I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 May 2024

10.00am

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant, JP

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Erica Hannam

 

 

Melanie Kenrick

 

 

Tim Spring

 

 

Dr Janet Tupou

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda Gweshe

Democracy Advisor

 

9 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: Jacinda.Gweshe@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      6

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              6

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       6

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           6

8.1     Little Shoal Bay Protection Society          6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     6

11        Termination of the community licence to Little Shoal Bay Boatyard Incorporated at Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve, Northcote Point 9

12        Landowner approval application from Northcote Pétanque Club for the establishment of pétanque terrains at Little Shoal Bay Reserve                                                                19

13        Northcote Community Hub and Puāwai Cadness Reserve concept design approval    27

14        Marlborough Park Youth Hall, Glenfield – future community centre management          119

15        Public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to reclassify land, grant an agreement to lease and subsequent community ground lease to He Oranga Wairua Marae at Shepherds Park, Beach Haven       127

16        Kaipātiki community places quarter three reports 2023/2024                                             137

17        Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust quarter three report 2023/2024                                     185

18        Proposed early termination of the community ground lease to North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated - Totaravale (Sunnynook) at Totaravale Reserve, R 37 Totaravale Drive, Totara Vale                          193

19        Taurus Crescent Reserve, Beach Haven – approval of the playground renewal revised concept design                                                 209

20        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025        257

21        Community forum review and future engagement                                                       275

22        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Kaipātiki Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                                                           289

23        Kaipātiki Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025                                                           355

24        Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2023/2024 grant allocations                                                         375

25        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Kaipātiki Local Board meeting schedule                                  397

26        Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum                    401

27        Review of appointments to external organizations for the 2022-2025 electoral term                                                                            409

28        Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents                           413

29        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report 431

30        Members' Reports                                            433

31        Governing Body and Houkura Independent Māori Statutory Board                                      443

32        Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule               445

33        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - April 2024                                                           451

34        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

35        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                             467

C1       Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model                                    467

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The meeting will be opened with a karakia.

 

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta 

Kia mātaratara ki tai         

E hī ake ana te atakura   

He tio 

He huka 

He hau hū  

Tīhei mauri ora

Cease o winds from the west

Cease o winds from the south

Bring calm breezes over the land

Bring calm breezes over the sea

And let the red-tipped dawn come

With a touch of frost

A sharpened air

And promise of a glorious day.

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

i)            A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

ii)          A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its additional meeting, held on Wednesday, 1 May 2024, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Little Shoal Bay Protection Society

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding Little Shoal Bay and the work in the area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       John Brew, Chairperson of Little Shoal Bay Protection Society, will be in attendance to address the board on this item.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Little Shoal Bay Protection Society and thank John Brew for his attendance and presentation. 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Termination of the community licence to Little Shoal Bay Boatyard Incorporated at Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve, Northcote Point

File No.: CP2024/05436

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to terminate the community licence to Little Shoal Bay Boatyard Incorporated at Little Shoal Bay, Northcote Point to align with the management intentions in the recently adopted reserve management plan for Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2010, the Little Shoal Bay Boat Owners Association Incorporated was granted a two-year licence under the Reserves Act 1977 to operate a boat haul out area in Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve, Northcote Point.

3.       The licence term expired on 30 April 2012. The agreement provides for continuation beyond expiry on a monthly basis. One month’s written notice is required to terminate the licence.

4.       In April 2015, the group changed its name to LSB Boatyard Incorporated (the boatyard group).

5.       On 21 February 2024, the Kaipātiki Local Board under resolution KT/2024/15 adopted the new Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan (Kaipātiki LPMP). The Kaipātiki LPMP is the management plan for all local parks in the local board area and is the statutory reserve management plan for those parks held under the Reserves Act, including Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve.

6.       Under resolution KT/2024/15 staff were requested to provide advice on terminating the licence to the boatyard group.

7.       The relevant management intentions in the newly adopted reserve management plan for Little Shoal Bay are to discontinue boat maintenance and haulage yard activities on the Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve and repurpose the area to support a wider range of recreational activities.

8.       The position of the boatyard group is that the licence should not be terminated. The matters submitted in support of this view, through the Kaipātiki LPMP process and in March 2024 are set out in this report.

9.       Having considered all relevant matters this report recommends that the community licence to the boatyard group at Little Shoal Bay is terminated.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the termination of the community licence to LSB Boatyard Incorporated for land at Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve, Council Terrace, Northcote Point legally described as Lot 2 DP 61241 (as per Figure 1), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        termination date of 20 June 2024

ii)       Little Shoal Bay Boatyard Incorporated to remove all licensee improvements and property from the site and to leave the site in a clean and tidy state.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that under the recently adopted Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan (Resolution KT/2024/15), which is the statutory reserve management plan for Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve, the management intentions of the area are to discontinue boat maintenance and haulage yard activities and repurpose the area to support a wider range of recreational activities.

Horopaki

Context

10.     Local boards have the allocated decision-making authority for local parks and local recreation, sport, and community facilities, including community leasing matters.The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the Parks and Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2023/2024 at their local board meeting on 19 July 2023 (resolution number KT/2023/130).The status of the current licence to LSB Boatyard Incorporated at Little Shoal Bay, Northcote Point and its future was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the future status of the licence considering the newly adopted Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan.This report seeks a decision on the termination of the licence following the recently adopted Kaipātiki LPMP, which is the operative reserve management plan for Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve. The relevant management intentions in the Kaipātiki LPMP are to discontinue boat maintenance and haulage yard activities on the Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve and repurpose the area to support a wider range of recreational activities.

11.     A reserve management plan must provide for and ensure the use, enjoyment, protection, and preservation, and where appropriate, the development of the reserve for the purposes for which it is classified.

12.     The purpose of a recreation reserve is as set out in s 17 of the Reserves Act, including providing areas for recreation and sporting activities and for the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public, and for the protection of the natural environment and beauty of the countryside.

13.     As the administering body of Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve the Kaipātiki Local Board must comply with the reserve management plan for the reserve (Reserves Act s 41(11).

Reserve Management Plan for Little Shoal Bay

14.     The 1999 Little Shoal Bay and Le Roys Bush Reserve Management Plan, which indicated the intention to terminate the hardstand and haul out facility in favour of passive recreation once a suitable alternative location for the boatyard could be found, was superseded on 21 February 2024 by a new reserve management plan, forming part of the Kaipātiki LPMP.

15.     In accordance with Reserves Act s 41 the draft Kaipātiki LPMP was notified for community and public feedback. There were two rounds of public consultation and a hearing of submissions to ensure community views and preferences were considered. The draft plan proposed to discontinue the use of Little Shoal Bay for boat maintenance, haulage, and storage.

16.     The draft Kaipātiki LPMP was publicly notified on 15 August 2022, with written submissions invited by 17 October 2022. Eighty-four submissions and three late submissions were received. In April 2023, the Kaipātiki Local Board resolved to establish a hearings panel of an independent commissioner and four local board members to consider and hear submissions and make recommendations to the local board on the Kaipātiki LPMP.

17.     Extensive written submissions were made by supporters and opponents of the boatyard activity. Staff reviewed all written submissions and prepared a report for the hearings panel with preliminary comments on the submissions, which was made publicly available prior to the hearing.

18.     A number of submissions on Little Shoal Bay, including those of the boatyard group, were heard at the draft Kaipātiki LPMP hearing on 16 June 2023.

19.     The hearings panel, having considered and heard all the submissions, noting the Reserves Act recreation reserve statutory framework of the decision, recommended to the Kaipātiki Local Board that boat maintenance and haulage yard activities on the Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve be discontinued and the area be repurposed to support a wider range of recreational activities.

Wai Manawa / Little Shoal Bay Mini-Shoreline Adaptation Plan 2022 and contamination

20.     For completeness it is also noted that the local board’s work programme FY 2023/2024 identifies the Little Shoal Bay renewals shoreline adaption plan as a work programme item. Under this item, staff have undertaken land contamination testing at the site. The site was found to have contaminated land. Council is currently undertaking a project to remediate the contaminated land. The project is underway, and the area is currently closed off and will remain closed for approximately eight weeks from 11 March 2024.

21.     It is noted the Shoreline Adaptation Plan accords with the preservation of the natural and environmental values reflected in the Little Shoal Bay Reserve management plan intentions, under the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan. This is articulated in points 5-7 of the management plan intentions (refer to attachment A of the agenda report).

22.     Council undertook public consultation during the drafting of the Shoreline Adaption Plan and it is noted that of the 182 participants who showed interest in Little Shoal Bay via the public consultation, 50 supported maintaining the boat yard activities.

LSB Boatyard Incorporated

23.     Little Shoal Bay is located at Council Terrace, Northcote Point. The land is legally described as Lot 2 DP 61241 held under the Reserves Act 1977 as a classified recreation reserve.

24.     The boatyard group licence consists of the area outlined in blue and red in Image 1 below. The area in blue allows for the occupation between 1 December to 30 April in the following year and is referred to as the “cradle storage period”. This permits the use only for the storage of boat cradles.

25.     The area in red in Image 1 below, is occupied between 1 May to 30 November of each year and is referred to as the “haul out period”. The haul out period allows for the haulage and maintenance of boats on the reserve.

26.     The licence was granted under the Reserves Act for occupation of the land and, among other things, required the licensee at all times to comply with all statutes, regulations, by-laws, national and/or regional policy statements and ordinances relating to the use of the licensed area by the licensee.

27.     The licence was granted in 2010 for a period of 2 years and has since been rolling over on a month-by-month basis.


 

Image 1

Matters raised by LSB Boatyard Incorporated

28.     The boatyard group have raised a number of matters for consideration by the decision-maker. This feedback was provided through its submissions on the Draft Kaipātiki LPMP and in March this year, following adoption of the Kaipātiki LPMP, in response to a request for any further information or feedback for consideration as part of this process on proposed termination of its licence.

29.     The boatyard group strongly objects to the intended closure of the boatyard and termination of its licence. In its view this would result in the closure of a locally and regionally important coastal maintenance facility and will have negative environmental impacts on the Auckland marine environment.

History and licence activities

30.     The boatyard group notes that it has been in existence since 1964 when the then Northcote Borough Council designated an area of Little Shoal Bay for boat haul out and maintenance.

31.     In April 2015, the group changed its name from Little Shoal Bay Boatowners Association Incorporated to LSB Boatyard Incorporated.

32.     Every year, members haul their boats up into the yard at the beginning of winter, the “haul out period”, and spend the months from June to November maintaining and repairing their boats to keep them seaworthy.

33.     As part of the boatyard group’s activities members clean down their boats, remove unwanted organisms, which helps reduce the spread of invasive marine animals, remove growth, sand, paint, or biofoul.

Key matters raised by boatyard group

34.     The boatyard group is of the view that the council has legal obligations to relocate the boatyard to a suitable alternative location should it wish to terminate the licence.

35.     In its view this is a requirement of a 1989 Planning Tribunal decision that it believes still binds the council. This is based on the position that the district scheme of the Northcote Borough Council became the district scheme of the North Shore City Council under the Town and Country Planning Act, which in turn carried over as a district plan under the Resource Management Act 1991, with the same provisions (s 373). The boatyard group also claims existing use rights.

36.     While recognising this is a land tenure decision under the Reserves Act, the boatyard group also considers that there has been a failure to consider wider planning requirements on council.

37.     It believes the council has broader legal obligations under various legislation and planning documents to demonstrate leadership and assist organisations such as it to control marine invasive pests.

38.     The boatyard group considers there has been a failure to consider the importance of boat maintenance facilities within national and regional coastal policies. To these ends the boatyard group has referenced the Biosecurity Act and Resource Management Act; the Auckland Unitary Plan coastal environment intentions; the New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement consultation requirements; obligations under the Top of the North Marine Biosecurity Partnership, and under the Regional Pest Management Plan.

39.     The boatyard group also refers to the regional context of hull cleaning facility closures and raises concerns about sufficient capacity to clean boat hulls, raising concerns that the marine environment will bear the costs.

40.     It also submits there are other parks in the Kaipātiki Local Board area that provide foreshore access and its presence does not restrict alternative recreational activities during the club’s storage only period of the year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Consultation

41.     There has been a long-standing divergence in community views between supporters of the boatyard group who advocate for the continued use of the reserve for the purpose of boat storage and maintenance, and those within the community opposed to the haul out and maintenance activities, who wish to see the reserve opened up for wider public recreation and conservation purposes.

42.     The boatyard group raised concerns in its submissions that there had been inadequate consultation with on the Kaipātiki LPMP management intentions for Little Shoal Bay. The hearings panel reported on Little Shoal Bay / Te Wai Manawa, including on the issue of the adequacy of consultation as follows:

“52. The historical activity of small (i.e. up to approximately 10m) boat haulout and

storage in this location was not disputed. The dispute concerns whether the nature

and scale of the current activity is any longer appropriate on a public recreation

reserve in today’s circumstance of an increasingly intensive residential

neighbourhood – and while also addressing the immediate issues of seawater /

storm inundation, stormwater flooding, the existing seawall configuration, the

contaminated ground, and the state of the existing small boat ramp(s).

 

53. That the discontinuance of the boatyard activity has been moot for many years is

also not disputed – although the LSBBY seeks to rely (among other things) upon a

relocation qualification included in a 1989 Planning Tribunal consent order issued

by Principal Judge Bollard sitting alone.

 

54. We note, importantly, that the Panel’s deliberation and recommendation on this

matter is neither dependent upon nor informed by consideration of matters that

might be addressed through other legislation such as the RMA. The issue is

squarely its appropriateness under the Reserves Act (and, to the extent required,

the Local Government Act).

 

55. In that regard the Panel notes the LSBBY’s submission relating to the perceived

inadequacy of the process and consultation undertaken. The Panel notes that it is

evident from both the LSBBY’s and others’ submissions (for and against) and the

presentations made to it that the matter was well publicised and known to parties,

there was ample opportunity to make submissions and representations (including

to this Panel), and the Panel has little doubt that all relevant issues are before it for

consideration).”

 

43.     The hearings panel having heard, read and considered all points raised and, on the balance, recommended the draft management intention for the park is to remain. That the activities boat maintenance and a haulage yard on the Little Shoal Bay Reserve is discontinued (resolution number KT/2024/15).

44.     Further feedback was sought from the boatyard group in March 2024 to inform this decision on termination of its licence, as set out in the context section of this report.

45.     For completeness it is also noted that council undertook public consultation during the drafting of recent Wai Manawa / Little Shoal Bay Mini-Shoreline Adaption Plan where of the 182 participants who showed interest in Little Shoal Bay via public consultation, 50 supported maintaining the boat yard activities.

Statutory framework for reserve management plan and Reserves Act licence termination decisions

46.     As set out in the context section of this report, the Kaipātiki LPMP adopted in February 2024 is the reserve management plan for Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve and is a statutory management plan prepared under the Reserves Act.

47.     The hearings panel noted the importance of the recreation reserve classification and the requirements in the Reserve Act 1977 that the reserve management plan must provide for and ensure the use, enjoyment, maintenance, protection, and preservation, and where appropriate, the development, of the reserve for the purposes for which it is classified.

48.     In its deliberations on the Little Shoal Bay / Te Wai Manawa at its business meeting on 21 February 2024 the Kaipātiki Local Board considered and debated at length all the various views and issues relevant to its decision under the Reserves Act and Local Government Act. The Local Board considered a late representation made on behalf of the boatyard group immediately prior to its deliberations and decision, as recorded in the Minutes of the meeting.

49.     Key themes in the local board deliberations included: that the issue of land contamination on the reserve was being addressed as a separate issue; the impacts of growing intensification/population pressure on the limited number of parks in the local board area and a desire to ensure freedom of access to green spaces and the water/coastline, which was not consistent with a large part of the reserve being used by a limited number of people; that this was a decision under the Reserves Act and not the Resource Management Act.

50.     The longstanding history of boatyard activities in the reserve was also raised and one local board member sought an amended decision from the Local Board: an alternative way forward that would allow the boatyard group to remain on the land, subject to various conditions including ongoing review.

51.     The motion was deliberated upon by the local board but was not supported; it was put to the vote on the voices and declared lost, as the Minutes of the meeting record.

52.     The management intentions for Little Shoal Bay in the newly adopted Kaipātiki local park management plan, being the reserve management plan for the reserve, state that council will discontinue boat maintenance and haulage yard activities on the reserve and repurpose the boat maintenance and haulage yard area to support a greater range of recreation activities near the water’s edge, to improve public access to the foreshore and coast, to improve amenity of the area and to support cultural heritage and identity.

53.     The Reserves Act requires the administering body of a reserve to comply with its reserve management plan.

Consideration of key matters raised by boatyard group

54.     As set out in the excerpt from the hearings panel report above, the hearings panel addressed the position held by the boatyard group that a 1989 Planning Tribunal consent order binds the council, by stating that it is not relevant to its decision under the Reserves Act and Local Government Act on the reserve management plan.

55.     Staff advice is that the position is the same in respect of a decision to terminate a recreation reserve licence addressed in this report under the Reserves Act.

56.     The termination decision is not a decision under the Resource Management Act, nor the planning documents created under it, nor other legislation cited such as the Biosecurity Act.

57.     In respect to the regional context raised by the boatyard group as a relevant matter, as a Unitary Authority, Auckland Council has the duties of a Regional Council under the Biosecurity Act 1993 relating to pest management. Council is required to provide leadership in activities that prevent, reduce, or eliminate adverse effects from harmful organisms present in Aotearoa New Zealand.

58.     Auckland Council’s regional focus for the control of marine pests is on monitoring, research, education, public advice and enforcement. The Council and its local boards are not required to provide any particular piece of land for boat haul out.

59.     The issue of regional capacity for boat haul out and bio-security impacts has been considered by Planning, Environment and Parks Committee via a memo prepared at the Committee’s request and tabled in March 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

60.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

61.     Climate change has a likely potential to impact the current license area, as it is located in a flood-sensitive and coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

62.     Council staff from across the Customer and Community Services Directorate provided advice into the new Kaipātiki Local Park Management Plan. The plan clearly sets out the council’s future intentions for the reserve, following a robust consultation process with the community, which includes the discontinuance of the boatyard and its activities. Staff advice was also sought on this licence termination decision under the Reserves Act.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

63.     The proposed licence termination will align the management intentions of the reserve management plan for Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve. Local impacts are as set out in prior sections of this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

64.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

65.     There are Reserves Act and Local Government Act statutory obligations to Māori. Commitments to Māori are also articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – Māori outcomes performance management framework.

66.     Iwi engagement about the council’s new local parks management plan in the Kaipātiki area was undertaken.

67.     No objections from iwi/hapū were raised on the Kaipātiki LPMP management intention to discontinue boatyard activities at Little Shoal Bay recreation reserve.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to council for the recommended licence termination.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Should the local board resolve not to terminate the licence, the local board will not be complying with the management intentions for Little Shoal Bay reserve management plan which it adopted on 24 February 2024 under resolution KT/2024/15.

70.     As communicated by the boatyard group, there is a risk of legal challenge from the boatyard group if the local board resolves to terminate the licence.

71.     To mitigate risk of the decision around the future of the Little Shoal Bay boatyard being challenged staff recommended that robust public consultation was undertaken as part of the new local parks management plan process; and that there was careful consideration, including expert advice where required, on submission points.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

72.     If the local board resolves to terminate the licence, staff must provide one month’s written notice of termination to the boatyard group, as required under the terms of licence, and will work with them to vacate the site.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Phillipa Carroll - Principal Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Allan Christensen - Manager Land Advisory Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Landowner approval application from Northcote Pétanque Club for the establishment of pétanque terrains at Little Shoal Bay Reserve

File No.: CP2024/04600

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a decision on the Northcote Pétanque Club’s application for landowner approval for the establishment and use of pétanque terrains at Little Shoal Bay Reserve, Northcote Point.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       ​Northcote Pétanque Club (NPC) have applied for landowner approval to establish pétanque terrains within the carpark area at Little Shoal Bay Reserve, Northcote Point. 

3.       ​The application was placed on hold while the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan (LPMP) and Mini Shoreline Adaptation Plan: Wai Manawa/Little Shoal Bay (SAP) were developed. 

4.       ​Staff have assessed the proposal in line with the recently adopted LPMP and SAP.

5.       ​Staff believe that having this space function as carparking at present is deemed to align with the intention of both the LPMP and SAP, while allowing Auckland Council to explore flood risk reduction work. Staff advise that approval of the proposal would contradict both plans and limit Auckland Council’s ability to adapt to climate change. 

6.       Staff are generally supportive of the creation of pétanque terrains within the wider area, however, do not consider the proposed site appropriate.  

7.       Subject to the Kaipātiki Local Board’s decision, staff have offered to assist the applicant in finding an alternative location. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      decline Northcote Pétanque Club’s application for landowner approval for the establishment and use of pétanque terrains at Little Shoal Bay Reserve, and: 

b)      request Auckland Council staff continue to work with Northcote Pétanque Club to assess alternative locations.   

Horopaki

Context

The land 

8.       Little Shoal Bay Reserve (Figure 1.) is located on the North Shore of the Waitematā Harbour and is predominantly used for active and passive recreation.  

9.       ​The reserve caters for sports including cricket, tennis, and basketball, while also enabling passive activities such as play and picnicking. Aside from sports facilities, the reserve houses assets including a public toilet, children’s playground, exercise equipment and carparking. 

10.     Little Shoal Bay Reserve is held by Auckland Council as a Recreation and Scenic Reserve and is comprised of various land parcels.  

11.     ​The terrains are proposed to be established on a land parcel, legally described as LOT 2 DP 53569.  


Figure 1. Extent of Little Shoal Bay Reserve (Blue). 

The applicant 

12.     ​Northcote Pétanque Club is affiliated with Northcote Bowling Club who own and operate a bowls and pétanque facility neighbouring Little Shoal Bay Reserve. 

13.     ​Many of the club patrons and visitors utilise parking within the reserve, when visiting the adjoining bowling club located at 24 Church Street, Northcote Point.

14.     ​Northcote Pétanque Club utilise various terrains around the area but are based at the Northcote Bowling Club facility. 

15.     ​The club believes providing additional pétanque terrains at Little Shoal Bay Reserve will increase the public’s participation in, and uptake of pétanque. 

Proposal 

16.     ​The Northcote Pétanque Club (NPC) request landowner approval to convert an area of carpark into pétanque terrains (Figure 2.).

17.     ​The area proposed to be converted is a section of the northern carpark, servicing both the reserve and sports park. 

18.     ​No structural changes would be needed to facilitate the terrain creation as materials would essentially be laid atop the existing carpark surface. 

19.     ​A section of the carpark (Figure 3.), approximately 30x30 metres (900sqm) would be converted into 12 pétanque terrains. These terrains would be administered by NPC and would be open to the public. 

20.     ​The presence of the terrains being in close proximity to the private bowling club would enable greater synergy between public users and the clubs, potentially increasing club membership. The location would also enable the club to maintain the proposed public terrains alongside their private assets.

21.     ​The proposal would see wooden edging (100mm high) established around the perimeter and the area within being covered with gravel or shell to a depth of 50mm. The wooden edges would be constructed along the existing curb which borders the carpark. 

22.     ​The original intent was to trial the terrains on a temporary basis and enter a more permanent agreement if successful. However, if this approach is not favoured, the applicant is also open to solely using the terrains on a temporary basis. 

23.     ​The proposed terrains have been designed with movability in mind, with the border edging and substrate being easily removed.


Figure 2. Proposed design/layout of public pétanque terrains. 


Figure 3. Approximate area where the terrains would be established (red). 
 

Background 

24.     An application for landowner approval to establish the pétanque courts was submitted on 05/11/2021 and was allocated for staff review on 15/12/2021.  

25.     Following conversations with the local board, the application was placed on hold pending the findings of the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan and Mini Shoreline Adaptation Plan: Wai Manawa/Little Shoal Bay.  

26.     ​Upon adoption of both plans, the application was reassessed by Auckland Council staff who indicated to the applicant that the proposal was not supported.  

27.     ​Subsequently, the decision-making delegation was called in by the Kaipātiki Local Board, requiring the board to return a decision on the proposal at a business meeting.

Shoreline Adaptation Plan 

28.     ​Shoreline Adaption Plans (SAPs) were created as a result of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. These plans aim to inform a long-term, sustainable management approach to Auckland Council owned land and assets in response to the impacts of coastal processes, climate change, erosion and flooding.

29.     ​The Wai Manawa/Little Shoal Bay Mini-Shoreline Adaptation Plan details localised hazards and management intentions relating to the Little Shoal Bay Reserve and wider area. 

30.     ​These plans are developed in collaboration with mana whenua, the local community, and local boards. 

Local Parks Management Plan 

31.     ​Local Parks Management Plans are being prepared for all of Auckland's local boards. These plans are developed in consultation with the local community, mana whenua, Auckland Council’s subject matter experts and the local board. 

32.     The intention of this plan is to reflect the local community’s needs and aspirations for local parks and help inform local board decisions around how parks are used and protected. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

33.     The following Auckland Council specialists have reviewed the proposal, and the comments below reflect those received: 

a)      Senior Land Use Advisor - Parks and Community Facilities 

b)      Principal Community Lease Advisor - Parks and Community Facilities 

c)      ​Parks and Places Specialist - Parks and Community Facilities 

d)      ​Senior Maintenance Delivery Coordinator - Parks and Community Facilities 

e)      ​Facilities Manager - Parks and Community Facilities 

f)       ​Manager Area Operations - Parks and Community Facilities 

g)      ​Coastal Management Practice Lead - Resilient Land & Coasts.

Maintenance and formalisation 

34.     For proposals where a group intends to install and maintain publicly accessible assets, staff would seek to formalise the use/occupancy via a lease or licence to occupy. This is the preferred management strategy as by entering into such an agreement, all parties are aware of requirements and responsibilities. 

35.     ​The reserve carparking area is subject to flooding and this may be exacerbated by climate change and rising sea levels. Staff are reluctant to enter into a formal occupancy agreement over assets within a flood plain, as this may impact our ability to adapt to changing circumstances (e.g. have the asset remove if flooding worsens).

Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan (LPMP)  

36.     ​The Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan has been developed in close consultation with the local community. Many of the outcomes and directions set within the plan are in response to feedback provided by the local community. 

37.     ​The LPMP advocates for the enhancement of organised sport and recreation within the reserve.

38.     Whilst the proposal aligns with the overall focus of the LPMP (mentioned above), it contradicts some management intentions as laid out in the plan and noted in the following paragraphs.  

39.     ​The LPMP notes the potential for the cricket pitch to be shifted to accommodate active recreation and planting of the western edge of the reserve. There is potential that the western edge of this carpark may need to be converted to grass to enable a shift of the cricket pitch location. This potential outcome may reduce carparking, putting further pressure on existing parking. 

40.     ​The LPMP also includes a management intention to retain existing carparking in the area. The proposal would see the loss of approximately 900sqm of carparking, which would not align with this direction.


 

Kaipātiki Climate Action Plan 2023 and Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2023 

41.     ​The ‘Ngā hapori me te tahatai | Community and coast’ section of the Kaipātiki Climate Action Plan sets a goal of reducing the risk of flooding and hazards to properties and infrastructure.

42.     ​The Kaipātiki Climate Action Plan also advocates to support the implementation of the Wai Manawa/Little Shoal Bay Mini-Shoreline Adaptation Plan.  

43.     ​The ‘Te Tāruke ā-Tāwhiri | Climate action’ section of the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2023 aims to adapt to climate change and implement ‘Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ in Kaipātiki. Shoreline Adaption Plans (SAPs) were created as a result of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

Shoreline adaption plan (SAP) 

44.     The Mini Shoreline Adaptation Plan for Wai Manawa/Little Shoal Bay has recommended a strategy of ‘hold the line’ across all timeframes at this location.  

45.     ​The ‘hold the line’ strategy relates to preserving the function and use of a reserve area or asset. It can mean holding the coastal edge in its current position or raising land levels to allow the same functionality as currently exists in flood-prone areas of the reserve land.

46.     ​The proposed terrain location is within an area subject to coastal storm inundation and flooding and the frequency of exposure to flood events is expected to increase over time. 

47.     The SAP sets a key intent to maintain the function and use of the existing area. Through the community engagement associated with the SAP development, some of the key outcomes identified were to improve access and parking within the reserve.  

48.     Implementation of the SAP including the options to manage and mitigate the longer-term flood risks are still being worked through. 

49.     ​As a result of the directions set in the SAP and LPMP, Parks and Community Facilities operational staff are exploring altering the existing carpark in order to reduce the risk of flooding. As these plans were adopted recently, this investigation is in the conceptual stage.

50.     ​There is a possibility that flood risk reduction works may see a reduction in the number of available carparks, placing further pressure on existing parking. 

51.     ​By enabling the pétanque terrains to be established in the proposed location, Auckland Council may reduce its ability to undertake the most efficient and/or impactful flood reduction work. 

52.     ​Staff do not consider it prudent to add new assets into the area that won’t be resilient to existing hazards and that requiring ongoing management and maintenance, while further limiting the options that can be considered for hazard management.

Additional staff views and advice summary 

53.     The installation of timber boxing to contain pétanque terrain material, may act as a barrier and redirect surface water, exacerbating flooding issues within the reserve and/or neighbouring properties.  

54.     Having this space function as carparking at present is deemed to align with the intention of both the LPMP and SAP and allow Auckland Council to explore flood risk reduction work. Whereas, approving this proposal would contradict both plans and limit Auckland Council’s ability to adapt to climate change.  

55.     Staff visited the reserve in 2020 and assessed carpark usage. At the time, observations suggested the usage of the carpark was low and steady. Usage was highest during bowling club events and while cricket matches were being played.

56.     If fixtures were scheduled at the cricket pitch and bowling club at the same time, car parking would be at a premium. However, bowls usually takes place during the weekdays, while cricket fixtures are usually scheduled in the summer weekends.

57.     If the carpark is to be modified and/or the cricket pitch or basketball court needs to be shifted (as a result of flood prevention) in the future, there may be a reduction in parking spaces. Additionally, if the bowling club membership grows and the proposed pétanque terrains attract further visitors, there may be further parking pressure on the existing carpark.

58.     While staff are not opposed to the creation of new pétanque terrains in general, this proposal is not supported for reasons discussed above. 

Alternative locations 

59.     The applicant has indicated that they have looked into alternative locations and have been unable to find an appropriate space.  

60.     Staff acknowledge that the area where the terrains are proposed would likely work best in terms of synergy with the existing bowling club located immediately north of the carpark. However, as this area is not supported, staff have offered to assist the applicant to find alternative locations.  

61.     ​Staff do not believe there are viable locations for new terrains within close proximity to the bowling club for the reasons discussed below. 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

62.     The creation of the proposed pétanque terrains is not expected to cause a significant climate impact. However, the presence of the terrains will impact Auckland Council’s ability to adapt to changing conditions and respond to the impacts of climate change and climate change related issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

63.     Feedback from Council Controlled Organisations has not been sought for this proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

64.     ​Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation and community facilities, including the use of local parks.

65.     The proposal contradicts multiple management intentions set by the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan (LPMP) and the Mini Shoreline Adaptation Plan for Wai Manawa/Little Shoal Bay (SAP).  

66.     These plans have been developed in collaboration with mana whenua, the local community, Auckland Council’s subject matter experts and the local board. The intention of these plans is to reflect desires of the aforementioned parties and provide direction on the most appropriate use of Auckland Council land and assets. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

67.     Engagement with mana whenua has not been undertaken by Auckland Council in relation to this proposal.

68.     Mana whenua were consulted during the development of the various plans and policies which have informed Auckland Council’s review of this proposal. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

69.     The costs associated with the construction of the terrains would be borne by the applicant.  

70.     There may be financial implications for Auckland Council, in the event the creation of the terrains exacerbate flood which leads to the need to remediate other public assets. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

71.     The area where the terrains would be established falls is subject to coastal storm inundation and flooding and the frequency of exposure to flood events is expected to increase over time.

72.     ​Generally, where structures are proposed within flood plains, Auckland Council requires these structures be raised to create freeboard for water to pass beneath. This is unachievable in this case as the terrains are required at ground level. 

73.     In the event flooding occurs, the presence of the terrains and associated edging may create localised pooling and exacerbate flood risk of nearby assets and land.  

74.     By enabling the terrain proposal to go ahead, Auckland Council may reduce its ability to undertake the most efficient and/or impactful flood reduction work. 

75.     Subject to the Kaipātiki Local Board’s decision, staff have offered to assist the applicant in finding a more suitable location. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     The Kaipātiki Local Board may resolve to decline or approve the application for landowner approval. Staff will inform the applicant of the outcome. 

77.     ​If approved, a licence to occupy must also be obtained. Staff will assist the applicant in obtaining a license to occupy (subject to all statutory requirements being met). Once the licence to occupy has been finalised, physical works could then proceed.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Alex Stansfield - Senior Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Northcote Community Hub and Puāwai Cadness Reserve concept design approval

File No.: CP2024/04680

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board for the concept design of the new, integrated, multi-purpose Northcote Community Hub and upgraded Puāwai Cadness Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A new integrated multi-purpose Northcote Community Hub is a key component of the Northcote regeneration plans.

3.       The location of the new community hub was approved by the local board in 2021 (resolution number KT/2021/170) to be a refurbishment of, and extension to, the existing library building located at 5 Ernie Mays Street, Northcote, adjacent to Puāwai Cadness Reserve. 

4.       Auckland Council and Eke Panuku have collaborated over the last few years to produce the concept design for the community hub, upgraded Puāwai Cadness Reserve and upgraded civic plaza that meets feedback received from the community through a community needs assessment completed in 2021 and the design brief approved by the Kaipātiki Local Board in October 2023.

5.       The concept design provides a building that will provide an improved community space for the growing Northcote community. It includes library space, improved connection with the adjacent reserve, an expansive new covered verandah, community rooms, and includes community service providers within the building, ensuring a better service and offering for the Northcote community.

6.       The project has total funding of $19.1 million allocated within Eke Panuku’s capital budget. This budget supports the construction of a building approximately 1,500 square metres in size and an upgrade of the surrounding open spaces.

7.       Approval of the concept design of the project will enable the development of detailed design work and the preparation of resource consent documents.

8.       Construction of the new community hub and upgraded reserve and open spaces is expected to commence in mid to late 2025.

9.       There is an opportunity for mana whenua to gift a name for the new community hub.

10.     Further collaboration with the local school community will help refine the play spaces in Puāwai Cadness Reserve. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the concept design for the Northcote Community Hub (Attachment A) and Puāwai Cadness Reserve (Attachment B).

b)      note that Eke Panuku will continue to update and seek feedback from the Kaipātiki Local Board on the detailed design of Puāwai Cadness Reserve through workshops.

c)       delegate decision-making on the fit-out to General Manager Connected Communities following feedback received from Kaipātiki Local Board through workshops.

d)      request Eke Panuku seek Nga Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau interest in gifting a name for the Northcote community hub building, noting that the current library building is being called Te Whare Mātauranga o Te Onewa.

e)      approve the plaza space in front of the Northcote Community Hub be named ‘Norman King Square’.

Horopaki

Context

Northcote town centre regeneration plans

11.     Northcote represents a major urban renewal opportunity for Auckland and residents have a long-held desire to see the town centre revitalised.

12.     In March 2016, the Auckland Council Planning Committee approved Eke Panuku lead the regeneration of the Northcote town centre, meeting outcomes set out in a High-Level Project Plan (resolution number AUC/2016/23).

13.     Eke Panuku developed the Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan (the masterplan) to set out how the Northcote town centre could be developed to meet the outcomes set out in the approved High Level Project Plan. The Kaipātiki Local Board endorsed the masterplan in March 2019 (resolution number KT/2019/41).

14.     The development of a multi-purpose community hub building is identified as one of the ten criteria for success in the town centre masterplan.

15.     The masterplan enables Eke Panuku to acquire buildings within the Northcote town centre under the Public Works Act, for the purposes of urban renewal. The criteria and principles of the masterplan must be realised to satisfy obligations under the Public Works Act.

Community needs assessment

16.     The community needs assessment was an item on the Kaipātiki Local Board 2020/2021 work programme (resolution number KT/2019/41).

17.     The Kaipātiki Local Board received the community needs assessment in September 2021 (resolution number KT/2021/149).

18.     The community needs assessment guided the design brief and requirements for the Northcote Community Hub.

Building location

19.     In October 2021, the Kaipātiki Local Board approved the location of the new Northcote multi-purpose community hub building to be a refurbishment and extension of the current library, which is a listed heritage building (resolution number KT/2021/170).

Design brief development and building spatial requirements

20.     Over 2022 and 2023 a working group consisting of Kaipātiki Local Board, Auckland Council, Eke Panuku and service providers representatives, collaborated to finalise the design brief for the community hub and Puāwai Cadness Reserve.

21.     Mana whenua feedback on the design brief was also received.

22.     The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the design brief and spatial requirements of the community hub and Puāwai Cadness Reserve in October 2023 (CP2023/15124).

23.     The requirements were for the building to include:

·        library services, meeting rooms and public-use spaces

·        one dedicated gallery/operating space for NorthArt (that can be modified to community-use space if required in the future)

·        dedicated operating space for service providers Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote, Northcote Plunket and Hearts and Minds New Zealand Incorporated. This operating space is to have the ability to be modified to accommodate future community services if required.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

24.     Analysis and adviceThe concept design for the community hub has been designed from the approved spatial requirements and brief of the local board and with feedback from the occupiers of the building.

25.     The concept design meets the requirements in the design brief and is supported by Auckland Council staff who are part of the project team.

Community hub building

26.     The Northcote community hub will act as an anchor and connector in the changing landscape. The Community Hub building is organised around a central spine, that acts as both visual and physical connecter. The ‘L’ shaped plan allows for clear delineation between old and new, whilst also providing an urban edge to the south and enclosure and activation of Puāwai Cadness Reserve.

27.     The new addition to the existing heritage building will be located to the south of the site, along the southern boundary, maximizing access to the reserve and respecting the existing building.

28.     The expanded library and community programme will be organised around a central spine and flexible verandah space. The design maintains the existing main entry to library and provides a secondary entry from the reserve.

29.     Library/public spaces are adjacent to support/back of house space and amenities, so the building is easily managed by library staff. There is shared entry/waiting and circulation areas and opportunities for separate entry/access out of hours.

30.     The new addition will respect and continue the heritage aspects of the existing building, including roof and ceiling structure.

Figure 1: View of Northcote community hub from Puāwai Cadness Reserve:

Figure 2: View of Northcote community hub from civic plaza:

Figure 3: Floor plan of Northcote community hub:

Outdoor spaces – Puāwai Cadness Reserve and plaza

31.     The design to upgrade Puāwai Cadness Reserve and the plaza includes:

·        a relocated basketball court

·        a large lawn area

·        two play spaces to cater for younger and older children

·        a shelter that can be used for events or gatherings

·        a larger plaza area in front of the building that provides a strong entrance into the community hub as well as a space for all weather events or gatherings

·        planting and swales that support natural overland flow paths

·        two garden areas

·        public toilets

·        significantly more trees to provide shade, support the natural environment and help with climate changes.

Figure 4: Illustrative plan of Puāwai Cadness Reserve and plaza space

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     Auckland Council and Eke Panuku are committed to green buildings and sustainable infrastructure to support Auckland Council’s commitment to halve the greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.

33.     The project will reduce operational carbon emissions to net zero by delivering Parks & Community Facilities sustainable asset standard (reducing energy consumption, provision of solar PV). Emissions will be generated through construction activities, however, these will be addressed and reduced through a whole of building lifecycle analysis with a focus on embodied carbon reduction.

34.     The sustainable asset standard requires a minimum rating to 5 Green Star. However, to achieve the most sustainable outcomes for the project; the building design aims to achieve a 6 star rating. This is largely through alignment with council and Eke Panuku environmental aims. This rating can be achieved with a percentage of added upfront cost which in the long-term will aim to further reduce carbon emissions by:

-     Target at least a 20 per cent reduction in upfront carbon emissions from the 2024 baseline to meet the higher benchmark.

-     Aim for the maximum points in long-term carbon storage by using materials that store at least 100 kg CO2e/m2 of atmospheric carbon.

-     Pursue innovations in design and construction that exceed typical industry practices and contribute to further carbon reductions.

35.     In the medium to long term, Northcote will be subject to more drought conditions, heavier rainfall events, and higher temperatures. Rainfall and flooding issues are being addressed across the town centre, but also through the landscape design of the library and Cadness Reserve upgrades. A significant increase in trees will provide increased shelter, shade, and rainfall interception (71 additional trees or a 284% increase). Rainwater capture and reuse will reduce the use of potable water in the building.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The community hub project team includes subject matter experts from across the council group including Eke Panuku, Regional Services and Strategy, Connected Communities, Parks and Community Facilities, Heritage, Financial and Business Performance, and Local Board Services.

37.     Through the concept design development process, the council team reviewed and provided feedback on the open space and building/library services design.

Open space design feedback:

·        Prefer not to have water feature as they are expensive to maintain.

·        Prefer to have a swale as opposed to a raingarden as it is easier to maintain.

·        Consider putting shade over any slides and toddler play equipment.

·        Support the proposed lighting design for open space area.

·        Support the inclusion of end of trip facility for staff within the building.

Building and library design feedback:

·        Importance of staff visibility of library’s central space.

·        Larger library workroom.

·        Providing a separate staff lunchroom / kitchen from the community kitchen.

·        Providing separate staff toilets / end of trip facilities from public facilities.

·        For tikanga considerations, more distance to be provided between kitchens and toilets.

38.     The concept design was supported by the Auckland Council’s Community Portfolio Investment Group in February 2024.

39.     The council project team will remain involved throughout the detailed design phases to ensure all aspects of the design meet the strategic and operational needs of council.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Kaipātiki Local Board

40.     Eke Panuku has provided the Kaipātiki Local Board with updates on the community hub project through bi-monthly workshops since 2020. Additional workshops and business meetings were also held when the local board’s direction and/or decision was sought for this project.

41.     The local board approved the building location in October 2021 and the project design brief in October 2023.

42.     Workshop were held on 27 March and 1 May 2024 with the local board to seek feedback on the final concept design for the new Northcote Community Hub and Puāwai Cadness Reserve.

43.     Bi-monthly workshops with the local board will continue. These will enable project updates and feedback to be received as the project continues through detailed design into construction.

Current community service providers in the Northcote facilities

44.     Operating space will be made available in the new, integrated, multi-purpose community hub for each of the four current lessees/service providers who have collaborated with the project team on the design brief and concept design through a number of workshops and meetings.

45.     The service providers are:

·        Citizens Advice Bureau Northcote

·        Plunket Northcote

·        NorthArt

·        Hearts and Minds Incorporated

46.     Auckland Council will work with these service providers to confirm new leases for their occupation in the new community hub building (if required).

47.     Note that a transition process of temporarily relocating the current service providers to the new space has started. The project team is currently verifying the list of requirements from each service provider to be included in the temporary space.

48.     Temporary relocation of service providers will enable deconstruction of Norman King building as stage one of the work and make the library / annex area available for construction / upgrade work as stage two of physical works.

49.     Continued service provision for residents is a priority. Auckland Council and Eke Panuku will continue to work with lessees/service providers (as well as library staff) who are displaced during construction of the new town centre, to ensure there is continued community services provision for Northcote residents.

Wider Northcote community

50.     The draft concept design is based on feedback from the Community Needs Assessment 2021. This assessment was drafted with feedback from 41 stakeholders, 718 public submissions, 90 Northcote Intermediate School students and through a number of informal intercept / engagement interviews with members of the public at various locations in Northcote Town Centre and at local events.

51.     We will continue to work with Northcote Intermediate School students, seeking input into the Puāwai Cadness Reserve play areas as detailed design progresses for the play areas and outdoor spaces.

52.     Following concept design approval, we will inform stakeholders and members of the community through local promotion and advertising media, community events, signage and posters, and social media channels.

53.     There are significant design restrictions with this project that include the preservation of heritage features of the current library, accommodating specific requirements from the local board and community service providers, and the project budget which determines the size of the new hub. This means that there is no scope for revising the concept design based on public feedback. Therefore, staff recommend that a full public consultation process, such as using the ‘Have Your Say’ website, does not take place.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     Eke Panuku has worked closely with mana whenua from the outset of the Northcote town centre redevelopment project. The principles underpinning the masterplan comprise the celebration of Māori communities. Te Aranga values and principles have been embedded within the design process of the hub.

55.     A site hikoi was held in December 2022 at the commencement of the design brief stage with the forum and the architectural design team in attendance. Multiple hui have been held with mana whenua to receive feedback on the design of the building and open space as it has progressed.

56.     In July 2023, a sub-committee of Eke Panuku’s mana whenua forum was established for this project including representatives of mana whenua from Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki and Te Patukirikiri. The sub-committee meet monthly with the architectural design team, to guide the design development and ensure alignment with the Take Mauri Take Hono framework.

57.     Eke Panuku and council will continue to work with mana whenua throughout the delivery of the community hub. In working together, Eke Panuku seeks to ensure that the project can produce outcomes that better reflect Māori in Auckland, and the Māori cultural narrative that exists for Northcote.

58.     Mana whenua agreed to appoint an artist to be involved on the identified scope / areas for the project during detailed design development. Artist procurement will follow approval of the concept design.

59.     An opportunity exists to provide a culturally representative name for the new Community Hub building. The current library is referred to as Te Whare Mātauranga o Te Onewa but this is a translation of Northcote Library and not a gifted name.

60.     Cadness Reserve has already been gifted the name Puāwai Cadness Reserve by mana whenua through the Te Kete Rukuruku programme. The plaza in front of the community hub building is currently named Norman King Square, which will remain.

61.     Staff will seek mana whenua’s interest in gifting a name for the community hub building and report this back to the local board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

62.     The community hub and open space has funding of $19.1 million allocated within Eke Panuku’s capital budget. This supports the construction of a building of approximately 1,500 square metres and the upgrade of Puāwai Cadness Reserve and Norman King Square.

63.     Following the completion of concept design package, an updated cost review report was completed by an independent quantity surveyor which shows the overall project cost estimate is within Eke Panuku’s allocated funding and budget.

64.     Local board’s approval of the location of the building in October 2021 and the refined design brief and new hub spatial arrangement in October 2023 were key decisions which enabled the delivery of the project within budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

65.     Identified risks and mitigations associated of the project are provided in the table below.

Table: Risks and mitigations associated with this report’s recommendations

Risk

Mitigation

Construction overlap between multiple capital projects in town centre will restrict access, carparking and create potential noise and vibration

Regular communication with businesses and tenants during design phase and seek feedback before physical works commencement.

Plan a staged delivery for community hub, Ernie Mays Street and Te Ara Awataha to ensure minimum disruption to business continuity.

Consider finding alternative parking spaces within town centre during construction.

Asbestos material during construction could have H&S risk to construction team and public.

Ensure asbestos management survey and asbestos demolition survey reports are provided and included in tender documents. Ensure asbestos removal follows council H&S requirements.

Library and other service providers temporary relocation may impact the continuity of some service providers (specially library moving to a smaller space)

Identify library needs and requirements prior to transition and upgrade the new space accordingly.

Communicate with public and other users about upcoming changes and ensure they are up to date with upcoming changes.

Delays in the approval process of design development significantly extends the hub construction timeframe resulting in an increase of build costs beyond the project budget  

Update project cost review reports during design development stage and monitor cost escalations, scope creep and new risks.

Continue with regular updates to the local board by the project team. Establish clear decision point timeframes with the consequences of delayed decision-making clearly identified. 

Challenges in logistical and design integration with other public realm projects such as Ernie Mays Street extension and Te Ara Awataha completion

Effective management within Northcote programme design and delivery.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     Upon approval of the concept design, the community will be informed of the approved concept design and the delivery milestones and timeframes for this project. This will be done through:

·        community days, including Te Ara Awataha celebration day on 4 May 2024

·        local advertising and promotion through media, council channels and/or community newsletters

·        signage and posters around the town centre

·        social media channels.

67.     The next step of the project is to commence the detailed design and prepare resource consent documentation for the project. The Auckland Council project team will continue to input into the design as it is detailed.

68.     Actions to take place during detailed design include:

·        Procure a mana whenua artist to be involved in identified design opportunities within project scope through an expressions of interest process through the Eke Panuku mana whenua forum.

·        Consult with mana whenua regarding the opportunity for a culturally significant name for the community hub building.

·        Continue working with students at Northcote Intermediate School on the play areas within Puāwai Cadness Reserve.

·        Progress library and community service providers relocation works to ensure a smooth transition to the new temporary space before construction commencement.

69.     Note that construction works are expected to commence mid to late 2025 subject to contractor procurement processes and consents approval timeframes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Northcote Community Hub architectural drawings

39

b

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Northcote Community Hub landscape drawings

97

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Amir Saadatjoo – Senior Project Manager, Eke Panuku Development

Authorisers

Angela Clarke – Head of Service Investment & Programming

Darryl Soljan – General Manager Connected Communities

Kate Cumberpatch - Priority Location Director, Eke Panuku Development

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



























































Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

























Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Marlborough Park Youth Hall, Glenfield – future community centre management

File No.: CP2024/05139

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a decision from the Kaipātiki Local Board on the future community centre management of Marlborough Park Youth Hall.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 9 September 2015, the Kaipātiki Local Board approved the repurposing of the Marlborough Park Youth Hall, located at Marlborough Park, Glenfield as a youth focussed facility and approved the Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust (KYDT) as the preferred operator to manage the hall (resolution number KT/2016/110-a).

3.       Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust currently have a three-year Community Centre Management Agreement (CCMA) (lease and $80,000 per annum council funding) ending 30 June 2024.

4.       Four options for the future management of the Marlborough Park Youth Hall are provided for the local board’s consideration:

·        Option 1 - renewal of a CCMA for KYDT to continue managing the facility.

·        Option 2 – the facility to be managed and governed through Auckland Council Venue for Hire.

·        Option 3 – run an Expression of Interest (EOI) process in financial year 2024/2025 for a community trust or incorporated society to manage the facility with a CCMA (three-year lease and $80,000 asset-based services (ABS) operational expenditure (OPEX) budget).

·        Option 4 – the facility is managed and governed by a Trust or incorporated society by way of a community lease.

5.       Staff recommend option 3 – to run an EOI process and that the facility is community managed and governed by a Trust or incorporated society with a CCMA (lease and council funding) to deliver access, activation, and programming at Marlborough Park Youth Hall.

6.       To provide Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust time to find new premises in the event they are not successful from the EOI process, staff recommend a 6-month extension of the current KYDT CCMA from 1 July 2024 to 31 December 2024.

7.       Subject to local board approval of the recommendations in this report, an EOI process will take place from July to September 2024 and staff will apply a six-month extension to the KYDT current CCMA whilst the EOI process takes place.

8.       A report will be presented to the local board at a business meeting in October 2024 to inform the decision on which community organisation will be appointed to manage the Marlborough Park Youth Hall.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      whakaee / approve option 3 - an Expression of Interest process in the 2024/2025 financial year for a provider to manage the Marlborough Park Youth Hall under a Community Centre Management agreement (three-year lease and $80,000 asset-based services (ABS) operational expenditure (OPEX) funding) to deliver access, activation, and programming.

b)      whakaee / approve a six-month extension of the Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust current Community Centre Management Agreement at Marlborough Park Youth Hall, from 1 July 2024 to 31 December 2024.

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Kaipātiki Local Board provide annual operational funding for seven community-led centres across the local board area, each receiving a different amount based on legacy council funding.

10.     In August 2021, as part of the Customer and Community Services annual work programme, the Kaipātiki Local Board approved $10,000 Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) for a funding review of the seven community centres who received funding from the local board at this time with recommendations for future equitable funding (resolution number KT/2021/86).

11.     In February 2022, the Kaipātiki Local Board received and endorsed the Kaipātiki Community Centres/Houses Funding Review 2021/2022 report and recommendations (resolution number KT/2022/16).

12.     The local board noted:

·        the sound work in the community development area that all the organisations were doing and according to council officer assessments, that they were meeting their KPIs.

·        that all organisations are reliant on council premises for their operation, and this is the single biggest contribution council makes.

13.     In addition, the local board requested staff to investigate the possibility of a building swap between Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT) located at 15 Chartwell Ave and Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust at Marlborough Park Youth Hall as part of 2022/2023 local board work programme development process.

14.     Discussions were held in early 2023 with KCFT and KYDT regarding the possible building swap, however, both community organisations have indicated that for various operational reasons, they do not want to move premises at this present time.  The local board has been regularly updated at workshops on this matter.

Marlborough Park Youth Hall

15.     On 9 September 2015, the Kaipātiki Local Board approved the repurposing of the Marlborough Park Youth Hall in Marlborough Park as a youth focused facility, and after an EOI process, approved KYDT as the preferred operator of the facility by issuing a license to occupy for two years, 1 June 2018 to 30 June 2021 (resolution number KT/2016/110-a).

16.     The local board also approved the allocation of $126,210 asset-based services (ABS) operational expenditure (OPEX) budget to KYDT for the 2017/2018 financial year and thereafter.

17.     In early 2021, the manager of KYDT informed staff that KYDT would consider not receiving the full funding amount required ($126,210) for delivering access, activation, and programming at Marlborough Park Youth Hall. KYDT indicated that the significant funds received from the Ministry of Education for youth mentoring contracts were sufficient to fulfil a large portion of their operational funding needs.

18.     Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust currently have a three-year CCMA (lease and council funding) that commenced on 1 July 2021 and ends on 30 June 2024.

19.     A CCMA is whereby the provider agrees to perform services for the management and operation of the community centre and the council agrees to pay for the services, on the terms and conditions of this agreement.

20.     In June 2021, the Kaipātiki Local Board resolved that KYDT would receive $80,000 ABS OPEX per annum ABS noting that KYDT would continue to deliver the same service expectations, despite council’s funding reduction. The remaining $46,000 of the allocated $126,210 ABS OPEX funding has been reallocated and used to top up the funding for four other community-led centres. (resolution number KT/2021/82).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Community Centre Management Agreement (CCMA)

21.     The current CCMA service levels and expectations for the Marlborough Youth Hall are as follows:

a)      Access - to provide fair, easy, and affordable access to a safe and welcoming venue in your local community.

b)      Activation - to enable and co-ordinate a wide range of activities that cater to the diversity of your local community.

c)      Intervention Programming - to identify, develop and deliver intentional targeted programme(s) that respond to strategic needs in your local community.

Expression of Interest (EOI) process

22.     It is recommended that when a council building becomes vacant or a CCMA ends, to undergo an Expressions of Interest (EOI) process.

23.     An EOI process ensures transparency for all community organisations in Kaipātiki that might show an interest to manage the Marlborough Park Youth Hall.

24.     The EOI process helps determine which applicants are suitable to progress to the Request for Proposal (RFP) stage, by assessing them against some pass or fail criteria.

25.     If the applicants pass all these criteria, they progress to the RFP stage where they are assessed against more in-depth criteria. This EOI stage helps identify suitable proposals from unsuitable ones and ensures the effort we put in to reviewing applications is commensurate.

26.     If the management of the Marlborough Park Youth Hall was to change, and if the provider remained under a CCMA, the Kaipātiki Local Board would have an opportunity to reconsider both service levels and the amount of funding a future provider would receive.

Options

27.     Table 1 below outlines the options for the future facility provider at Marlborough Youth Hall.


 

Table 1 - options analysis

Options

Description

Pros and cons

Option 1 

Renewal of a CCMA for KYDT to continue managing Marlborough Park Youth Hall

KYDT to receive a 1-year CCMA agreement with $80,000 of the allocated $126,210 ABS OPEX funding.

 

Marlborough Park Youth Hall continues to be used for Youth access, activations, and programmes.

Option 2 

Council managed and governed  

Venue Hire will manage all bookings and retain all the hire fees.

The community can hire the hall through the Auckland Council Venue Hire website.

 

 

KYDT would need to find new premises.

There would be no targeted community activation or programming.

The local board will only receive the access statistics for the hall.

Local board would retain the $126,210 ABS OPEX funding in future financial years.

Option 3 – Recommended

Community managed and governed by a Trust or incorporated society by Community Centre Management Agreement (lease and funding)

To run an Expression of Interest (EOI) for a community organisation to manage the facility.

A community organisation to receive a CCMA for 3 years with $80,000 ABS OPEX funding.

KYDT to receive a 6-month extension to their current CCMA to prevent the building lying empty and allow time to the EOI process to run.

 

KYDT would have time to find new premises if they are unsuccessful in the EOI process.

An expression of interest (EOI) would ensure transparency for all community organisations in Kaipātiki that might show an interest to manage Marlborough Park Youth Hall.

Future top-up funding for other community centres may need to be considered. 

Option 4

Community managed and governed by a Trust or incorporated society by a Community Centre Management Agreement (lease only)

To directly appoint or run an EOI for a community organisation to manage the facility.

A community organisation to receive a lease for 5 years with no funding.

Local board would retain the $126,210 ABS OPEX funding

KYDT would need to find new premises if they are unsuccessful with the EOI process.

The successful community organisation would not receive any funding and would only have to report on access stats.

Risk of programming not being delivered and/or the ‘youth’ component of the facility not being honored.

 

28.     Staff recommend option 3 – that Marlborough Park Youth Hall is community managed and governed by a Trust or incorporated society under a CCMA (lease and funding).

29.     An expression of interest (EOI) process would ensure transparency for all community organisations in Kaipātiki that might show an interest to manage Marlborough Park Youth Hall.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     Well activated community services and venues create a stronger sense of place and foster localism and place-based approaches. This builds community connection and has a positive impact on our resilience to climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Council staff from within Customer and Community Services - Connected Communities, Parks and Community Facilities – Community Leasing have been consulted. Staff are supportive of the option 3, as it will ensure transparency for all community organisations in Kaipātiki that might show an interest to manage Marlborough Park Youth Hall.

32.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that information sharing continues throughout the process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     The proposals outlined in this report align to the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan’s 2023 Community and People outcomes, objectives, and initiatives:

·        Our people are engaged, connected, healthy, thriving, and are proud to live in Kaipātiki.

·        Our built environment is vibrant, well maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, meets our people’s needs, and has a low impact on our climate.

34.     The recommendations will ensure that community-led activities are delivered in ways that respond to the diverse aspirations of the local community and that there is increased engagement and broad community benefit from delivering local programmes, events, and initiatives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

36.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan 2050, the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (Long-term Plan), the Auckland Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, the council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

37.     Community centres and the programmes they provide enable locally responsive activities, promoting participation, inclusion, and connection for all Aucklanders, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The table below outlines the financial implications for each option.


 

Table 2 – option costs

 

Options

Costs

 

Option 1 – Renewal of a CCMA for KYDT to continue managing Marlborough Park Youth Hall for 1 year

$80,000 ABS OPEX annually until 30 June 2025.

 

Option 2 - Council managed and governed    

 

Venue Hire will manage all bookings and retain all the hire fees. Local board would retain the $126,000 ABS OPEX funding

Option 3 - Community managed and governed by a Trust or incorporated society by a Community Centre Management Agreement (lease and funding)

A community organisation to receive a CCMA for 3 years with $80,000 ABS OPEX funding.

Option 4 - Community managed and governed by a Trust or incorporated society by Community Centre Management Agreement (lease only)

To direct, appoint or run EOI for a community organisation to manage the facility.

 

Local board would retain the total allocated $126,000 ABS OPEX funding

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     If the local board do not proceed with an EOI, there is a risk of lack of transparency and a negative community perception. Staff recommend proceeding with an EOI process.

40.     The Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust CCMA expires 30 June 2024. There is a risk that the Trust will not find new premises before the CCMA expires. Therefore, staff recommend that the local board extend the KYDT CCMA for a further 6 months, until December 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Subject to local board approval of the recommendations in this report, an EOI process will take place from July to September 2024 and staff will apply a 6-month extension to the KYDT current CCMA whilst the EOI process takes place. 

42.     A report on will be presented to the local board at a business meeting in October 2024 to inform the decision on which community organisation will be appointed to manage the Marlborough Youth Hall.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jamie Adkins – Place and Partner Specialist

Authorisers

Darryl Soljan – General Manager Connected Communities

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to reclassify land, grant an agreement to lease and subsequent community ground lease to He Oranga Wairua Marae at Shepherds Park, Beach Haven

File No.: CP2024/03747

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the the Kaipātiki Local Board to publicly notify Auckland Council’s intention to classify land, grant an agreement to lease and subsequent new community ground lease to He Oranga Wairua Marae at Shepherds Park, Beach Haven.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The He Oranga Wairua Marae Trust (trust) was formed in 2017 by local Māori whanau, with the desire to establish a marae for the people living in the Beach Haven, Birkdale, and Glenfield area. This has been an aspiration since the 1970s when the first Tū Tangata programmes were run.

3.       The trust is a local community trust established for the purpose of building and operating a marae to service the cultural and spiritual needs of Māori whanau living in Beach Haven, Birkdale, Glenfield, and Kaipātiki. As well as the building side of their kaupapa, they also undertake unfunded work to support social and cultural needs. It is this mahi that underpins their purpose and will carry through and substantially grow with the newly proposed marae.

4.       Local Māori whānau come from all corners of Aotearoa but appreciate that before urbanization and the creation of these suburbs, there were already iwi who loved these lands and called them home. To honour these tupuna and their descendants, the trust acknowledges them, their mana and their history and ensures that their plans and aspirations, our activities and efforts coincide with their aspirations for those who live in their rohe.

5.       The trust presented to the local board on 7 December 2023 to outline both their business plan and concept plans for the marae.

6.       The trust formally applied to council for an agreement to lease and subsequent community ground lease for land at Shepherds Park to enable the trust to develop and operate a marae.

7.       The land parcel for the proposed marae is currently held under The Reserves Act 1977 as a classified recreation reserve. Staff recommend surveying a section within the parcel that will house the marae and reclassify as local purpose -Marae. This will enable the marae to undertake their daily activities and apply for external funding.

8.       As the subject parcel of land is subject to requirements of the Reserves Act 1977, Auckland Council must publicly notify and engage with iwi on its intention to reclassify, grant an agreement to lease and subsequent community ground lease.

9.       The report also asks the local board chair to appoint a panel if a hearings is required as a result of public notification.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to reclassify approximately 5,500 sq metres of land at Shepherds Park, Beach Haven, legally described as Lot 156 DP 20048 from classified recreation reserve to local purpose- Marae under 16 (1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

b)      whakaae / approve the public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant under Section 61 (a) of the Reserves Act 1977 an agreement to lease and subsequent community ground lease to He Oranga Wairua Marae Trust for approximately 5,500 sqm of land at Shepherds Park, Beach Haven, legally described as Lot 156 DP 20048, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)       The agreement to lease for a term of 5 years.

ii)       Subject to completion of the stage one of the development and fulfilment of all conditions of the agreement to lease, a community ground lease to He Oranga Wairua Marae Trust.

iii)      Lease term 11 years commencing from the date of satisfaction of the Agreement to lease with two 11-year rights of renewal.

iv)      Permitted activity for the site to be for the development and operation of a marae including overnight accommodation for cultural and education purposes and one residential unit for a caretaker.

v)      All other terms and conditions to be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 (Updated July 2023), and the Auckland Council standard form community lease agreement.

c)       delegate to the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to appoint a panel to consider submissions or objections received following the public notification of the intention to lease, and for the panel to make a decision.

d)      request that council staff report back to the local board following public notification for a decision or final approval of the proposed community lease.

Horopaki

Context

10.     This report considers the leasing and land issues with respect to the trust’s proposed occupation of a portion of land at Shepherds Park, Beach Haven.

11.     The Kaipātiki Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport, and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Land and proposed lease

12.     The trust is proposing to occupy approximately 5,500 square metres of land within the parcel legally described as LOT 156 DP 20048 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

13.     The land is currently held as a classified recreation reserve. To enable the trust to operate the marae and apply for funding from external bodies staff recommend reclassifying the land to Local Purpose- Marae.

14.     The trust proposes to develop the marae in stages. Stage one will consist of earthworks, consents, marae atea, wharekai, kauta administration and caretakers building and an ablutions block.

15.     Following the successful completion of stage one- the marae proposes in stage two to undertake the development of the wharenui, and a small storeroom followed by stage three. This will include the building used for programmes.

16.     Staff will recommend granting an agreement to lease, this will give security of tenure to the trust to help secure funding. A condition of the agreement to lease will be that the trust secure all funding for the specific stages of the development before commencing build work.

17.     For proposals of this size, staff recommend up to three years to secure funding and two more years to construct stage one of the proposed development.

18.     Once the trust has fulfilled the terms and conditions of the agreement to lease (stage one of the development) a community ground lease will be granted.

19.     The community occupancy guidelines recommend a 10 + 10-year lease for tenant owned buildings. In this instance the development is projected to cost in excess of $14,000,000. To reflect both the funds required for the development and that marae are to be long term community assets staff recommend a community ground lease tenure 3 * 11-year terms to reflect the maximum lease time allowed under the Reserves Act 1977.

The Trust

20.     The Marae Charitable Trust was established on 19 June 2017 (incorporation number 2673634). The trust is managed by an elected Governance Komiti of between six and nine members as per the Trust Deed.

21.     The trust mission statement is to create and maintain an inclusive forum for Māori and the wider community by providing a marae complex with supporting facilities and services located at Shepherds Park, Beach Haven, Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland.

22.     The proposed He Oranga Wairua Marae development has been designed to accommodate both contemporary urban and traditional Marae facilities within a curved West facing complex (see figure 2). All marae facilities except the administration building and attached Caretakers Facility are connected by either internal or covered verandah access enabling convenient all weather and all hour's connectivity between core marae functions. All facilities are accessible as required by the Building Code with level entry thresholds.

23.     Carparking for marae use is proposed to be accommodated by both dedicated new as well as existing parking areas plus parallel parking on Cresta Avenue New parking areas proposed consist of Manuhiri parking off Cresta Avenue (25 spaces), the Ringawera / cooks parking (4 spaces) and the Stage 3 Programmes parking (28 spaces).

24.     It is widely acknowledged by neighbouring sports clubs that there is ample nearby parking already available except for Saturday mornings during the football season. The Marae Committee are open to sharing their dedicated carparking areas when not required for marae activities.

25.     The proposed new pedestrian paths to the north and south will allow marae access to be integrated within the existing Shepherds Park track network while allowing existing users to continue their uninterrupted use of the Reserve.


 

Figure 2 – Concept plan

26.     The proposed development site utilises an area of park land that is currently occupied by an old storage shed and steep contoured bush and tree-covered area that is located in between the football fields and the bowling club. The sports playing fields will be unaffected by the development.

27.     The site will require the removal of a trees and bush area which includes the removal of a some gum trees. Public use of the park will be largely unaffected as the proposed development site was used for storage by the KCFT, who have since vacated: the storage shed is still there and remains empty.

28.     Access to the development site will utilise an existing road access off Cresta Ave. Minor redirection of public pedestrian access will be required during construction. The initial construction works will require earthworks to form building platforms and retaining walls, but this work will all be carried out within the fenced off development area and will not affect park users.

29.     The proposed building site is on a lower level to the sports fields so the visual impact on most of the park is greatly minimised due to the contours of the land and from screening provided by existing mature trees.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

30.     In accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, reclassifying land to a different classification type requires public notification. Once a piece of land is classified local purpose, technically new leases do not need to be publicly consulted. As this is a new development and of significant value and size, staff recommend undertaking public consultation on the development and lease proposal. This provides an opportunity for the community to provide feedback on the proposal and will help provide a pathway for an accepted and supported marae at the park.

31.     This provides an opportunity for the community to provide feedback on the proposal and will help provide a pathway for an accepted and supported marae at the park.

32.     The public notification process will involve the publishing of an advertisement about the land reclassification and lease proposal in relevant local papers. The public are invited to make submissions and or objections and are allowed one calendar month to submit these and advise whether they wish to be heard. This may lead to a hearing process.

33.     Staff would also recommend a letter box drop, posters and a drop-in session. This exceeds the usual public consultation process on reserve land, but keeping in mind the scale and cultural importance of the development it is imperative council ensure the community have the opportunity to discuss the proposal, so they have buy in to the project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     It is anticipated that activation of the park will result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission.

35.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy, and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

36.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

37.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate support the progress of the proposed marae development at Shepherds Park.

39.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     At its business meeting on 21 February 2024, the Kaipātiki Local Board resolved to adopt their new open space management plan (resolution number KT/2024/15).

41.     Through the open space management plan a management intention for Shepherds Park is to support the marae proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     Engagement with iwi identified as having an interest in land in the Kaipātiki Local Board geographical area will be undertaken about the proposal.Engagement will involve:

Engagement will involve:

·        attending a monthly forum and following up with an email contact containing detailed information and inviting iwi representatives to hui and/or

·        A Kaitiaki site visit to comment on any spiritual, cultural, or environmental impact on the proposal.

43.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

44.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

45.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects. The proposed marae will help council fulfil its promise to Māori under Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

46.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests, and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     The costs associated with public notification and engagement with iwi on council’s intention to reclassify the land and grant a new agreement to lease and subsequent community lease will be borne by the Parks and Community Facilities Department. Should there be a hearing process this may incur additional cost.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     Should the Kaipātiki Local Board resolve not to undertake public consultation this will jeopardize any decision the board makes around the land classification and occupation agreements.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     Council staff will engage with iwi and undertake public consultation on the land classification, agreement to lease and subsequent lease.

50.     Council staff will subsequently report back to the local board for a decision on the public notification process or final approval of the land classification and occupation agreements.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Proposed lease area for He Oranga Wairua Marae at Shepherds Park)

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Phillipa Carroll - Principal Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Kaipātiki community places quarter three reports 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/05310

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the activities and achievements of the community places in Kaipātiki for quarter three 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached reports provide members with an oversight of the activities and achievements of the community places in the Kaipātiki Local Board area for quarter three 2023/2024. The reports contain updates on:

·        Bayview Community Centre;

·        Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project;

·        Glenfield Community Centre;

·        Hearts and Minds;

·        Highbury House; and

·        Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Kaipātiki community places quarter three 2023/2024 reports as set out in Attachments A – G of this agenda report. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Bayview Community Centre quarter three report 2023/2024

141

b

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project quarter three report 2023/2024

147

c

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Glenfield Community Centre quarter three report 2023/2024

151

d

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Hearts and Minds quarter three report 2023/2024

157

e

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Highbury House quarter three report 2023/2024

165

f

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust programming update quarter three report 2023/2024

171

g

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust activation update quarter three report 2023/2024

179

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 






Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 





Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 






Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 








Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 






Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 









Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 








Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust quarter three report 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/05361

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to update members on the schedule of work achieved and completed by the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT), aligned to Schedule 1 of the Kaipātiki Local Board contract delivery partnership, for quarter three of 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The report as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report provides members with an oversight of Kaipātiki Local Board’s shared community development partnership with the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT). The Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust leads and supports collaborative responses to improve community wellbeing in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust quarter three report as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust quarter three report 2023/2024

189

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 







Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Proposed early termination of the community ground lease to North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated - Totaravale (Sunnynook) at Totaravale Reserve, R 37 Totaravale Drive, Totara Vale

File No.: CP2024/05610

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongoPurpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to terminate the community ground lease for the tenant-owned building for North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated – Totaravale (Sunnynook), located at Totaravale Reserve, R 37 Totaravale Drive, Totara Vale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated – Totaravale (Sunnynook) (the playcentre) occupies part of the land at Totaravale Reserve, R 37 Totaravale Drive, Totara Vale for their tenant-owned building.

3.       The land is legally described as Part Lot 9 DP 58805 and is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

4.       The playcentre has had a ground lease at this site for more than 30 years. Their current community lease has a final expiry date of 28 February 2039.

5.       The playcentre premises were affected during the January 2023 Auckland flooding event. 

6.       The playcentre building was ‘yellow stickered’ by council officers during the rapid building assessment stage after the flooding event, meaning access to the building was restricted.

7.       The playcentre was aiming to rebuild their asset to continue operations from this location and deliver their services to the local community. They approached Auckland Council staff seeking flooding protection for their site and confirmation that the zone was safe to rebuild their asset.

8.       As this is a tenant-owned building, leasing staff worked with experts from across the council in order to provide advice and confirmation of the land’s condition with regards to the safety of rebuilding their asset. Given that the playcentre building is located in a flood plain/flooding-prone zone, Healthy Waters staff were consulted to provide their advice and recommendations.

9.       Staff have investigated options for supporting the playcentre moving forward for the local board’s consideration and decision.

10.     Subject matter experts from across Auckland Council do not support or recommend the playcentre rebuild their asset at this reserve.

11.     The rezoning of the land to red zoning, where properties are potentially excluded from redeveloping, is likely to be driven by central government. As this property is on council-owned land, it cannot be part of the Category 3 property buy-out scheme between the government and Auckland Council.

12.     The stormwater network and channel will flood in larger events and are expected to flood across the reserve area in the future. Regulatory requirements for this site are therefore likely to be very challenging. Should this land be zoned as Category 3 in the future, the property could be excluded from redevelopment.

13.     Flood protection will also be challenging for the playcentre due to its location and potential to be zoned as Category 3. Category 3 is defined as “high risk, house should be removed, and/or not rebuilt and the land will remain a flood risk.”

14.     Due to the nature of this site and the potential safety risks, this report recommends that the playcentre move from Totaravale Reserve and look at alternative options to deliver their services.

15.     If the local board decides to approve the early termination of the community ground lease, staff will work with the lessee to facilitate meetings and introductions to staff that work on leases of adjoining local board areas for possible relocation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve termination of the community ground lease, to North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated – Totaravale for 1,000 square meters (more or less) located at Totaravale Reserve, R 37 Totaravale Drive, Totara Vale on the land legally described as Part Lot 109 Deposited Plan 58805 (refer to Attachment A – Totaravale Reserve), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)     Removal of Improvements, Alterations and Additions as per lease dated 22 July 2019

ii)     Reinstatement of the land to make it good again to the satisfaction of the landlord.

b)      request that the Community Leasing staff work with the playcentre through this process and facilitate meetings and introductions to relevant staff working on leases of adjoining local board areas.

 

Horopaki

Context

16.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

17.     Kaipātiki Local Board received information of this damaged tenant-owned building via a memorandum dated 7 March 2024, seeking feedback and direction. 

18.     The termination of this ground lease to North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated – Totaravale (Sunnynook) at Totaravale Reserve, R 37 Totaravale Drive, Totara Vale is additional to the approved work programme.

Land, building/s and lease

19.     Totaravale Reserve is located at R 37 Totaravale Drive, Totara Vale (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report: Site Plan – Totaravale Reserve, R 37 Totaravale Drive, Totara Vale). The land is legally described as being Part Lot 109 Deposited Plan 58805 and is currently held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

20.     The playcentre holds a community lease for the tenant-owned building on the council owned land situated at Totaravale Reserve.

21.     The current lease area is 1,000 square meters (more or less) as outlined in Attachment A of the agenda report: Totaravale Reserve.

22.     All operational and maintenance costs for this group owned building are borne by the lessee.  These costs are funded from membership fees, fundraising, private hire and/or insurance claim refunds.

23.     The playcentre had all necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

24.     The playcentre has been operating at this site for more than 30 years via a community ground lease. The building and other improvements are owned by the lessee.

25.     The playcentre’s current community lease agreement with the council commenced on 1 March 2019, with renewal date on 1 March 2029 and will finally expire on 28 February 2039.

26.     Before the January 2023 flooding event, the playcentre was used as a preschool for up to 10 hours a week during term time. The premises have not been used since the floods.

North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated – Totaravale (Sunnynook)

27.     The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated – Totaravale (Sunnynook) is part of the amalgamation of various playcentre associations that now form Te Whānau Tupu Ngātahi O Aotearoa – Playcentre Aotearoa and its primary purpose and objective is to provide families with young children with opportunities of child-led learning and play experiences. 

28.     Each playcentre is cooperatively managed by parents and supported by Playcentre Aotearoa staff at a regional and national level. This provides independence and support to meet the specific needs of each area.

29.     It offers families the chance to play, grow and learn together, as well as forge meaningful friendships with other families in the community. It is also an opportunity to extend the parents’ own life skills. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Public notification and engagement

30.     As this is an existing community lease to The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated – Totaravale (Sunnynook) for the land at Totaravale Reserve, no public notification or iwi engagement is required for termination of this lease.

Assessment of the site post flooding

31.     In April 2023, the playcentre contacted Auckland Council staff seeking flooding protection for their site and subsequent confirmation that the zone was safe to rebuild their severely damaged building, to continue to operate services from that location.

32.     The playcentre provided a Summary Report of Weather Damage of their building carried out in February 2023 by an independent consultant. The report showed total damage estimated at $151,000 excluding the cost of supplies and equipment to clean and repair the asset, as well as any ongoing maintenance repairs that may be required.

33.     The independent consultant found the building to be unsuitable for use until the repair works were completed.

34.     The council were also undertaking rapid building assessments (placard) process to all properties in the area due to severe flooding event. The council officers were in charge of checking if a building was safe immediately after the extreme weather event.

35.     Teams working on the affected flooded sites:

·        Strategic Property Optimisation from Eke Panuku

·        Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery team at Auckland Council

·        Compliance Response & Investigations from Licensing & Regulatory Compliance at Auckland Council

36.     The building was ‘yellow stickered’ by council officers during the rapid building assessment, meaning access to the building was restricted.

37.     The playcentre approached leasing staff requesting further clarifications on the property assessment process, flood protection for their site and confirmation that the area was safe to rebuild their asset. 

38.     Leasing staff undertook a thorough investigation with appropriate council experts to provide advice regarding the land’s condition and the safety of rebuilding the asset. A summary of options investigated are shown in Table 1. 

 

Table 1: Summary of options investigated

Options

Commentary

Option 1 (Recommended)

Removal of building and termination of lease

 

·    Currently, the playcentre at this site only uses its building for its intended purposes as a preschool for only 10 hours a week during term time.

·    Flood protection will be challenging for the playcentre due to its location and potential to be rezoned as Category 3 (defined as high risk, house should be removed, and/or not rebuilt and the land will remain a flood risk.)

 

Option 2

New building on a new site

 

·    There are several playcentres situated in the lower part of the North Shore and there are four existing playcentres in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

·    The playcentre has expressed their interest in finding a space in the Albany area (Upper Harbour Local Board area) to rebuild their asset.

 

Option 3

Improvement of existing buildings/assets  

 

·    The playcentre could most effectively use their insurance claim capital to invest and improve their existing tenant-owned assets and bring them to a more up-to-date building standard.

·    10 hours a week for the 18 children pre floods would not be considered as maximising the space and would not mean a significant risk or loss of programming if the community lease is terminated.

 

 

39.     Staff recommend that the building is not to be rebuilt at Totaravale Reserve due to the high-risk conditions of the land. Regulatory requirements for this site will likely be very challenging.

40.     Staff recommend that the local board approve the termination of the lease and the removal of building for the playcentre, and request staff to work alongside the playcentre to facilitate meetings or introductions to relevant staff that work on adjoining local board areas for possible relocation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     Although it is anticipated that continued activation of the Totaravale Reserve via the playcentre will have no impact on greenhouse gas emissions it is not a suitable site for a community building.

42.     The retention of the land for open space aligns with the need to provide more green spaces to respond to the escalating impacts of climate change and ensuring cities are more absorbent i.e., creation of sponge cities or green infrastructure.

43.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting the council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

44.     The land at Totaravale Reserve, including the playcentre building, has been categorised as a Flood Prone Area. The flood plain information on GEOMaps, shown in Figure 1, was last updated in June 2021. The flood plains and flood prone areas may be extended in future.

 

Figure 1: Map showing flood plain and floor prone areas at Totaravale Reserve

A map of a lake

Description automatically generated

 

45.     Auckland Emergency Management’s Hazard Viewer also shows the land at Totaravale Reserve as flooding area, with the playcentre’s building located in the middle of this hazard area zone (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report: Auckland’s Hazard Viewer – Te Mapi Tirotiro Pūmate o Tāmaki Makaurau).

46.     Flood Plains show areas predicted to be covered by flood water as a result of a 1-in-100 year rainstorm event by river or surface flooding.

47.     Flood Prone Areas are low points in the ground that may flood. They are often associated with roads or railway embankments, or places where water can become trapped and pool if their outlet is blocked. These areas are also associated with 1-in-100 year rainfall events.

48.     Healthy Waters experts do not consider the January 2023 flooding a one-off event, as there is a likelihood that it could happen again.

49.     The stormwater network and channel will flood in larger events and is expected to flood across the reserve area in the future.


 

 

Figure 2: Map showing flood plains and flood prone areas affecting Totaravale Reserve

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate and the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate have been consulted and are not supportive of rebuilding the playcentre at this location.

Table 2: Specialists consulted

Parks and Places Specialist, Specialist Operations, Parks and Community Facilities

Healthy Waters Specialist, Healthy Waters Design & Delivery

Facilities Manager, Area Operations, Parks and Community Facilities

Principal – Compliance, Healthy Waters Strategy & Resilience

Manager Specialist Asset Assessments, Project Specialisation, Parks and Community Facilities

Healthy Waters Specialist, Healthy Waters Strategy & Resilience

Senior Customer Specialist, Healthy Waters Strategy & Resilience

Team Leader - He Kaiārahi Tīma
Compliance, Tāmaki Makaurau Recovery

Senior Healthy Waters Specialist, Planning

 

 

51.     There is a future Healthy Waters project planned for the area, which includes the playcentre site. The project is in the preliminary design and artesian pressure investigation stage and the physical works are planned to be delivered in the 2024/2025 financial year.

52.     This project will not help mitigate the flooding at this site.

53.     The site could potentially be considered Category 3 in future, as per Auckland Council’s property risk categorisation process:

 

A screenshot of a computer

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

54.     The red zoning of this land would likely exclude it from redevelopment, where properties are potentially excluded from redeveloping, is likely to be driven by central government. As this property is on council-owned land, it cannot be part of Auckland Council’s buy-out scheme.

55.     Auckland Council will then assess how the land will be used. It will consider options including adding to neighbouring parkland, which would improve storm resilience for neighbouring properties. That process may take several months.

56.     As of October 2023, property risk re-assessment appointments were being made to support the tenant with remediation works and decontamination. Photos of Totaravale Reserve and the subject property are shown in Attachment C of the agenda report: Photos of North Shore Playcentre damaged building.

57.     Flood protection will be challenging for the playcentre due to its location and potential Category 3– High risk, house should be removed, and/or not rebuilt and the land will remain a flood risk.

58.     Therefore, it is their recommendation that we do not support the playcentre to rebuild in the same location, considering the flood risk in that area and young children being housed in the building.

59.     Due to the nature of the site in large scale rain events and the potential risk to children’s safety, the leasing staff recommend that the playcentre move from Totaravale Reserve and look at alternative options to deliver their programme.

60.     It is Auckland Council’s plan to retain the land as open space, to support future flood resiliency. The land sits in a flood plain and adjacent to an overland flow path.

61.     The retention of the land for open space accords with providing more green spaces to respond to escalating impacts of climate change and ensuring cities are more absorbent i.e., creation of sponge cities or green infrastructure.

62.     The early termination of community ground lease has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of Council-Controlled Organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

63.     The local board was informed of the assessment of this proposal via a memorandum on 7 March 2024. The local board indicated for this matter to be presented at a business meeting.

64.     The proposed lease termination aligns with the Kaipātiki Local Board Local Board Plan 2023 priority area:

·        Environment – our natural environment is restored and protected for future generations to enjoy.

Our community are prepared for the impacts of a changing climate.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

65.     As this is an existing community lease to The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated – Totaravale (Sunnynook) for the land at Totaravale Reserve, no iwi engagement is required for termination of this lease.

66.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

67.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

68.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

69.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

70.     There is no financial impact to terminate the ground lease to the playcentre.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

71.     Should the local board resolve to decline the recommended termination of the community ground lease to the playcentre at Totaravale Reserve, R 37 Totaravale Drive, Totara Vale, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted as this site is no longer a viable option.

72.     The continuation of this community ground lease will not guarantee the playcentre’s safety due to uncertainty of land protection against flooding events. Should the building remain at this site, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and improvements. The council will be liable for the asset regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals. The renewal of the building will also not appear in the annual work programme as it is a tenant-owned asset.

73.     The playcentre will also run the risk of not being able to obtain regulatory and compliance requirements and insurance due to the flood prone nature of the site.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

74.     If the local board resolves to approve the proposed early termination of the community ground lease, staff will work with the North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated – Totaravale (Sunnynook) to finalise the termination of lease in accordance with the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Site Plan Totaravale Reserve

205

b

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Totaravale Reserve Auckland's Hazard Viewer - Te Mapi Tirotiro Pūmate o Tāmaki Makaurau

207

c

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Totaravale Reserve - Photos North Shore Playcentre damaged building

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jeimy Figueros – Community Lease Specialist  

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Taurus Crescent Reserve, Beach Haven – approval of the playground renewal revised concept design

File No.: CP2024/05658

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the revised concept design and play equipment for the playground renewal at Taurus Crescent Reserve, located at 8 Taurus Crescent, Beach Haven, and to progress the project to detailed design and construction. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The renewal of Taurus Crescent Reserve playground was identified in the Kaipātiki Play Provision and SunSmart Study 2018. The Kaipātiki Local Board requested that staff look at the possibility of improvement to play and shade provision at the time of renewal to benefit the growth of population in Beach Haven.

3.       The project was approved by the Kaipātiki Local Board as part of the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme (resolution number KT/2023/130).

4.       The local board has allocated $479,000 budget towards the renewal and upgrade of the playground. This is comprised of $384,000 from the ABS Renewals Capital Expenditure (CAPEX) budget, $30,000 from the Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) budget and $65,000 for shade sails from the SunSmart Priorities for Kaipātiki Play spaces project budget.

5.       The project will deliver on Local Board Plan 2023 Outcome 1: Te whai wāhitanga me te oranga | Belonging and wellbeing and Outcome 3: Ngā wāhi me ngā takiwā | Places and spaces. 

6.       Feedback was sought from the local community via letter drop to residents, including the Kāinga Ora development, school engagement, and the Local Board Play and SunSmart Provision report recommendations. A concept design has been developed, incorporating the recommendations from all parties. 

7.       Play equipment is focused around providing dynamic, agility and strength-based pieces for children between 5 – 9-year-olds as well as swings, slides music and nature play for toddlers.

8.       Accessibility has also been a key focus for the overall design as well as provision of community spaces for families to enjoy. 

9.       The concept design was approved by the Kaipātiki Local Board on 6 December 2024 (resolution number KT/2023/246) with several additional requests, including onsite public consultation.

10.     Staff now seek approval for the revised concept design, before progressing the project to detailed design, consenting and construction.

11.     Subject to the local board approval of the revised concept design, physical works are expected to commence in November 2024 due to the timeline required for the order and delivery of playground equipment.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the revised concept design (refer to Attachment A to this agenda report) and request staff to proceed with the construction and installation of the playground at Taurus Crescent Reserve, Beach Haven.

Horopaki

Context

12.     The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme (resolution number KT/2023/130), which included the upgrade of the playground at Taurus Crescent Reserve.

13.     The project funding is made up of $360,000 ABS Capex Renewals and $30,000 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) Capex.

14.     $65,000 has been prioritised for shade sails at Taurus Crescent Reserve from the Kaipātiki – Sunsmart priorities for play spaces project.

15.     Additional funding of $24,000 from the ABS Renewals Capex was approved in December 2023 to deliver the playground.

16.     Physical works are expected to commence in November 2024.

17.     Taurus Crescent Reserve is located at 8 Taurus Crescent in Beach Haven. It is on a corner lot and is characterised by a gently sloping grass area with residential properties on two sides. There are currently no trees planted in the reserve.

A playground with a playground and a playground in the background

Description automatically generated

Figure 1: Taurus Crescent Reserve playground viewed from 7 Taurus Crescent facing north.

A grass field with buildings in the background

Description automatically generated

Figure 2: Taurus Crescent Reserve playground viewed from 99 Taurus Crescent facing west.

18.     From the operational maintenance playground inspection report, the playground at Taurus Crescent is noted to be in ‘very poor’ condition. Equipment is often not operational; the safety surface is breaking apart and the flying fox does not meet current safety standards.

19.     Kāinga Ora have undertaken redevelopment in the area by adding a significant number of new houses. This has increased the number of residents in the area and the use of the playground.

20.     The Kaipātiki Local Board Play and SunSmart Provision report recommends improvements to the playground with the provision of additional collaborative play and painted games such as te reo Māori number trails. These elements have been incorporated into the concept design.

Link to strategic documents

21.     The project will deliver on both the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2023 and 2020:

Outcome 1: Te whai wāhitanga me te oranga | Belonging and wellbeing: allowing improved recreational opportunities within the community, encouraging activities that will benefit physical wellbeing, mental wellbeing, spiritual wellbeing, and social wellbeing.

This project has encouraged children and young people to be included in the design and decision-making, empowering to affect change.

Outcome 3: Ngā wāhi me ngā takiwā | Places and spaces: The playground design will transform how the play space is used, promoting use by the wider whanau and encouraging physical development, as well as opportunities for imagination and emotional strength.

By investing in shade sails and large specimen trees we plan to provide the use of equipment at a safer temperature and help reduce exposure to harmful ultraviolet rays.
The design will provide opportunities for accessible and inclusive play, extending the provision within the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.     The concept design and additional funding of $24,000 ABS Renewals Capex was approved by the Kaipātiki Local Board on 6 December 2024 (resolution number KT/2023/246).
The local board requested:

a)      staff to hold an open day at Taurus Crescent Reserve to receive feedback from the community on the design and bring the consultation results and recommended revised concept design options back to the local board for approval to progress the project to detailed design and construction.

b)      that the concept design allows for the option of full-coverage shade sails to be considered.

c)      provision of a rubbish bin at the playground site is maintained.

Accessibility

23.     The sloping site has been developed as three distinct areas connected by a central all weather accessible concrete path (as shown in Attachment A – Final Concept Plan for Taurus Crescent Reserve).

24.     Retention of the existing concrete pavement adjacent to the entrance, in tandem with all-weather turf or wet pour ensures accessibility for all in the primary community gathering space.

25.     Level access is provided to all key play equipment pieces, noting that more explorative / nature play areas and log scrambles require a higher level of mobility to access.

26.     Musical equipment and sound play are also provided off the accessible entrance path.

Play activities

27.     The overall design intent is to improve and enhance play provision within the local area targeting 5 – 9-year-olds, with supplementary play activities for 0 - 4. Due to slope conditions on site, the playground zones are tiered alongside an accessible pathway with timber edging. This will allow a relatively flat/gentle gradient within the zones.

28.     Additional areas around the zones will be planted to allow a buffer between the adjacent residential properties, as well as integrated with certain play elements for nature play.

Zone

Description

Zone 01

Paved surface to provide line marking/ball games to enable social and imaginative play with seating and shade provision. Also allow for community/family gathering space.

Zone 02

Use of existing timber post with integrated climbing elements for strength and agility with all-access wet pour rubber surfacing. There is an option for a basketball hoop in this zone, however there will not be enough space for a half court.  A full court is available at Lysander Crescent playground.

Zone 03

All access spinning play element with wet pour rubber surfacing integrated with Zone 02 targeted to all ages.

Zone 04

A bark soft fall area with swinging and climbing elements with direct connection to accessible pathway, aimed to accommodate older children.

Zone 05

Integrates the existing deck structure and other connecting elements for social, balancing, and creative play. Potential to include sound play activities to enhance social interaction.

Zone 06

A sliding element integrated with the embankment to accommodate the level changes. Equipment options in this area are limited due to the slope gradient.

Zone 07

Balance / agility components on the slope connected to the accessible pathway. Potential option to include sand play.

 

29.     Investigations were carried out to see if council could retain the existing flying fox, however the site constraints don’t meet current playground code and it is not feasible.

Consultation / Engagement

30.     Feedback on the concept design was sought from the residents surrounding Taurus Crescent Reserve. There were delays to the onsite feedback event due to COVID-19 restrictions and a letter-drop survey was undertaken in 2022. Over 80 letters were delivered to houses on Taurus Crescent, Rangatira Road, Lysander Crescent, Mirage Place and Gemini Place.

31.     Three surveys were submitted.  All respondents were keen to see areas for structured and informal play, gathering, swinging, sliding, climbing jumping and creative play. Picnic tables and a basketball hoop were also requested.

32.     Staff undertook consultation at Kauri Park School in February 2023 where 109 children participated.

Number of people

Items requested

74

Slides

51

Basketball hoop

48

Swings

42

Climbing tree pole

37

Play module for older children with slide, net and climbing activities

37

Balance beams

23

Musical bells

17

Painted games

11

Chin up bar

8

Natural play with sand

 

33.     Following local board approval of the proposed concept design, the AK Have Your Say public consultation process began early March 2024 aligned with an open day at Taurus Crescent Reserve playground to enable the public to refine their aspirations for the park based on the precedent images selected. 300 flyers were delivered to advertise the open day and AK Have your say survey. The event was also publicized on the Kaipātiki Local Board Facebook page.

34.     Within the concept design an additional shade structure was added to zone 5 to increase shade provision and a drinking fountain was provided as an optional extra to be included into the play space following recommendations from the local board.

35.     At the onsite open day, tamariki and rangatahi were encouraged to vote for their favourite play items, while adults were directed to the online survey, either on iPads available on site or provided with the website link for comments.

Proposed concept design for consultation

36.     The approved concept design incorporating comments from local board members was updated for community consultation. The plans provided play equipment options for community input.

A diagram of a building

Description automatically generated

          Figure 3: Local board approved concept design showing different play levels, new tree shade (circles), new shade sails (rectangles), and optional drinking fountain.

Several different views of a park

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Figure 4: Proposed concept design showing the 3-tiered levels to the playground.

A close-up of a diagram

Description automatically generated

          Figure 5: Playground equipment options in each play space zone.

Surfaces and colours

37.     Vibrancy of colour and design unity in repeating patterns with accents were also considered to offer play value and differentiate different play zones.

38.     Three colour pallets to be used for play equipment, wet pour and shade sail were updated following local board feedback and presented to the community as a final colour option. 

A group of squares with different colors

Description automatically generated

            Figure 6: Proposed colour scheme options

Consultation summary

39.     Detailed stakeholder feedback analysis is attached to the report as Attachment B and C.

40.     The following reflects community feedback from the March consultation, both online, AK Have your say votes (20) and in person (27) preferences by local rangatahi and tamariki are included.

a)      80 per cent supported the concept design.

b)      58 per cent thought there was sufficient shade planned for the playground
26 per cent thought there wasn’t sufficient shade planned for the playground.
16 per cent responded, ‘I don’t know’ or ‘maybe’.

c)      The following preferences include online and in person (open day) voting results:

d)      100 per cent of respondents support the inclusion of a drinking fountain at the playground.

e)   Play equipment preferences for each zone were indicated as below:

Zone

Items Preferred  

Zone 1

Basketball key and games line marking

 

Zone 2

Basketball hoop with backboard and pull up bar.

Zone 3

Inclusive carousel

Zone 4

Basket and belt swings

Zone 5 & 7

Agility/balance walk, and sound play.

Online: preference for agility/balance walk, and sound play

Open day: preference for sand play

After adding the survey results together, staff recommend continuing with the agility and balance walk.
(Agility - 27 votes total, Sand play - 19 Votes total)

 

f)    Preferred choice of colour palette for the play space:

Option 1: 17 votes (Yellow, grey, orange, grey)

Option 2: 13 votes (Green, orange, grey, grown)

Option 3: 18 votes (Pink, grey, purple, blue)

41.     Other community comments:

a)      A barrier behind the basketball court was requested to stop balls and children running onto the road.

b)      A BBQ was suggested to be included into the design.

c)   There was concern about noise from a basketball hoop, especially late at night.

d)   Bollards were suggested to enclose the park within the grassed road reserve area.

Revised concept design

42.     The revised concept design reflects preferences indicated by the community during the March 2024 consultation including preferred colour palette, 1.2m timber fence on the southern boundary behind the basketball court and drinking fountain. It is proposed that this concept will form the basis of detail design.

A collage of images of playground equipment

Description automatically generated

Figure 7: Final play equipment selected.

 

A drawing of a park

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Figure 8: Final concept design

 

A white paper with black text

Description automatically generated

A diagram of a park

Description automatically generated

Figure 9 - Cross section of play space

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

44.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emission from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as much as possible when delivering the project. This can be achieved through a well-managed construction schedule to ensure minimal repetition of work or transportation as well as reusing the existing cushion fall on site for tree mulch.

45.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options (including sourcing materials locally) and the use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

46.     The proposed concept design incorporates planting of eight new native trees and the addition of new fruit tree vegetation to ensure natural shade provision for park users and potential further reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

47.     Impacts from flooding and storms are unlikely to impact Taurus Crescent Reserve as it is on the highest part of the sloped site and is not located within a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

48.     Auckland Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services directorate have been consulted and are supportive of the installation as it will improve the service provision of the park and reduce the cost of maintenance.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     The park and playground are located at 8 Taurus Crescent and offers important connections for the residents within the new Kāinga Ora development.

50.     The project will deliver to the community by providing an improved and enhanced play provision within the local area, targeting 5 – 9-year-olds with supplementary play for 0 - 4 years. The design provides a safe playground that is within walking distance from home and can provide connections for the whole family to sit and enjoy.

51.     The local board provided feedback on the proposed concept plan in June 2023 requesting that specimen trees be planted at Taurus Crescent Reserve Playground as well as a picnic table. These have been incorporated into the new plans.

52.     The local board requested that consultation be undertaken with Beach Haven Primary School. Several attempts were made to facilitate a feedback day at the school in the same way that was conducted at Kauri Park School, however the school were unable to undertake this. Alternatively, the school posted the concept design on their Facebook page and in the school newsletter. Beach Haven Primary school was also provided with the opportunity to choose equipment and provide additional feedback; however, no feedback was provided by the school.

53.     The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the concept design in December 2023 and requested staff to undertake further consultation on the concept design including an open day onsite.

54.     The project aligns with the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020 and 2023:

 

Outcome 

Objective 

Outcome 1: Te whai wāhitanga me te oranga | Belonging and wellbeing

Our people are involved in the community, socially connected to one another, and supported to be active, creative, resilient, and healthy.

Outcome 3: Ngā wāhi me ngā takiwā | Places and spaces

Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

55.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan (operative in part), Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework.

56.     Parks and reserves are taonga (treasure; anything highly prized) and hold significant importance to mana whenua. Developing a network of neighbourhood parks that provide for all ages and abilities will positively benefit the health and wellbeing of mana whenua and the wider community through increased recreation provision and reflection of their presence and stories.  

57.     A collaborative play te reo Māori play trail has been incorporated into the concept design.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.     A total budget of $479,000 has been approved by the local board for this project in the following financial years, this includes an additional $24,000 of ABS Renewals Capex allocated in December 2024 (resolution number KT/2023/246).

59.     The potential 2025/2026 fairer funding budget changes will not affect this project.

Budget source 

FY21/22

FY22/23

FY23/24

FY24/25

Total ($) 

Renewal Capex

$14,892.15

$12,463.09

$48,644.76

$308,000

$384,000

LDI Capex

 

 

$30,000

 

$30,000

Sunsmart LDI Capex

 

 

$65,000

 

$65,000

Total allocated budget 

$14,892.15

$12,463.09

$143,644.76

$308,00.00

$479,000

Budget required

$14,892.15

$12,463.09

$143,644.76

$308,00.00

$479,000

Deficit

 

 

 

 

0

Maintenance cost 

 

 

$9,620

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     There is a risk that individuals or groups within the community may not be in support. This may delay the project and result in additional costs through the resource consent and engagement stages.

61.     The following risks and mitigations have been considered:

Risks identified

Mitigation

Health & Safety

 

Public are exposed to unsafe conditions

The site will be fully fenced off from the public with signage alerting the people of work taking place.

Construction

 

Poor weather during construction may delay delivery

The construction programme is schedule for summer when ground conditions and the weather is suitable for installation.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

62.     The table below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step. Unforeseen delays in the procurement of a design and / or build partner have the potential to delay completion of the project beyond the identified timeframe.   

Project phase 

Planned completion timeframe 

Detailed design 

Once the concept revision is approved by the local board, the development of the detailed design can be progressed.

June – August 2024 

Procure physical works contractor/build partner

The tender will be submitted to a suitable contractor as per the procurement guidelines. 

September - October 2024

Physical works 

November 2024 – February 2025

 

63.     Progress updates on the project will be provided to the local board through the monthly reports and as part of the quarterly reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Taurus Crescent Final Concept design

225

b

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Survey Responses Report

231

c

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Taurus Cresent open day consultation results

253

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Keren Alleyne - Senior Project Manager

Authorisers

Julie Pickering - Head of Area Operations

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 







Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 























Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 







Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/01199

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report confirms Business Improvement District (BID) annual compliance against the Auckland Council BID Policy (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) as of 10 March 2024.

2.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report.

3.       This report considers whether the local board should recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Birkenhead and Northcote Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

BID-operating business associations within the local board area

4.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are programmes where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

5.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report. As part of the 19 Requirements, the BIDs are required to provide annual accountability reports which are due 10 March each year.

6.       The BID annual accountability reports on public funds received by the BID within the local board area for the 2022/2023 financial year and has a direct link to council’s Long-term Plan 2024/2025 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process to strike the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

7.       Kaipātiki Local Board has two BIDs operating in their local area:

Table One: shows the amount of targeted rate each BID is seeking in 2024/2025.

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Met BID Policy annual reporting requirements.

(9,11 & 18)

Birkenhead Business Association

$229,027

ü

Northcote Business Association

$ 125,000

ü

 

8.       Staff recommend the local board approve Birkenhead and Northcote BIDs to receive their targeted rate grant for 2024/2025.

Regional summary across all 51 BIDs for this reporting period

9.       Of the 51 BID-operating business associations in Tāmaki Makaurau, 92 per cent (47 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

10.     36 BIDs (70.5 per cent) increased their targeted rates between 2% to 50% for 2024/2025, while 15 BIDs maintained the fiscal status quo.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Long-term Plan 2024/2025 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i)     $229,027 for Birkenhead BID

ii)    $125,000 for Northcote BID.

Horopaki

Context

Auckland Council Business Improvement District (BID) Policy and BID targeted rate grant agreement.

 

11.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2022) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the BID-operating business association and inform this annual report (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

12.     The remaining four BID Policy Requirements set out the process for establishing, expanding, and discontinuing a BID programme; and determines rating mechanisms. These will be covered within individual BID local board reports.

13.     The BID Policy does not prescribe or measure standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

14.     The BID Policy is supported by a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement, a three-year agreement signed by both Auckland Council and each BID-operating business association’s executive committee. The agreement sets out the relationship between the parties, how payment will be made and that compliance with the BID Policy is mandatory. The agreement confirms the business associations independence from Auckland Council. All 51 BIDs have signed a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement for period 1 December 2022 to 30 December 2025.

15.     This report updates the local board on compliance with the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID), with a focus on the BIDs annual accountability reporting (BID Policy Requirement 9, 11 and 18) relating to public funds received by the BID for the 2022/2023 financial year.

16.     This report includes a copy of the individual BIDs Governance Summary documents, Attachment B, and C. These documents include the full resolution detailing the amount of BID targeted rate grant approved by association members at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 financial year. The Chair also agrees, by signing this document, to advise council of any perceived or real/current issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

BID Programmes

17.     Local BID programmes should provide value to the collective business community by delivering a suite of economic activities that respond to local needs and opportunities and are agreed by the local business community. BID programmes also provide the opportunity to work with the council group and engage with local boards.

18.   The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

19.   Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve a detailed income and expenditure operational budget and business plan for the following financial year.

20.   Responsibility for delivery and outcomes of the BID programme sits with the individual BID-operating business association executive committee (provision of reporting information) and members (reviewing information provided to them by the executive committee).

21.   BID-operating business associations operate as independent Incorporated Societies. All BIDs are registered incorporated societies and need to be aware of the requirement to re-register by April 2026 under the updated Incorporated Societies Act 2022. 

Kaipātiki Local Board BID Targeted Rates 2024/2025

22.     Kaipātiki Local Board has two BIDs operating in their local board area. Table 2 shows the amount of targeted rate each BID had approved at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 and linked to the council’s Long-term Plan 2024/2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process.

Table Two: Amount of targeted rate for each BID in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Change from previous year dollars/ percentage

Last year target rate amount was increased

Birkenhead Business Association

$229,027

6%

2023

Northcote Business Association

$ 125,000

0%

2020

 

Decision making

Auckland Council

23.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

24.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Local Boards

25.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional overview

26.     The BID Policy has been in place in Tāmaki Makaurau since 2022 and applies to 51 BIDs across the ā-rohe, up from 50 BIDs reported in the 2023 report to local boards.

27.     Across all 51 BID-operating business associations 92 per cent (47 out of 51 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

28.     Annual accountability reporting is a requirement of the BID Policy (Requirement 11). This has meant the BID Team deviated from the BID Policy Requirement providing an extension to the due date to enable BIDs to achieve sufficient compliance for 2024/2025.

29.     The BID team observed this year BIDs have paid less attention to providing the required annual accountability documents by the 10 March 2024 due date, compared with the previous year.

Summary of BIDs meeting BID Policy Requirements

30.     51 per cent (26) of BIDs successfully completed their annual accountability reporting by the due date of 10 March 2024.

31.     41 per cent (21) received notification that they had missing information or documents and were provided an extension to the 10 March deadline. 

32.     4 BIDs failed to meet BID Policy Requirement 11 and the 10 March deadline and the provided extension to this deadline.

33.     BID targeted rate grants 2024/2025 - 36 increased their targeted rates between 2 per cent to 50 per cent for 2024/2025, while 15 maintained the fiscal status quo.

34.     Of the 11 BIDs with income under $120,000 (BID Policy Requirement 4), two BIDs now met this requirement as of 10 March 2024.

35.     Of the remaining nine BIDs, three have made no comment to increase their income. Five BIDs have increased their BID Targeted rate grant and are on track to meet this requirement by 1 July 2028 and one has indicated interest in a BID expansion project.

Regional BID Programme Growth

36.     This section provides an overview of BID programme growth across the region.

37.     Onehunga BID achieved a successful expansion ballot in February 2024. This will see them evolve from a retail focused BID into a BID encompassing retail, plus commercial and industrial areas, with a significant growth in target rate commencing 1 July 2024.

38.     Kingsland BID has confirmed at their 2023 AGM they would implement a BID expansion project in 2024/2025.

39.     Grey Lynn Business Association will be holding a ballot later this year towards establishing as a new BID from 1 July 2025.

40.     Takanini Business Association is on track to progress their BID establishment project aiming to become a new BID from 1 July 2026

BID Team: 2024 Accountability Reporting process overview.

41.     Upon receipt of individual BID annual accountability documents, staff follow a set process that includes:

·        Reviewing the accountability reporting of the previous accountability period (10 March 2023) to understand if any recommendations or feedback had been made.

·        Review the documents provided for 10 March 2024.

·        Discussion regarding observations relevant to that BID (knowledge, actions taken etc)

·        Communicate to BID (information missing, more information required, completion of reporting).

42.     Generic observations from year 10 March 2024 accountability include:

·    Acceptance that limited local board discretionary funding was available which led to BIDs having a greater focus on efficiencies in their own BID budgets.

·    The improving quality of annual discussions between local boards and BID-operating business associations. Less emphasis on operational aspects and more discussion on how they could collaborate together.

BID Policy – Requirements 9, 11 and 18

43.     Requirements 9 and 18 of the BID Policy are focused on BID affiliates having access to BID programme information and the BID targeted rate spend. It specifies a range of information BIDs must ensure are easily and freely accessible on a suitable online platform.

44.     This year a one-off ‘Website Check List’ was added to the annual accountablity reporting.  This document confirms complance against BID Policy, Requirements 9 and 18 relating to the transparency of BID information on a public platform.

45.     The BID Policy, requirement 11 sets out the documents that form the annual accountability reporting documents for each BID. These documents confirm membership decision-making has taken place regarding the BID programme at the 2023 AGM.

46.     Other reporting requirements such as the filing of annual financial statements with the Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act are included in this reporting.

Kaipātiki Local Board BIDs

47.     The table below sets out the documents required by 10 March 2024 under BID Policy Requirement 11.

 

Table Three: Business associations compliance with the BID Policy Requirement 11, 9 and 18.

BID Policy Requirement 11

Business Associations – documents submitted

Birkenhead Business Association Incorporated

Northcote Business Association Incorporated

Statement of financial/ performance reporting 2022/2023

ü

ü

Audited report/review 2022/2023

ü

ü

Audit Management Letter 2022/2023

ü

ü

Chairs report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Treasurers report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Manager’s report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Approved business plan for 18 months 2024/2025

ü

ü

Income and expenditure budget 2024/2025

ü

ü

Draft Minutes 2023 AGM

ü

ü

Financial/Audit reports posted to Companies Office website

ü

ü

Mandatory Management Summary – signed by manager

ü

ü

Mandatory Governance Summary – signed by Chair

ü

ü

Strategic Plan *

2024-2029

2020-2025

Website Check List

ü

ü

 Note: * Current strategic 3–5-year plans to be available upon request.

 

Table Four: Business associations compliance with other BID Policy Requirements.

Business Associations

BID Policy Requirements

Birkenhead Business Association Incorporated

Northcote Business Association

Requirement 3: Increase BID income to $120,000 by 1 July 2028

N/A

N/A

Requirement 10: Other Council Funding – accountability reporting* Baseline to be established year ending 2025

N/A

N/A

Requirement 12: Clear separation between BID governance and management Measure- BID Team advised of issue within BID. Year ending 10 March 2024

Nil

Nil

Note – BID Policy Requirement 10: * Funding agreements between the BID and local board (or any other part of council) set out the contractual obligations for funds received. These other funds are in addition to the BID targeted rate funding and are not covered in this report.

 

Kaipātiki Local Board: observations on BID Operating business associations within the area

·        Birkenhead – nothing noted.

·        Northcote – important there remains a focus on securing the minimum number of executive committee members to maintain meeting quorums.

48.     Using the documents and information submitted, the BID Team is satisfied that Birkenhead and Northcote BIDs have sufficiently met the BID Policy Requirements and the BID Policy for setting of the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

49.     Staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for 2024/2025 as set out in Table One.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and can facilitate environmental sustainability programmes and climate response where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations that operate a BID programme. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

52.     BIDs work across several Council Controlled Organisations including Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

54.     Birkenhead and Northcote BID programmes best align with the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2023, Outcome: Our Economy

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

55.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Birkenhead and Northcote business associations means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     The BID Policy and the annual accountability process does not prescribe or report on individual BID programme’s effectiveness, outcomes, or impacts. However individual BIDs may include this level of detail in other reports provided to their members. This localised project reporting is not a requirement of the BID Policy and is not part of the BID Policy annual accountability reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

58.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

59.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, the BID Policy sets out a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

60.     For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, it requires the BIDs to fully complete all annual accountability reporting and the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID. 

61.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy throughout the year including responding to queries and issues raised by council staff, members of the BID, the public and elected members.

62.     We actively grow relationships with council departments that interact with BID programmes to ensure a consistent approach is applied for the programme.

63.     The role of the local board representative is a key link between the parties involved in the BID programme in terms of communication and feedback.  Local Board representatives on BID programmes are strongly encouraged to contact the BID Team if they have any queries or concerns.

64.     This report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds. It provides an annual update that the BIDs operating within the local board area are compliant with the BID Policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 including the annual budget 2024/2025.

66.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2024 to Birkenhead and Northcote BIDs.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - BID Policy Requirements Summary

269

b

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Birkenhead Governance Summary 10 March 2024

273

c

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Northcote Governance Summary 10 March 2024

275

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 




Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Community forum review and future engagement

File No.: CP2024/04013

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a review of Kaipātiki Local Board community forums and engagement in 2023.

2.       Agree to the Kaipātiki Local Board engagement approach for the period 2024/2025, including Community Forums and Community Conversations.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Previously, across Auckland Council the primary purpose of community forums was a tool to manage meetings, rather than an engagement mechanism. This model provided the opportunity for deputations and reporting from community organisations, and to consider any items of business that need to be considered due to time constraints, or that are more appropriately dealt with at community forum.

4.       A best practice review of the community forum models was conducted by staff in May 2022, and it was discovered that managing the forums formally like the deputation and public forum sections of a business meeting, had not been an effective engagement tool. The main reason being that they do not allow for effective two-way engagement and the groups involved tend to not be representative of the wider community.

5.       In December 2022, the Kaipātiki Local Board adopted the tabled meeting schedule for 2023-2025 (KT/2022/241). As part of this, it was resolved to trial for 12 months one community forum meeting every third month and moving the forum from the local board office to a more local based meeting, which is held in different venues around the community.

6.       On the 3 April 2024 a workshop was held with the local board that provided a review of community forums. This review highlighted that the current format of the community forum model has had limited success in engaging different community groups across the local area. In 10 years of holding the forums, 160 groups have presented with 117 presenting once and nine of the groups presenting to the board multiple times.

7.       Following the trial and review, it is recommended to continue to hold community forums every three months as done previously, with the removal of the formal meeting management tool. The aim of the change is to remove barriers and increase the opportunities to engage wider with the community.

8.       It is proposed that the Kaipātiki Local Board introduce an engagement tool commonly referred to as Community Conversations to further enhance the opportunities to engage wider within the local board area as stated, a priority in the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2023. 

9.       Community conversations is an initiative designed to encourage communities to share what is on their mind while bringing together a diverse range of community groups to discuss important issues and converse with members of the Kaipātiki Local Board. 

10.     With the changes to the community forum model and addition of community conversations, the goal is to remove barriers and enable the members the opportunity to hear from those unheard groups, such as youth, diverse ethnic communities, people of different faiths, Pacific people, and the accessibility community.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      agree to move to a refreshed engagement model for community forums.

b)      agree to hold community forums every three months, on a Wednesday of the relevant month, commencing at 6.00pm.

c)       agree to hold two Community Conversations a year.

d)      note that the date, time, and location of the 2024 and 2025 community conversations will be confirmed closer to the time based on the engagement activity that is proposed for members to attend.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Kaipātiki Local Board area has 88,000 residents and identify with the below ethnic groups (2018 census).   

12.     Auckland Council Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 (5.1) states that engagement should be:

i)       focused on a long-term relationship

ii)       ongoing

iii)      driven by a community’s needs and preferences

iv)      leave communities feeling included, involved, and informed of the local board role and how they can participate in engagement initiatives ensuring they are a valued part of key decision making

v)      see the local board as an advocate for their interests focusing on collaborating and forming relationships with key people

vi)      to feel that communication from the local board and community engagement is open, consistent, and effective while continuously improving and innovation are evident in how engage

vii)     designed to enhance council’s partnership with its diverse communities, inclusive, culturally responsive consultation and engagement processes are essential.

13.     If engagement is delivered in a meaningful manner, it allows for mana whenua, mataawaka, citizens, community, and interest groups to work together with council in a manner that is mana-enhancing, in a space that is safe, through a medium that is appropriate.

14.     The community forum model began in 2013 (resolution number KT/2013/315) with the primary purpose of engaging with the community and to replace the majority of public forum and deputation items in the ordinary business meeting.

15.     In establishing the community forum as the primary means of engaging with the community in a public meeting environment, members of the public would be discouraged where possible from attending the monthly business meeting to present a deputation/public forum item and would instead be directed to a community forum where they would be given more time to present their item.

16.     Community forums in its current state has had low attendance over the past decade, with varying results each year and the same groups providing presentations to the local board annually.

17.     For 2023, it was agreed to trial moving the existing community forum format around various venues within the community to grow the level of engagement.  Overall attendance numbers continued to be low and did not reflect any different to previous years.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     On the 3 April 2024 a workshop was held with the local board that provided a review of community forums held in 2023 and historic data. The review outlined the successes and limitations of community forums over the past decade, including the attendance of the types of groups, the number of times they attended and survey results from the last one held in November 2023.

19.     Out of the 160 groups that presented deputations from 2013-2023, the groups that presented five or more times included:

·        Bayview Community Centre,

·        Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project,

·        Glenfield Community Centre,

·        Harbour Sport,

·        Hearts and Minds,

·        Highbury House,

·        Monarch Park Placemaking Group,

·        Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Society and

·        Kaipātiki Project are the exception, with 14 presentations

20.     117 groups presented once. The commons reasons for attendance were to raise an issue, request, or provide an update to the board.

21.     Reviewing the statistics, it shows that over the past decade the current format of the community forum model has had limited success in engaging different community groups across the local area, with nine of the groups presenting to the board more than five times.

22.     As the 2023 community forums were a 12-month trial, staff asked presenters to complete a survey following their attendance following the last forum in November 2023. The results shared at the workshop provided a mixed but overall positive response. From the ten presentations over the four dates nine responses were received to the survey (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report).

23.     Community forums are currently managed under the conditions of the Local Government Officials Meetings Act to capture decision-making reports that were unable to be scheduled at business meetings.

24.     It is proposed to continue holding community forums as the feedback received reflects positively and presenters have valued the time and the ability to connect with the local board members.

25.     It is recommended that the meeting management structure is removed to provide more of a conversation space. Making this change will provide a clear difference to a business meeting with the forums having the sole purpose of hearing from the community.

26.     It is intended to continue to hold the forums quarterly at various locations within the local board area as done in 2023, with a total of four held in a financial year.

27.     Community conversations is being recommended as an additional engagement tool for the local board to utilise and support the goal of growing their engagement levels in particular with the unheard voices of the Kaipātiki community.

28.     Conversations are less formal, more conversational form of engagement that are led and facilitated by community stakeholders. It turns engagement outward to authentically engage members of the community. The local board members will go out to where the community are, which opens the door to a broader range of diverse community groups (including Māori, Pacific, Asian, youth and neuro-diverse).

29.     Attachment A provides a detailed overview of both community forums and conversations, highlighting the differences and benefits.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     The environment is a key outcome for the Kaipātiki Local Board with strong relationships and engagement across environmental groups currently. Building on our engagement capacity and tools will enable it to be further enhanced.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The removal of formal meeting management will enable the local board services teams to refocus the intention of the community forums to be focused on engagement as its key purpose, not an extension to business meetings.

32.     The addition of community conversations support the overall strategy to develop and build the council’s deliberative democracy approach and adds to the suite of engagement tools that are used.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     Both engagement tools are about bringing together a diverse range of community groups to discuss important issues and converse with members of the local board with a multitude of positive benefits for all.

34.     It enables both forums and conversations to be run on communities’ term rather than council processes, enabling staff and members to build better public perception.

35.     The changes will enable the members an opportunity to have conversations without the formal structure of meeting management.

36.     The Board is committed to continually improve and adapt to how the Kaipātiki community want to engage with the local board and these options are providing another way the local residents of the area can participate and provide their feedback.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2023 has Māori outcomes as a key priority, with the goal to build relationships with mana whenua and local Mataawaka groups to restore names significant to Māori. Building on our engagement capacity will support the members to do this in a meaningful manner as it requires a commitment of time and resources to develop and maintain the relationships.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The proposed budget of $5,000 in the 2024/2025 work programme will be utilised towards holding both community forums and conversations. The funds will support costs like venue hire, printed collateral, catering, koha and additional activities i.e. – children activities or spinning wheel items.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     To mitigate any potential risk of missing important information being shared at the forums, there will be notes taken by local board services staff, copies will be provided to members and saved in local board services filing system.

40.     Removing the official minuting component of the meeting does not remove the entire LGOIMA process, being the official information aspect around access to the information that is shared and captured at these meetings.

41.     Public will still have formal opportunities to present to the local board as part of deputation and public input at business meetings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Engagement advisor to continue work on the local board engagement action plan for the new financial year, including a schedule of dates that will be shared with members once confirmed.

43.     Advisor will continue building relationships with the community in order to further enhance relationships and build and create meaningful engagement opportunities for the members through community forums and conversations.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 – Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Engagement tool overview 2024

283

b

15 May 2024 – Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 2023 Community Forum Survey Results

289

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lisa Kent - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 






Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Kaipātiki Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/05291

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Kaipātiki Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2024.

2.       To seek approval for the allocation of $1,000 for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme and to seek approval for the re-allocation of the unspent funding for the Birkenhead Santa Parade.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

4.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Kaipātiki Local Board Plan outcomes.

The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Movies in Parks event was delivered and well attended by the community.

·        Activation of community led venue partners Kaipātiki saw over 40 events delivered in the community with more than 300 to 400 participants overall from the community.

·        Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan was adopted in February.

·        Chelsea Estate Heritage Park`s renew carparks, bollards and stormwater drainage project was completed in January.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There is one activity with a red status this quarter.

•        Kaipātiki Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places).

6.       Staff have advised that the Birkenhead Santa Parade which was cancelled in October did not complete a funding agreement for the event and therefore did not uplift their funding of $7,500, so these funds have not been spent. It is recommended to re-allocate these funds to the #236 Kaipātiki Community Grants budget, which will help support the over-subscribed round two of the Local Grants round.

7.       Staff from the Lease Team recommend that the local board defer the item #3069 Lindisfarne Hall - Northcote Preschool New Lease and Possible Expression of Interest (EOI) until the detailed new multi-purpose building, Northcote Central Community Hub, plans are finalised, which is led by Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

8.       Funds were set aside for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) following the drafting of the 2023/2024 work programme. However, due to changes at Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (TAU), approval was delayed. Auckland Council Grants team has now taken on this work. This report provides the opportunity for the local board to approve the Young Enterprise Scheme (KT) #1265 and associated budget of $1,000 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board

a)      receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

b)      agree to re-allocate unspent Santa Parade funds of $7,500 (#233 Event Partnership Fund Kaipātiki, Birkenhead Santa Parade (Birkenhead Rotary) to the Kaipātiki Community Grants budget (#236 Community Grants Kaipātiki).

c)       approve the deferral of #3069 Lindisfarne Hall - Northcote Preschool New Lease and possible expression of interest as recommended by staff until the detailed new multi-purpose building, Northcote Central Community Hub, plans are finalised as this project is led by Eke Panuku Development Auckland, to the 2024/2025 financial year.

d)      approve Young Enterprise Scheme (KT) (Activity ID #1265) and associated budget of $1,000 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme from unallocated locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget.

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Kaipātiki Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services (Resolution number KT/2023/130)

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services (Resolution number KT/2023/128)

·        Local Governance (Resolution number KT/2023/129)

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

12.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

13.     The key achievements from quarter three 2023/2024 are outlined in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Key activity updates from quarter three 2023/2024

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter three 2023/2024 update

Movies in Parks - Kaipātiki

Green

In Progress

The 2024 Kaipātiki Movies in Parks event was successfully delivered on Friday 1 March at Greenslade Park to an estimated audience of 2,000.

Activation of community led venue partners Kaipātiki

Green

In Progress

In Q3, Highbury House celebrated Pride Month, partnering with different community organisations in Birkenhead. Each organisation decided on one or two activities that they would deliver in February, The House then produced an event calendar and flyer as well as static promotions on site.

Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project ran their annual Celebrating Communities programme, which encompassed over 40 events during the month of March

Glenfield Community Centre has been heavily involved in the ANZAC Glenfield Service steering committee

Bayview Community Centre held their annual ‘Meet the Neighbours’ event. Due to the size of the event it was held at the local reserve. It was estimated that 300 to 400 residents attended the event.

Hearts & Minds held two courses in Q3, a Parenting course and Depression/Anxiety course. 19 residents participated in the two courses

Marlborough Park Hall have been supporting Creative Collaborative, who wanted to run art therapy programmes for young people. There are over 30 young people attending the programme at the hall

 

Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan

Green

In Progress

The plan was adopted by the local board in February. Implementation process and handover to begin in Q3 FY2023/2024.

 

Chelsea Estate Heritage Park - renew carparks, bollards and stormwater drainage

Green

In Progress

Project completed in January 2024.

Activities with significant issues

14.     There is one work programme activity that has been identified by operating departments as having a significant issue. (Red status).

Table 2: Key activity updates from quarter three 2023/2024

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter three 2023/2024 update

Kaipātiki Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places)

Red

In Progress

Iwi have advised that the final few names will not be provided this year as previously advised. Workshop scheduled for Q4 for discussion with local board on next steps.

Activities on hold

15.     Table 3 below includes information on work programme activities that have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

Table 3: Key activity updates from quarter three 2023/2024

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter three 2023/2024 update

Totaravale Reserve - renew playground and park amenities

Amber

On Hold

The project is on hold until it is clear what is happening with the Making Space for Water proposals in the area.

(OLI) Birkenhead War Memorial Park - deliver master plan One Local Initiative

Amber

On Hold

Project on hold - Future funding from the One Local Initiative programme for design and construction of a new multi-use facility is uncertain. Options that are achievable within the renewal budget will be investigated. Temporary toilets and changing room facilities workshopped with the local board and report being delivered to local board.

Birkdale Kauri Kids - renew community facility

Amber

On Hold

Project to remain on hold until local board prioritisation can be undertaken and there is a better understanding of future budget allocation. Pending review and decision of Early Childhood Education services.

Birkdale Community Hall - rebuild facility

Amber

On Hold

Project to remain on hold until local board prioritisation can be undertaken and there is a better understanding of future budget allocation. Pending review and decision of Early Childhood Education services.

Glenfield Hall Domain, Glenfield-Girl Guides Glenfield

Amber

 On Hold

Staff are in communications with Girl Guides head office who are looking to optimize their property portfolio. Staff has requested Girl Guides to make contact once they have activated this site for optimization so staff can ensure a smooth transition to another community group.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

16.     These activities are recommended for deferral from the current work programme into future years:

Table 4: Key activity updates from quarter three 2023/2024

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter three 2023/2024 update

Lindisfarne Hall - Northcote Preschool

Grey

Deferred

Staff from the Lease Team recommend the local board to defer the item until the detailed new multi-purpose building, Northcote Central Community Hub, plans are finalised. This is led by Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

Cancelled activities or merged activities:

17.     There have not been any activities that have been cancelled or merged by operating departments in this work programme.

 

Other changes to activities:

18.     Funding from the Birkenhead Santa Parade of $7,500 is available to the local board to allocate in 2023/2024. To ensure this budget is expended in 2023/2024, it is recommended that the local board allocate this budget to the #236 Kaipātiki Community Grants budget, for distribution through the contestable local grants programme. The local board may however consider other options for reallocation and are encouraged to seek staff advice on these options noting that the budget needs to be spent by the end of the financial year.

Young Enterprise Scheme (YES)

19.     The Kaipātiki Local Board has previously funded the Young Enterprise Scheme (KT) #1265 as part of Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s (TAU) 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years’ work programme.

20.     Due to changes at TAU the approval of the Young Enterprise Scheme (KT) #1265 into financial year 2023/2024 work programmes was delayed while an alternative team was identified to manage the activity.

21.     The responsibility within the Council for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) has now been transferred from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited to Auckland Council Grants team.

22.     The YES event was delivered by the Auckland Business Chamber on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust in quarter three.

23.     The proposed budget for the Young Enterprise Scheme (KT) (#1265)) was $1,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount remains unallocated and can be accommodated from within the local board’s total draft budget for 2023/2024.

24.     This report provides the opportunity for the local board to approve the Young Enterprise Scheme (KT) (#1265) and associated budget of $1,000 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

26.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This report informs the Kaipātiki Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     A number of the activities in the local board work programmes positively impact Māori.

Table 5. below provides updates on the activities that have a direct Māori outcome focus.

Table 5: Update of activities with a direct impact on Māori in quarter three 2023/2024

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter three 2023/2024 update

Manaakitanga Kaipātiki

Green

In progress

In Q3 funding was distributed to community groups to deliver local initiatives, following approval by the local board. Aru Waihīrere kapa haka roopu has increased their visibility and engagement activities in the community. In Q3, the group has participated in more than four community activities and has built a working partnership with the libraries and other community groups. Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project (BBCP) is running successful Maori kaupapa programmes. Community feedback has been positive. Each programme has an enrolment of approximately 30 participants. 20 families (approximately 50 people each week) participate in kiddy kapa haka. Funding for Matariki 2024 is scheduled to be completed in early Q4, although in Q3 staff have been in communication with KCFT to ensure co-ordination is underway. KCFT held a community hui in Q3 to settle on the themes and the pathway forward. The discussion covered Puriri Tree and Puriri Moth planting and lantern making. Another hui in early Q4 will be held to confirm the two major themes for the Matariki month

 

Kaipātiki - Te Kete Rukuruku - Māori naming of parks and places

Amber

In Progress

Project on Hold

Current status: Awaiting a Māori name for Shepherds Park. Progress on the new interpretive signage's design is ongoing, with a preliminary version already circulated among stakeholders for their input.

 Next steps: Maintain engagement with both stakeholders and Mana Whenua. The completion of the signage designs will proceed once the Māori name is officially confirmed by Mana Whenua.

Kaipātiki Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places)

Red

In Progress

Iwi have advised that the final few names will not be provided this year as previously advised. Workshop scheduled for Q4 for discussion with local board on next steps.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     This report is provided to enable the Kaipātiki Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programme. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

31.     The proposed budget for the Young Enterprise Scheme (KT) (Activity ID #1265) is $1,000 and can be funded from the local board’s available locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget 2023/2024.

Financial Performance

32.     Operating expenditure of $17.7 million is $958,000 above budget for the last nine months. The Asset Based Services (ABS) is nearly $1.1 million above year to date budget and the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) is $107,000 below year-to-date budget.

33.     Operating revenue of $4.8 million is $215,000 above budget mainly in lease revenue and leisure facilities.

34.     Capital expenditure of $8.1 million is over budget by $3.4 million mainly due to advanced delivery of a number of projects through risk adjusted programmes (RAP) which include asset renewal programme and network plan connections.

35.     The financial report for the nine months ended 31 March 2024 for Kaipātiki local board area is in Appendix B attached.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

37.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

38.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2024).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board Work Programme 2023/2024 Q3 Update

301

b

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Financial Summary of the Kaipātiki Local Board Work Programme 2023/2024 Q3

351

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ann Kuruvilla - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



















































Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 






Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/05080

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Kaipātiki Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents two options for the Kaipātiki Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025 for adoption, Attachment A presents the grant programme with two local grant rounds, and Attachment B presents the grant programme with three local grant rounds.

5.       Due to the estimated budget for 2024/2025 Community Grant programme being limited, the proposal that is being put forward to the Kaipātiki Local Board for 2024/2025 Community Grant is that there will be a reduction in the number of Local Grants rounds from three rounds down to two rounds. The proposal has been reflected in the Kaipātiki Local Board 2024/2025 Community Grant Programme (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

6.       Due to the concerns around the quality of Multiboard Grant applications and to streamline the grant process, it is proposed to cancel the Multiboard Grant round in 2024/2025 and redirect applicants to the Local Grant round.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      adopt the Kaipātiki Grants Programme 2024/2025 with two grant rounds as presented in Attachment A to this agenda report if the allocated grants budget for 2024/2025 is under $100,000, OR,

b)      adopt the Kaipātiki Grants Programme 2024/2025 with three grant rounds as presented in Attachment B to this agenda report if the allocated grants budget for 2024/2025 is more than $100,000,

c)       agree to cancel Multiboard Grants Round in 2024/2025.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders.

8.      The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

9.       The local board community grants programme includes:

·        outcomes as identified in the local board plan

·        specific local board grant priorities

·        which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds, and opening and closing dates

·        any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

·        other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

10.     Once the local board grants programme 2024/2025 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

11.     It has been a long-standing concern around Multiboard Grant applications that:

·        Lower quality applications are received due to less alignment with Local Board Plans.

·        Frequent applications for ongoing costs and other lower priority outcomes

·        Increase barriers for accountability completion as multiple board criteria needs to be met

·        Confusion: difficult for first-time applicants to understand the concept and cause larger withdraw rate due to not meeting the funding criteria

·        Timelines are less clear for applicants: some boards may have an early decision date, but other boards may decide later in the year.

·        Less chance to be funded: difficult to demonstrate the specific Local Board benefit in Multiboard Grant applications.

·        Delays applicant getting funding: The applicant can only be notified after ALL boards made their decision which cause some applicants submitted application in June but received the decision in December.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Kaipātiki Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2024/2025.

13.     It is suggested to adopt the Kaipātiki Grants Programme 2024/2025 (Attachment A) with delivering two grants rounds in 2024/2025, unless the intended allocated amount for Community Grants is over $100,000.

14.     It is suggested to cancel the Multiboard Grant round in 2024/2025 due to the reasoning listed above, this will lead to better alignment to the local board funding outcomes as the groups will need to clearly demonstrate the direct community benefit in Local Grant process.

15.     By cancelling Multiboard Grant Round and directing the applicants to apply to Local Grant Rounds, the board will have a better control and visibility of the grant applications and have greater influence on targeting specific outcomes/areas of focus.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

18.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts and culture, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021 -2031 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.   

23.     If the local board decided to retain Multi Board Grants there is a risk that there will be a reduced scale of Multiboard Grants participation.  This will reduce the overall effectiveness of a Multiboard Programme (with two or three participants only).

24.     By retaining Multi Board Grants there is also the risk that this may dilute the effectiveness of the core grants programme (local grants) especially with a potentially reduced budget.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     An implementation plan is underway, and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board Grant Programme 2024-2025 Two Rounds Option

361

b

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board Grant Programme 2024-2025 Three Rounds Option

369

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Amber Deng - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 








Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 








Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2023/2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2024/04981

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Kaipātiki Local Board with information on applications in Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2023/2024; to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2023/2024 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2023/2024 (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report).

3.       The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted the Kaipātiki Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 19 July 2023. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board (refer to Attachment C of the agenda report).

4.       The local board set a total of $63,476 for Community Grants from its Local Driven Initiatives Operational budget (LDI Opex) for the 2023/2024 financial year, which covers two local grant rounds and two multi-board grant rounds and Transitional Rates Grants.

5.       A further total of $32,510 was reallocated from ID# 4049 of the Customer and Community Services Work Programme to ID#236 of the Customer and Community Services Work Programme, for distribution through the contestable local grants programme 2023/2024.

6.       A total of $53,366.71 was allocated to 2023/2024 Kaipātiki Local Grant Round One and Multiboard Grant Round One, this includes $8,866.71 approved towards four Transitional Rates Grant Applications submitted to Local Grant Round One.

7.       A total of $5,000 was refunded from Auckland King Tides Initiative under application LG2308-124 due to project delay.

8.       A total of $1,284.28 was refunded from The Birkenhead Bowling Club Incorporated under application LG2208-310 due to project underspend.

9.       A total of $290.49 was refunded from Children's Autism Foundation under application LG2108-221 due to project underspend.

10.     This will leave $49,194.06 for one Local Grant Round and one Multiboard Grant Round.

11.     Twenty-seven applications were received for Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two, requesting a total of $135,567.15. Nineteen applications were received for Kaipātiki Multi-Board Grants Round Two, requesting a total of $96,922.39.

12.     The total amount requested, for the two grant rounds, is $232,489.54.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2023/2024 listed in the following table: 

Table One: Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2023/2024 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2408-201

Chinese Association of North Shore City

Community

Towards editing and photography, koha for performers, venue hire to celebrate Dragon Boat Festival Mid-Autumn Festival from 15 June 2024 to 3 October 2024

$2,800.00

Eligible

LG2408-202

English Language Partners New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards cost to hire Glenfield Community Centre for free English classes from 1 June 2024 to 20 December 2024

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-205

Youthtown Incorporated

Community

Towards staff delivery time to run Kaitiaki Youth Group in Hillcrest project from 3 June 2024 to 20 December 2024

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-206

KiwiOra Community Trust

Arts and culture

Towards Thai Cooking instructor fee, Rangoki and Indian cooking class material and facilitator, Origami workshop material and facilitator to deliver Cultural Festival: Celebrating Diwali and Loy Krathong event from 1 November 2024 to 30 November 2024

$1,415.00

Eligible

LG2408-207

The Northart Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards materials for art-making activities and workshops, kai and staff time to deliver project Matariki with NORTHART from 22 June 2024 to 20 July 2024

$2,843.00

Eligible

LG2408-208

Wingspan Trust

Community

Towards cost to deliver free counselling sessions at Wingspan Trust from 1 June 2024 to 30 November 2024

$6,250.00

Eligible

LG2408-210

Northcote Toy Library Incorporated

Community

Towards rent and storage cost to run Northcote Toy Library at 5a Akoranga Drive from 1 June 2024 to 31 March 2025

$6,865.50

Eligible

LG2408-211

Beachhaven Birkdale Garden Circle

Environment

Towards monthly bus hire cost to visit places of interest from 28 June 2024 to 23 May 2025

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG2408-212

Judokwai NZ (1948) Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards floor and wall maintenance at Jodokwai Club from 1 October 2023 to 30 September 2024

$7,000.00

Ineligible

LG2408-213

Willow Christian Trust

Community

Towards rates contribution at 33 Rawene Road from 1 July 2023 to 30 June 2024

$2,030.65

Eligible

LG2408-214

Adaptive Movement Charitable Trust Board

Sport and recreation

Towards cost for young people to participate Youth Adaptive Movement Strength & Conditioning Group Classes from 3 June 2024 to 6 September 2024

$6,240.00

Eligible

LG2408-215

Albany Birkenhead Collegians Hockey Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards turf hire for practice sessions, Games and Umpires team fee to deliver Youth Hockey 2024 from 1 September 2024 to 31 December 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-217

Auckland North Community and Development Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, marketing, presenter fees, programme coordinator/admin, and travel cost to deliver free LiiFT programme in Kaipātiki Local Board area from 1 June 2024 to 30 November 2024

$4,218.00

Eligible

LG2408-218

New Zealand Friendship For Peace

Community

Towards cost to run Māori culture Wānanga at Te Whanau O Awataha from 4 June 2024 to 27 May 2025

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-220

Glass Ceiling Arts Collective Limited

Community

Towards a contribution to class tutor and support tutor fee for two weekly youth theatre classes at South Seas Film School Campus in Glenfield from 8 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$7,000.00

Ineligible

LG2408-221

Highbury Community House Inc

Community

Towards plant, soil, mulch and related cost to plant plants at Kaimataara o Wai Manawa from 1 July 2024 to 1 December 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-222

Aroha Vietnam Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, decorations, performance, fruits, refreshment, marketing, Vietnamese foods and miscellaneous to celebrate festival at Glenfield Community Centre from 1 October 2024 to 31 October 2024

$1,700.00

Eligible

LG2408-225

Kauri Park School

Arts and culture

Towards pianist service, piano moving and tuning and bleacher moving cost for Kaipātiki Choir Concert 2024 on 26 November 2023

$3,347.00

Eligible

LG2408-226

Beach Haven Tennis Club

Sport and recreation

Towards a contribution for a shade canopy at Beach Haven Tennis Club from 1 July 2024 to 31 October 2024

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-227

Momentum Charitable Trust

Community

Towards cost to run four one-day life and financial skills programmes at North Shore Probation Centre from 2 June 2024 to 31 July 2024

$6,780.00

Eligible

LG2408-228

Birkenhead Senior Citizen's Association Inc.

Community

Towards rates contribution at 251 Hinemoa Street from 1 July 2023 to 30 June 2024

$3,500.00

Eligible

LG2408-230

Sustain & Enable Limited

Community

Towards workshops delivery, promotion and marketing, venue hire and refreshment, travel, energy efficiency devices, accountability report time to deliver Home Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Living Workshops at Pest Free Kaipātiki from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$3,128.00

Ineligible

LG2408-231

Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Inc

Community

Towards bus hire, marquee hire, facilitators time, advertising, operation, resources that including kai and medical service, koha, and Hāngi meals to deliver Winter Community Events at Birkdale Intermediate School and BBCP community house from 2 1June 2024 to 30 June 2024

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-232

Digital Seniors

Community

Towards a contribution of operation and staff wage to deliver Digital Seniors Hubs at Glenfield Library and Birkenhead Library from 1 July 2024 to 30 June 2025

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-234

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards cost to deliver twenty Spoken Word Poetry workshops at Northcote College from 30 June 2024 to 13 December 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-235

North Shore Islamic Association

Community

Towards cost of marquee and equipment hire, bouncy castle hire and activities to hold event Eid on the Shore 2024 at Auckland University of Technology North Campus on 22 June 2024

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2408-236

Birkenhead United Football Club

Sport and recreation

Towards purchase and install security cameras at Birkenhead United Football Club in Shepherd Park from 1 June 2024 to 1 September 2024

$6,950.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$135,567.15

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Multiboard Grants Round Two 2023/2024, listed in Table Two:

Table Two: Multiboard Grants Round Two 2023/2024 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-206

Unity Community Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, sports gear, office lease, sports trainers wages, office lease, computers, kitchenware, administrative expenses, furniture, and CEO salary, for establishing sport and recreation hubs across Auckland

$10,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-209

Ioasa, Julian Terrence

Arts and culture

Towards mentoring costs

$1,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-2100

Feelings for Life Charitable Trust

Community

Towards graphic design, videographer, workshop materials, participant resources, facilitator and advisor, administrator and event manager, venue hire, catering, and AV for the Kaiako Hauora North Programme

$3,539.00

Eligible

MB2324-2102

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards crew programme & event delivery costs for Raise Up youth development programme from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$7,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-2103

North Harbour Community Patrol

Community

Towards annual operating expenses, including fuel costs, vehicle maintenance, uniforms, equipment, telephones, software, computers, and internet costs

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-2104

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards postage, printing cost, reimbursement of clinical backup team for practical expenses for Anxiety NZ Trust from 1 May 2024 to 30 September 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-216

Age Concern Auckland Trust

Community

Towards wages at 57 Rosebank Road from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$3,057.00

Eligible

MB2324-221

The Operating Theatre Trust trading as Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards ticket cost for disabled or disadvantaged children to attend Mrs Wishy Washy show from 21 September 2024 to 26 October 2024

$4,891.50

Eligible

MB2324-222

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards cost of native trees and classroom recycling bins to deliver Paper4trees Auckland from 1 April 2024 to 31 August 2024

$4,209.89

Eligible

MB2324-224

The Re-Creators Limited

Community

Towards cost of rent, tools, equipment, admin, tutor, project management, marketing to deliver Community DIY skills-based upcycling workshops from 1 May 2024 to 27 September 2024

$4,725.00

Eligible

MB2324-231

Every Body is a Treasure Charitable Trust

Community

Towards facilitator costs from 1 April 2024 to 28 February 2025

$9,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-235

PP Grief Support & Education Charitable

Community

Towards counselling and room hire

$7,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-242

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards specialist contractor fees for volunteer and triage support staff supervision

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-250

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards accommodation, radio advertising, mentor manager wage and volunteers psychological screening for programme delivery from 30 September 2024 to 30 August 2025

$6,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-251

Garden to Table Trust

Community

Towards salaries, mileage, and home office costs for the Garden to Table Food Education Programme

$4,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-255

Unlabeled Limited

Community

Towards home office, accountancy, cell phone, developer program, banking, marketing, translations, web hosting app and web hosting site and equipment cost for Rokket - tool adaptation and support for digital inclusion from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$7,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-257

NZ Children's Choral Academy

Arts and culture

Towards senior and junior choir musical directors, and venue hire for a Children's Choir Programme at Raye Freedman Arts Centre

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-293

Young Workers Resource Centre

Community

Towards wages for employing an education coordinator

$10,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-297

YES Disability Resource Centre Services Trust T/A Shore Junction

Community

Towards a contribution of youth worker wage for Shore Junction from 1 June 2024 to 21 December 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$96,922.39

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

14.     Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

15.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

16.     The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted its grants programme for 2023/2024 on 19 July 2023 (refer to Attachment C of the agenda report). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

17.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

19.     Application LG2408-212 from Judokwai NZ (1948) Incorporated, is ineligible as per the eligibility exclusion outlined on Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024, “activities must not have already taken place before the local board has the opportunity to consider the application (unless the Board accepts there are genuine mitigating circumstances)".

20.     Application LG2408-220 from Glass Ceiling Arts Collective Limited, is ineligible as per the eligibility exclusion outlined on Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024, “commercial/private companies will generally be ineligible to apply, unless their project demonstrates clear community benefits (see paragraphs 73, 74 and 75 of the overarching Community Grants Policy)".

21.     Application LG2408-230 from Sustain & Enable Limited, is ineligible as per eligibility exclusion outlined on Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024, “commercial/private companies will generally be ineligible to apply, unless their project demonstrates clear community benefits (see paragraphs 73, 74 and 75 of the overarching Community Grants Policy)".

22.     Application MB2324-206 from Unity Community Foundation, is ineligible for Kaipātiki Local Board because the $9,000 amount requested exceeds the maximum amount budget allowed of $7,000 for each application.

23.     Application MB2324-209 from Ioasa, Julian Terrence, is ineligible as per eligibility exclusion outlined on Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024, "private individuals (except where they agree to be umbrellaed by an endorsed local community organisation)"

24.     Application MB2324-231 from Every Body is a Treasure Charitable Trust, is ineligible for Kaipātiki Local Board because the amount requested $10,000 exceeded the maximum amount budget allowed, $7,000, for each application.

25.     Application MB2324-255 from Unlabeled Limited, is ineligible as per as per eligibility exclusion outlined on Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024, “commercial/private companies will generally be ineligible to apply, unless their project demonstrates clear community benefits (see paragraphs 73, 74 and 75 of the overarching Community Grants Policy)".

26.     Application MB2324-293 from Young Workers Resource Centre, is ineligible for Kaipātiki Local Board because the amount requested $10,000 exceeded the maximum amount budget allowed, $7,000, for each application.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

28.     Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

30.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Kaipātiki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grant Programme 2023/2024.

32.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

33.     A summary of each application received through Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two 2023/2024 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2023/2024 (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

36.     The local board has set a total of $63,476 for Community Grants from its Local Driven Initiatives Operational budget (LDI Opex) for the 2023/2024 financial year which covers two local grant rounds and two multi-board grant rounds and Transitional Rates Grants.

37.     A total of $32,510 reallocated from ID# 4049 of the Customer and Community Services Work Programme to ID#236 of the Customer and Community Services Work Programme, for distribution through the contestable local grants programme 2023/2024.

38.     A total of $53,366.71 was allocated to 2023/2024 Kaipātiki Local Grant Round One and Multiboard Grant Round One, this includes $8,866.71 approved towards four Transitional Rates Grant Applications submitted to Local Grant Round One.

39.     A total of $5,000 was refunded from Auckland King Tides Initiative under application LG2308-124 due to project delay.

40.     A total of $1,284.28 was refunded from The Birkenhead Bowling Club Incorporated under application LG2208-310 due to project underspend.

41.     A total of $290.49 was refunded from Children's Autism Foundation under application LG2108-221 due to project underspend.

42.     This will leave $49,194.06 for one Local Grant Round and one Multiboard Grant Round.

43.     Twenty-seven applications were received for Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Two, requesting a total of $135,567.15. Nineteen applications were received for Kaipātiki Multi-Board Grants Round Two, requesting a total of $96,922.39.

44.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Following the Kaipātiki Local Board allocation of funding for Local Grants Round Two 2023/2024 and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2023/2024, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 2023/2024 Kaipātiki Local Grant Round Two Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 2023/2024 Kaipātiki Multiboard Grant Round Two Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

15 May 2024 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 2023/2024 Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grant Programme

391

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Amber Deng - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 









Kaipātiki Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Kaipātiki Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2024/04670

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to add an additional meeting or an amendment to the 2022-2025 Kaipātiki Local Board meeting schedule, so the local board can review public feedback on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 before providing formal views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to the delivery of the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has affected the delivery of the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

3.       Public engagement data on the RLTP will not be available to local boards until 24 June 2024. Local boards must provide their formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines. These timeframes are outside the local board’s normal meeting cycle.

4.       To enable local boards to consider public engagement data before providing formal views, this report recommends the local board approve an additional or extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Kaipātiki Local Board meeting schedule. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the addition of one meeting at 10.00am on 26 June 2024 at Kaipātiki Local Board office to the 2022-2025 Kaipātiki Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate providing formal views on the Regional Land Transport Plan after reviewing public feedback.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its 7 December 2022 business meeting.

8.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to delivering the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has impacted Auckland Transport’s timeframes on delivering the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

9.       Public engagement on the draft RLTP will run from 17 May 2024 until mid-June 2024. Auckland Transport will provide a summary of public feedback to local boards on 24 June 2024.

10.     Local boards must provide formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines.

11.     Local boards expect to see public feedback before providing their formal views. Therefore, it is recommended that local boards resolve their formal views on the RLTP after 24 June and before 3 July. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The local board has three choices:

i)          Add the meeting as an addition to the 2022-2025 meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

Or,

iii)        Approve an amendment to the 2022-2025 Kaipātiki Local Board meeting schedule to move the 19 June Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting to the following week on Wednesday 26 June 2024.

13.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the RLTP timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

14.     For option two, only the specific topic on the RLTP may be considered for which the meeting is being held.

15.     For option three, considering that the Kaipātiki Local Board has already scheduled an additional meeting on Wednesday 12 June 2024 for the Local Board Agreement, adding another business meeting for the Regional Land Transport Plan would bring the total number of business meetings in June to three, thereby reducing the time available for workshop items. This option suggests amending the Kaipātiki Local Board 2022-2025 meeting schedule by moving the meeting planned for Wednesday 19 June to the following week on Wednesday 26 June 2024. 

16.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     There is no specific impact to mana whenua or mataawaka from this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     There is a risk that local board views on the RLTP will not be informed by public feedback. This risk is mitigated if the local board resolves to add an additional or extraordinary meeting after the public feedback data is made available on 24 June 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Staff will implement the preferred process when preparing the business meeting schedule.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor