subdivision reference number SUB60408961) was issued in December 2023 to undertake a two-staged subdivision to establish 34 units across the site including vesting of a road.

8.      The following thirteen road names were approved in 2017 by the Papakura Local Board under PPK/2017/2011, for the Waiata Shores Development:

·    Road 1 – Te Napi Drive

·    Road 2 – Waituarua Drive

·    Road 3 – Naganui Avenue

·    Road 4 – Pepene Avenue

·    Road 5 – Paraone Crescent

·    Road 6 – Riria Crescent

·    Road 7 – Adlam Lane

·    Road 8 – Orford Lane

·    Road 9 – Gosper Road

·    Road 10 – Te Awapu Crescent

·    Road 11 – Periko Way

·    Road 12 – Neilds Close

·    Road 13 – Clarry Close.

9.      Since this approval, the road layout within the development has changed. Within Stage 6A2, Road 12 no longer exists, and Road 5 ‘Paraone Crescent’ no longer connects to the roundabout due to a realignment, and now connects to Te Napi Drive. This amended alignment requires re-confirmation of the previously approved name across that new alignment.

10.    In addition, there is a new Road 3 (one-way road established under BUN60408909) with entry via the new Paraone Crescent and exit into the roundabout.

11.    Therefore, the applicant and developer seek to partially rescind the approval of PPK/2017/2011 in relation to resolution (a) which approved the name ‘Neilds Close’ for Road 12; and ‘Paraone Crescent’ for Road 5. The applicant is also proposing to utilise  ‘Paraone Crescent’ for the new alignment of that road and provide a new name for the new ‘Road 3’.

12.    The new roading layout that will replace the old layout can be seen in Attachment B to the agenda report. The old roading layout can be seen in Attachment A to the agenda report.

13.    A location plan of the development can be found in Attachment C to the agenda report.

14.    In accordance with the standards, every public road and any private way, COAL, or right of way, that serves more than five lots generally requires a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

15.    The new public road therefore requires a road name.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.    The guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

17.    The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

18.    The names represent a cultural or ancestral link to the area where the development is located:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Pohorama Lane

(applicant’s preference)

This name is a Te Ākitai Waiohua ancestor who occupied the area.

 

Gifted from Te Ākitai Waiohua

Waitawhio Lane

(alternative)

This name is a Te Ākitai Waiohua settlement of the area.

 

Gifted from Te Ākitai Waiohua

Papahinau Lane

(alternative)

This name is a Te Ākitai Waiohua settlement of the area.

 

Gifted from Te Ākitai Waiohua

19.    All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

20.    Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

21.    ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new public road, suiting the form and layout of the road.

22.    Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.    This report seeks the decision of the local board and this decision is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.    To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

27.    From the inception of the Waiata Shores Development, Fletcher Residential Limited have engaged with mana whenua, in particular, Te Ākitai Waiohua. The names proposed for Road 3 in this application have all been gifted from Te Ākitai Waiohua.

28.    On 24 January 2024 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the guidelines. Unsurprisingly in this circumstance, no responses, comments, or feedback were received.

29.    Having received the gifted names for Road 3 from Te Ākitai Waiohua, the applicant now wishes to present those names for a decision from the local board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

31.    The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.    There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.    Approved road names are notified to LINZ and recorded on its New Zealand wide land information database.  LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Old Roading Plan

13

b

New Roading Plan

15

c

Location Plan

17

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amy Cao - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 



Papakura Local Board

01 May 2024

 

 


Papakura Local Board

01 May 2024

 

 


Papakura Local Board

01 May 2024

 

 



Papakura Local Board

01 May 2024

 

 

Long-Term Plan 2024-2034: local board consultation feedback and input

File No.: CP2024/04739

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To receive consultation feedback from the Papakura Local Board area on:

·        proposed priorities, activities and advocacy initiatives for the Papakura Local Board Agreement 2024/2025

·        regional topics for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

2.      To recommend any local matters or advocacy initiatives to the Governing Body, that they will need to consider or make decisions on in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 process.

3.      To provide input on the proposed regional topics in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.      Local board agreements set out annual funding priorities, activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and initiatives for each local board area. Local board agreements for 2024/2025 will be included in the Council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

5.      Auckland Council publicly consulted from 28 February to 28 March 2024 to seek community views on the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034. This included consultation on the Papakura Local Board’s proposed priorities for 2024/2025 to be included in their local board agreement, and key priorities and advocacy initiatives for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

6.      Auckland Council received 27,960 submissions in total across the region and 754 submissions from the Papakura local board area.

7.      There is support for the local priorities for the Papakura local board area, with 65 per cent of respondents supporting all or most of the priorities.

8.      The top themes from submitters in the Papakura local board area are:

·        Council to focus on core business

·        Cost of living

·        Crime and safety concerns

·        Youth needs

·        Papakura Town Centre.

9.      In the Long-term Plan process there are matters where local boards provide recommendations to the Governing Body, for consideration or decision-making. This includes any local board advocacy initiatives. The Governing Body will consider these items as part of the Long-term Plan decision-making process in May/June 2024:

·        any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·        any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·        proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·        release of local board specific reserve funds

·        any other local board advocacy initiatives.

