I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 May 2024

10:00AM

Kumeū Meeting Room
296 Main Road, Kumeū

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Brent Bailey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Louise Johnston

 

Members

Michelle Carmichael

 

 

Mark Dennis

 

 

Tim Holdgate

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

Geoff Upson

 

 

Ivan Wagstaff

 

 

Guy Wishart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ignacio Quinteros

Democracy Advisor

 

10 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21579781

Email: ignacio.quinteros@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Local Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Central Shooters Inc

President

Auckland Shooting Club

Member

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

Member

Michelle Carmichael

Fight the Tip Tiaki te Whenua Inc

Deputy chairperson

Tapora School Board of Trustees

Staff representative

Mark Dennis

Helensville Tennis Club

Elected member

Parakai Springs Complex

Operations manager

Tim Holdgate

Landowners Contractors Association

Vice chairman

Agricultural & Pastoral Society Warkworth

Committee member

 

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Colin Smith

Landowners Contractors Association

Committee member

Geoff Upson

 

 

Ivan Wagstaff

 

 

Guy Wishart

Huapai Kumeū Lions

 

Member

Kaipara ki Mahurangi LEC

Member

Kumeū Community Centre

Committee member

Kumeū Small Landowners Assoc

Member

Future Kumeū Inc Committee

Member

Kumeū Live (Music Events)

Manager

Kumeū Emergency Network

Member

Kumeū Community Action

Member

Kumeū Showgrounds Committee

Member

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation: Coatesville Pony Club           5

8.2     Deputation: Whitebait Connection            6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     6

11        Ngā Pānui mō ngā Mōtini | Notices of Motion   7

12        Notice of Motion - M Carmichael - Recording of Business Meetings                                               9

13        Approval to rename a section of road  within State Highway 1, Pūhoi                                      13

14        New road name and the extension of an existing road name at 47 Urumaraki Avenue, Helensville (Urumaraki Heights Subdivision) 25

15        Contract term for the Community Places Coordinator role East Rodney                          35

16        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025          41

17        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                                                             57

18        Review of representation arrangements - subdivisions for the 2025 elections                 65

19        Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum                      87

20        Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents                             95

21        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Rodney Local Board meeting schedule                                  113

22        Record of urgent decision: Rodney Local Board feedback included in  Auckland Council's submission on Fast-track Approvals Bill                                                                       117

23        Rodney Ward Councillor update                     133

24        Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule May 2024                                                                            139

25        Rodney Local Board workshop records        143

26        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of

            Extraordinary Items

 

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 April 2024, and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday 1 May 2024, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.


 

 

 

8.1       Deputation: Coatesville Pony Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Jo Lynch from Waitemata District Pony Club has requested a deputation to discuss the Coatesville Pony Club lease renewal.

2.       A presentation has been provided and is available under Attachment A of this item (under separate cover).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Ms Lynch for her attendance and presentation at the meeting.

 

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Whitebait Connection

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Hana Aickin and Briar Broad from Whitebait Connection have requested a deputation to discuss their activities.

2.       A presentation has been provided and is available under Attachment A of this item (under separate cover).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Ms Aickin and Ms Briar for their attendance and presentation at the meeting.

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

11        Ngā Pānui mō ngā Mōtini | Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) or Standing Order 1.9.1 (LBS 3.10.17) (revoke or alter a previous resolution) a Notice of Motion has been received from <Member Names>  for consideration under item 12.

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Notice of Motion - M Carmichael - Recording of Business Meetings

File No.: CP2024/05587

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

1.       Member Michelle Carmichael has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member M Carmichael and Member I Wagstaff as seconder (including supporting information), is appended as Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Motion

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      record all local board business meetings via Teams as of 19th June 2024 for a trial period of six months (including 20 November 2024 Business Meeting)

b)      confidential agenda items will not be recorded if they are closed to the public at the request of the council staff

c)       will publish the Microsoft Teams recording of business meetings on the usual social media channels so they are available to public

d)      will share the video link/s of the meeting on the Rodney Local Board Facebook page

e)      will at the end of the trial period review the continuation of Microsoft Teams recordings and process of sharing them to public at the 20 November 2024 business meeting following the assessment of:

i)       the benefit/usefulness of the recordings to members of the public, local board and staff

ii)       the amount of staff time required to facilitate this process

iii)      if any changes to the process are required based on experiences during the trial period

f)       will as part of the review decide whether video recordings will be extended to include workshop meetings at the 20 November 2024 business meeting

g)      acknowledge that at times sound or video may not be available due to technical difficulties at the time of the meeting.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion and supporting information

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ignacio Quinteros - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Approval to rename a section of road  within State Highway 1, Pūhoi

File No.: CP2024/04893

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to rename a section of State Highway 1, Pūhoi, between McKinney Road and the end of Hibiscus Coast Highway (approximately 16.5 kilometres).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that the renaming of roads is strongly discouraged unless there are compelling issues or reasons to support a change, including redesign of roads, changes in traffic flow, and mail or service delivery issues.

3.       The section of State Highway 1 subject to this application is intended to be revoked by Auckland Transport and it will no longer retain state highway status. In accordance with the road naming guidelines the section of road therefore needs to be renamed to reflect its new status as a local road.

4.       The applicant, Auckland Transport, has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

5.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

6.       The proposed names for the reclassified section of State Highway 1, Pūhoi are:

·        Pōhuehue Road (applicant’s preference)

·        Schedewy Road (alternative)

·        Hikauae Road (alternative).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the renaming of State Highway 1 between McKinney Road and the end of Hibiscus Coast Highway to ‘Pōhuehue Road’, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90108491).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Transport is working with the New Zealand Transport Agency-Waka Kotahi to revoke State Highway 1 between Johnstone Hills Tunnels (near Pūhoi) and McKinney Road, Warkworth. Following the opening of the new Pūhoi to Warkworth motorway, it is no longer appropriate for that section of road to retain ‘State Highway’ status and is therefore to be revoked by Auckland Transport and reclassified as a ‘Local’ road. Approximately 16.5km of State Highway 1 requires a new name given the current name, ‘Old State Highway 1’, does not reflect the proposed new status of the road.

8.       A location plan of the section of road to be renamed can be found in Attachment A to the agenda report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines  set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

10.     The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·        a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·        a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·        an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

11.     Theme: The following table gives the meaning of the proposed names. The preferred name reflects a cultural and ancestral linkage to the area, and the alternatives reflect a historical / landscape linkage.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Pōhuehue Road

(applicant’s preference)

‘Pōhuehue’ is named after an ancestor belonging to Ngāti Manuhiri, who lived in the area in the late 18th / early 19th century. It is also the name of an area that the section of road will run through. The road passes over the Pōhuehue viaduct which is in proximity to the Pōhuehue Falls and bush walk along the Pōhuehue stream

Schedewy Road

(alternative)

Schedewy’s Hill has always been a feature of this road, and the land for several kilometres on each side of the road was allotted to Anton Schedewy when he emigrated to New Zealand in 1875. Schedewy's Transport business depot was located there. The last owners of the business were Anton's great-grandsons, Kelvin, and Ian Schedewy. The name commemorates this family as Pūhoi settlers

Suggested by the Puhoi Heritage Museum.

Hikauae Road

(alternative)

‘Hikauae’ is the traditional name for “Schedewy’s Hill” (pre-european) and acknowledges a significant battle that took place in the area

Gifted from Ngāti Manuhiri

 

12.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

13.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

14.     Road Type: ‘Road’ is an acceptable and more appropriate road type for the section of road to be named.

15.     Consultation: Community groups and mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines.

16.     The applicant consulted with the Puhoi Heritage Museum on the renaming of the section of State Highway 1, and the museum suggested the name ‘Schedewy’s Hill Road’. This name has been slightly modified by the applicant and adopted as an alternative option. The applicant has also consulted with the family members of Anton Schedewy and has received their support for the use of the name.

17.     On 7 March 2024, the applicant sent out a letter (Attachment B to the agenda report), to all those residents who own a property along the section of the road to be renamed. This was conducted in accordance with Principle 5.3 of the guidelines. Principle 5.3 states that 100 per cent of the owners of all properties that take their current address from that road should be consulted and that most of them agree to the change.

18.     The letter also explained how the transition to addressing from the newly renamed road will be undertaken so as to minimize any impact on property owners.

19.     To date (24/04/2024) no responses, comments, or feedback has been received from the affected property owners. Given that the renaming of the road is a requirement, the applicant would now like to continue to a decision from the local board.

20.     Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

25.     The applicant has undertaken consultation with Ngāti Manuhiri on the renaming of the road. On 8 November, 2022, Ngāti Manuhiri gifted the name ‘Ngāti Manuhiri’ to the applicant.

26.     On 14 February, 2024, mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·        Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·        Te Kawerau ā Maki

·        Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·        Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust)

·        Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Trust Board)

·        Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·        Ngāti Whanaunga (Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated)

·        Ngāti Manuhiri

·        Ngāti Wai.

27.     By the close of the consultation period (10 working days), Te Kawerau ā Maki stated their support of the proposed name ‘Ngāti Manuhiri Road’.

28.     On 7 March, 2024, Ngāti Manuhiri informed the applicant that the use of the name ‘Ngāti Manuhiri’ would be inappropriate without the road type ‘Highway’, and therefore it has not been proposed as an option. Ngāti Manuhiri subsequently gifted the name ‘Hikauae’, which has now been adopted by the applicant as an alternative option. It should be noted that while Ngāti Manuhiri have not gifted the applicant’s preferred name ‘Pōhuehue’, they support and endorse the use of the name. Ngāti Manuhiri does not support the use of ‘Schedewy Road’.

29.     No other responses, comments, or feedback were received.

30.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

32.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

RDN90108491 State Highway1 Puhoi Attachment A - Location Map

19

b

RDN90108491 State Highway 1 Puhoi - Letter sent out to property owners

21

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mira Narula – Planning Consultant

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 




Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

New road name and the extension of an existing road name at 47 Urumaraki Avenue, Helensville (Urumaraki Heights Subdivision)  

File No.: CP2024/04793

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to name one new private road being a commonly owned access lot and to extend an existing road name for the extension of a public road, created by way of a subdivision development at 47 Urumaraki Avenue, Helensville.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       The developer and applicant, Cabra Developments Limited, has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new roads at 47 Urumaraki Avenue are:

 

Applicant’s Preference

Alternatives

Road 1

Urumaraki Avenue (extension of an existing road)

N/A

COAL 1

(commonly owned access lot)

 Whanga Lane

Tahurangi Lane

Stream Lane

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the following names for one new private road and the extension of an existing public road, created by way of subdivision undertaken by Cabra Developments Limited at 47 Urumaraki Avenue, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60409221, SUB60409223, road naming reference RDN90114748).

i)       Whanga Lane (commonly owned access lot)

ii)       Uruamaki Avenue (extended road).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60409221 (subdivision reference number SUB60409223) was issued in June 2023 for the creation of twenty-eight residential lots, two commonly owned access lots (COALs), and an extension of a public road.

7.       Scheme and location plans of the subdivision can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

8.       In accordance with the standards, every public road and any private way, commonly owned access lot (COAL), or right of way, that serves more than five lots generally requires a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering.

9.       The new public road therefore requires a name, as does one of the commonly owned access lots as it serves more than five lots. The roads to be named are highlighted in yellow in Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines  set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.     The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·        a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·        a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·        an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The following table gives the meaning of the proposed names. The names reflect a landscape / historical link to the locality.

 

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Road 1

Urumaraki Avenue

n/a – extension of an existing road

COAL 1

Whanga Lane

(applicant’s preference)

The Te Reo word whanga means ‘harbour.’ This name refers to the Kaipara Harbour, which is a significant part of the region and is related to Helensville’s history

Tahurangi Lane

(alternative)

Tahurangi means ‘fairy folk’ in Te Reo. This is a term that Māori used to describe the first inhabitants of Auckland, prior to human settlement. Tahurangi were mysterious, magical creatures who lived in the deep forests and the high mountain tops

Stream Lane

(alternative)

This name refers to the planted waterway that persons will travel over via the road

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     Road Type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting its form and layout. ‘Avenue’ is an appropriate road type for the extended public road.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     On 15 March , 2024, mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·        Te Kawerau ā Maki

·        Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·        Ngāti Manuhiri

·        Ngāti Wai

·        Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·        Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority).

22.     By the close of the consultation period (10 working days), no responses had been received. The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance.

23.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

25.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

47 Urumaraki Avenue Helensville - Attachment A - Scheme Plan

31

b

47 Urumaraki Avenue Helensville - Attachment B - Location Map

33

     


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mira Narula – Planning Consultant

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Contract term for the Community Places Coordinator role East Rodney

File No.: CP2024/04713

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve funding for a three-year contract for the new Community Places Coordinator East Rodney role.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the 2023/2024 work programme development, the local board resolved to combine two previous Community Activator roles in their Customer and Community Services work programme into one new position: the Community Places Coordinator (resolution RD/2023/95).

3.       The Community Places Coordinator role coordinates and runs programmes, activities, and events at the three largest community centres in East Rodney, supports community led projects and events across a range of other venues and provides governance assistance for rural hall committees across all of Rodney.

4.       The work associated with this role makes a significant contribution to the Our Community and Our People outcomes in the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023. It advances four out of the five objectives in the Our Community outcome and five of the eight objectives in the Our People outcome.

5.       Resourcing for this work is funded through a combination of asset based and Local Driven Initiatives operating budget from the Rodney Local Board, by way of an annual contract. Both the current funding and the contract will end on 30 June 2024.

6.       In order to provide more robust programme planning and service delivery as well as stability for the role, staff recommend offering a three-year contract until 30 June 2027.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve a three-year contract for the Community Places Coordinator East Rodney from 1 July 2024 to 30 June 2027 at $105,000 per annum with the addition of $16,000 annual fund for activations.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board, in their 2023/2024 work programme development discussions, indicated that they would like to see two previous Community Activitor roles combined into one new position with a wider focus and scope. Resourcing of $121,000 for this new position was allocated in the 2023/2024 work programme budget which covered the cost of the full-time postion until 30 June 2024. These funds covered the $105,000 contractor fee, including $16,000 for activations.

8.       The new Community Places Coodinator role was advertised and filled in August 2023. The key purpose of the position is to make the Wellsford District Community Centre, the Warkworth Town Hall and the Mahurangi East Community Centre friendly, welcoming community spaces offering new activities, programmes and learning opportunities that reflect the interests and needs of local residents and the wider community.

9.       An additional purpose of the role is to provide high level support and guidance to the Rural Hall Advisory Committee groups across the Rodney Local Board area.

10.     Although the new combined position has only been in place since August 2023, the current contractor provided similar services as the activator for Wellsford District Community Centre from 2021. During this time there has been an increase in visitation to the Wellsford District Community Centre of 490 per cent. The number of people using the centre jumped from 5,736 prior to 2020 to 33,912 in 2023. Activities have included markets, events, Mums and Bubs yoga classes, a Rescued Food Cook-off, recycling workshops, movies, Spring and Autumn Fiestas, games, fitness and many new learning opportunities in conjunction with the library.

11.     Most of these new activities and programmes have been the result of services provided by the coordinator role in identifying and building relationships with potential providers, assisting them to develop and promote their activities, working with the community to find out what they need and want and making the centre building more user friendly and accessible to everyone.

12.     The role has also been responsible for new funding being made available from Harbour Sport for a Nature Play Trail in Goodall Reserve, Snells Beach and a Play Pod Trailer for Wellsford and the surrounding areas.

13.     Mahurangi East Community Centre is already a well used centre that is much loved by the local community. It has however just been closed for renovations for the next six months along with the adjacent library. The Community Places Coordinator has been working with the60 current user groups of the centre to assist them with finding other venue options during this period and most have been able to be accommodated.

14.     The Warkworth Town Hall is used primarily for arts, cultural and more formal events. Usage has increased by 115 per cent between 2021 and 2023 but this figure will also reflect the impact of COVID-19. There is capacity for more usage of the Warkworth Town Hall and the Community Places Coordinator role is based there so that more attention can be focused on utilising the spaces. Over the last six months a new Citizens Advice Service has been established on the mezzanine floor and the old barbershop room has been converted into a small social services space for providers like budget advice and visiting counselling services.

15.     All of these activities and programmes contribute signifcantly to the majority of the Rodney Local Board Plan’s 2023 Community and People outcomes, objectives and initiatives.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The services provided by the Community Places Coordinator role and the previous Community Activator roles have been reliant on funding being renewed annually. There has been no security of funding for these roles and each year there has been uncertainty as to whether they will be able to continue the following year.

17.     This is not conducive to robust programme planning and service delivery in either the short or medium term. It is difficult to plan programmes and activities, particularly with partners and other stakeholders, when there is no certainty as to whether the role will be there to follow up and deliver the services that have been agreed. It takes time to develop and deliver new relationships and services. It is also difficult to attract and retain experienced workers.

18.     Staff therefore recommend that the local board agree to a three-year contract until 30 June 2027 for this position (option 3 in table 1). This will provide continuity of services, give some clarity for planning service provision, and allow the time needed to establish new services and activities.

19.     There are several instances across the council where three-year funding agreements have been put in place for community groups and individuals who have developed a track record of reliable delivery. The current Community Places Coordinator has been the Wellsford Community Activator since 2020 and the Warkworth Activator from early 2023 before taking on the new combined role in August 2023. Service delivery has been consistently high over this period.

20.     It is recommended that the Community Places Coordinator continue to have access to $16,000 annually to fund and resource activations.

                        Table One: Options for term of the contract and funding

Options

Option 1:

Status quo (approve one year contract and funding in June as part of the work programme)

Option 2:

Provide a contract and funding until 30 June 2025

 

Option 3:

Provide a contract and funding until 30 June 2027

Recommended approach

Detail

Take no action and the contract for the Community Places Coordinator East Rodney role will be considered and potentially adopted in June for one year as part of the 2024/2025 work programme

Extend the contract for the Community Places Coordinator East Rodney role until 30 June 2025 ahead of the 2024/2025 work programme adoption

 

Extend the contract for the Community Places Coordinator East Rodney role until 30 June 2027 ahead of the 2024/2025 work programme adoption

Funding

Further funding beyond 30 June 2024 will be discussed as part of the 2024/2025 local board work programme development process and finalised when the work programme is resolved on

Funding of $121,000 would be required to be committed from 2024/2025 work programme budget

Funding of $121,000 would be required to be committed now from each of the future 2024/2025, 2025/2026 and 2026/27 work programme budgets

Implications

 

 

 

 

 

 

·    There will be a gap in service provision if there are delays in the budget being resolved on

·    This may delay the planning and service delivery for future activities and programmes

·    This does not provide the Community Places Coordinator East Rodney with clarity about their ability to deliver services in the future

 

·    This will ensure continued services can be provided to the community

·    May limit the timeframe for planning and service delivery to activities and programmes that can be organised and delivered within a year

·    This does not provide the Community Places Coordinator East Rodney with clarity about their ability to deliver services in the future

·    This will ensure continued programmes and activities can be provided to the community and new services can be expanded and developed over time

·    This will allow time to build and maintain robust quality relationships with community partners

·    More likely to attract potential funding partners and external sponsorship

·    It is more likely that good quality contractors can be retained if they feel secure in their roles and that their work is valued and respected

Risks

·    Potential contractor turnover due to uncertainty of role

·    Short term service delivery that may not reach its potential

·    The local board would be committing $121,000 from their 2024/2025 work programme budget ahead of other considerations

·    Potential contractor turnover due to uncertainty of role

·    Short term service delivery that may not reach its potential

 

·    The local board would be committing $121,000 per year from future 2024/2025, 2025/2026 and 2026/2027 work programme budgets

·    The local board priorities may change in the future, and it would be unable to exit contractual commitments

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Well activated community services and venues create a stronger sense of place and foster localism and place-based approaches. This builds community connection and has a positive impact on our resilience to climate change.

22.     The services provided by the former Community Activator role and the current Community Places Coordinator role were invaluable in supporting the Wellsford Community Centre and the Warkworth Town Hall to stand up as emergency centres during the storms and flooding in early 2023. This work has continued and extended to working with the community emergency group at the Mahurangi East Community Centre. The role serves as an ongoing channel of communication between Auckland Emergency Management and Rodney’s centres and rural halls as well as the many local community emergency groups.

23.     There is an emphasis in this role on supporting and developing community programmes that promote and enhance environmental sustainability and improve climate outcomes. There has been support for community gardens, recycling and upcycling workshops, cooking programmes to reduce food waste and classes on composting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The services provided by this role intersect with several council departments and teams. They are the go-to and primary point of contact between users of the centres and halls, advisory committees, and Community Facilities. They work alongside and support the leasing team, parks and play teams and community development teams. They also support and complement the work of libraries and work closely with Auckland Emergency Management. It is considered a valuable and reliable starting point for busy subregional teams needing an on the ground connection to local communities in Rodney.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The activities and programmes supported by the Community Places Coordinator contribute significantly to the majority of the Rodney Local Board Plan’s 2023 Community and People outcomes, objectives and initiatives.

·        Community facilities and services are well used, inclusive and cater to the changing needs of our local communities

·        Children, young people and whanau are able to access services, activities and programmes locally

·        Communities have great local options for indoor and outdoor sport and recreation that provide opportunities for all ages and abilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.

27.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan 2050, the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (Long-term Plan), the Auckland Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, the council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

28.     Community centres and the programmes they provide enable locally responsive activities, promoting participation, inclusion, and connection for all Aucklanders, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     This report seeks a funding commitment of $121,000 annually from the Rodney Local Board, funded from a combination of Asset Based Services (ABS) and Local Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating funding. Should the local board approval of this report, staff will enter into a three-year contract starting from 1 July 2024 to 30 June 2027.

30.     The $16,000 activation fund is essential to deliver the level of service, and without it the role will not be performed to expected levels.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Decision could pre-empt other budgetary decisions in the future.

Potentially offset by benefits of longer-term thinking, planning and better developed service delivery

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     If the local board agrees with the staff recommendation, a professional services agreement will be signed, and funding will be administered.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jamie Adkins - Place Partner Specialist

Authorisers

Darryl Soljan - Manager Customer Experience - North & West Libraries

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/01206

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm Business Improvement District annual compliance against the Auckland Council Business Improvement District Policy (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) as of 10 March 2024.

2.       To consider whether the local board should recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Improvement District programmes for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

BID-operating business associations within the local board area

3.       Business Improvement Districts are programmes where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

4.       The Business Improvement Districts Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District and inform this report. As part of the 19 Requirements, the Business Improvement Districts are required to provide annual accountability reports which are due 10 March each year.

5.       The Business Improvement District annual accountability reports on public funds received by the Business Improvemen District within the local board area for the 2022/2023 financial year and has a direct link to council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034 process to strike the Business Improvement District targeted rates for 2024/2025.

6.       Rodney Local Board has two Business Improvement Districts operating in their local area:

 Table 1: BID targeted rate sought 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Met BID Policy annual reporting requirements.

