I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 May 2024

5:00 pm

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office
Shop 17B
93 Bader Drive
Māngere

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

 

Deputy Chairperson

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Members

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

 

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacqueline Robinson

Democracy Advisor

 

9 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: jacqui.robinson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - I AM MĀNGERE                     5

8.2     Deputation -  Fe'unu Koula Global Academy of Tongan Arts, Dance and Culture.                                                         6

8.3     Deputation - Māngere College                   6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                7

9.1     Youthspace at 12 - 16 High Street Ōtāhuhu                                                        7

9.2     Ōtāhuhu Budgeting Services                     7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Governing Body member Update                       9

12        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                                              11

13        Chairperson's Report                                         15

14        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025          17

15        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025                                        43

16        2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant, Round Two and Multiboard Grant, Round Two Grant Allocations                                                57

17        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund                                             77

18        Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum                      97

19        Classification of Winthrop Way Reserve Māngere East as local purpose (community buildings) reserve                                             105

20        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                  111

21        Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents                           127

22        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meeting schedule       145

23        Local board resolution responses, feedback and information report                                     149

24        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendars                                                           155

25        Record of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                               159

26        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

27        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                             169

C1       Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model                 169

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 April 2024, and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 1 May 2024, as a true and correct record.

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - I AM MĀNGERE

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Kate Rooney (Sustainable Coastlines), Edwina Merito CEO, (Sustainable Coastlines) and Toni Helleur (Many Streams of Our Community Trust) will be in attendance to request advice, land owner approval and discuss a possible partnership on a project of relocating a gifted facility (The Flagship Education Centre from Sustainable Coastlines) to Many Streams of Our Community Trust with the intentions of this facility being accessible for the community of Māngere.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Kate Rooney, Edwina Merito and Toni Helleur for their attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          8.1 - I AM Māngere Executive Summary 2023 - deputation............................... 173

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation -  Fe'unu Koula Global Academy of Tongan Arts, Dance and Culture.

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Losalia Milika Pusiaki, founder of Fe'unu Koula Global Academy of Tongan Arts, Dance and Culture will be in attendance to talk about the Tongan Day Festival being held 7 Sept 2024.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Losalia Milika Pusiaki for her attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          8.2 - Tongan Day Festival 2024 - deputation........................................... 175

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Māngere College

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Neville Padavatan, Support Services at Māngere College will be in attendance to talk about how local board grants have been utilised by the school, and the students experiences in the “Nature and Nurture” project.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Neville Padavatan for his attendance and presentation.

 

 


 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Youthspace at 12 - 16 High Street Ōtāhuhu

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Richette Rogers and Caroline Paepa will be in attendance to talk about the youth space located at 12 – 16 High Street Ōtāhuhu.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Richette Rogers and Caroline Paepa for their attendance and public forum presentation.

 

 

 

 

9.2       Ōtāhuhu Budgeting Services

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Lesley Matia of the Ōtāhuhu Budgeting Services at 12 – 16 High Street Ōtāhuhu will be in attendance to share the organisations work, as part of the leasing programme with Auckland Council.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Lesley Matia for her attendance and public forum presentation.

 

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Governing Body member Update

File No.: CP2024/00245

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2024/05560

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allow the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead roles, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

2.       To make any appointments to vacant positions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Members have an opportunity to update the board on their activities as topic area leads.

4.       The table below outlines the current leads and alternates for topic areas of local board business meetings and organisations on which the board is represented through a formal appointment.

Topic Area

Lead

Alternate

Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee Appointments Committee

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Staff consultation over landowner approval applications (excluding applications for filming and events)

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Staff consultation on applications for filming

Christine O’Brien

Makalita Kolo

Liquor licence matters, to prepare and provide objections, if any, and speak to any local board views at any hearings on applications for liquor licences

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Resource consent matters to:

i)         provide the local board views, if any, on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

ii)        prepare and provide local board’s views, if any, on notified resource consents and speak to those views at any hearings if required

iii)       provide the local board’s views on matters relating to or generated by the COVID-19 (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020 while this legislation remains in force

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Christine O’Brien

Local Government New Zealand Auckland Zone

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Select shared representatives to council working groups, working parties and other internal bodies, where there is a limited number of local board representatives to be selected from amongst all 21 or clusters of local boards

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Manukau Harbour Forum joint committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Ara Kōtui (formerly Māori input into local board decision-making political steering group)

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Staff consultation on applications for events and other activities on local parks and local facilities that also require regulatory approval, or may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Approve the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, when timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Arts, Community and Events (including libraries)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Christine O’Brien

Local planning, housing, and heritage – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

1st half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

2nd half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Transport

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st half of the term:

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd half of the term:

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Economic development

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Makalita Kolo

Youth, Children, Seniors and Uniquely Abled

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Water care COMMUNITY

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Auckland Airport Community Trust for Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Ambury Park Centre

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Christine O’Brien

Department of Corrections - Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Māngere Bridge Business Association

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Christine O’Brien

Māngere East Village Business Association

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Māngere Mountain Education Trust

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Makalita Kolo

Māngere Town Centre Business Association

Makalita Kolo

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Ōtāhuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Christine O’Brien

Ōtāhuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated Society joint committee

Makalita Kolo

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

South Harbour Business Association

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Makalita Kolo

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-Management Committee.

To agree changes of a minor nature to the Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-management Agreement in consultation with Te Ākitai Waiohua / Pūkaki Māori Marae Committee

Delegate authority to the Chair of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and the Auckland Council chief executive to sign on behalf of Auckland Council the Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-management Agreement

Appoint the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board as an additional member to Te Pūkaki Tapu o Poutūkeka Co-management Committee, to come into effect on agreement with Te Ākitai Waiohua / Pūkaki Māori Marae Committee on a total Co-management committee membership of six

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

The Southern Initiative (TSI) Steering Group

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Joe Glassie-Rasmussen

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal and written reports from local board members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2024/05559

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the chairperson’s verbal and written report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/01200

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report confirms Business Improvement District (BID) annual compliance against the Auckland Council BID Policy (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) as of 10 March 2024.

2.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report.

3.       This report considers whether the local board should recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Ōtāhuhu, South Harbour, Māngere Town Centre, Māngere Bridge and Māngere East Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

BID-operating business associations within the local board area

4.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are programmes where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

5.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report. As part of the 19 Requirements, the BIDs are required to provide annual accountability reports which are due 10 March each year.

6.       The BID annual accountability reports on public funds received by the BID within the local board area for the 2022/2023 financial year and has a direct link to council’s Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process to strike the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

7.       Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has five BIDs operating in their local area:

Table One: shows the amount of targeted rate each BID is seeking in 2024/2025.

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Met BID Policy annual reporting requirements.

(9,11 & 18)

Actions underway towards BID Policy compliance

Ōtāhuhu Business Association

$749,232.00

 

ü

N/A

South Harbour Business Association

$87,425.00

 

X

Ongoing discussions about  management options for South Harbour BID are taking place.

 

Māngere Town Centre Business Association

$345,570.00

 

X

BID compliance requirements to be met at AGM 2024

Māngere Bridge Business Association

$34,729.00

 

X

BID compliance requirements to be met at AGM 2024

Māngere East Business Association

$6,100.00

 

X

Approach to be developed May/ June 2024 (local board involvement)

 

Staff recommend that the local board approve Ōtāhuhu, South Harbour, Māngere Town Centre, Māngere Bridge and Māngere East (ME BID) BIDs to receive their targeted rate grant for 2024/2025.

Regional summary across all 51 BIDs for this reporting period

8.       Of the 51 BID-operating business associations in Tāmaki Makaurau, 92% (47 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

9.       36 BIDs (70.5%) increased their targeted rates between 2% to 50% for 2024/2025, while 15 BIDs maintained the fiscal status quo.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i.        $ 749,232.00 for Ōtāhuhu Business Association BID

ii.       $ 87,425.00 for South Harbour Business Association BID

iii.      $ 345,570.00 for Māngere Town Centre Business Association BID

iv.      $ 34,729.00 for Māngere Bridge Business Association BID

v.       $ 6,100.00 for Māngere East Business Association BID

 

b)      Supports council officers working with Māngere East Village Business Association Society Inc. towards the discontinuation of the Māngere East BID programme by 30 June 2025.


 

Horopaki

Context

Auckland Council Business Improvement District (BID) Policy and BID targeted rate grant agreement.

 

10.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2022) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the BID-operating business association and inform this annual report. (Attachment A).

11.     The remaining four BID Policy Requirements set out the process for establishing, expanding, and discontinuing a BID programme; and determines rating mechanisms. These will be covered within individual BID local board reports.

12.     The BID Policy does not prescribe or measure standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

13.     The BID Policy is supported by a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement, a three-year agreement signed by both Auckland Council and each BID-operating business association’s executive committee. The agreement sets out the relationship between the parties, how payment will be made and that compliance with the BID Policy is mandatory. The agreement confirms the business associations independence from Auckland Council. All 51 BIDs have signed a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement for period 1 December 2022 to 30 December 2025.

14.     This report updates the local board on compliance with the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID), with a focus on the BIDs annual accountability reporting (BID Policy Requirement 9, 11 and 18) relating to public funds received by the BID for the 2022/2023 financial year.

15.     This report includes a copy of the individual BIDs Governance Summary documents, Attachment B, C, D, E and F. These documents include the full resolution detailing the amount of BID targeted rate grant approved by association members at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 financial year. The Chair also agrees, by signing this document, to advise council of any perceived or real/current issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

BID Programmes

16.     Local BID programmes should provide value to the collective business community by delivering a suite of economic activities that respond to local needs and opportunities and are agreed by the local business community. BID programmes also provide the opportunity to work with the council group and engage with local boards.

17.   The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

18.   Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve a detailed income and expenditure operational budget and business plan for the following financial year.

19.   Responsibility for delivery and outcomes of the BID programme sits with the individual BID-operating business association executive committee (provision of reporting information) and members (reviewing information provided to them by the executive committee).

20.     BID-operating business associations operate as independent Incorporated Societies. All BIDs are registered incorporated societies and need to be aware of the requirement to re-register by April 2026 under the updated Incorporated Societies Act 2022. 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board BID Targeted Rates 2024/2025

21.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has five BIDs operating in their local board area. Table 2 shows the amount of targeted rate each BID had approved at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 and linked to the council’s Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process.

Table Two: Amount of targeted rate for each BID in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Change from previous year dollars/ percentage

Last year target rate amount was increased

Ōtāhuhu Business Association Inc

$749,232.00

+ 5%

2022

South Harbour Business Association Incorporated 

$87,425.00

 

0%

2022

Māngere Town Centre BID Inc

$345,570.00

 

+ 10%

2023

Māngere Bridge Progressive Business Association Inc

$34,729.00

 

+ 5%

2022

Māngere East Village Business Association Society Inc

$6,100.00

 

0%

2010

 

Decision making

Auckland Council

22.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

23.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Local Boards

24.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional overview

25.     The BID Policy has been in place in Tāmaki Makaurau since 2022 and applies to 51 BIDs across the ā-rohe, up from 50 BIDs reported in the 2023 report to local boards.