10.    Local boards have a statutory responsibility to provide input into regional strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive consultation feedback on the proposed Papakura Local Board priorities and activities for 2024/2025 and key advocacy initiatives for 2024-2034

b)      whiwhi / receive consultation feedback on regional topics in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 from people and organisations based in the Papakura local board area

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito/note the Franklin Local Board’s proposal to implement a targeted rate within the Franklin Local Board area to facilitate the delivery of a Franklin Paths programme and consider providing feedback to the Governing Body on this initiative

d)      whakarite / provide input on regional topics in the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034 and advocacy initiatives to the Governing Body.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.    Each financial year Auckland Council must have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the Papakura Local Board) for each local board area. The local board agreement sets out how the Council will reflect priorities in the Papakura Local Board Plan 2023 in respect of the local activities to be provided in the local board area, and also includes information relating to budgets, levels of service, and performance measures.

12.    The local board agreements 2024/2025 will form part of the Auckland Council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

13.    Auckland Council publicly consulted from 28 February to 28 March 2024 to seek community views on the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.  The consultation content included information on regional proposals to be decided by the Governing Body, and information on the Papakura Local Board’s proposed priorities for 2024/2025 to be included in their local board agreement, and key local board priorities and advocacy initiatives for 2024-2034.

14.    Auckland Council is facing key financial challenges including adapting to economic fluctuations, paying for growth, the rising cost of asset ownership, storm response and resilience and a limited funding system. To address this, strategic choices and direction must be made in the council’s proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

15.    Local boards have a statutory responsibility to identify and communicate the interests and preferences of people in their local board area in relation to the content of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.    This report includes analysis of consultation feedback, any local matters to be recommended to the Governing Body and seeks input on regional topics in the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

Consultation feedback overview 

17.    As part of the public consultation for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Auckland Council used a variety of methods and channels to reach and engage a broad cross section of Aucklanders to gain their feedback and input into regional and local topics.

18.    In total, Auckland Council received feedback from 27,960 people in the consultation period. This feedback was received through:

·        written feedback – 27 per cent hard copy and 42 per cent online forms, 2 per cent emails and letters.

·        in person – 29 per cent pieces of feedback through 125 Have Your Say events (3 of which were held in the Papakura local board area).

         The tables and graphs below indicate the demographic categories people identified with. This information only relates to those submitters who provided demographic information.

             

 

       

19.    All feedback will be made available on an Auckland Council webpage called “Submissions on the Long-term Plan 2024-2034” and will be accessible after 24 April 2024 through the following link: https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/long-term-plan-2024-2034-consultation-feedback

Feedback received on the Papakura Local Board’s priorities for 2024/2025 and the 10-year budget 2024-2034

20.    Three hundred and ninety-eight (398) submissions were received on Papakura Local Board’s priorities and key advocacy initiatives.

21.    Seven submissions were received from mana whenua iwi with interests in the Papakura Local Board area, and feedback was also received through the Ara Kōtui hui.

22.    Seven submissions were received from local Papakura organisations and businesses.

23.    The Papakura Local Board consulted on the following priorities for 2024/2025:

·       Priority 1: We know you value the community being brought together through free events which we will continue to support including the Anzac Day events. This is particularly special to our area given the strong military history in Papakura.

·       Priority 2: We will continue to support Māori-led initiatives and aspirations with Mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge), including the Māori Wardens. We also are pleased to partner with mana whenua in the delivery of Te Kete Rukuruku project which is the dual naming and storytelling of our parks and reserves.

·       Priority 3: We have recently been working on enhancements to the Te Koiwi Reserve Pond and are looking at further work that can be done in this area.

·       Priority 4: We will continue to support the Takanini Business Association in their Business Improvement District (BID) establishment.

·       Priority 5: Papakura has a talented and culturally rich community, and we will continue to showcase this through the community arts programme.

24.    The Papakura Local Board consulted on the following priorities for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034:

·       Priority 1: local resource to deliver economic outcomes

·       Priority 2: investment into the community sport network including Papakura Tennis and Squash.

25.    The Papakura Local Board also consulted on the following key advocacy initiatives that sit outside local board decision-making:

·       Initiative 1: access to the encumbrance fund and to the legacy parking fund in addition to capital expenditure budgets

·       Initiative 2: allocation of maintenance, renewals and operational budget for Bruce Pulman Park as an asset of local, regional and national significance

·       Initiative 3: retention and increase of Local Board Capital Transport Fund (LBCTF)

·       Initiative 4: further develop AT local (on demand ride-share public transport service) in parts of Papakura Local Board area to increase public transport use

·       Initiative 5: for growth funding to be provided for new facilities in line with growth and deprivation

·       Initiative 6: advocate for improved road maintenance

·       Initiative 7: prioritise addressing inequity of funding in the first three years of the long-term plan so that underfunded local boards have the financial tools to address service provision.


 

26.    The majority of local respondents support all (24 per cent) or most priorities (41 per cent) proposed by the Papakura Local Board.