 

North West Country Business Association

$ 189,000

ü

One Mahurangi Business Association

$144,000

ü

 

7.       Staff recommend that the local board approves North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Improvement Districts to receive their targeted rate grant for 2024/2025.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the 2024/2025 targeted rates for inclusion in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 for the following Business Improvement District  programmes:

i)       $189,000 for North West Country Business Improvement Districts

ii)       $144,000 for One Mahurangi Business Improvement Districts.

Horopaki

Context

Business Improvement Districts Policy and targeted rate grant agreement.

8.       Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2022) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the BID-operating business association and inform this annual report. (Attachment A to the agenda report).

9.       The remaining four BID Policy Requirements set out the process for establishing, expanding, and discontinuing a BID programme; and determines rating mechanisms. These will be covered within individual BID local board reports.

10.     The BID Policy does not prescribe or measure standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

11.     The BID Policy is supported by a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement, a three-year agreement signed by both Auckland Council and each BID-operating business association’s executive committee. The agreement sets out the relationship between the parties, how payment will be made and that compliance with the BID Policy is mandatory. The agreement confirms the business associations independence from Auckland Council. All 51 BIDs have signed a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement for period 1 December 2022 to 30 December 2025.

12.     This report updates the local board on compliance with the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID), with a focus on the BIDs annual accountability reporting (BID Policy Requirement 9, 11 and 18) relating to public funds received by the BID for the 2022/2023 financial year.

13.     This report includes a copy of the individual BIDs Governance Summary documents, Attachment B, and C to the agenda report. These documents include the full resolution detailing the amount of BID targeted rate grant approved by association members at their 2023 Annual General Meeting  (AGM) for the 2024/2025 financial year. The BID Chairperson also agrees, by signing this document, to advise council of any perceived or real/current issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

Business Improvement Districts programmes

14.     Local BID programmes should provide value to the collective business community by delivering a suite of economic activities that respond to local needs and opportunities and are agreed by the local business community. BID programmes also provide the opportunity to work with the council group and engage with local boards.

15.   The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

16.   Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve a detailed income and expenditure operational budget and business plan for the following financial year.

17.   Responsibility for delivery and outcomes of the BID programme sits with the individual BID-operating business association executive committee (provision of reporting information) and members (reviewing information provided to them by the executive committee).

18.   All BIDs are registered incorporated societies and need to be aware of the requirement to re-register by April 2026 under the updated Incorporated Societies Act 2022. 

Rodney Local Board Business Improvement Districts Targeted Rates 2024/2025

19.     Rodney Local Board has two BIDs operating in their local board area. Table 2 shows the amount of targeted rate each BID had approved at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 and linked to the council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process.

 Table 2: BID targeted rate changes in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Change from previous

Last year target rate amount was increased

North West Country Business Association

$189,000

0%

2020

One Mahurangi Business Association

$ 144,000

0%

2023

 

20.     The One Mahurangi BID targeted rate is collected using the BID flat rate mechanism of $575.00 (incl GST) per BID ratepayer. For the 2024/2025 BID targeted rate grant calculation the number of BID ratepayers has increased to 288. This combined with a surplus from 2022/2023 of $5,500 brings the total One Mahurangi BID targeted rate grant to $149,500 for 2024/2025. The Mahurangi BID targeted rate requirement for 2024/2025 will be set at $144,000.

Decision making

Auckland Council

21.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 and its striking (setting) of the 2024/2025 targeted rates.

22.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Local boards

23.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional overview

24.     The BID Policy has been in place since 2022 and applies to 51 BIDs across the ā-rohe, up from 50 BIDs reported in the 2023 report to local boards.

25.     Thirty-six BIDs increased their targeted rates 2024/2025 - between two per cent to 50 per cent -while 15 maintained the fiscal status quo.

26.     Of the 11 BIDs with income under the $120,000 minimum (BID Policy Requirement 4), two BIDs now meet this requirement as of 10 March 2024. Of the remaining nine BIDs, three have made no comment to increase their income. Five BIDs have increased their BID Targeted rate grant and are on track to meet this requirement by 1 July 2028 and one has indicated interest in a BID expansion project.

Regional Business Improvement Districts I Programme Growth

27.     Onehunga BID achieved a successful expansion ballot in February 2024. This will see them evolve from a retail-focused BID to encompass retail, commercial and industrial areas, with a significant growth in target rate commencing 1 July 2024.

28.     Kingsland BID has confirmed at their 2023 AGM they would implement a BID expansion project in 2024/2025.

29.     Grey Lynn Business Association will be holding a ballot later this year towards establishing as a new BID from 1 July 2025.

30.     Takanini Business Association is on track to progress their BID establishment project aiming to become a new BID from 1 July 2026.

Business Improvement Districts 2024 Accountability Reporting process overview.

31.     Upon receipt of individual BID annual accountability documents, staff follow a set process that includes reviewing the documents provided for 10 March 2024 against the BID policy, analysing changes from the previous accountability period, and following up with BIDs on issues.

32.     Generic observations from 2024 accountability include:

·        limited local board discretionary funding was available which led to BIDs having a greater focus on efficiencies in their own BID budgets

·        improving quality of annual discussions between local boards and BID-operating business associations. Less emphasis on operational aspects and more discussion on how they could collaborate together.

33.     The BID Policy, requirement 11 sets out the documents that form the annual accountability reporting documents for each BID. These documents confirm membership decision-making has taken place regarding the BID programme at the 2023 AGM. Other reporting requirements include the filing of annual financial statements with the Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act.

34.     The BID team observed this year BIDs have paid less attention to providing the required annual accountability documents by the 10 March 2024 due date, compared with the previous year. Fifty-one per cent (26) of BIDs successfully completed their annual accountability reporting by the due date of 10 March 2024. Forty-one per cent (21) received notification that they had missing information or documents and were provided an extension to the 10 March deadline. 

35.     Four BIDs failed to meet BID Policy Requirement 11 and did not complete annual accountability reporting.

36.     Requirements 9 and 18 of the BID Policy are focused on BID affiliates having access to BID programme information and the BID targeted rate spend. It specifies a range of information BIDs must ensure are easily and freely accessible on a suitable online platform.

37.     This year a one-off ‘Website Check List’ was added to the annual accountablity reporting. 

38.     Rodney Local Board Business Improvement Districts Using the documents and information submitted, the BID Team is satisfied that North West Country and One Mahurangi BIDs have sufficiently met the BID Policy Requirements and the BID Policy for setting of the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

39.     Staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for 2024/2025 as set out in Table 1.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

40.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and can facilitate environmental sustainability programmes and climate response where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations that operate a BID programme. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including council-controlled organisations, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

42.     BIDs work across several council-controlled organisations including Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

44.     North West Country and One Mahurangi BID programmes best align with the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023, Outcome: Our Economy

45.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for North West Country and One Mahurangi business associations means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     The BID Policy and the annual accountability process does not prescribe or report on individual BID programme’s effectiveness, outcomes, or impacts for Māori. However individual BIDs may include this level of detail in other reports provided to their members. This localised project reporting is not a requirement of the BID Policy and is not part of the BID Policy annual accountability reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

48.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, the BID Policy sets out a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for money collected by a public sector organisation.

50.     For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, it requires the BIDs to fully complete all annual accountability reporting and the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID. 

51.     Council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy throughout the year including responding to queries and issues raised by council staff, members of the BID, the public and elected members.

52.     We actively grow relationships with council departments that interact with BID programmes to ensure a consistent approach is applied for the programme.

53.     The role of the local board representative is a key link between the parties involved in the BID programme in terms of communication and feedback.  Local Board representatives on BID programmes are strongly encouraged to contact the BID Team if they have any queries or concerns.

54.     This report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds. It provides an annual update that the BIDs operating within the local board area are compliant with the BID Policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 including the annual budget 2024/2025.

56.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds effective from 1 July 2024 and distribute them in quarterly BID grant payments to North West Country and One Mahurangi BIDs.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID Policy Requirements Summary

49

b

North West Country Governance Summary to 10 March 2024

53

c

One Mahurangi Goverance Summary to March 2024

55

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Attachment A: BID Policy Requirements Summary

Requirement number

Requirement

Compliance responsibility

1:

Auckland Council requires BID-operating business associations to fully comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (Kaupapa Hereā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi). 

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

2:

BID programmes should aim to develop economic activities that support and benefit their BID affiliates and provide value to the business community.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee/ members

3:

BID programmes established before 2010 and currently receiving, receiving less than $120,000 targeted rate grant per annum, are required to increase their total ongoing income received (including the BID targeted rate grant) to at least $120,000 per annum by 1 July 2028 (6 years).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee/

4: If applicable

All establishing BID programmes must operate at a size (geographical) and scale of not less than $120,000 per annum (BID target rate grant) to achieve:

·    A long-term focus for the BID programme

·    Independent long-term financial sustainability of the business association, including securing additional income streams.

·    Adequate resourcing to complete all compliance costs under the policy.

New BIDs

5:

All BID-operating business associations must have a signed current three-year BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement (Appendix A).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

6:

The BID targeted rate grant spend must focus on delivering value to BID affiliates.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

7:

The BID targeted rate grant and BID programme resources (management, governance time or funds) cannot be used under any circumstances:

·          For any political purpose

·          and or to endorse or support a particular candidate or political party.

 BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

8: If applicable

BID-operating business association must accept that Auckland Council reserves the right, at its sole discretion (to be exercised reasonably), to review the use of targeted rate grant funds and the need for an audit and anticipates full cooperation from the BID-operating business association.

Auckland Council

9:

BID affiliates must have at all times, access[1] to BID programme information and BID targeted rate spend (section 4).

Information about the business association operating the BID programme including:

How decision-making takes place

How BID affiliates can provide feedback into the BID programme priorities and the BID targeted rate grant spend.

How to become a business association member (membership information and consent process)

·    BID affiliates and association members must have access to the following documents at least 14[2] days prior to the General Meeting (AGM) date:

BID programme annual business plan, including:

§ Activities

§ Outcomes

§ Budget allocations

Draft BID programme income and expenditure budget (upcoming year)

General Meeting Agenda (AGM/SGM)

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee, affiliates, members

10:

Where BID-operating business associations receive funding from Auckland Council or council-controlled organisations in addition to the BID targeted rate grant, council processes require the BID-operating business association be compliant with all accountability requirements associated with that funding.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

11:

All BID operating business associations must complete the annual accountability reporting requirement to Auckland Council by the required dates as defined in Table One – ‘Summary of accountability documents and deadlines’.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

12:

All BID-operating business associations must have a clear delineation between the governance and management of a BID programme.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

13:

All BID-operating business associations must include the following governance practices:

a)   Executive Committee representation

b)   Minimum quorum

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

14:

All BID-operating business associations must have an annual audit (or review) and comply with the following:

c)   Auditor qualification and type of audit – Auditor qualification and Type of Audit

d)   Insurance

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

15:

All BID-operating business association must have written approaches to both governance and management.

 

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

16:

The BID-operating business association constitution and the executive committee board charter must not be inconsistent with the policy.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

17:

All proposed amendments to the constitution concerning the BID programme and BID targeted rate grant funding will require written approval by Auckland Council prior to membership approval at a General Meeting (AGM/SGM).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

18:

All BID-operating business associations are required to identify, engage, and communicate with:

·    BID affiliates

·    Business association members

·    Local Board BID representative

·    Local Board/s

·    A suitable online platform should be used for BID programme information to be freely available.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

19:

Only BID affiliates qualify as a full member of a BID-operating business association.

 

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

20: If applicable

Auckland Council must be provided with a signed copy of the agreement/contract when a BID-operating business association provides overall management and services to deliver the total BID programme on behalf of another BID-operating business association. Both BID-operating business association executive committees continue to be responsible for their association and to their association members.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee(s),

21:

BID-operating business associations are required to engage in at least one meeting per year with the local board/s. This meeting should be scheduled for a date between the completion of the General Meeting (AGM/SGM) and 10 March.  

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

22:

The BID-operating business association must advise Auckland Council if they become aware that they are not compliant with the BID Policy.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

23: If applicable

Completion of Table Three - ‘BID Ballot Processes” is a requirement for:

a)   Establishing a new BID programme

b)   Amendments to an existing BID programme (boundary, rating mechanism or discontinuation).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee –

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/04274

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Rodney Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2024.

2.       To seek approval to re-allocate budget underspends of funds from Local Civic Events and Rubbish Bin Service Funding Top-up lines within the Rodney Local Board’s Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the local board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 Rodney Local Board work programme (resolution RD/2023/95 and RD/2023/131).

4.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

5.       The key activity updates from this quarter are (but not limited to):

·        ID1228: Tātou Belonging – we bring communities together, support and encourage volunteers in our libraries – Rodney

·        ID506: Restore Rodney East Facilitator

·        ID4056: The Forest Bridge Trust Possum Control – Rodney.

6.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status this quarter.

7.       This report also seeks approval from the local board for the re-allocation of $7,000 from work programme line 395: Local Civic Events and $33,000 from work programme line 4057: Rubbish Bin Service Funding Top-up to work programme line 30864: Green Road – deliver outcomes identified in the masterplan and pathway plan.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2024

b)      whakaae / approve the re-allocation of $7,000 from work programme line 395: Local Civic Events Rodney and $33,000 from work programme line 4057: Rubbish Bin Service Funding Top-up to work programme line 30864: Green Road – deliver outcomes identified in the masterplan and pathway plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Rodney Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet local board plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

11.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

12.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2023/2024 include:

·        ID1228: Tātou Belonging – we bring communities together, support and encourage volunteers in our libraries – Rodney. Warkworth Library has welcomed new volunteers to their team this quarter. A community volunteer affiliated with the Matakana Community Garden has replanted the planters in front of Warkworth Library and work is underway for a collaboration between Warkworth Library’s Garden Club and community volunteers to start a seedling swap. Library volunteers continue to help with shelving, mending and home bound delivery in Rodney. Volunteers come from all walks of life, from young neuro-divergent school leavers to older women wanting to give back to their community

·        ID506: Restore Rodney East Facilitator. Restore Rodney East have been progressing the Pest Free Mahurangi East Peninsula project, with event planning and securing shared tools and resources. The gap analysis undertaken by Boffa Miskell has been completed with a significant amount of information gathering by Restore Rodney East to inform the report. Restore Rodney East are now forward planning next steps of this project with the community. There are four upcoming events being planned; Warkworth A&P Show (16 March), Connect and Inspire (7 April), Science Director speaking from Predator Free 2050 Ltd (13 April), Enviro Expo - in collaboration with The Forest Bridge Trust (22 June). They are also running a Snip n Chip campaign with the RSPCA in the Mahurangi East area in April. The Tools and Resource library continues to grow through their lotteries grant and funding from Environmental Services. Restore Rodney East continue to seek funding from external funders such as Foundation North and Lotteries to grow their financial sustainability

·        ID4056: The Forest Bridge Trust Possum Control – Rodney. Environmental Services staff have worked with The Forest Bridge Trust to identify priority areas for possum traps. These have considered east and west coast areas with high ecological value. The Forest Bridge Trust have deployed 37 Flipping Timmy Possum traps to three landowners. They are currently in communication with multiple landowners and community groups to accelerate deployment of the remaining traps (245). Landowner engagement has been slow over the holiday/summer period, but a pipeline of landowners and areas has now been established. All deployed traps are registered on Trap NZ and are tagged as being funded by the Rodney Local Board.

Activities on hold

13.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        ID30619: Rodney Town Centre Revitalisation – implement centre plan – stage 2 Warkworth. The Warkworth Town Centre Plan was adopted on 29 November 2023 RD2023/206.The project has been placed on hold pending the creation of an implementation plan

·        ID31411: Waterloo Reserve Milldale – develop new suburb park. this project is on hold waiting for the budget to be approved. If the budget is approved investigation and design will commence in 2024/2025 financial year

·        ID30623: Shoesmith Hall – refurbish facility. Project on hold pending a strategic assessment

·            ID40318: Sandspit Wharf – refurbish managers house. Project on hold pending a strategic assessment

·        ID40308: Rodney refurbish community buildings. Project on hold pending a strategic assessment

·        ID40299: Bourne Dean Recreations reserve – renew open space assets. Project on hold. When project management capacity allows project will progress

·        ID24230: Point Wells Recreation Reserve – renew accessway and associated assets. Project is on hold. Start deferred. Investigation and design underway now with physical works to be delivered next financial year as ground conditions allow

·        ID36674: Worker Road Reserve – renew open space asset. Project to be deferred to financial year 2026/2027. Community planting proposed in the interim

·        ID36673: Rautawhiri Park – renew playspace and open space assets. Project on hold. When project management capacity allows project will progress

·        ID3808: 1 Matheson Road, Wellsford - Citizens Advice Bureau-Wellsford: During quarter three, the Community Broker requested that leasing staff put the project on hold until a full needs assessment had been undertaken and the matter had been workshopped with the local board about the services offered and potential alternatives

·        ID3352: 1 Matheson Road, Wellsford -Bowls Wellsford Incorporated. Staff, prior to progressing any new lease agreement, need to investigate land status matters relating to the underlying land. As such, during quarter four, staff will work with the Statutory Land Team to establish land status.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

14.     These activities are deferred from the current work programme (community leases) into future years:

·        ID309: 15 Mill Lane, Warkworth - Warkworth Womens Charitable Trust. During quarter three, staff prompted the trust about submitting its filled lease application form. Staff may only progress this item on receipt of a filled application form and all relevant supporting documentation.

Cancelled activities

15.     The following work programme activity has been cancelled:

·        ID390: Support and Activation – Rodney Halls. This line has been cancelled and outcomes are being delivered via line 4058.

Activities with underspends

Local Civic Events

16.     The Rodney Local Board approved $20,000 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operation expenditure budget to deliver and support local civic events as part of the work programme 2023/2024.

17.     Thirteen thousand dollars from the Local Civic Events work programme line item was previously re-allocated (resolution RD/2024/19) due to the cancellation of the Wellsford A & P Show and the Helensville Christmas Parade. A further event, the Kume Christmas Parade was funded through community donations.

18.     The remaining $7,000 was identified for the opening of 49 Commercial Road and Helensville River Walkway. Civic Events staff have advised both openings should be aligned with each other. Due to the delay in the completion of 49 Commercial Road, the remaining $7,000 of LDI operational budget will not be spent in 2023/2024. Both events will be postponed to the 2024/2025 financial year.

Rubbish bin service funding top-up

19.     The Rodney Local Board allocated $60,000 LDI opex budget within the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme towards maintaining the level of service for rubbish bins through work programme line 4057. However, implementation of the rubbish bin removal took place part way during the year therefore the local board only needed to fund service level top-ups for the remaining part of the year. This has resulted in approximately $33,000, which will be unspent by financial year end.

20.     Through assessment it has been determined a service level top-up does not meet the criteria for a carry forward of LDI opex budget, therefore the recommendation is for the local board to re-allocate this unspent funding towards a project, which can be completed by 30 June 2024.

Recommendations for re-allocation

21.     Parks and Community Services have identified that $7,000 from work programme line 395: Local Civic Events – Rodney and $33,000 from work programme line 4057: Rubbish Bin Service Funding Top-up can be allocated to work programme line 30864: Green Road – deliver outcomes identified in the masterplan and pathway plan, to enable the additional gravel to the carpark and vehicle accessways and the realignment of the carpark fence. This work will be delivered by the end of the 2023/2024 financial year (30 June 2024).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

23.     Work programmes were approved in July and August and 2023 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

24.     The local board has invested in several sustainability projects which aim to build awareness around waste management, water quality, pest control and changing behaviours at a local level. These include:

·          ID506: Restore Rodney East facilitator

·          ID508: Pest Free Coatesville coordinator

·          ID511 Rodney West coordinators

·          ID512 Shorebirds Trust coordinator

·          ID4056: The Forest Bridge Trust possum control – Rodney

·          ID631: Helensville construction and demolition waste minimisation programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

26.     Relevant departments within Auckland Council have been consulted regarding the re-allocations and no objections or concerns have been raised by delivery staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     This report informs the Rodney Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

28.     The re-allocation of funding within the local board’s work programme supports strong delivery and optimisation of the local board’s available budget for financial year 2023/2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The local board is committed to supporting work that contributes to outcomes for Māori. This includes seeking opportunities for collaboration and early engagement with mana whenua.

30.     All libraries in Rodney continue to support the growth of te reo Māori and promote Māori outcomes in or communities through the use of Māori greetings and incorporation of te reo Māori into pre-schools sessions.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     This report is provided to enable the Rodney Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programme. There are no financial implications associated with this report.  

32.     Re-allocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to take in order to optimise the locally driven initiatives (LDI) opex budget each financial year.

33.     Should the local board choose not to support the re-allocation, the funds will be absorbed into organisational savings should they remain unspent by 30 June 2024.

Financial Performance

34.     For the first nine months of 2023/2024, LDI operational projects totalled $202,000 below budget, mostly due to timing of spend and delivery being planned in the last quarter of the year. Overall operating revenue and expenditure are on target for Rodney Local Board.

35.     Capital spend of $10.8 million was $3.1 million ahead of the year to date budget, primarily due to a range of projects being brought forward for accelerated delivery in the renewals programme, as well as cost escalations in the 49 Commercial Road building renewal, with funding contributions from other council funding sources.

36.     The complete Rodney Local Board financial performance report as at 31 March 2024 can be found in Attachment B to the agenda report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

38.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Parks and Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

39.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

40.     There is a risk if the re-allocation of $7,000 from budget line 395: Local Civic Events and $33,000 from budget line 4057: Rubbish Bin Service Funding Top-up within the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme is not approved as the funds will be absorbed into organisational savings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2024).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney work programme update Q3 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Rodney Q2 financial performance report (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Review of representation arrangements - subdivisions for the 2025 elections

File No.: CP2024/05795

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm the local board’s feedback on subdivisions for Rodney Local Board for the 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 20 March 2024, a report was presented to the local board requesting feedback on representation project issues that were specific to the Rodney Local Board (Attachment A to the agenda report)

3.       The representation project comprises the review of representation arrangements for the 2025 elections, which the council is required to undertake, and the development of a reorganisation plan that proposes to reduce the number of local boards.

4.       The 20 March 2024 report dealt only with those matters that were specific to the Rodney Local Board. The key issue was the non-compliance of subdivisions with the 10 per cent rule which applies to a representation review. This report presents alternative options to correcting any non-compliance.

5.       At the 20 March 2024 meeting the local board resolved (RD/2024/27) to:

a)      tautoko / support in principle option 5 subject to:

i)       Dairy Flat subdivision boundary extends as far North as the Johnston tunnels

ii)      Warkworth subdivision boundary extends as far South as the Johnston tunnels

iii)     Kumeū subdivision boundary extends to include the Waimauku and Muriwai   townships

iv)     North rural subdivision Eastern boundary extends to the South of Ahuroa

v)      concern regarding the geographical size of the North Rural area for just one member to represent.

6.       Following the local board decision and adoption of changes noted in 5 (a) i) through iv), option 5 was further modified to achieve greater compliance [with representation ratio balance requirements], while still complying with 5 (a) i) through iv). On 12 April 2024, the in-principle resolution of the Rodney Local Board, as modified, was considered by the Joint Governance Working Party, who are to make recommendations on representation arrangements for the 2025 elections to the Governing Body and agree to the scope of the consultation material on 30 May 2024. Local board views and preferences will be sought once more in August 2024 through:

·        local board engagement on the resolved initial proposal

·        formal reporting at business meetings.

7.       At its 1 May 2024 extraordinary business meeting the local board requested that staff provide advice on the Rodney Local Board subdivision boundary options 1-6 and, re-consider the Rodney Local Board subdivision boundary options 1-6 (resolution RD/2024/57).

8.       At a workshop on 8 May 2024 staff provided advice further advice on the options to ensure equitable representation across the subdivisions and to align with communities of interest. (Attachment B to the agenda report)

9.       Local board members requested the matter be placed on the following business agenda to allow the local board to formally consider the updated advice. The Governing Body will be considering the representation arrangements and local board subdivision amendments at its meeting on 30 May 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakaū / confirm a modified version of option 5 that adjusts the boundaries of the Rodney Local Board area subdivisions in terms of:

i)       Dairy Flat subdivision boundary extends as far north as the Johnston tunnels

ii)      Warkworth subdivision boundary extends as far south as the Johnston tunnels

iii)      Kumeū subdivision boundary extends to include the Waimauku and Muriwai      townships

iv)      north rural subdivision eastern boundary extends to the south of Ahuroa

b)      acknowledge that the modified version of option 5 presented to the Joint Governance Working Party on 12 April 2024 results in a small non-compliance for the Warkworth subdivision, however this reflects communities of interest and will achieve effective representation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20 March business meeting report

67

b

Memo Revision of representation feedback– issues specific to Rodney Local Board

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 











Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 











Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum

File No.: CP2024/05205

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, coordinated by Auckland Emergency Management.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The role that local board members play during an emergency is becoming an increasingly important element of emergency management.

3.       To support this role, a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is proposed.

4.       The terms of reference (Attachment A to the agenda report) show that the forum will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision will be “local board members with an interest in emergency management working together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response.”

5.       The forum will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about readiness and response in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for readiness and response measures, and to provide informal guidance to staff on related issues.

6.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July 2024.

7.       Staff recommend the forum meet three times a year. Additional meetings can be arranged if there is urgent content that requires discussion between scheduled forum sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three local board members to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Following the weather events of January and February 2023, Auckland Emergency Management was subject to several reviews and various recommendations.

9.       Part of the implementation of the recommendations included the establishment of a Planning Unit and an associated Community Planning and Readiness Manager, with a team of seven Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors, to support readiness and preparedness at the local level.

10.     The Head of Planning Unit commenced 15 January 2024, and appointments to the Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisor roles were made in late 2023, with the last Senior Advisor commencing their role early February 2024.

11.     All local boards have expressed a desire to be more involved in readiness and response, and to be upskilled in advance of another catastrophic weather event.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local board members are passionate about ensuring the best outcomes for their communities before, during, and following an emergency.

13.     A number of gaps have been identified where, during an emergency, local board members did not have the information they needed to best support their communities and the emergency response. Recent events also highlighted the importance of community readiness, and the role that people played to support each other during a response.

14.     In response to this, the Auckland Emergency Management Planning Manager has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of an Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·        learn more about emergency readiness and response

·        share relevant knowledge with other local board members and with their communities

·        improve connections between participants at a governance level

·        encourage collaboration between local boards to support emergency readiness and response outcomes

·        provide informal guidance to staff in regard to emergency readiness and response

·        share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

15.     The vision of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is “local board members with an interest in emergency management work together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response”.

16.     Local boards are invited to appoint up to three members to the forum. Participation is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes and be able to watch recording of forum meetings.

17.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

18.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum and provide further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet three times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed in consultation with the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The formation and operation of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum has no direct climate impact, particularly as the group will meet online only.

20.     The impacts of climate change on weather patterns mean that catastrophic weather events are likely to become more frequent. Response and readiness will form a significant part of ensuring that impacts on our communities are mitigated where possible.

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be administered by staff from the council’s Auckland Emergency Management team, with support from kaimahi in the Local Board Services department.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors have been meeting with local boards duringquarter three to build relationships and develop Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Plans.

23.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum responds to requests from local board members to increase activity in this space and enables development and upskilling that is likely to have a positive impact on the final response plans that are produced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Auckland Emergency Management are working with marae to provide support in emergency preparedness activities and to identify marae that may be able to provide support to communities in response.

25.     Potential topics for 2024 Readiness and Response Forum include mana whenua engagement and suggestions for improving iwi involvement at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There is a risk that local board members who become members of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum expect that they will play a central role in emergency response in the event of another weather event.

28.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is an information-sharing forum, and the Terms of Reference are intended to clarify this, ensuring participants have a realistic expectation of the roles and responsibilities of membership.

29.     The Emergency Management Elected Members’ Guide (July 2023) is a key guiding document for elected members, providing detailed information on the role of elected members in emergency reduction, readiness, response and recovery activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

31.     An initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July 2024.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Readiness and Response Forum

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Wallace - Head of Planning

Authorisers

Adam Maggs - Head of Competency and Public Readiness

Oliver Roberts - Planning & Operations Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 




Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2024/05602

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·        alphabetical order of surname

·        pseudo-random order; or

·        random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The overseas findings on ballot order effects is controversial[3] and based on elections that differ to local government elections in New Zealand. Auckland Council has based its decisions in the past on its own statistical analysis of previous election results.

6.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 Auckland Council elections. From 2016, prior to each election a statistical analysis was conducted by the Research and Evaluation Unit on the results of previous elections which each time has concluded that there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The focus was on whether there was any advantage to being listed first.

7.       The Research and Evaluation Unit extended the scope of the statistical analysis this time to include list positions other than first, and also the effects of “race[4] length”. This takes into account the number of candidates standing for a particular election race. The analysis confirms previous results in terms of candidates listed first but has found that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages. The full analysis is attached as Attachment A to the agenda report.

8.       This effect would be remedied by all names on the voting document being in random order. The disadvantage of random order is that it creates some friction for voters. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout.

9.       Nevertheless, since the evidence is clear that in some cases alphabetical order creates a disadvantage, staff recommend that the order of names on Auckland Council voting documents for 2025 be random order.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback to the Governing Body on whether candidate names on voting documents should be in random order given the statistical evidence that being lower on the list in certain types of election race appears to confer significant disadvantages.

 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

10.     Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)     The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)     Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)     If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)     If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)     In this regulation,—

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where —

(a) the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b) all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

11.     In 2013, the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names, a consideration being an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology, however the council has chosen to use alphabetical order of names in past elections on the basis that statistical research did not indicate a compelling case to change to random order. 

12.     For the 2022 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and city councils whose data was available, with random order being used by 19 out of the 22 councils other than Auckland:

 

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Random

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Random

Manawatū-Whanganui Regional Council

Random

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Random

Southland Regional Council

Random

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council (2024)

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2025

Pseudo-random order and true random order

13.     Random order printing removes name order bias, whereas the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. For example, any first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

14.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is that they create friction for the voter. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout if the friction deters any voters.

Alphabetical order

15.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

16.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

17.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is now evidence from a statistical analysis of council’s previous election results, that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race confers significant disadvantages.

 

Analysis of previous election results

18.     An analysis[5] of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 is contained in Attachment A.

19.     Again, the analysis found no compelling evidence that candidates who were listed first were more likely to be elected in the last five Auckland Council elections.

20.     This time the analysis introduced consideration of positions other than first, and also of ‘election race length’ (for example, how many candidates were in each local board or ward race) and also added linear interpolation modelling.

21.     This extended analysis has found that comparing actual votes received proportional to the expected share, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages.

Conclusion

22.     A decision about the order of names on voting documents is made by resolution of the council under clause 31 of the Local Electoral Regulations 2001. Such regulations are provided for in section 139 of the Local Electoral Act 2001.

23.     Section 4 of the Local Electoral Act 2001 requires local authorities, when making decisions under the Act, to take into account the principles set out in section 4. These principles are:

(1)    The principles that this Act is designed to implement are the following:

(aa)   representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls:

(a)     fair and effective representation for individuals and communities:

(b)     all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to—

(i)     cast an informed vote:

(ii)    nominate 1 or more candidates:

(iii)   accept nomination as a candidate:

(c)     public confidence in, and public understanding of, local electoral processes through—

(i)      the provision of a regular election cycle:

(ii)      the provision of elections that are managed independently from the elected body:

(iii)     protection of the freedom of choice of voters and the secrecy of the vote:

(iv)     the provision of transparent electoral systems and voting methods and the adoption of procedures that produce certainty in electoral outcomes:

(v)     the provision of impartial mechanisms for resolving disputed elections and polls.

24.     The principles include substantial participation in the elections and public confidence in electoral processes. They also include a principle that all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to accept nomination as a candidate. This implies a candidate should not be disadvantaged by virtue of their surname.

25.     While alphabetical ordering of names facilitates participation (supporting one of these principles), there is now evidence that this could disadvantage some candidates if they appear lower on the candidate list (compromising the principle that all persons have an equal opportunity to stand).

26.     In terms of public confidence, for the 2022 elections a website[6] criticised the council’s decision to use alphabetical order. This is the only known criticism however the council needs to be seen to be making this decision in a robust manner.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order.  Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Given the widespread adoption of random order of names on voting documents among regional and city councils, if names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of public criticism of the council’s decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Analysis of order of candidate names on election outcomes

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 













Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Rodney Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2024/04667

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to add an additional or extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Rodney Local Board meeting schedule, so the local board can review public feedback on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 before providing formal views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to the delivery of the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has affected the delivery of the Regional Land Transport Plan  2024-2034.

3.       Public engagement data on the Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 will not be available to local boards until 24 June 2024. Local boards must provide their formal views on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines. These timeframes are outside the local board’s normal meeting cycle.

4.       To enable local boards to consider public engagement data before providing formal views, this report recommends the local board approve an additional or extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Rodney Local Board meeting schedule. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

EITHER

a)      whakaae / approve the addition of one meeting at 9.30am on Monday 1 July 2024 at the Rodney Local Board office, 3 Elizabeth Street, Warkworth to the 2022-2025 Rodney Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate providing formal views on the Regional Land Transport Plan after reviewing public feedback.

OR

b)      whakaae / approve an extraordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board, to be held at 9.30am on Monday 1 July 2024 at Rodney Local Board office, 3 Elizabeth Street, Warkworth, for the purpose of the local board to provide its formal views on the Regional Land Transport Plan after reviewing public feedback.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Rodney Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its Wednesday 18 October 2023 business meeting.

8.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to delivering the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has impacted Auckland Transport’s timeframes on delivering the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

9.       Public engagement on the draft RLTP will run from 17 May 2024 until mid-June 2024. Auckland Transport will provide a summary of public feedback to local boards on 24 June 2024.

10.     Local boards must provide formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines.

11.     Local boards expect to see public feedback before providing their formal views. Therefore, it is recommended that local boards resolve their formal views on the RLTP after 24 June and before 3 July. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meeting as an addition to the 2022-2025 meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

13.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the RLTP timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

14.     For option two, only the specific topic on the RLTP may be considered for which the meeting is being held.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     There is no specific impact to mana whenua or mataawaka from this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     There is a risk that local board views on the RLTP will not be informed by public feedback. This risk is mitigated if the local board resolves to add an additional or extraordinary meeting after the public feedback data is made available on 24 June 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Staff will implement the preferred process when preparing the business meeting schedule.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Record of urgent decision: Rodney Local Board feedback included in  Auckland Council's submission on Fast-track Approvals Bill

File No.: CP2024/04268

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the record of an urgent decision using the local board’s urgent decision-making process (resolution number RD/2022/158) which outlined the Rodney Local Board feedback into Auckland Council’s submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Government introduced the Fast-track Approvals Bill under urgency on 7 March 2024. The Government intends to facilitate infrastructure and major projects with significant regional or national benefits. The Fast-track Approvals Bill is with the Environment Select Committee. Submissions close on 19 April 2024.

3.       The purpose of the Fast-track Approvals Bill is to “provide a fast-track decision-making process that facilitates the delivery of infrastructure and development projects with significant regional or national benefits”. The purpose takes precedence over considerations in other legislation. This means that projects inconsistent with Resource Management Act 1991 national direction can be approved, likewise approvals on conservation land inconsistent with conservation strategies. The Fast-track Approvals Bill upholds existing Treaty settlements and other arrangements such as joint management agreements.

4.       The Fast-track Approvals Bill provides a 'one-stop-shop’ process that applies to multiple approvals under a range of legislation. An approval may be for a single approval or a bundle of approvals for the same project.

5.       Submissions to the Environment Select Committee on the Fast-track Approvals Bill close on 19 April 2024. The council may be requested to attend a select committee hearing after the submission has been lodged. Presenting to the select committee affords an opportunity to comment on any projects proposed to be listed in the Fast-track Approvals Bill, if that information is then available.

6.       An Auckland Council briefing on the Fast-track Approvals Bill was held on 25 March 2024 for elected members. A subsequent memo (Attachment B to the agenda report) was provided on 9 April 2024 with information on the council’s submission process to the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

7.       The deadline for the local board to provide feedback to be included into the Auckland Council submission was Friday 12 April 2024. This was outside normal business meeting timeframes therefore the local board feedback (Attachment A to the agenda report) was formalised using the urgent decision delegation process.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the record of the urgent decision made on 12 April 2024 as set out in Attachment A on the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision: Fast-track Approvals Bill

119

b

Memo: Auckland Council submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 












Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2024/05591

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive Councillor Sayer’s update on activities of the Governing Body.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward councillor report April 2024

135

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ignacio Quinteros - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 





Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule May 2024

File No.: CP2024/00046

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule update for May 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule, a schedule of items that will come before the Rodney Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months.

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule for the Rodney Local Board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

· ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

· clarifying what advice is required and when

· clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed and is subject to change. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule update for May 2024.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa – Policy Schedule May 2024

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ignacio Quinteros - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 

Rodney Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2024/00077

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Rodney Local Board workshop records for May 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give local board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Rodney Local Board workshop records for 24 April 2024, 1 May 2024 and 8 May 2024.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 24 April

145

b

Workshop record 1 May

147

c

Workshop record 8 May

149

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ignacio Quinteros - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 May 2024

 

 




[1] Access must be unrestricted, free of any barriers and available in appropriate languages to enhance understanding.

[2] Special General Meeting (SGM) 21 days notice.

[3] See, for example, “How Much is Enough? The Ballot Order Effect and the Use of Social Science Research in Election Law Disputes”, R. Michael Alvarez and Betsy Sinclair, https://web.archive.org/web/20100615182629id_/http://home.uchicago.edu/~betsy/papers/eljalvarez.pdf

[4] In this analysis a ‘race’ refers to an election in a particular ward or local board in a particular year.

[5] By Ross Wilson in the RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit in 2023. It is noted that the RIMU research did not (and could not) separate out the effects of alphabetical order on the ballot slip, from the effects of alphabetical ordering of the directory of candidate profile statements. The candidate booklet cannot be randomised.

[6] https://thefacts.nz/all/alpha-bias-surnames-in-the-top-3-won-50-of-elections/