26.     Across all 51 BID-operating business associations 92% (47 out of 51 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

27.     Annual accountability reporting is a requirement of the BID Policy (Requirement 11). This has meant the BID Team deviated from the BID Policy Requirement providing an extension to the due date to enable BIDs to achieve sufficient compliance for 2024/2025.

28.     The BID team observed this year BIDs have paid less attention to providing the required annual accountability documents by the 10 March 2024 due date, compared with the previous year.

Summary of BIDs meeting BID Policy Requirements

29.     51% (26) of BIDs successfully completed their annual accountability reporting by the due date of 10 March 2024.

30.     41% (21) received notification that they had missing information or documents and were provided an extension to the 10 March deadline. 

31.     4 of BIDs failed to meet BID Policy Requirement 11 and the 10 March deadline and the provided extension to this deadline.

32.     BID targeted rate grants 2024/2025 - 36 increased their targeted rates between 2% to 50% for 2024/2025, while 15 maintained the fiscal status quo.

33.     Of the 11 BIDs with income under $120,000 (BID Policy Requirement 4), two BIDs now met this requirement as of 10 March 2024.

34.     Of the remaining nine BIDs, three have made no comment to increase their income. Five BIDs have increased their BID Targeted rate grant and are on track to meet this requirement by 1 July 2028 and one has indicated interest in a BID expansion project.

Regional BID Programme Growth

35.     This section provides an overview of BID programme growth across the region.

36.     Onehunga BID achieved a successful expansion ballot in February 2024. This will see them evolve from a retail focused BID into a BID encompassing retail, plus commercial and industrial areas, with a significant growth in target rate commencing 1 July 2024.

37.     Kingsland BID has confirmed at their 2023 AGM they would implement a BID expansion project in 2024/2025.

38.     Grey Lynn Business Association will be holding a ballot later this year towards establishing as a new BID from 1 July 2025.

39.     Takanini Business Association is on track to progress their BID establishment project aiming to become a new BID from 1 July 2026

BID Team: 2024 Accountability Reporting process overview.

40.     Upon receipt of individual BID annual accountability documents, staff follow a set process that includes:

·    Reviewing the accountability reporting of the previous accountability period (10 March 2023) to understand if any recommendations or feedback had been made.

·    Review the documents provided for 10 March 2024.

·    Discussion regarding observations relevant to that BID (knowledge, actions taken etc.)

·    Communicate to BID (information missing, more information required, completion of reporting).

41.     Generic observations from year 10 March 2024 accountability include:

·    Acceptance that limited local board discretionary funding was available which led to BIDS having a greater focus on efficiencies in their own BID budgets.

·    The improving quality of annual discussions between local boards and BID-operating business associations. Less emphasis on operational aspects and more discussion on how they could collaborate.

BID Policy – Requirements 9, 11 and 18

42.     Requirements 9 and 18 of the BID Policy are focused on BID affiliates having access to BID programme information and the BID targeted rate spend. It specifies a range of information BIDs must ensure are easily and freely accessible on a suitable online platform.

43.     This year a one-off ‘Website Check List’ was added to the annual accountablity reporting.  This document confirms complance against BID Policy, Requirements 9 and 18 relating to the transparency of BID information on a public platform.

44.     The BID Policy, requirement 11 sets out the documents that form the annual accountability reporting documents for each BID. These documents confirm membership decision-making has taken place regarding the BID programme at the 2023 AGM.

45.     Other reporting requirements such as the filing of annual financial statements with the Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act are included in this reporting.

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board BIDs

46.     The table below sets out the documents required by 10 March 2024 under BID Policy Requirement 11.

Table Three: Business associations compliance with the BID Policy Requirement 11, 9 and 18.

BID Policy Requirement 11

 

 

 

Business Associations – documents submitted

Ōtāhuhu Business Association Inc

South Harbour Business Association Incorporated 

Māngere Town Centre BID Inc

Māngere Bridge Progressive Business Association Inc

Māngere East Village Business Association Society Inc

Statement of financial/ performance reporting 2022/2023

ü

ü

Not approved by Members at 2023 AGM

 

ü

ü

Audited report/review 2022/2023

ü

Not submitted

ü

Not submitted

Not submitted

Audit Management Letter 2022/2023

ü

Not submitted

ü

Not submitted

Not submitted

Chairs report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

Treasurers report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Not submitted

 

ü

Manager’s report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

Approved business plan for 18 months 2024/2025

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

Income and expenditure budget 2024/2025

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

Draft Minutes 2023 AGM

ü

ü

ü

ü

Rejected

Financial/Audit reports posted to Companies Office website

ü

ü

Not filed

ü

ü

Mandatory Management Summary – signed by manager

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

Mandatory Governance Summary – signed by Chair

ü

ü

ü

ü

Rejected

Strategic Plan *

2021-2026

2024-2027

2022-2027

2016-2023 – being developed

No Strategic Plan

Website Check List

ü

Not online 10 March 2024

ü

ü

No online platform

10 March 2024

 Note: * Current strategic 3–5-year plans to be available upon request.


 

Table Four: Business associations compliance with other BID Policy Requirements.

Business Associations

 

BID Policy Requirements

Ōtāhuhu Business Association Inc

South Harbour Business Association Incorporated 

Māngere Town Centre BID Inc

Māngere Bridge Progressive Business Association Inc

Māngere East Village Business Association Society Inc

Requirement 3: Increase BID income to $120,000 by 1 July 2028

N/A to this BID

Exploring potential to work with another BID

N/A to this BID

No reference to how they will progress this requirement

No reference to how they will progress this requirement

Requirement 10: Other Council Funding – accountability reporting*

Baseline to be established year ending 2025

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

 

Requirement 12: Clear separation between BID governance and management

Measure - BID Team advised of issue within BID. Year ending 10 March 2024

No issue identified or notified to BID team

BID team identified issue/ not advised by BID.

 

BID team identified issue/ not advised by BID.

 

No issue identified or notified to BID team

BID team identified issue/ not advised by BID.

 

Note – BID Policy Requirement 10: * Funding agreements between the BID and local board (or any other part of council) set out the contractual obligations for funds received. These other funds are in addition to the BID targeted rate funding and are not covered in this report.

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board: observations on BID Operating business associations within the area

·    Ōtāhuhu – nothing noted.

·    South Harbour –  Has an issue maintaining a quorum on executive committee. SH BID did not provide an audit or audit management letter by 10 March. Audit currently underway. South Harbour is working collaboratively with Ōtāhuhu BID towards a new management arrangement with both executive committees supportive.

·    Māngere Town Centre – financial sustainability concerns being managed by AGM elected executive committee. Financial Statements for year ending June 2023 to be presented to members at 2024 AGM. Working with BID Team.

·    Māngere Bridge –  2 year audit required for AGM 2024. 

Māngere East Village Business Association Society Inc. and the Māngere East BID programme

47.     The ME BID programme is the responsibility of the Māngere East Village Business Association Society Inc.

48.     Council officers have had concerns about ME BID for some time, including their dependency on Māngere Town Centre BID to provide services over many years.

49.     Options for ME BID and its future were discussed with the local board on 1 May 2024. The board was updated that the organisations small amount of target rate grant made it unsustainable in terms of the expenses related to compliance with the BID Policy (for example, an annual audit, a manager in place).

Support previously provided by Māngere Town Centre BID has ceased as of 31 December 2023.  There will be no further support available from that BID.

50.     Little value to ME BID members can be provided with the current target rate grant annual amount of $6,100 which has remained unchanged since 2010.

51.     There is evidence that the executive committee is at risk with of being non-compliant with the organisations Incorporated Societies constitution due to the limited number of members involved with the management and governance of the society. This creates a risk to the governance and management of the BID programme it operates and BID funds.

52.     The BID Policy requires BIDs established before 2010, receiving less than $120,000 pa target rate grant to increase their total income received (including the BID targeted rate grant) to at least $120,000 per annum by 1 July 2028.

This has been discussed several times with ME BID but there is no evidence of progression towards achieving this policy requirement.

53.     The BID team seeks the support of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to work with Māngere East Village Business Association Society Inc. towards commencing the process of discontinuation of the ME BID programme over the 2024/2025 year. The goal would be to cease the ME BID and targeted rate by 30 June 2025.  

54.     Whilst supportive of setting the target rate for 2024/2025, work must now start towards the discontinuation of the BID programme. This approach allows a long lead in time.

55.     Discontinuation is the process as guided by the BID Policy.

56.     Using the documents and information submitted, the BID Team is satisfied that Ōtāhuhu, South Harbour, Māngere Town Centre, Māngere Bridge BIDs have sufficiently met the BID Policy Requirements and the BID Policy for setting of the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.  The BID team will work with Māngere East BID over the 2024/2025 year and is supportive of setting their target rate of $6100.00 for the 2024/2025 financial year.

57.     Staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for 2024/2025 as set out in table one.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

58.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and can facilitate environmental sustainability programmes and climate response where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

59.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations that operate a BID programme. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

60.     BIDs work across several Council Controlled Organisations including Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

61.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

62.     Ōtāhuhu, South Harbour, Māngere Town Centre, Māngere Bridge and Māngere East Business Improvement BID programmes best align with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2023, Outcome: Our Economy

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

63.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Ōtāhuhu, South Harbour, Māngere Town Centre, Māngere Bridge and Māngere East business associations means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

64.     The BID Policy and the annual accountability process does not prescribe or report on individual BID programme’s effectiveness, outcomes, or impacts. However individual BIDs may include this level of detail in other reports provided to their members. This localised project reporting is not a requirement of the BID Policy and is not part of the BID Policy annual accountability reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

65.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

66.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, the BID Policy sets out a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

68.     For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, it requires the BIDs to fully complete all annual accountability reporting and the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID. 

69.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy throughout the year including responding to queries and issues raised by council staff, members of the BID, the public and elected members.

70.     We actively grow relationships with council departments that interact with BID programmes to ensure a consistent approach is applied to the programme.

71.     The role of the local board representative is a key link between the parties involved in the BID programme in terms of communication and feedback.  Local Board representatives on BID programmes are strongly encouraged to contact the BID Team if they have any queries or concerns.

72.     This report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds. It provides an annual update that the BIDs operating within the local board area are compliant with the BID Policy.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 including the annual budget 2024/2025.

74.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2024 to Ōtāhuhu, South Harbour, Māngere Town Centre, Māngere Bridge and Māngere East BIDs.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID Policy 2022 - all requirements and responsibility for accountability

29

b

Governance Summary - Māngere Town Centre

33

c

Governance Summary - Ōtāhuhu BID

35

d

Governance Summary - South Harbour BID

37

e

Governance Summary - Māngere Bridge BID

39

f

Governance Summary - Māngere East Village

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Attachment A: BID Policy Requirements Summary

Requirement number

Requirement

Compliance responsibility

1:

Auckland Council requires BID-operating business associations to fully comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (Kaupapa Hereā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi). 

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

2:

BID programmes should aim to develop economic activities that support and benefit their BID affiliates and provide value to the business community.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee/ members

3:

BID programmes established before 2010 and currently receiving, receiving less than $120,000 targeted rate grant per annum, are required to increase their total ongoing income received (including the BID targeted rate grant) to at least $120,000 per annum by 1 July 2028 (6 years).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee/

4: If applicable

All establishing BID programmes must operate at a size (geographical) and scale of not less than $120,000 per annum (BID target rate grant) to achieve:

·    A long-term focus for the BID programme

·    Independent long-term financial sustainability of the business association, including securing additional income streams.

·    Adequate resourcing to complete all compliance costs under the policy.

New BIDs

5:

All BID-operating business associations must have a signed current three-year BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement (Appendix A).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

6:

The BID targeted rate grant spend must focus on delivering value to BID affiliates.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

7:

The BID targeted rate grant and BID programme resources (management, governance time or funds) cannot be used under any circumstances:

·          For any political purpose

·          and or to endorse or support a particular candidate or political party.

 BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

8: If applicable

BID-operating business association must accept that Auckland Council reserves the right, at its sole discretion (to be exercised reasonably), to review the use of targeted rate grant funds and the need for an audit and anticipates full cooperation from the BID-operating business association.

Auckland Council

9:

BID affiliates must have at all times, access[1] to BID programme information and BID targeted rate spend (section 4).

Information about the business association operating the BID programme including:

How decision-making takes place

How BID affiliates can provide feedback into the BID programme priorities and the BID targeted rate grant spend.

How to become a business association member (membership information and consent process)

·    BID affiliates and association members must have access to the following documents at least 14[2] days prior to the General Meeting (AGM) date:

BID programme annual business plan, including:

§ Activities

§ Outcomes

§ Budget allocations

Draft BID programme income and expenditure budget (upcoming year)

General Meeting Agenda (AGM/SGM)

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee, affiliates, members

10:

Where BID-operating business associations receive funding from Auckland Council or council-controlled organisations in addition to the BID targeted rate grant, council processes require the BID-operating business association be compliant with all accountability requirements associated with that funding.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

11:

All BID operating business associations must complete the annual accountability reporting requirement to Auckland Council by the required dates as defined in Table One – ‘Summary of accountability documents and deadlines’.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

12:

All BID-operating business associations must have a clear delineation between the governance and management of a BID programme.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

13:

All BID-operating business associations must include the following governance practices:

a)   Executive Committee representation

b)   Minimum quorum

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

14:

All BID-operating business associations must have an annual audit (or review) and comply with the following:

c)   Auditor qualification and type of audit – Auditor qualification and Type of Audit

d)   Insurance

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

15:

All BID-operating business association must have written approaches to both governance and management.

 

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

16:

The BID-operating business association constitution and the executive committee board charter must not be inconsistent with the policy.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

17:

All proposed amendments to the constitution concerning the BID programme and BID targeted rate grant funding will require written approval by Auckland Council prior to membership approval at a General Meeting (AGM/SGM).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

18:

All BID-operating business associations are required to identify, engage, and communicate with:

·    BID affiliates

·    Business association members

·    Local Board BID representative

·    Local Board/s

·    A suitable online platform should be used for BID programme information to be freely available.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

19:

Only BID affiliates qualify as a full member of a BID-operating business association.

 

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

20: If applicable

Auckland Council must be provided with a signed copy of the agreement/contract when a BID-operating business association provides overall management and services to deliver the total BID programme on behalf of another BID-operating business association. Both BID-operating business association executive committees continue to be responsible for their association and to their association members.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee(s),

21:

BID-operating business associations are required to engage in at least one meeting per year with the local board/s. This meeting should be scheduled for a date between the completion of the General Meeting (AGM/SGM) and 10 March.  

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

22:

The BID-operating business association must advise Auckland Council if they become aware that they are not compliant with the BID Policy.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

23: If applicable

Completion of Table Three - ‘BID Ballot Processes” is a requirement for:

a)   Establishing a new BID programme

b)   Amendments to an existing BID programme (boundary, rating mechanism or discontinuation).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee –

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

AUCKLAND COUNCIL BID PROGRAMME
MANDATORY GOVERNANCE SUMMARY

Completed and submitted no later than 10 March annually

 

Reference: BID Policy, Appendix C

 

 

 

 

BID-operating business association name:       Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated

 

 

Incorporated Society number: 2155514

 

Purpose -This document confirms the BID programme annual accountability reporting as required by the Auckland Council and the BID Policy.

This document will be included in the annual BID compliance report prepared by Auckland Council for the relevant Local Board/s.

 

CONFIRMATION AND DECLARATION

 

 

 

1.

I confirm that all documents as attached to the Mandatory Management Summary (Appendix B)

comply with the BID Policy

provided to Auckland Council for the year ending 30 June 2023...........................

Please note Financial statements were re-instated and will be presented in our next AGM.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.

 

14th of November 2023..................... , approved via a resolution/s the income and expenditure budget and the

BlD targeted rate grant amount as follows:

 

Move to approve the budget for the following financial year 2024-2025 draft budget which includes a BID targeted rate grant amount of $345,570, including a 10% ($31,415) increase to the BID targeted rate grant for 2024-2025 financial year.

Further ask the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board recommend to the Governing Body the amount of $345,570 be included in the Auckland Council draft 2024/2025 annual budget consultation process.

Note: Auckland Council agrees to consider the incorporation of the BID targeted rate amounts into the Auckland Council Annual Budget or 10-year budget.

 

3.

I confirm that members received all required notice about General Meetings (AGM/SGM) held either 14 days or 21days prior to the date of the meeting (s).

4.

I confirm that BID affiliates have free access to information about the BID Programme.

 

5.

I confirm that all Incorporated Society Act 1908 (as amended or replaced from time to time) requirements have been met.

 

 

6.

As chair of the above business association, I confirm the association is, to the best of my awareness, compliant with the BID Policy.

I will advise Auckland Council if I become aware of any known perceived or real/current or potential issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

 

Chair confirmation      Name Lara Dolan                                       Signature:

A black text with a white background

Description automatically generated


Date:   4/03/2024



 



Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/05056

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025 for adoption as provided in Attachment A.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      adopt the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025 provided as Attachment A

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.      The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme includes:

·   outcomes as identified in the local board plan

·   specific local board grant priorities

·   the types of grants, the number of grant rounds, and opening and closing dates

·   any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

·   other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       A proposal has been put forward to the board that an amount of the 2024/2025 grants budget will be specially allocated towards applications that meet “Revitalising Town Centre” and/or “Environment” criteria. The proposal has been reflected in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board 2024/2025 Grant Programme (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

9.       Once the local board grants programme 2024/2025 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria, and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Grants Programme have been workshopped with the local board and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2024/2025.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste, alternative transport methods, community energy efficiency education and behaviour change, build community resilience, and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021 -2031 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     An implementation plan is underway, and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Community Grants Programme 2024-2025

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amber Deng - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 










Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant, Round Two and Multiboard Grant, Round Two Grant Allocations

File No.: CP2024/04980

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round Two and Multiboard Grant Round Two.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Programme 2023/2024, provided as Attachment A, which sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the board.

3.       This report presents applications received in the 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round Two provided as Attachment B, and Multiboard Grant Round Two as Attachment C.

4.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $252,068 for the 2023/2024 financial year, which including ring-fenced funding of $80,000 for applications that meet Revitalising Town Centre criteria and $40,000 for applications that meet environmental outcomes. 

·        A total of $8,500 was reallocated to 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Youth Grant.

·        A total of $24,910.50 was allocated to Māngere-Otāhuhu Quick Response Grant Round One.

·        A total of $66,096.00 was allocated to Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round One and Multiboard Grant Round One.

·        A total of $7,000 was allocated to deferred application LG2409-177 from Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round One.

·        A total of $2,221.04 was refunded from Children's Autism Foundation under application MB2021-236 due to project partial cancellation.

·        A total of $1,084.23 was refunded from Northern Dance Network Incorporated under application QR2009-118 due to project partial cancellation.

·        A total of $2,189.00 was refunded from AFL New Zealand Incorporated because the project did not go ahead.

This will leave $152,209.37 for one Local Grant round, one Multiboard Grant round and one Quick Response Grant round.

5.       Twenty-five applications have been submitted to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round Two, requesting a total of $274,279.72. Thirty-one applications have been submitted to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Multiboard Grant Round Two, requesting a total of $171,141.50.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round Two

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

LG2409-205

Paeaneer Limited

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, stage set up and sound hire, staff wage to deliver Labyrinth & Beatdown 4 Day Dance event at Affirming Works Studio from 4 June 2024 to 8 June 2024

$11,210.00

LG2409-206

The Samoan Congregational Christian NZ

Community

Towards marquee and related equipment hire, port-a-loo hire and container kitchen hire to deliver Women's Spiritual Fellowship event at Congregational Christian Church of Samoa Māngere Bridge on 25 May 2024

$30,833.80

LG2409-207

Bluwave Galumoana Limited

Arts and culture

Towards advertising cost to promote core Samoan principles of Fa'aaloalo, Alofa ma Tautua in Māngere and south Auckland area from 23 February 2024 to 30 April 2024

$2,000.00

LG2409-208

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards purchase Nose clips and Mouth Pieces for free Spirometry testing delivered in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board area from 3 June 2024 to 30 August 2024

$1,700.00

LG2409-213

Māngere College

Community

Towards Redwood Night Trip, accommodation, petrol, transportation, Tarawera Legacy trip to Rotorua from 2 December 2024 to 6 December 2024

$9,254.00

LG2409-216

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards Life Education Programme delivery cost at Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local schools from 4 June 2024 to 20 December 2024

$15,000.00

LG2409-218

Naad Charitable Trust NZ

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, sound hire and stage set up, media and video, performers fee, instrument hire, oversea artists and advertising cost to run Naad Music Festival at Māngere Arts Center from 2 August 2024 to 3 August 2024

$16,295.00

LG2409-224

The Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust

Community

Towards room rental and transport cost to deliver Music Therapy South Auckland satellite programme at Māngere East Community Centre from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$9,200.00

LG2409-225

Maliumai Community Trust

Community

Towards admin support time, venue hire, facilitator time, transport, and gift vouchers to run Pacific Cadetship Career Pathways project in Māngere-Otāhuhu from 22 July 2024 to 2 August 2024

$12,000.00

LG2409-226

Māngere Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre

Sport and recreation

Towards window security tint, mats, floor surface clean, painting at Māngere Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre from 3 June 2024 to 31 July 2024

$12,698.00

LG2409-228

D65 Trust

Community

Towards trainers wage, administration fee, step boards and PA system to deliver FITLIFE Māngere Nights programme from 3 June 2024 to 30 May 2024

$65,637.10

LG2409-230

Taulanga U Trust

Community

Towards water tank refill, contractor cost to prepare and ploughing the field to deliver Kumara and Potato Growing Project at Radonich Park from 1 October 2024 to 31 March 2025

$4,390.00

LG2409-232

Blue Highway Tapui Limited

Community

Towards Google business account, website set up, marketing, internet and phone bill, welcome pack discount cost for Blue Highway Website Launch from 3 June 2024 to 1 October 2024

$4,052.00

LG2409-234

Ambury Park Centre Incorporated

Community

Towards hay for horses at Ambury Park from 1 June 2024 to 30 November 2024

$9,997.00

LG2409-237

SBS Sports & Cultural Club Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards advertisement, videography and photography cost to run Ladies cultural night project at Due Drop Centre on 20 July 2024

$7,705.00

LG2409-238

New Zealand Ethnic Women Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards project supervisor/coordinator wage, sewing tutor, sewing machine and sewing and crafting materials to run NZ Ethnic Women's Sewing School on 366 Māngere Road from 1 June 2024 to 1 May 2025

$22,718.00

LG2409-241

fatafata mafana oe lolo a halaevalu.

Community

Towards venue hire at Shiloh Hall from 2 February 2024 to 27 September 2024

$2,000.00

LG2409-250

Sustain & Enable Limited

Community

Towards workshops delivery, marketing, venue hire and refreshment, travel, energy efficiency devices, accountability report time to deliver Home Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Living Workshops at Ōtāhuhu Town Hall from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$3,068.00

LG2409-252

Counties Manukau Badminton Assn Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards a contribution of coaching cost, admin and affiliation fees to deliver Junior Development Programme in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area from 1 June 2024 to 30 April 2025

$3,620.00

LG2409-256

Momentum Charitable Trust

Community

Towards cost to run six one-day life and financial skills programmes at Probation Centres in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu from 3 June 2024 to 31 July 2024

$10,170.00

LG2409-258

Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated

Community

Towards performers, activities and Facebook promotion to run Cultural and Language Weeks 2024 at Māngere Town Centre from 1 June 2024 to 19 October 202

$5,000.00

LG2409-259

Panacea Arts Charitable Trust t/a Mapura Studios

Arts and culture

Towards staff wage to run Mapura Māngere Studios at Māngere Town Centre Library from 24 July 2024 to 25 September 2024

$3,675.00

LG2409-260

Community Cat Coalition Incorporated

Environment

Towards cat de-sexing related cost in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area from 1 June 2024 to 31 March 2025

$5,000.00

LG2409-261

School Start First Impressions

Community

Towards operating cost and stationary cost at School Start First Impressions from 1 July 2024 to 30 September 2024

$2,056.82

LG2409-262

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards operational cost to deliver twenty Spoken Word Poetry workshops at Zayed College for Girls and McAuley High School from 10 June 2024 to 13 December 2024

$5,000.00

Total

 

 

 

$274,279.72

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Multiboard Grant Round One

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

MB2324-202

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards contractors' fee for volunteer training and supervision

$6,000.00

MB2324-204

David Riley T/A Reading Warrior

Arts and culture

Towards book illustration, design, printing, and shipping costs

$2,000.00

MB2324-206

Unity Community Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, sports gear, office lease, sports trainers wages, office lease, computers, kitchenware, administrative expenses, furniture, and CEO salary, for establishing sport and recreation hubs across Auckland

$20,000.00

MB2324-209

Ioasa, Julian Terrence

Arts and culture

Towards mentoring costs

$1,000.00

MB2324-2104

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards postage, printing cost, reimbursement of clinical backup team for practical expenses for Anxiety NZ Trust from 1 May 2024 to 30 September 2024

$2,000.00

MB2324-216

Age Concern Auckland Trust

Community

Towards wages at 57 Rosebank road from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$5,604.00

MB2324-217

NZ Council of Victim Support Groups

Community

Towards overall operational expenses

$1,500.00

MB2324-218

New Zealand Eid Day Trust Board

Events

Towards venue hire, entertainment, games, operations, marketing, and misc costs for NZ Eid Al Adha 2024 at Eden Park Stadium

$4,000.00

MB2324-221

The Operating Theatre Trust trading as Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards ticket cost for disabled or disadvantaged children to attend Mrs Wishy Washy show from 21 September 2024 to 26 October 2024

$4,891.50

MB2324-222

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards cost of native trees and classroom recycling bins to deliver Paper4trees Auckland from 1 April 2024 to 31 August 2024

$4,017.50

MB2324-224

The Re-Creators Limited

Community

Towards cost of rent, tools, equipment, admin, tutor, project management, marketing to deliver Community DIY skills-based upcycling workshops from 1 May 2024 to 27 September 2024

$5,800.00

MB2324-227

East Skate Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards programme delivery costs, which include food, drinks, equipment, professional skate coaches, PA system, and free skateboards for participants

$2,650.00

MB2324-228

Pet Whisperer Rescue Trust

Environment

Towards desexing, veterinary care including euthanasia, vet consults, and microchips & registration cost from 1 June 2024 to 1 December 2024

$15,000.00

MB2324-231

Every Body is a Treasure Charitable Trust

Community

Towards facilitator costs from 1 April 2024 to 28 February 2025

$8,000.00

MB2324-232

Training and Budget Services Inc

Community

Towards wage of a Head Trainer for project deliveries from 1 May 2024 to 29 November 2024

$5,000.00

MB2324-243

Babystart Charitable Trust

Community

Towards infant and maternal clothing and care items, logistics, packaging and project administration cost to distribute baby boxes from1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$4,387.50

MB2324-244

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards catering, accommodation, staff wage, referee, event first response, medals and cups, laundry service, transport, and portable cabins to run South Auckland Intermediate Sports Camps from 1 August 2024 to 13 October 2024

$10,000.00

MB2324-247

The Kids for Kids Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire and production expenses for the National Young Leaders Day at the Duedrop Events Centre

$2,000.00

MB2324-250

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards accommodation, radio advertising, mentor manager wage and volunteers psychological screening for programme delivery from 30 September 2024 to 30 August 2025

$6,500.00

MB2324-252

Te Whakaora Tangata Trust

Community

Towards catering, resources, telecommunications and venue hire cost for Life Restoration Programme from 1 May 2024 to 31 November 2024

$1,680.00

MB2324-255

Unlabeled Limited

Community

Towards home office, accountancy, cell phone, developer program, banking, marketing, translations, web hosting app and web hosting site and equipment cost for Rokket - tool adaptation and support for digital inclusion from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$11,000.00

MB2324-263

Fungataua Trust New Zealand

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, facilitator, and workshop materials cost to deliver Nima Mea'a programme from 27 May 2024 to 20 November 2024

$3,000.00

MB2324-270

Habitat for Humanity Northern Region Limited

Community

Towards Healthy Home Programme delivery costs including the purchase of intervention items and contribution to community education from 1 July 2024 to 30 June 2025

$3,000.00

MB2324-271

Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Community

Towards programme leaders salaries to deliver Kiwi Can programme from 29 April 2024 to 28 March 2025

$2,000.00

MB2324-273

Auckland Softball Association Inc.

Sport and recreation

Towards a proportion of annual operating expenses excluding salaries

$5,000.00

MB2324-282

Feelings For Life Charitable Trust

Community

Towards graphic design, video production related cost, material and resources, facilitator, admin, manager wages, venue hire and catering to deliver Kaiako Hauora Programme from 1 June 2024 to 1 July 2024

$4,411.00

MB2324-283

Paradesi Force Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, stage presentation and equipment, administration, volunteer costs, transport, advertising, workshops, trainers, and coaching costs

$10,000.00

MB2324-286

Te Raranga Charitable Trust

Community

Towards external facilitation cost, marketing, media, office expenditure, venue hire, resource and consultancy cost to deliver LinkUp programme from 1 May 2024 to 31 October 2024

$10,000.00

MB2324-288

New Zealand National Refugee Youth Council

Community

Towards Innovation lab trainer, venue hire, catering cost to run Auckland Innovation Lab Programme at Fickling Convention Centre from 8 July 2024 to 20 June 2025

$3,700.00

MB2324-289

Faith City Trust Board

Community

Towards resources, refreshment, printing, venue hire, boxing equipment, bus hire to deliver Project Wy from 1 July 2024 to 31 October 2024

$2,000.00

MB2324-290

Vaka Ltd

Arts and culture

Towards 3D printing cost for design a Taonga workshops from 1 June 2024 to 16 August 2024

$5,000.00

Total

 

 

 

$171,141.50

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

7.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   higher priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds, and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

8.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Programme as presented in Attachment A. The programme sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the board.

9.       The community grant programme has been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

12.     Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

13.     Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction, increasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation, local tree planting and streamside revegetation, and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage. Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants so they can increase their chances of success next time.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Outcomes Delivery, Ngā Mātārae has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $252,068 for the 2023/2024 financial year, which including ring-fenced funding of $80,000 for applications that meet Revitalising Town Centre criteria and $40,000 for applications that meet environmental outcomes. 

·        A total of $8,500 was reallocated to 2023/2024 Māngere-Otāhuhu Youth Grant.

·        A total of $24,910.50 was allocated to Māngere-Otāhuhu Quick Response Grant Round One.

·        A total of $66,096.00 was allocated to Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round One and Multiboard Grant Round One.

·        A total of $7,000 was allocated to deferred application LG2409-177 from Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round One.

·        A total of $2,221.04 was refunded from Children's Autism Foundation under application MB2021-236 due to project partial cancellation.

·        A total of $1,084.23 was refunded from Northern Dance Network Incorporated under application QR2009-118 due to project partial cancellation.

·        A total of $2,189.00 was refunded from AFL New Zealand Incorporated because the project did not go ahead.

This will leave $152,209.37 for one Local Grant round, one Multiboard Grant round and one Quick Response Grant round.

20.     Twenty-five applications have been submitted to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grant Round Two, requesting a total of $274,279.72. Thirty-one applications have been submitted to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Multiboard Grant Round Two, requesting a total of $171,141.50.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Following the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board allocating funding, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2023/2024 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Community Grants Programme

69

b

2023/2024 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grant Round Two Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

2023/2024 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Multiboard Grant Round Two Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amber Deng - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 









Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund

File No.: CP2024/05313

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund 2023/2024 applications.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board prioritised supporting economic development in their area by providing an Economic and Business Development Fund (the fund) of $66,000 within its 2023/2024 LDI budget.

3.       Local businesses, not for profits and entrepreneurs within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area had the opportunity to apply for contestable funding of up to $2,000 towards economic development. The 2023/2024 fund opened for applications on 1 February 2024 and closed on 29 February 2024.

4.       Forty-seven applications were received totalling $110,447.00.

5.       Proposals for funding allocations were presented to the local board at a workshop on 3 April 2024. This report seeks the local board’s approval for the allocation of the fund.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakaae / agree to fund applications to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund 2023/2024, as set out in Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is committed to championing businesses, not for profits and entrepreneurs in their local board area and to support them to identify and take advantage of economic opportunities.

7.       The local board has prioritised supporting economic development in their area by providing a second round of the Economic and Business Development Fund in 2023/2024. The aim of the fund is to aid the local board area’s economic development - successful applications must therefore be located within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

8.       Local businesses, not for profits and entrepreneurs within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area had the opportunity to apply for funding of up to $2,000 towards economic development.  Types of expenses covered by the fund:

·        tools or equipment

·        money for training or conference attendance

·        money for marketing, research, or consulting expenses

·        seed money for start-ups

·        sustainability initiatives

·        response to environmental changes/challenges

·        or submissions not outlined for consideration towards economic development.

9.       According to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2023, 59 per cent of the local board’s population are Pacific Peoples. In addition to improving Māori wellbeing as outlined further in this report, a key objective of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is to provide funding opportunities to respond to the local board’s commitment to improving Pasifika wellbeing by providing funding opportunities to local businesses including Pasifika businesses and entrepreneurs.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The 2023/2024 fund opened on 1 February 2024 and closed on 29 February 2024.  Forty-seven applications were received totalling $110,447.00. Refer to Attachment B for a summary of the applications.

11.     All applications were assessed using the fund’s guidelines.  A review panel met in March 2024 to assess the applications and proposals were workshopped with the local board on 3 April 2024. In summary:

·    Thirty applications are identified as having strong alignment to support the local board’s objective of supporting local economic development. These applications total $58,600.

·    Sixteen applications did not align with the requirements as strongly as the other applications and one application has been withdrawn

12.     Of the 47 applications submitted, 11 applications (one of which has been withdrawn) are associated with Many Streams of Our Community Trust, a community-led charitable trust that provides mentoring and capacity building services to small community groups, local champions and small start-up businesses. Their pop-up shop Nesian Collective in Māngere Town Centre is a teaching platform to help businesses move to the next level of commercial leasing - selling from a shop in a major mall – by learning business skills throughout their journey while being part of Nesian Collective. The Nesian goal is to see the businesses they support open their own shops in Māngere Town Centre.

Table 1: Applications that strongly align with the fund’s objectives

Application and organisation name

Purpose

Business

Amount

MOLBED03 RR Lawn Mowing Service

Promotion via provision of free services for elderly, special needs, and those who don't have the resources

Small business that specialises in landscaping, lawn mowing, hedge trimming and tree pruning

$2,000

MOLBED05 Leslie Tuilaepa

Cabinet Joinery Tool 

Small home business offering CNC router, Co2 laser and FDM 3d printing design and production services wanting to increase capability.

$2,000

MOLBED06 Design Timber Doors & Windows Ltd

Buying Joinery Machine 

Manufacturing timber doors and windows, wanting machine to increase production.

$2,000

MOLBED10 TZ Family Café Limited trading as Kowhai Café

Replace equipment 

Café located in Māngere Town Centre wanting to replace equipment.

$2,000

MOLBED13 Neon Electrical Ltd

Training and additional electrical certifications 

Self-employed electrician, providing a range of general electrical services to the local and wider area wanting to upskill.

$1,695

MOLBED15 Seed Funding R2- Cultural Threads Collective

Seed Funding R2- Cultural Threads Collective 

Support women of refugee and migrant backgrounds into home businesses.

$2,000

MOLBED16 PELE baby, Nesian Collective

New product designs and marketing for Nesian Collective business

PELE baby specialises in quality, Pasifika designed baby items (a homeware range is being worked on also).

$2,000

MOLBED19 ageav co

Merchandise to expand business offerings

Street dancer wanting to expand into merchandise.

$2,000

MOLBED22 HM Creations and Solutions Limited t/a Hm Café

Business development by expansion of product offering 

Local food vendor wanting to expand product offering.

$2,000

MOLBED26 Prika Limited

Building communities & transforming healthcare through digital marketing 

Established business "rooted in Te Ao Māori principles" offering project management, asbestos management, and project design services. 

$2,000

MOLBED28 Paint it Right Services Ltd

Sprayer machine tool  

Small family-owned painting business looking to be more hands on this year to bring in more revenue.

$2,000

MOLBED29 Bradley Mata'uiau T/A Locker 71

Laptop 

Content and marketing sole trader business.

$2,000

MOLBED31 JATEM Memorials & Headstone

Computer infrastructure equipment 

JATEM Memorials specialise in customising headstones. Serving families, communities and the Pacific Islands for the past three years. Offer shipping services to our neighbouring Islands in the Pacific

 

$2,000

MOLBED33 Marlina's Cookies, Nesian Collective

Food production and storage equipment and marketing costs to increase production and expand business for Nesian Collective business 

Family-owned business currently selling at Nesian Collective.

$2,000

MOLBED34 JBJ Contracting Handyman Ltd

Ride on lawn mower 

Local handyman wanting to expand business.

$2,000

MOLBED39 Captured By Lina, Nesian Collective

Computer for Nesian Collective business

Videographer and content producer.

$2,000

MOLBED41 Ina Bishop Tevaevae Collection, Nesian Collective

Business start up -including provision equipment and material for workshops for Nesian Collective business

Entrepreneur selling Tevaevae at Nesian

$2,000

MOLBED42 Sifet Qaim Limited T/A Artistic Embroidery

E-commerce website and social media awareness 

The business does embroidery and printing on uniforms for businesses and schools.

$1,500

MOLBED43 Oats and soaks, Nesian Collective

New setup costs including fit out costs, signage, product bags and wrapping, flyers, marketing for Nesian Collective business 

Beauty and skincare formed with traditional ingredients from the Polynesian islands.

$2,000

MOLBED45 Many Streams of Our Community Trust - Nesian Collective

Shop improvements and media content at Pop up Shop at Māngere Town Centre

Community-led trust that supports through mentoring and capacity building services to help small community groups, local champions and small start up business with pop up shop in Māngere Town Centre.

$2,000

MOLBED46 In the Ngahere

Tools, NZ Mentors subscription and marketing training.

Produce greeting cards and finely crafted contemporary wooden products inspired by Māori and Pasifika design. They try to source as much recycled wood as possible from construction sites. Established in 2021, founders Charlie (Niuean and English) and Catherine (Ngatiwai, Nga Puhi, Ngati Hine, Ngati Pakeha) created ‘In the Ngahere’ because of their love of design; wooden craft and paper products and their culture.

$2,000

MOLBED48 Emz Pineapple Pies, Nesian Collective

Food production equipment, fit out costs and signage for Nesian Collective business

Food vendor business currently selling products at Nesian Collective.

$2,000

MOLBED50 Hazmaru Ltd

Promotion and formalization of initiative  

Safe removal and disposal of hazardous materials and waste, especially asbestos. The company also does demolition/deconstruction work which is a natural fit with hazardous removals

$2,000

MOLBED51 Danika Cooper Jewellery Limited

Marketing, design work and product development for Nesian Collective business 

Pasifika Jewellery business part of Nesian Collective.

$2,000

MOLBED53 The Red Book Agency

Laptop 

Provider of community training and coaching. Work with individuals, schools, families, church groups and businesses to help build a capable and confident community that thrives. Free CV & employment support to members of the community who contact them directly.

$1,500

MOLBED55 iDeliveries New Zealand

Online presence increase and branding 

Tasks and deliveries business saving clients’ time.

$2,000

MOLBED57 Walk Creations NZ Ltd

Business equipment including cap heat press, digital heat press and printer 

Family funded business with the vision of creating gospel influenced clothing and accessories. They specialise in garment printing with the hope to diversify into cultural creations with a mix of specialised gifting items (Gift boxes/hampers).

$1,905

MOLBED58 LIT Cotton Candy Ltd

Machine maintenance 

Produce naturally flavoured candyfloss using local ingredients. Over 30 flavours, won Silver and Bronze Awards in the New Zealand Artisan Awards 2021 and 2023.

$2,000

MOLBED60 Cuppy

Sourcing products and partnerships 

Social enterprise selling drinkware (ceramic mugs and cups) that incorporate indigenous languages. Fifty per cent of their profits will go towards a charity that does the mahi to reduce child poverty.

$2,000

MOLBED61 Umu Studio

Tools for wood-based art & design projects 

Workshop/studio based in Māngere. Mentor supporting at risk youth referred from Oranga Tamariki and intensive wraparound Service based at the old Māngere Men’s Shed. Seeking funding for power tools that serve all of our creative and cash generating projects.

$2,000

Total

 

 

$58,600.00

 

13.     Applications MOLBED16, MOLBED33, MOLBED39, MOLBED41, MOLBED43, MOLBED45, MOLBED48, and MOLBED51: These strong applicants, who are all part of the Nesian Collective, are working towards having their own independent shop outside of their current pop-up. MOLBED 16 and 51 are likely to achieve this first.

14.     Application MOLBED29: Information was requested of the applicant regarding the status of their content and marketing business due to the lack of activity and online presence. The applicant’s website has since been restored and they have provided evidence of current projects.   

Table 2: Applications that do not align with the requirements as strongly as other applications

Application & organisation

Proposal

Business

MOLBED02 Aims Trading Limited

 Security bars and marketing

Retail category business, holding bill payment, car registration services, postal services. Western Union service & etc.

MOLBED04 Yandall Graphic Design

Purchase of Adobe software 

Graphic design, including print and digital design. Eg, Posters, social media, electronic direct mail, brochures, logos and branding and clothing design

MOLBED14 QS Productions LTD

Support for Guest Tutors, materials for hands-on activities, including access to recording studios and production equipment

"Bring The Noise" NZ music industry youth development programme youth mentoring & skills provision

MOLBED18 DDF Dance Studio Ōtāhuhu

Event space for end of year showcase 

DDF Dance Studio is based in Ōtāhuhu, 35 Saleyards Road unit 2.

MOLBED23 Armaya

Business start-up costs including stock and office items.

Customised personal organisation products

MOLBED24 Misiluki Ltd

Marketing - Graphic Designer for new product labels for body oil range

Skincare company.

MOLBED27 Dynamic Basketball

Funding for basketball athlete development 

Basketball training academy

MOLBED32 Sau E Siva Creatives Ltd

Company Laptop 

South-Auckland based Pacific Dance Theatre Collective

MOLBED35 Māngere Town Centre BID

Pop up space in the Māngere Town Centre 

Māngere Town Centre Business Improvement District works to improve the economic development of the retailers in the Māngere Town Centre. Status changed to does not align as strongly as the other applications, will refer BID to submit proposal towards Revitalising Town Centre Fund.

MOLBED37 KEMBO (Nesian Collective)

Community initiative of a safe and simple open space

Community activation; fridge, furniture and space will be based at I AM Māngere Community Hub shop 7a at the Māngere town centre. 

MOLBED44

Many Streams of Our Community Trust - Nesian Collective

Withdrawn, applicant confirmed MOLBED45 is the correct application.

MOLBED49 Golden Gardenia, Nesian Collective

Earring materials, packaging, earring stands and business cards

Polynesian inspired fashion jewellery business

MOLBED54 Fale Dojo Ltd

Purchase new gear for fitness classes 

Professional wrestling training school and fitness facility

MOLBED56 Safety 1st Projects Ltd

Build a website and purchase upgraded laptop 

Project management company

MOLBED59 Affirming Works

 Heavy-duty equipment cases for our audio and lighting gear and secure locker storage

Variety of services including in-school mentoring, support for youth transitioning into adulthood, pathways to employment, and retreats focused on family violence prevention

MOLBED63 Lisinia Kimoana Leakehe

iPad and help with travel expense 

Financial Adviser trying to establish business with Pacific and Māori people as their demographic to work with.  Status changed to not eligible, applicant confirmed business address is now 391 Rosebank Road, Avondale.

Kiriata received via email

 Additional outdoor screens, projectors, and a wider range of themes for TP slumber parties

Provide outdoor big screens for a variety of events such as birthdays, karaoke nights, and movie nights. Additionally, offer themed indoor/outdoor teepee slumber parties for children

 

15.     Application MOLBED35: The Māngere Town Centre Business Improvement District (BID) application does not align to the criteria as strongly as the other applications.  Staff will therefore refer the BID to submit an application to Revitalising Town Centre Fund.

16.     Application MOLBED56 and MOLBED63: Both applications have been declined as their registered business addresses are not within the local board area.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The fund aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by including sustainability initiatives within the fund’s criteria.

18.     The fund enables proposals from local businesses, entrepreneurs and not for profits that encourage local services and goods for the community to shop locally and improve connection with their town centres which can contribute towards reducing the local carbon footprint.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board have prioritised supporting economic development in their area by provision of a second round of the Economic and Business Development Fund within its 2023/2024 LDI budget.

20.     A review panel made up of staff representing community delivery, the grants team and economic development met on 15 March 2024 and participated in the application review process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board are committed to championing businesses, entrepreneurs and not for profits in their local board area.  The local board are dedicated to improving the well-being of their local people by supporting their local economy.

22.     The local board discussed and provided feedback about the applications at a workshop on 3 April 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The fund aims to respond to Auckland Council’s and the local board’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing funding opportunities to local businesses including Māori businesses and entrepreneurs.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     Budget is committed for the second round of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund within the local board’s LDI 2023/2024 work programme budget.

25.     The 2023/2024 local board’s Economic and Business Development Fund was oversubscribed. However, some applications have less alignment to the Fund's objectives and are therefore not recommended for grant funding. Should the local board support the report’s recommendation, there would be an underspend of $7,400 to this line item.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the fund. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round due to the alignment to the local board’s fund objectives.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Should the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board allocate funding, staff will notify applicants of the local board’s decision. 

28.     Submissions that have been declined, where appropriate will be referred to other potential funding opportunities; for example Māngere-Ōtāhuhu community funding, other local board contestable funding or Community Leisure Management funding, as applicable.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Applications recommended for the 20232024 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund

89

b

Summary of Applications for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic and Business Development Fund

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lisa Beale - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Economic Broker

Authorisers

Liz Muliaga - Manager, Community Programme Delivery Team -  South

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 







Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum

File No.: CP2024/05359

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, coordinated by Auckland Emergency Management.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The role that local board members play during an emergency is becoming an increasingly important element of emergency management.

3.       To support this role, a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is proposed.

4.       The terms of reference (Attachment A) show that the forum will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision will be “local board members with an interest in emergency management working together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response.”

5.       The forum will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about readiness and response in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for readiness and response measures, and to provide informal guidance to staff on related issues.

6.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July.

7.       Staff recommend the forum meet three times a year. Additional meetings can be arranged if there is urgent content that requires discussion between scheduled forum sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Following the weather events of January and February 2023, Auckland Emergency Management was subject to several reviews and various recommendations.

9.       Part of the implementation of the recommendations included the establishment of a Planning Unit and an associated Community Planning and Readiness Manager, with a team of seven Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors, to support readiness and preparedness at the local level.

10.     The Head of Planning Unit commenced 15 January 2024, and appointments to the Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisor roles were made in late 2023, with the last Senior Advisor commencing their role early February 2024.

11.     All local boards have expressed a desire to be more involved in readiness and response, and to be upskilled in advance of another catastrophic weather event.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local board members are passionate about ensuring the best outcomes for their communities before, during, and following an emergency.

13.     A number of gaps have been identified where, during an emergency, local board members did not have the information they needed to best support their communities and the emergency response. Recent events also highlighted the importance of community readiness, and the role that people played to support each other during a response.

14.     In response to this, the Auckland Emergency Management Planning Manager has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of an Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·    learn more about emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant knowledge with other local board members and with their communities

·    improve connections between participants at a governance level

·    encourage collaboration between local boards to support emergency readiness and response outcomes

·    provide informal guidance to staff in regard to emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

15.     The vision of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is “local board members with an interest in emergency management work together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response”.

16.     Boards are invited to appoint up to three members to the forum. Participation is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes and be able to watch recording of forum meetings.

17.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

18.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum and provide further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet three times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed in consultation with the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The formation and operation of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum has no direct climate impact, particularly as the group will meet online only.

20.     The impacts of climate change on weather patterns mean that catastrophic weather events are likely to become more frequent. Response and readiness will form a significant part of ensuring that impacts on our communities are mitigated where possible.

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be administered by staff from the council’s Auckland Emergency Management team, with support from kaimahi in the Local Board Services department.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors have been meeting with local boards during Q3 to build relationships and develop Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Plans.

23.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum responds to requests from local board members to increase activity in this space and enables development and upskilling that is likely to have a positive impact on the final response plans that are produced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Auckland Emergency Management are working with marae to provide support in emergency preparedness activities and to identify marae that may be able to provide support to communities in response.

25.     Potential topics for 2024 Readiness and Response Forum include mana whenua engagement and suggestions for improving iwi involvement at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There is a risk that local board members who become members of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum expect that they will play a central role in emergency response in the event of another weather event.

28.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is an information-sharing forum, and the Terms of Reference are intended to clarify this, ensuring participants have a realistic expectation of the roles and responsibilities of membership.

29.     The Emergency Management Elected Members’ Guide (July 2023) is a key guiding document for elected members, providing detailed information on the role of elected members in emergency reduction, readiness, response and recovery activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

31.     An initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July 2024.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Readiness and Response Forum

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Wallace - Head of Planning Auckland Emergency Management

Authorisers

Adam Maggs – General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Oliver Roberts – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 




Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Classification of Winthrop Way Reserve Māngere East as local purpose (community buildings) reserve

File No.: CP2024/05564

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To resolve to classify Winthrop Way Reserve as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Winthrop Way Reserve is made up of two parcels of land currently held as unclassified recreation reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

3.       The Reserves Act provides that all unclassified reserves vested in a local authority must be classified according to their principal or primary purpose. Auckland Council is therefore statutorily obliged to classify all unclassified reserves which it holds. This is undertaken under Section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 and if not undertaken would mean that Auckland Council is not meeting its statutory obligations.

4.       Local boards hold the delegated authority under Section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 to classify council held reserves, subject to all statutory processes having been satisfied. 

5.       Staff attended the Mana Whenua Forum on 25 October 2023. No concerns were raised at the forum. In addition, staff contacted the relevant mana whenua representatives via an email inviting iwi to submit their feedback by 15 November 2023. Staff did not receive any feedback on or objection to the proposed classification.

6.       The proposed classification was publicly notified in Manukau Courier and Auckland Council website on 14 March 2024. No submissions have been received.

7.       This report recommends that the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board resolves to classify Winthrop Way Reserve as local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      resolves to classify pursuant to Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 Winthrop Way Reserve, legally described as Lot 142 DP 55382 comprised in record of title NA30A/773 and Lot 143 DP 55382 comprising record of title NA30A/774 as local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

Horopaki

Context

8.       Classification is a mandatory process under Section 16(1) or 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 which involves determining the principal or primary purpose of a reserve (e.g., recreation reserve, local purpose reserve, historic reserve, etc). When determining the purpose of the reserve the present values of the reserve as well as the future “potential” values and the possible future uses and activities on the reserve are considered. 

9.       Auckland Council is required by law to classify all unclassified reserves which it holds. Auckland Council is not meeting its statutory obligations if classification is incomplete. 

10.     Two parcels of land making up Winthrop Way Reserve are currently held as an unclassified recreation reserve.

11.      To comply with the statutory requirement to classify reserves according to their principal or primary purpose, the parcels must be classified for their principal or primary purpose. 

12.     Local boards hold delegated authority under Sections 16(1) and 16(2A) of the Act to approve classifications of council owned reserves, subject to all statutory processes having been satisfied.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Winthrop Way Reserve (highlighted yellow in Figure 1) is located at 37 & 39 Winthrop Way, Māngere East.

Figure 1: Map of Winthrop Way Reserve

14.     The reserve is comprised of 2 defined land parcels legally described as:

·    Lot 142 DP 55382 comprising 739m² retained in record of title NA30A/773

·    Lot 143 DP 55382 comprising 799m² retained in record of title NA30A/774

15.     Both lots are currently held by the Crown through DOC and vested in Auckland Council in trust as an unclassified recreation reserve, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

16.     The lots are zoned Open Space – Informal Recreation Zone under Auckland Unitary Plan (operative in part).

17.     There are no natural resources, heritage layers or special character areas indicated within the reserve. However, GEOmaps identifies the area as prone to flooding.

 

Reserves Act 1977

18.     The Reserves Act came into force on 1 April 1978 and requires all reserves to be classified for their principal or primary purposes.  

19.     The Reserves Act 1977 requires the administering bodies to consider necessary or desirable activities on the reserve and to classify the reserve for such specified purpose.

20.     The purpose of recreation reserves is to provide an area of land suitable for sporting and recreational activities, enjoyment of public with emphasis on the retention of open spaces and outdoor recreational activities.

Proposed classification – local purpose (community buildings) reserve 

21.     Even though Winthrop Way Reserve has been held as unclassified recreation reserve, the reserve has been and will continue to be used by Taeaofou I Puaseisei Preschool Trust for early childhood education centre and associated services. For that reason, Auckland Council is proposing that the reserve is classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve rather than recreation reserve to better accommodate the activity on the land and allow compliant leasing processes into the future.

Consultation

22.     Engagement with iwi has been undertaken as per Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

23.     Staff attended the Mana Whenua Forum on 25 October 2023. No concerns were raised at the forum. In addition, staff contacted the relevant mana whenua representatives via an email inviting iwi to submit their feedback by 15 November 2023. Staff did not receive any feedback on or objection to the proposed classification.

24.     The council’s intention to classify the reserve was publicly notified in Manukau Courier and Auckland Council’s website on 14 March 2024. No submissions have been received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The proposal outlined in this report does not include any change in the current use of or activity on Winthrop Way Reserve and does not introduce any new source of greenhouse gas emission.

26.     The proposed classification is a formalisation of the statutory requirement under the Reserves Act 1977 which is an administrative process and therefore will have no impact on climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The proposed classification has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board holds the delegated authority under Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 to approve classification of the reserve subject to completion of all statutory processes.

29.     The views and preferences of the local board in relation to the proposal are sought via this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     There is no express requirement to consult mana whenua under the Reserves Act. However, section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 states: 

Act to give effect to the Treaty of Waitangi 

 

This Act shall be so interpreted and administered as to give effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. 

 

31.     The proposal to classify part of Winthrop Way Reserve was presented to the mana whenua groups identified as having an interest at the Mana Whenua Forum held on 25 October 2023. In addition, staff contacted the relevant mana whenua representatives via an email inviting iwi to submit their feedback by 15 November 2023. Staff did not receive any feedback on or objection to the proposed classification.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The proposed classification is an administrative exercise and will not result in any costs to the local board. All costs (if any) relating to the publication of a notice of classification in the New Zealand Gazette will be met by Auckland Council’s Parks & Community Facilities Department.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     It is a statutory requirement that the reserve is classified.

34.     Should the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board choose not to resolve to classify the reserve, this decision would mean that Auckland Council is in breach of its statutory obligations under the Reserves Act.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     If approved, staff will seek that the General Manager, Parks & Community Facilities approves and signs, on behalf of the Minister of Conservation and under delegated authority, a gazette notice classifying Winthrop Way Reserve as local purpose (community buildings) reserve. The gazette notice will then be published in New Zealand Gazette to ensure permanent public record of the classification.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tamara Zunic - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Property & Commercial Business

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/05803

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2024.

2.       To approve an allocation for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) and associated budget of $3,500 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

4.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan outcomes.

5.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Ōtāhuhu Pool and Leisure Centre (Toia) operations enable and co-ordinate a wide range of activities that cater to the diversity and needs of the local community.

·        Tātou Belonging - we bring communities together ran a huge variety of activations for all cultures and ages in March to celebrate Pasifika Month across Auckland and collaborated with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Libraries, Māngere Arts Centre, and Whare Koa.

·        Māori Responsiveness Māngere-Ōtāhuhu connected with the Tūpuna Maunga Authority regarding their Whānau Ātea at Te Pane o Mataoho who were awarded the Māori Outcomes Award 2024 for their community Hangi pit initiative.

·        The Community Arts Broker programme supported 4 local creative projects to source further funding and opportunities.

·        The Community grants programme received a grant refund on 12 February 2024 for a total of $5,412.14.

·        Ōtāhuhu Softball Club [Sturges Park] – the project to renew toilet facilities and changing room awarded a contract for the exterior refurbishment work at the Ōtāhuhu Softball Club.

·        The Ecological and environmental volunteer programme FY24 completed 242 volunteer hours to undertake a large clean up by Ōtāhuhu Toia at Sturges Park.

·        The Pūkaki Crater Co-Management Operations team are working on Pūkaki leases (both head, grazing leases), currently undergoing building condition assessments on site.

·        The Resource Recovery Network redirected a total of 1717 kilograms of business waste and 1350 kilograms of household waste from landfill.

6.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred, or merged). The following key activities were reported with some risk or issues, which are being managed:

·        Seaside Park - renew carpark and accessway.

·        David Lange Park - upgrade suburb park.

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two and Three.

·        Achieving Māori Outcomes Māngere-Ōtāhuhu: Tuia Programme.

7.       ID 1315 Walter Massey Park Master Plan will have $7,000 carried forward into the new financial year.

8.       Net operational financial performance of the local board is approximately 9 per cent below budget for the nine months ended March 2024. Revenue is at par for the year to date while operating expenditure is 11 per cent below budget Asset Base Services major underspent was CF Utilities. Capital expenditure is approximately 11 per cent above budget for the nine months ended on 31 March 2024. However, there are no major delivery issues.

9.       Funds were set aside for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) following the drafting of the 2023/2024 work programme. However, due to changes at Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (TAU), formal approval of the budget was not possible at the time the board adopted its work programme in June 2023 as a budget holding department was unavailable. At the time staff confirmed with the local board that the board will support the delivery of the YES programme by the Auckland Chamber of Commerce, although it wasn’t part of the board’s adopted work programme. The funds were held in a reserve fund for formal approval during the financial year. Auckland Council Grants team has now taken on this work. This report provides the opportunity for the local board to retrospectively approve the Young Enterprise Scheme (MO) (Activity ID 1268) and associated budget of $3,500 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2024

b)      whakaae / approve Young Enterprise Scheme (MO) (Activity ID 1268) and associated budget of $3,500 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme from unallocated locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget

c)       whakaae / approve $7,000 of the remaining budget for ID 1315 Walter Massey Park Master Plan will be carried forward into the new financial year

d)      whakaae / approve $3,000 allocated for a whakarewatanga/launch of the gifted name at Te Taahuhu / Criterion Square will be carried forward into the new financial year for ID 2831 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        External Partnerships

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

 

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

  

 

13.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

14.     Activation of community-led venue partners: Ōtāhuhu Pool and Leisure Centre (Toia) operations enable and co-ordinate a wide range of activities that cater to the diversity and needs of the local community. The customer satisfaction score for the quarter is 83%.

15.     Tātou Belonging - we bring communities together ran a huge variety of activations for all cultures and ages in March to celebrate Pasifika Month across Auckland and collaborated together with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Libraries, Māngere Arts Centre, and Whare Koa.

16.     Māori Responsiveness Māngere-Ōtāhuhu connected with the Tūpuna Maunga Authority regarding their Whānau Ātea at Te Pane o Mataoho who were awarded the Māori Outcomes Award 2024 for their community Hangi pit initiative.

17.     The Community Arts Broker programme supported 4 local creative projects to source further funding and opportunities. These include - Aiga – A Siva Afi Exhibition and Opening event at Māngere Arts Centre, Ōtāhuhu Historical Society – promotional campaign for Ōtāhuhu 175th anniversary, Art Battle Māngere, at Māngere Art Centre and Māngere Bombing Competition, Music Performances, Moana-Nui-A-Kiwi, Ōtāhuhu.

18.     The Community grants programme received a grant refund on 12 February 2024 for a total of $5,412.14. The details are below:

·        MB2021-236, Children's Autism Foundation refunded $2,221.04 due to project partial cancellation.

·        QR2009-118, Northern Dance Network Incorporated refunded $1,084.23 due to project partial cancellation.

·        LG2409-106, AFL New Zealand Incorporated refunded $2,189.00 because the project did not go ahead.

19.     Ōtāhuhu Softball Club [Sturges Park] – the project to renew toilet facilities and changing room awarded a contract for the exterior refurbishment work at the Ōtāhuhu Softball Club.

20.     The Ecological and environmental volunteer programme FY24 completed 242 volunteer hours to undertake a large clean up by Ōtāhuhu Toia at Sturges Park.

21.     The Pūkaki Crater Co-Management Operations team are working on Pūkaki leases (both head, grazing leases), currently undergoing building condition assessments on site.

22.     The Resource Recovery Network redirected a total of 1717 kilograms of business waste and 1350 kilograms of household waste from landfill.

23.     Completed activities in this quarter included:

·        David Lange Park - develop destination playground and renew park assets.

·        Local civic events Māngere-Ōtāhuhu.

·        Youth Grants - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu.

·        Kiwi Esplanade (Bird Refuge & Pump House) - renew toilet and changing room facilities.

·        Implementation of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport & Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu - install CCTV cameras.

24.     ID 1315 Walter Massey Park Master Plan will have $7,000 carried forward into the new financial year. The masterplan has been placed on hold for 6 months to be considered through the local board's Service Property Portfolio Review. $7,000 of the remaining budget will be carried forward into the next FY.

25.     ID 2831 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two: the final narrative has been received from iwi and is now being finalised. Auckland Transport advise that Te Taahuhu / Criterion Square upgrade will not be finished until end of June at the earliest. This will not allow enough time for a whakarewatanga to be organised for this financial year. The $3000 allocated for this event will be applied to be carried forward for delivery next financial year.

Activities on hold

26.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        David Lange Park - upgrade suburb park: there is no funding in FY24 for this project.

·        Massey Homestead - refurbish heritage facility: there is no funding in FY24 for this project.

·        Achieving Māori Outcomes Māngere-Ōtāhuhu: Tuia Programme: for 2024 this project is not progressing due to uncertainty surrounding funding and the Governing Body decision in 2023 to withdraw from membership of Local Government NZ and the Mayor’s Taskforce for Jobs.

Changes to the local board work programme

27.     Cancelled activities

·        ID 3509: Hibiscus Mahi Programme. There is no local board funding in this financial year that has been allocated to the Hibiscus Mahi Programme. The programme continues to be run by IAM but with a much smaller number of Hibiscus Mahi hosts within and around the Māngere town centre due to funding constraints.

28.     Activities with RAG status Amber

·        ID 15612 Seaside Park - renew carpark and accessway: due to the complexity, investigation on the two side carparks along the accessway will continue. Recent findings from the accessway investigation have formed other major risks.

·        ID 3461 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Three: the local board resolved 30 sites for Māori naming in tranche three. Shared interest discussions taking place in Q4 and working towards finalising these. Limited time to resolve, usually takes longer than three months so may need to carry forward $3000 if they are not resolved quickly. This is a potential carry forward and will be confirmed once a resolution is made.

·        ID 3558 Achieving Māori Outcomes Māngere-Otāhuhu - Ara Kōtui: a hui was held on 13th February 2024 with a presentation on the re-organisation proposal for local boards, with mana whenua iwi giving initial feedback.  The five southern local boards then shared their local priorities for the Long-term Plan and Local Board Agreement priorities for 23/24. At a subsequent hui held on 12th March 2024 representatives from Ngāti Te Ata, Ngāti Whanaunga shared their priorities, and gave further feedback on the local board re-organisation proposal. The purpose and future of Ara Kōtui was also discussed.

Young Enterprise Scheme (YES)

29.     The Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Board has previously funded the Young Enterprise Scheme (MO) (Activity ID 1268) as part of Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (TAU) 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years’ work programme.

30.     Due to changes at TAU the approval of the Young Enterprise Scheme (MO) (Activity ID 1268) into financial year 2023/2024 work programmes was delayed while an alternative team to manage the activity was agreed upon.

31.     The responsibility within the Council for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) has now been re-allocated from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited to Auckland Council Grants team.

32.     The YES event was delivered by the Auckland Business Chamber on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust in quarter three.

33.     The proposed budget for the Young Enterprise Scheme (MO) (Activity ID 1268) was $3,500 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount remains unallocated and can be accommodated from within the local board’s total draft budget for 2023/2024.

34.     This report provides the opportunity for the local board to retrospectively approve the Young Enterprise Scheme (MO) (Activity ID 1268) and associated budget of $3,500 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

36.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

37.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        ID 658 Low Carbon Lifestyles - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     This report informs the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     The local board remains committed to integrating and supporting work that contributes to outcomes for Māori. This includes enhancing partnerships and collaborative ways of working with mana whenua and mataawaka.

41.     Some of the activities in the local board’s 2023/2024 work programme (Attachment A) have specific impact on the wider Māori community, these activities include:

·        ID 253: Māori Responsiveness Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

·        ID 243: Local implementation of Ngā Hapori Momoho (Thriving Communities) councils social wellbeing strategy – Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

·        ID 30687 and ID24064: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu - renew signage -Te Kete Rukuruku - Māori naming of parks and places

·        ID 1042: Pūkaki Crater Co-Management Committee

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     This report is provided to enable the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programme.

43.     The proposed budget for the Young Enterprise Scheme (MO) (Activity ID 1268) is $3,500 and can be funded from the local board’s available locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget 2023/2024.

Financial Performance

44.     Operating expenditure of $15.4 million is $1.5 million below budget.

45.     Asset Based Services operating expenditure (ABS Opex) is $1.2 million below budget. This is primarily due to underspent for CF Utilities. Variances to budget are generally due to differences in timing of actual spend to anticipated spend. It is anticipated that the end of year result will be in line with the budget allocation.

46.     Locally Driven Initiatives operating expenditure (LDI Opex) is $310,000 under budget. Partnership Grants and Local Community Grants approval will take place by end of June 2024.

47.     Operating revenue of $1.1 million is at par with budget.

48.     Capital Expenditure of $4.1 million is above budget by $407,000. The capital programme is ahead of schedule and at this stage remaining budget of $2.6 million will be utilised by end of June 2024 for the various renewal programmes.

49.     The financial report for the nine months ended 31 March 2024 for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board area is in Appendix B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

51.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

52.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2024).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - 1 January – 31 March 2024 Work Programme Update (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board - Operating Performance Financial Summary

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nicole Braganza – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 







Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2024/05606

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·    alphabetical order of surname;

·    pseudo-random order; or

·    random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The overseas findings on ballot order effects is controversial[3] and based on elections that differ to local government elections in New Zealand. Auckland Council has based its decisions in the past on its own statistical analysis of previous election results.

6.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 Auckland Council elections. From 2016, prior to each election a statistical analysis was conducted by RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit on the results of previous elections which each time has concluded that there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The focus was on whether there was any advantage to being listed first.

7.       RIMU extended the scope of the statistical analysis this time to include list positions other than first, and also the effects of “race[4] length”. This takes into account the number of candidates standing for a particular election race. The analysis confirms previous results in terms of candidates listed first but has found that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages. The full analysis is attached as Attachment A.

8.       This effect would be remedied by all names on the voting document being in random order. The disadvantage of random order is that it creates some friction for voters. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout.

9.       Nevertheless, since the evidence is clear that in some cases alphabetical order creates a disadvantage, staff recommend that the order of names on Auckland Council voting documents for 2025 be random order.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to the Governing Body on whether candidate names on voting documents should be in random order given the statistical evidence that being lower on the list in certain types of election race appears to confer significant disadvantages.

 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

10.     Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)     The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)     Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)     If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)     If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)     In this regulation,—

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where —

(a) the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b) all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

11.     In 2013, the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names, a consideration being an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology, however the council has chosen to use alphabetical order of names in past elections on the basis that statistical research did not indicate a compelling case to change to random order. 

12.     For the 2022 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and city councils whose data was available, with random order being used by 19 out of the 22 councils other than Auckland:

 

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Random

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Random

Manawatū-Whanganui Regional Council

Random

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Random

Southland Regional Council

Random

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council (2024)

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2025

Pseudo-random order and true random order

13.     Random order printing removes name order bias, whereas the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. For example, any first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

14.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is that they create friction for the voter. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout if the friction deters any voters.

Alphabetical order

15.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

16.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

17.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is now evidence from a statistical analysis of council’s previous election results, that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race confers significant disadvantages.

Analysis of previous election results

18.     An analysis[5] of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 is contained in Attachment A.

19.     Again, the analysis found no compelling evidence that candidates who were listed first were more likely to be elected in the last five Auckland Council elections.

20.     This time the analysis introduced consideration of positions other than first, and also of ‘election race length’ (for example, how many candidates were in each local board or ward race) and also added linear interpolation modelling.

21.     This extended analysis has found that comparing actual votes received proportional to the expected share, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages.

Conclusion

22.     A decision about the order of names on voting documents is made by resolution of the council under clause 31 of the Local Electoral Regulations 2001. Such regulations are provided for in section 139 of the Local Electoral Act 2001.

23.     Section 4 of the Local Electoral Act 2001 requires local authorities, when making decisions under the Act, to take into account the principles set out in section 4. These principles are:

(1)    The principles that this Act is designed to implement are the following:

(aa)   representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls:

(a)     fair and effective representation for individuals and communities:

(b)     all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to—

(i)     cast an informed vote:

(ii)    nominate 1 or more candidates:

(iii)   accept nomination as a candidate:

(c)     public confidence in, and public understanding of, local electoral processes through—

(i)      the provision of a regular election cycle:

(ii)      the provision of elections that are managed independently from the elected body:

(iii)     protection of the freedom of choice of voters and the secrecy of the vote:

(iv)     the provision of transparent electoral systems and voting methods and the adoption of procedures that produce certainty in electoral outcomes:

(v)     the provision of impartial mechanisms for resolving disputed elections and polls.

24.     The principles include substantial participation in the elections and public confidence in electoral processes. They also include a principle that all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to accept nomination as a candidate. This implies a candidate should not be disadvantaged by virtue of their surname.

25.     While alphabetical ordering of names facilitates participation (supporting one of these principles), there is now evidence that this could disadvantage some candidates if they appear lower on the candidate list (compromising the principle that all persons have an equal opportunity to stand).

26.     In terms of public confidence, for the 2022 elections a website[6] criticised the council’s decision to use alphabetical order. This is the only known criticism however the council needs to be seen to be making this decision in a robust manner.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order.  Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Given the widespread adoption of random order of names on voting documents among regional and city councils, if names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of public criticism of the council’s decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Analysis of order of candidate names on election outcomes

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 













Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2024/05360

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to add an additional or extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meeting schedule, so the local board can review public feedback on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 before providing formal views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to the delivery of the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has affected the delivery of the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

3.       Public engagement data on the RLTP will not be available to local boards until 24 June 2024. Local boards must provide their formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines. These timeframes are outside the local board’s normal meeting cycle.

4.       To enable local boards to consider public engagement data before providing formal views, this report recommends the local board approve an additional or extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meeting schedule. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve an extraordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board, to be held at 5.00pm on Wednesday 26 June 2024 at Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board office, for the purpose of the local board to provide its formal views on the Regional Land Transport Plan after reviewing public feedback.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its 7 December 2022 business meeting.

8.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to delivering the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has impacted Auckland Transport’s timeframes on delivering the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

9.       Public engagement on the draft RLTP will run from 17 May 2024 until mid-June 2024. Auckland Transport will provide a summary of public feedback to local boards on 24 June 2024.

10.     Local boards must provide formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines.

11.     Local boards expect to see public feedback before providing their formal views. Therefore, it is recommended that local boards resolve their formal views on the RLTP after 24 June and before 3 July. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meeting as an addition to the 2022-2025 meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

13.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the RLTP timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

14.     For option two, only the specific topic on the RLTP may be considered for which the meeting is being held.

15.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     There is no specific impact to mana whenua or mataawaka from this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     There is a risk that local board views on the RLTP will not be informed by public feedback. This risk is mitigated if the local board resolves to add an additional or extraordinary meeting after the public feedback data is made available on 24 June 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Staff will implement the preferred process when preparing the business meeting schedule.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Local board resolution responses, feedback and information report

File No.: CP2024/05741

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

Information reports for the local board

Context

2.       On 10 April 2024, the local board were invited to provide feedback on the governments Fast-track Approvals Bill under urgency. The government intends to facilitate infrastructure and major projects with significant regional or national benefits. The deadline for submitting feedback was 17 April 2024.

3.       On 17 April 2024, the local board provided feedback (Attachment A) via delegation to the Chair and Deputy Chair, to be included in Auckland Council’s memo submission.

4.       The delegation process was resolved at the 10 December 2022 business meeting MO/2022/170. The process was utilised in this case as feedback needed to be submitted before the 5.00pm 17 April business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Fast Track Approvals Bill 2024 feedback provided by delegation to the Chair and Deputy Chair in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Fast Track Approvals Bill 2024 - feedback

151

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 




Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendars

File No.: CP2024/05561

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa for May 2024 for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is provided in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Hōtaka Kaupapa.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hotaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar

157

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Record of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2024/05562

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 3 April 2024, 10 April 2024 and 24 April 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 3 April 2024, 10 April 2024 and 24 April 2024.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Record, 3 April 2024

161

b

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Record, 10 April 2024

163

c

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Record, 24 April 2024

165

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

 


 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, there may be a delay on confirming the decision with the Revenue, Expenditure, and Value (REV) Committee and the awarding of contracts should be completed prior.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    8.1 - I AM Māngere Executive Summary 2023 - deputation     Page 173

Item 8.2      Attachment a    8.2 - Tongan Day Festival 2024 - deputation     Page 175


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 












[1] Access must be unrestricted, free of any barriers and available in appropriate languages to enhance understanding.

[2] Special General Meeting (SGM) 21 days notice.

[3] See, for example, “How Much is Enough? The Ballot Order Effect and the Use of Social Science Research in Election Law Disputes”, R. Michael Alvarez and Betsy Sinclair, https://web.archive.org/web/20100615182629id_/http://home.uchicago.edu/~betsy/papers/eljalvarez.pdf

[4] In this analysis a ‘race’ refers to an election in a particular ward or local board in a particular year.

[5] By Ross Wilson in the RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit in 2023. It is noted that the RIMU research did not (and could not) separate out the effects of alphabetical order on the ballot slip, from the effects of alphabetical ordering of the directory of candidate profile statements. The candidate booklet cannot be randomised.

[6] https://thefacts.nz/all/alpha-bias-surnames-in-the-top-3-won-50-of-elections/