 

 

Key themes

27.    Key themes from Papakura residents across all feedback received include:

·        Council to focus on core business and essentials

·        Cost of living

·        Youth/Elderly focus

·        Crime and safety concerns

·        More focus needed on Papakura township.

28.    There was less support from the community on priorities 2 and 5, common themes included:

·        Priority 2: We will continue to support Māori-led initiatives and aspirations with Mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge), including the Māori Wardens. We also are pleased to partner with mana whenua in the delivery of Te Kete Rukuruku project which is the dual naming and storytelling of our parks and reserves. 40 per cent of submitters, submitted that this was not an important priority with recurring comments that council focus on core business, other ethnicity needs in the area and cost of living crisis.

·        Priority 5: Papakura has a talented and culturally rich community, and we will continue to showcase this through the community arts programme had 43 per cent of submitters submit that this was not an important priority. Recurring comments received were council focus on core business, focus on other needs such as crime/safety and cost of living crisis.


 

29.    Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Papakura Local Board area provided feedback and noted their priorities:

·        Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua

Finishing the wharekai, Taahuna Pa Marae – wharepaku, wharenui, wastewater upgrades, health, water safety, waka ama, and rangatahi development

·        Ngaati Whanaunga

Water, housing, taking care of parks/environment, providing services like libraries, playgrounds, public transport, economic development, and health. Involvement with the Papakura Local Board at both at a project and governance levels.

·        Ngāti Tamaterā

Support climate action funding for walking and micro-mobility connections. Collaborate on youth development, crime prevention, community-led projects focused on social cohesion and climate resilience.  Supporting Ngāti Tamaoho aspirations for a cultural hub, fostering creative expression and building strong and healthy community partnerships.

Feedback on other local topics

30.    Key themes across feedback received on other local topics included:

·        Animal management

·        Rubbish/waste concerns regarding changing to fortnightly collection

·        General area, parks and sports fields maintenance concerns

·        Migrant needs.

Requests for local funding

31.    Requests for local funding through the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 consultation included:

·        Widen the bridge on Linwood Road

·        Graffiti cleanup

·        Protection of trees Kirks Bush

·        Hunua Road traffic issues

·        Maintenance/tidy up at Kirks Bush entrance

·        New kids park at Brylee Drive

·        Opaheke, Belfield Park and Mill Road development

·        Develop the Village Green, make old Plunket building a cafe with proper toilets

·        Redevelop Roselands

·        Freshen the Cenotaph

·        Pedestrian bridge over Papakura stream near the mouth

·        Updated masterplan for Massey Park and Mansell field

·        Rideshare on-demand

·        Bruce Pullman central grounds (on Walters Road) cleanup.

32.    Consultation feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the local board when approving their local board agreement between 11-14 June 2024. Local board key advocacy initiatives will be considered in the current report.

Information on submitters

33.    The tables and graphs below indicate the source of submissions.

34.    Most submissions came from individuals (89 per cent and via hardcopy (57 per cent).

    

 

   

 

35.    The graphs below indicate the demographic categories people identified with. This only relates to those submitters who provided demographic information.

Overview of feedback received on regional topics in the Long-term Plan from the Papakura Local Board area

36.    The proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034 sets out Auckland Council’s priorities and how to pay for them. Consultation on the proposed Long-term Plan asked submitters to respond to key questions on the following:

1.   Overall direction for Long-term Plan

2.   Transport plan

3.   North Harbour Stadium

4.   Major Investments:

a.   Creating an Auckland Future Fund using the Auckland International Airport shareholding

b.   Options relating to the future of Port of Auckland (includes options c. and d.)

5.   Port Land

6.   Changes to other rates, fees and charges.

37.    Submitters were also encouraged to give feedback on any of the other matters included in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 consultation document.

38.    The submissions received from the Papakura Local Board area on these key issues are summarised below, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

Key Question 1: Overall direction for Long-term Plan

39.    Aucklanders were asked about the overall proposed direction for council services and investment over the next ten years. This included the ‘central proposal’ alongside alternative options of ‘pay more, get more’ and ‘pay less, get less’ in seven areas of council-funded service and activities. These seven areas are their associated options are described in detail in the consultation document available at Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Consultation Document from pages 22-27 and included:

·        Transport - Roads, public transport and safety improvements across the transport network

·        Water - Managing stormwater to minimise flooding and protect waterways

·        City and local development - Delivering urban regeneration and lead development of the city centre

·        Environment and regulation - Protecting and restoring the natural environment

·        Parks and community - A wide range of arts, sports, recreation, library and community services including a fair level of funding for local boards (see section on fairer funding for local boards below)

·        Economic and cultural development - Major events funding and economic development

·        Council support - Supporting the delivery of services, enabling effective governance, emergency management and grants to regional amenities.

40.    The central proposal would see annual rates increases for the average value residential property set at 7.5 per cent in year one, 3.5 per cent in year two, 8.0 per cent in year three and no more than 3.5 per cent for the years after that. Over the 10-year period 2024-2034, the central proposal would provide for a capital investment programme of $39.3 billion and $53.7 billion of operational spending.

41.    The central proposal, and alternative options of ‘pay more, get more’ and ‘pay less, get less’ scenarios are outlined in Table 1 below.


 

Table 1 - The central proposal and the ‘pay more, get more’ and ‘pay less, get less’ scenarios

Annual rates increase for average value resident property

Pay less and get less

Central proposal

Pay more and get more

Year 1

5.5 per cent

7.5 per cent

14 per cent

Year 2

3.5 per cent

3.5 per cent

10 per cent

Year 3

3.5 per cent

8.0 per cent

10 per cent

Later years

No more than 1 per cent above CPI inflation thereafter

No more than 3.5 per cent for the years after that

5 per cent for the years after that

CAPEX

$33.5b

$39.3b

$52.0b

OPEX

$69.2b

$72.0b

$76.5b

42.    The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

 

43.    Papakura submitters key themes/comments – Overall:

·        Submitters are concerned about the cost of living, and of rates increasing faster than inflation

·        There is a general preference to pay less and get less in order to keep rates low

·        Submitters are supportive of maintaining the essentials such as rubbish collection and are willing to contribute more in the transport space to improve traffic congestion, road quality, affordable and a reliable public transport system

·        Submitters would like to see a reduction in spend on cultural projects, economic development and CBD renewals and events

·        Find other savings / Improve efficiency (141 submitters)

·        Roads and footpath concerns (125 submitters)

·        General financial strategy (122 submitters)

·        Stick to core services (119 submitters)

·        Transport safety (118 submitters)

·        Organisational support (108 submitters)

·        Regional parks, sport and recreation (15 submitters)

·        Regional community places and services, community centres/hubs, youth facilities, community led development, safety (graffiti, crime prevention, alcohol bans), migrant services (14 submitters).

44.    Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Papakura local board area gave feedback as follows:

Do less (reduce council services/ investment), with lower rates increases and some debt

 

 

Proceed with the central proposal

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Do more (increase council services/investment), with higher rates increases, and some debt

 

Other

 

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

Ngāti Tamaoho

I don’t know

 

 

 

Do more

As proposed

Do less

Q1 Transport: Roads, public transport and safety improvements across the transport network

Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Q2 Water: Managing stormwater to minimise flooding and protect waterways.

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

Ngāti Tamaoho

 

 

Q3 City and local development: Infrastructure and to enable city and urban development.

Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

 

Q4 Environment and regulation: Protecting and restoring our natural environment

Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

 

Q _5  Parks and Community. A wide range of arts, sports, recreation, library and community services including a fair level of funding for local boards

Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

 

Q6  Economic and cultural development: Major events funding and economic development

 

 

 

Q7  Council support. Supporting the delivery of  services, enabling effective governance, emergency management and grants to regional amenities

 

 

 

 

Key Question 2: Transport Plan

45.    Aucklanders were asked for feedback on a proposal to work with government to make progress toward an integrated transport plan for Auckland with a proposed total capital spend of $13.4 billion for Auckland Transport over 10 years.

46.    This would include:

·        making public transport faster, more reliable and easier to use by investing in rapid transit network actions, such as making it easier to pay, including introducing capped weekly public transport passes

·        network optimisation, reducing temporary traffic management requirements and introducing dynamic lanes

·        stopping some initiatives previously planned such as some raised pedestrian crossings and cycleways.


 

47.    The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

48.    Papakura submitters key themes/comments:

·        Some submitters were supportive of introducing a capped weekly public transport pass. It was also suggested that a daily $5/day cap is offered on the weekend

·        Some submitters supported the use of alternative payment methods on public transport and transitioning to a national ticketing solution

·        There were quite a few submitters that supported the light rail project continuing

·        Submitters are supportive of measures to make public transport more reliable and faster

·        A number of submitters were supportive of stopping raised pedestrian crossings and investment in cycleways. However, there were other submitters that were supportive of cycleways.

·        Improve Public Transport services/infrastructure/maintenance (84 submitters)

·        Generally support (59 submitters)

·        Roads and footpaths concerns (56 submitters)

·        Anti public transport (21 submitters)

·        Pro public transport (19 submitters).

49.    Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Papakura local board area gave feedback as follows:

Transport Plan

 

Support all of the proposal

 

Support most of the proposal

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Do not support most of the proposal

Ngāti Tamaoho

Do not support any of the proposal

 

I don't know

 

 

Key Question 3: North Harbour Stadium

50.    Aucklanders were asked for feedback on options for the future of North Harbour Stadium precinct. The options set out were:

1.   to keep the stadium precinct as it is now, and maintain it at a cost of $33 million over 10 years

2.   redevelop the stadium precinct funded through reallocation of this $33 million, the sale of some stadium precinct land while retaining the existing community playing fields and any other external funding available

3.   change the operational management of the stadium to ensure greater use by the community (noting that this option could be considered in addition to either option 1 or 2).

51.    The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

   

 

52.    Papakura submitters key themes/comments:

·        Not worth the investment (22 submitters)

·        Increase usage / attract more events (21 submitters)

·        Don’t know (19 submitters)

·        North Harbour/community needs the stadium (18 submitters)

·        Mismanaged / needs to be managed better (17 submitters).

53.    Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Papakura local board area gave feedback as follows:

North Harbour Stadium

 

Keep the stadium precinct as it is

 

Consider redeveloping the stadium precinct

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Change the operational management

Ngāti Tamaoho

Other

 

I don’t know

 

Key Question 4a: Major Investments: Auckland Future Fund and Auckland International Airport Limited shares

54.    Aucklanders were asked to provide feedback on a proposal to establish a diversified investment fund for Auckland (the Auckland Future Fund) in order to spread the risk of council’s investments over a range of different assets in different locations. The proposal includes the transfer of council’s shareholding of just over 11 per cent in Auckland International Airport Limited (AIAL) to the fund to enable the subsequent sale of any or all the shares by the fund manager.

55.    The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

56.    Papakura submitters key themes/comments:

·        Don't sell assets (belongs to the people) (31 submitters)

·        Don’t know (16 submitters)

·        Council to maintain control/influence (14 submitters)

·        General support (11 submitters)

·        Will benefit ratepayers (10 submitters).

57.    Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Papakura local board area gave feedback as follows:

Major Investments: Auckland Future Fund and Auckland International Airport Limited shares

 

Proceed with the proposal

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

Don’t proceed with establishing an Auckland Future Fund and transferring AIAL shareholding

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Trust

Ngāti Tamaoho

Other

 

I don’t know

 

 


 

Key Question 4b: Major Investments: Port of Auckland

58.    Aucklanders were also asked for their feedback on options for the future of Port of Auckland.  The two options identified were:

1.   retain underlying ownership of the port land and wharves, and lease the operation of the port for a period of about 35 years with the upfront payment from the lease invested in the proposed Auckland Future Fund.

2.   retain underlying ownership of the port land and wharves with the Port of Auckland Limited continuing to operate the port and implement their plan to deliver improved profitability and dividends.

Key Question 4c: Major Investments: Port of Auckland

59.    It was noted that if the council group continues to operate the port through Port of Auckland Limited, it could continue to use the profits and dividends from the port to fund council services, or it could invest the profits and dividends in the proposed Auckland Future Fund.

Key Question 4d: Major Investments: Port of Auckland

60.    People were also encouraged to give feedback on other aspects of the proposal, including in relation to self-insurance, and implementation options for the proposed Auckland Future Fund and possible changes to the council’s shareholding in Port of Auckland Limited and to the ownership of the Port Land.

61.    The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

 

  

62.    Papakura submitters key themes/comments 4b:

·        Council to maintain control/influence (16 submitters)

·        Don’t lease out the port (16 submitters)

·        Lease out the port (10 submitters)

·        General support (10 submitters)

·        Financial benefits (e.g. prudent, flexibility, liquidity) (10 submitters).

63.    Papakura submitters key themes/comments 4c:

·        General support (20 submitters)

·        Balanced approach of using AFF dividends (11 submitters)

·        Will benefit ratepayers (7 submitters)

·        AFF profits to fund council services (5 submitters)

·        General financial strategy disagree (6 submitters).

64.    Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Papakura local board area gave feedback as follows:

Question 4b.

Major Investments: Port of Auckland

 

Retain underlying council ownership of port land and wharves, and continue council group operation of the port (through Port of Auckland Limited), and implement the plan to deliver improved profitability and more dividends to council

Ngāti Tamaoho

 

Retain underlying council ownership of port land and wharves, and lease the operation of the port for a period of about 35 years and use the upfront payment from the lease to invest in the proposed Auckland Future Fund

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Other

 

I don’t know

 

Question 4c.

Major Investments: Port of Auckland

 

Continue to use it to fund council services

 

Invest in the proposed Auckland Future Fund

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Other

Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

I don’t know

 

Key Question 5: Port Land

65.    Aucklanders were asked for their feedback on a proposal whereby some land and wharves currently used for port operations could be transferred to Auckland Council and used for something else that provides public benefit. This could include the creation of some new public spaces and/or new waterfront residential or commercial developments.

66.    Captain Cook and Marsden wharves could be transferred to council within 2-5 years provided that resource consent can be obtained for work at the Bledisloe Terminal. These works are required to allow some port operations to be moved and would cost around $110 million, but otherwise there would be no significant impact on the operations or value of the port.

67.    The Bledisloe Terminal site could be freed up and transferred to council for use in another way within 15 years. However, this would significantly reduce the scale of port operations in Auckland with many shipments needing to be transported into the Auckland by truck or rail. It would also lower the value of the proposed port lease by an estimated $300m or reduce the future profits and dividends the council earns from the port.

68.    The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

Captain Cook /Marsden wharves

Bledisloe Terminal

69.    Papakura submitters key themes/comments 5a:

·        Provide for better public use/benefit (20 submitters)

·        PoA provides an essential service (13 submitters)

·        Will not provide public benefit (7 submitters)

·        Depends on the proposed use / need more detail (7 submitters).

70.    Papakura submitters key themes/comments 5b:

·        Provide for better public use/benefit (15 submitters)

·        PoA provides an essential service (10 submitters)

·        Will not provide public benefit (10 submitters)

·        General support (6 submitters).

71.    Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Papakura local board area gave feedback as follows:

Question 5a.

Port Land

 

Proceed with the proposal to transfer Captain Cook and Marsden wharves from the port to Auckland Council so they can be used for something else that provides public benefit

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

No change – leave Captain Cook and Marsden wharves to be managed as part of the port operations

 

Other

Ngāti Tamaoho

I don’t know

 

Question 5b.

Port Land

 

Keep Bledisloe Terminal as a Port of Auckland operational area

 

Transfer Bledisloe Terminal to council to be used for something else, that provides public benefit, within 15 years

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Other

 

Ngāti Tamaoho

I don’t know

 

Key Question 6: changes to other rates, fees and charges

72.    Aucklanders were asked for feedback on proposed changes to business rates, targeted rates and charges as set out below.

Waste management rates changes

73.    Auckland Council is proposing to continue the planned roll out of rates funded refuse collections to the North Shore, Waitākere and Papakura in 2024/2025, and Franklin and Rodney in 2025/2026 replacing the current pay as you throw service, and consequent rates change. During the rollout it is proposed the refuse targeted rate will be applied to properties in these areas based on the approximate number of months the rates funded service is available to them.

74.    It is also proposed to adjust the Waste Management Targeted Rates in 2024/2025 to maintain cost recovery levels and to re-introduce recycling charges for schools.


 

Changes to other rates, fees and charges

75.    Other proposed changes to rates and fees and charges included in the consultation document for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 include:

·        Resuming the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) and extend it to 2034/2035 to continue to invest in the protection of native ecosystems and species.

·        Resuming the full Water Quality Targeted Rate (WQTR) and extend it to 2034/2035 at a level that only covers the annual programme operating and interest costs. This ensures water quality improvements in harbours and streams across the region can be funded but at a lower amount for next year than previously planned.

·        Broadening the description of bus services funded by the Climate Action Transport Targeted Rate (CATTR) to reduce the need to consult each year for minor changes to the bus programme.

·        Discontinue the Long-Term Differential Strategy which gradually lowers the share of general rates paid by businesses and raises the share paid by other ratepayers, and raise the share of the NETR, WQTR and CATTR paid by businesses to align to the share of general rates paid by businesses.

·        Changing the Rodney Drainage Districts Targeted Rate to reflect public feedback and updated analysis of the benefits to properties and boundaries.

·        Increasing the Waitākere Rural Sewerage Targeted Rate from $296.75 to $336.80 (per year) for the 2024/2025, 2025/2026, and 2026/2027 years to maintain cost recovery in the three-year contract cycle, and avoid an annual subsidy of around $117,000 from general rates.

76.    The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

Natural Environment Targeted Rate

Water Quality Targeted Rate

 


 

Climate Action Transport Targeted Rate

Long Term Differential Strategy

Re-introducing recycling charges for schools

Rates funded refuse collection roll out

Rodney Drainage Districts Targeted Rate


 

Waitākere Rural Sewerage Targeted Rate

Franklin Local Board Paths Targeted Rate

 

 

77.    Papakura submitters key themes/comments:

·        There was a slight majority of submitters who support the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) proposal.

·        There was overwhelming submitter support for the Water Quality Targeted Rate (WQTR) proposal.

·        There was a reasonable majority of support for the Climate Action Transport Targeted Rate (CATTR) proposal. However, there was a considerable number of submitters who did not support or did not know.

·        There was a reasonable majority of support for discontinuing the Long-Term Differential Strategy and raising the share of NETR, WQTR and CATTR paid by businesses. However, there was a considerable number of submitters who did not support or did not know.

·        There was a reasonable majority of support for changing the Rodney Drainage Districts Targeted Rate. However, there was a considerable number of submitters who did not know.

·        There was a reasonable majority of support for increasing the Waitākere Rural Sewerage Targeted Rate from $296.75 to $336.80 (per year). However, there was a considerable number of submitters who did not know.

·        The majority of submitters did not support applying the Recycling Targeted Rate to all schools.

·        There was a reasonable majority of support for the planned roll out of rates funded refuse collections to the North Shore, Waitākere and Papakura in 2024/2025, and Franklin and Rodney in 2025/2026. However, there was a considerable number of submitters who did not support or did not know.

·        Franklin Paths (7 submitters) – 3 support / 1 do not support / 3 other.


 

78.    Mana whenua iwi with interests in the Papakura local board area gave feedback as follows:

Proposal

Support

Do not support

Q1 - Resume the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) and extend it to 2034/2035 so we can continue to invest in the protection of native ecosystems and species. This increases rates for the average value residential property by around $20.04 and $152.71 for the average value business property.

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Ngāti Tamaoho

Q2 -Resume the Water Quality Targeted Rate (WQTR) and extend it to 2034/2035 at a level to only cover the annual programme operating and interest costs. This ensures that we can continue to fund the water quality improvements in harbours and streams across the region, at a lower amount for next year than previously planned. This reduces this rate from what was previously planned for the average value residential property by around $6.53 and $17.10 for the average value business property.

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Ngāti Tamaoho

Q3 - Broaden the description of services funded by the Climate Action Transport Targeted Rate (CATTR) to reduce the need to consult each year for minor changes to the bus programme (changes to the settings of the CATTR would still require consultation).

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Ngāti Tamaoho

Q4 - Discontinue the Long Term Differential Strategy which gradually lowers the share of general rates paid by businesses and raises the share paid by other ratepayers. We also propose to raise the share businesses pay of the NETR, WQTR, and CATTR to align to the general rate.

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Ngāti Tamaoho

 

Q5 - Re-introduce recycling charges for schools.

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

 

Ngāti Tamaoho

 

Q6 - Continue the planned roll out of rates funded refuse collection to the North Shore, Waitākere and Papakura in 2024/2025, and Franklin and Rodney in 2025/2026, replacing the current pay as you throw service, and consequent rates change.

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Ngāti Tamaoho

Q7 - Change the Rodney Drainage Districts Targeted Rate to reflect public feedback and updated analysis of the benefits to properties and boundaries.

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

Ngāti Tamaoho

Q8 - Increase the Waitākere Rural Sewerage Targeted Rate from $296.75 to $336.80 (per year) for the 2024/2025, 2025/2026, and 2026/2027 years to maintain cost recovery in the three-year contract cycle, and avoid an annual subsidy of around $117,000 from general rates, with the next cost review scheduled for the 2027/2028 year.

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

 

Ngāti Tamaoho

79.    In addition to most other fees and charges which will be adjusted in line with inflation, there are also specific changes to the fees outlined below:

·        new fees to recover the cost of processing new requirements under the Building (Dam Safety) Regulations 2022

·        increased deposit levels for a number of consenting fees

·        an increase to film-permitting fees to adjust for cumulative inflation since 2015. It is also proposed that this fee is adjusted for inflation yearly

·        adjusted fees for all services provided from pool and leisure centres to ensure an appropriate level of cost recovery

·        baseline fees across similar venue hire and bookable spaces so that they are charged appropriately. This includes community halls, community centres, art centres and bookable library spaces.

Other matters for feedback

80.    The following proposals were also included in the consultation in the Long-term Plan:

Draft Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025

81.    Aucklanders were asked to feedback on the draft Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025 which sets out a framework in which the council must carry out the routine management of 14 Tūpuna Maunga.

82.    There were no submissions from the Papakura Local Board area which referenced Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2024/2025.

Fairer funding for Local Boards (Local Board Funding Policy)

83.    Auckland Council is proposing to shift to a fairer funding model, where some local boards will receive additional funding to deliver for their communities. Other local boards, where there is a disparity of funding, would need to make changes in their priorities to manage within a reduced budget. The proposal is to address local board funding equity through the first three years of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

84.    The central proposal is to achieve this through a 50/50 combination approach, i.e., reallocating some existing funding between local boards and providing some new funding ($20 million opex and $30 million capex) over the first three years of the LTP 2024-2034.

85.    As the extent of funding disparity between local boards is significant, and the council’s capacity for new funding is limited, the proposal is for 18 local boards to be within 5 per cent of their equitable funding levels (opex and capex) by year three of the LTP 2024-2034. Of the 21 local boards, three local boards will remain funded above their equitable levels but to a lesser degree than current levels.

86.    A fixed funding allocation is proposed for Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Island Local Boards, who will be allocated 1 per cent and 2 per cent of the available funding respectively, given their smaller population sizes.

87.    These changes would require an amendment to the Local Board Funding Policy.

88.    In addition to the central proposal being put forward, there are also scenarios to 'pay more, get more' and 'pay less, get less'. Under the ‘pay more, get more’ scenario no reallocation among local boards would be required. A funding uplift would be provided to get all local boards to their equitable funding levels. To achieve full equity under this option, close to $900 million would be required in additional operating funding and about $1 billion in capital funding over 10-years.

89.    To achieve local board funding equity under the ‘pay less, get less’ scenario, where no additional funding would be available, a significant reallocation would be required from local boards that are currently funded above their equitable level of funding to boards who receive lesser funding. Local boards that could lose funding may not be able to deliver projects previously agreed, asset renewals or services without increasing fees, imposing local targeted rates or rationalising assets.

90.    There was one submission from the Papakura Local Board area which referenced fairer funding and this submission supported the proposal.

Any other feedback

91.    Aucklanders were asked if they had any other comments. Key themes of note across other areas of feedback received included:

·       General financial strategy negative comments (11 submitters)

·       Regional community places and services, community centres/hubs, youth facilities, community led development, safety (graffiti, crime prevention, alcohol bans), migrant services (14 submitters)

·       Road and footpath concerns (8 submitters).

Recommendations on local matters 

92.    This report allows the local board to recommend local matters to the Governing Body for consideration as part of the Long-term Plan process, in May 2024. This includes:

·        any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·        any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·        proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·        release of local board specific reserve funds

·        local advocacy initiatives.

Local targeted rate and business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals

93.    Local boards are required to endorse any new or amended locally targeted rate proposals or business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals in their local board area. Note that these proposals must have been consulted on before they can be implemented.

94.    Local boards then recommend these proposals to the Governing Body for approval of the targeted rate.

95.    These conditions do not apply to the Papakura local board for the 2024/2025 financial year.

96.    The Franklin Local Board consulted on introducing the Franklin Local Board Paths Targeted Rate of $52 per SUIP (Separately Used or Inhabited Part) to provide increased investment in paths in the Franklin Local Board area. The proposal was well supported by submitters in the Franklin Local Board. Seven submitters from Papakura commented on this proposal and 3 supported it while 1 did not support it (see paragraph 76 and 77).

97.    The Papakura Local Board should consider commenting on the proposed Franklin targeted rate as it relates to a neighbouring board and may have positive impacts on the Papakura community.   

Funding for Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

98.    Local boards are allocated funding for local driven initiatives (LDI) annually, to spend on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. Local boards have decision-making over the LDI funds but need approval from the Governing Body where:

·    the release of local board specific reserve funds is requested, which are being held by the council for a specific purpose

·    a LDI capital project exceeds $1 million.

99.    These conditions do not apply to the Papakura Local Board for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Local board advocacy

100.  Local boards can also agree advocacy initiatives which considers the consultation feedback above. This allows the Governing Body to consider these advocacy items when making decisions on the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 in May. 

101.  The advocacy initiatives approved by the local board will then be included as an appendix to the 2024/2025 Local Board Agreement

Local board input on regional topics in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034

102.  Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws, and any proposed changes to be made to them. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

103.  Local board plans reflect community priorities and preferences and are key documents that guide the development of local board agreements (LBAs), local board annual work programmes, and local board input into regional plans such as the Long-term Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

104.  The decisions recommended in this report are part of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 and local board agreement process to approve funding and expenditure over the next 10 years.

105.  Projects allocated funding through this Long-term Plan process will all have varying levels of potential climate impact associated with them. The climate impacts of projects Auckland Council chooses to progress, are all assessed carefully as part of council’s rigorous reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

106.  The Long-term Plan 2024-2034 is an Auckland Council Group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

107.  The local board’s decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. The local board has a statutory role in providing its feedback on regional plans.

108.  Local boards play an important role in the development of the council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034. Local board agreements form part of the Long-term Plan. Local board chairs have also attended Budget Committee workshops on the Long-term Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

109.  Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact Māori. Local board agreements and the Long-term Plan are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori Outcomes.

110.  Local board plans, developed in 2023 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local board area priorities.

111.  There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations enable local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and areas of mutual interest. Ongoing relationships influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

112.  Some projects approved for funding could have discernible impacts on Māori. For any project or programme progressed by Auckland Council, the potential impacts on Māori, will be assessed as part of relevant reporting requirements.

113.  Analysis of consultation feedback received on the proposed Long-term Plan includes submissions made by mana whenua, matawaaka organisations and the wider Māori community who have interests in the rohe / local board area.

114.  Ngā Mātārae led the council-wide approach to engagement with Māori entities.  This included:

·        Two information sessions for mana whenua

·        One information session for mataawaka organisations

·        Two submission workshops (to provide help with developing submissions)

·        A hearing style event for mana whenua, Māori organisations and community groups.

 

115.  Nineteen mana whenua entities have interests in the Auckland Council rohe. Fourteen of the 19 (74 per cent) responded to the Auckland Council’s proposals for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034. Of these, seven were from the Papakura local board area.

116.  Papakura Local Board engaged locally with Mana whenua through Ara Kōtui hui in February and March 2024.

117.  Māori comprise 27 per cent of the population in the Papakura Local Board area (2018 census).  Sixty-nine submissions were received from people who identify as Māori in the Papakura Local Board area.  This represents 14 per cent of total submissions.

118.  The following mana whenua and mataawaka organisations gave feedback on the Papakura Local Board priorities.

Detailed feedback is included in paragraph 29.

·        Ngaati Te Ata Waiohua

·        Ngaati Whanaunga

·        Ngāti Tamaterā.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

119.  The local board provides input to regional plans and proposals. There is information in the council’s consultation material for each plan or proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

120.  The council must adopt its Long-term Plan, which includes local board agreements, by 30 June 2024. The local board is required to make recommendations on these local matters for the Long-term Plan by mid-May 2024, to enable and support the Governing Body to make decisions on key items to be included in the Long-term Plan on 16 May 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

121.  Recommendations and feedback from the local board will be provided to the relevant Governing Body committee for consideration as part of decision-making for the Long-term Plan 2024-2034.

122.  The local board will approve its local content for inclusion in the final Long-term Plan 2024-2034 (including its local board agreement) and corresponding work programmes in June 2024.

123.  The final Long-term Plan 2024-2034 (including local board agreements) will be adopted by the Governing Body on 27 June 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Melissa Bidois - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager