I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 May 2024

12.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Damian Light

 

Deputy Chairperson

Bo Burns

 

Members

Katrina Bungard

 

 

David Collings

 

 

Bruce Kendall

 

 

John Spiller

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Adele White

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Claire Bews

Democracy Advisor

 

10 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 021 540 216

Email: claire.bews@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           5

8.1     Deputation - Jennie McCormick of the Howick and Pakuranga Community Houses Inc Society                                     5

8.2     Deputation - Janet Dickson of the Howick Ratepayers and Residents Association   6

8.3     Deputation - Committee Members of the Howick Village Association                       6

8.4     Deputation - Margaret Hawkeswood - Community Volunteer                                 6

8.5     Deputation - Howick Community Hub      7

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     7

11        Governing Body Members' Update                    9

12        Chairperson's Report                                         11

13        Future delivery model for Howick War Memorial Hall, 91 Picton Street                         13

14        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Howick Local Board meeting schedule                                    19

15        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                                                             23

16        Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum                      31

17        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025          35

18        Urgent Decision of the Howick Local Board to Formalise Input into Auckland Council's Submission on the Fast Track Approvals Bill 45

19        Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents                             47

20        Howick Local Board Workshop Records         53

21        Hōtaka Kaupapa | Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                               55

22        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                               59

C1       Howick Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model                                      59

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 18 April 2024, and the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 2 May 2024, including the confidential section, as true and correct records.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Jennie McCormick of the Howick and Pakuranga Community Houses Inc Society

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.    Jennie McCormick of the Howick and Pakuranga Community Houses Inc Society will present to the Board the Society’s annual deputation outlining the work they do in the Howick Local Board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Jennie McCormick for their deputation and attendance.

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Janet Dickson of the Howick Ratepayers and Residents Association

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.    Janet Dickson – Chair of the Howick Ratepayers and Residents Association will present to the Board a deputation on the topic of the Howick War Memorial Hall.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Janet Dickson for her deputation and attendance.

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Committee Members of the Howick Village Association

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.    Committee Members of the Howick Village Association will present to the Board a deputation on the topic of the Howick War Memorial Hall.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank the Committee Members for their deputation and attendance.

 

 

8.4       Deputation - Margaret Hawkeswood - Community Volunteer

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.    Margaret Hawkeswood - Community Volunteer and hirer of the Howick War Memorial Hall will present to the Board a deputation on the topic of the Howick War Memorial Hall.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Margaret Hawkeswood for her deputation and attendance.

 

 

8.5       Deputation - Howick Community Hub

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.    Howick Community Hub will present to the Board a deputation on the topic of the Howick War Memorial Hall.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank members of the Howick Community Hub for their deputation and attendance.

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Governing Body Members' Update

File No.: CP2024/04686

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Howick Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Howick Local Board on board-specific matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Howick Ward Councillors with an opportunity to update the Howick Local Board on matters they have been involved with since the last meeting that are of particular relevance to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the written and verbal reports from Cr Sharon Stewart QSM and Cr Maurice Williamson.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Bews - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2024/04687

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the local board chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and note the chairperson’s written report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The local board chairperson will update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Chairperson’s verbal update and written report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

16 May 2024, Howick Local Board: Chairperson's Report - Chair Light's Written Report

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Bews - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Future delivery model for Howick War Memorial Hall, 91 Picton Street

File No.: CP2024/04225

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formalise proposed changes to the operating model of the Howick War Memorial Hall, 91 Picton Street as part of the Howick Local Board work programme 2024/2025.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         Since July 2020, Howick War Memorial Hall has been operated as a venue for hire with no booking fees or charges attached. Prior to this, an information service was run out of the space, at the time referred to as Howick Information Service Centre.

3.         The shift to venue for hire delivery was intended as an interim measure while staff assessed the potential of community-centric delivery models for the hall. To test the community’s appetite for community-led operation of the space the local board resolved to run an Expression of Interest (EOI) process.

4.         There was a strong community response to the EOI. Between May 2021 and July 2022, staff worked with community and the local board to bring the hall into a community centre model operated by a community-based group.

5.         A change in operating model could not be agreed upon and the initiative did not deliver the local board’s intended outcome.  Monies available to support this change were reprioritised to another project in 2023/2024.

6.         Staff recommend that from 1 July 2024 the hall formally move to a venue for hire delivery model with relevant fees and charges attached, which will have the benefit of generating a modest revenue.

7.         A permanent shift to venue for hire allows the EOI process to be officially closed and interested parties and community to be informed of the future direction for the hall.

8.         Staff propose to implement this change via development of the 2024/2025 Howick Local Board work programme and recommend a schedule of fees.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve Howick War Memorial Hall to operate as an official venue for hire managed through the standard Auckland Council venue booking systems.

b)      tono / request officers apply the hire fees and charges to Howick War Memorial Hall as calculated by staff and in line with the Hire Fee Framework 2014.

Horopaki

Context

9.         Howick War Memorial Hall, 91 Picton Street, previously operated as an information centre staffed by a combination of council employees and volunteers. During this time, it was known as the Howick Information Service Centre.

10.       In 2018, in response to a 2017 needs assessment identifying the hall as underutilised, the local board expressed interest in implementing a community hub with programmed activities.

11.       In August 2020, the local board resolved to enable the hall to operate as a venue for hire and requested staff begin discussions with them from October 2020 regarding future delivery models for the space (Resolution number HW/2020/126). Since this time no fees or charges have been in place for use of the space.

12.       The hall is one of only two free, bookable halls owned by the council in the Auckland region. A lack of fees and charges means the venue deviates from the Hire Fee Framework adopted by the local board.

13.       In May 2021, staff returned to the local board with a report outlining recommendations for community-led delivery of the space. Subsequently, the local board instructed staff to undertake an Expression of Interest (EOI) process to find a community-based organisation to run the hall either as a community-led community centre or an activated community space under a community lease (Resolution number HW/2021/65).  To ensure community access throughout the EOI process a venue for hire model remained in place with Connected Communities staff managing bookings while prioritising EOI applicants.

14.       When the process closed in October 2021, nine EOI applications were received. At the December 2021 business meeting, staff delivered a report recommending Howick Business Association as a community operator for the hall. In response, the local board requested staff investigate the possibility of interested EOI applicants operating the hall in a collaborative manner (Resolution number HW/2021/65).

15.       Between February and March 2022, staff held five facilitated meetings with interested parties exploring collaborative options for community delivery.  Participants unanimously preferred that a single operator be appointed with an agreement for groups and the wider community to retain access to booking the space.

16.       In April 2022, staff returned with a report detailing findings from the facilitated meetings and recommended Howick Business Association as the preferred community provider. The local board resolved to defer the decision on the management of the hall pending a workshop with prospective applicants (Resolution number HW/2022/49). Subsequently, the local board interviewed the five EOI applicants with continued interest during a workshop in June 2022.

17.       At the 18 July 2022 business meeting staff presented a report with recommendations for the local board to thank EOI applicants, approve community-led delivery for the hall, approve the recommended applicant to manage the centre with a related budget, and approve staff to investigate renovations required to have the hall fit for purpose as a community centre. The report failed for want of a mover or seconder. The EOI process, begun in May 2021, is open and unresolved.

18.       For the financial year 2022/2023, $81,451 (excluding GST) was allocated to fund a community organisation to manage and activate the hall, this remained unspent. The following financial year, $82,000 (excluding GST) was budgeted for community-led delivery of the hall. In October 2023, the amount was reassigned to other local board priorities (Resolution number HW/2023/195).

19.       A Community Building Assessment in 2022 considered the premises serviceable and in moderate condition (Condition Grade 3). Advice in this report is based on the current state and capacity of the building which presently accommodates 15 users per booking.

20.       From financial year 2021/2022 bookings for the space have increased as per Table one below. At the higher level of booking seen for this financial year to date, the hall is booked for 2338 of a possible 6408 bookable hours, or 36% of available hours. Approximately 10 groups and/ or singular users regularly book the space for activities.  

Table one: Booking information for Howick War Memorial Hall 1 July 2022 to date.

Financial year

Bookings

Estimated attendees

Total hours booked

2021/2022

245

4,242

1,351

2022/2023

328

3,240

1,632

2023/2024 (to date)

596

2,338

1,439

 

21.       The development of the 2024/2025 work programme provides an opportunity to formalise Howick War Memorial Hall as a venue hire location with fees and charges attached.

22.       During the development of the Howick Local Board work programme, staff wish to address the delivery model for the hall. Due to workshop and business meeting timings, this report provides a decision-making tool for work programme development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.       Connected Communities staff currently deliver the work programme associated with moving the hall into a community-led model (line ID 207). From May 2021 onward, staff have worked with the local board to explore avenues for a community-led operating model at the hall. Staff advice did not result in the selection of a community provider. For several consecutive years, budget attached to community-led delivery has remained unspent on this purpose and the hall remains outside the Hire Fee Framework. Subsequently, staff compiled the options in table two below.

Table two: Staff recommendation for Howick War Memorial Hall operation from 1 July 2024

Option

Description

Comment

Option 1 –
Status Quo

De facto venue for hire with no fees or charges attached

·     No discrete mandate

·     No local board decision to support this status

·     Deviates from Hire Fee Framework

Option 2 –
Venue for Hire

Recommended

 

Recognised venue for hire space with fees and charges attached

·     Formal local board decision defines hall status

·     Clear for staff, customers and community

·     Mandated reasoning for ongoing investment

·     Fair and transparent

·     Supported by Hire Fee Framework which includes scalable fee hire via discounts for regular users and community groups

Option 3 –

Community-led community centre

Community Centre run by local board selected community operator

·     Existing mandate to explore this option

·     Will require a fresh process with additional resourcing

 

24.       Staff recommend stopping the work programme item for investigation of community-led delivery at the hall (ID 2027) and formalising the venue hire function of the hall with ongoing delivery overseen by the Customer and Community Venues team (line ID 206). By applying fees and charges to hire of the venue, the local board will gain revenue thereby offsetting some maintenance and renewal outgoings for the space.

25.       Permanently shifting the hall to the Customer and Community Venues team would bring the booking system in line with other venues in the region allowing customers to book online with less staff involvement. The hall is currently advertised on the Auckland Council website with bookings taken by the venue hire team exclusively over the phone. 

26.       Staff recommended hire fees correlate to venues of similar size and condition across the region as in table three below. Also displayed are Hire Fee framework discounts that are embedded for regular users and community groups. Fees and charges can be revised annually as part of the local board agreement process. In addition to discounts below, the local board can choose to subsidise community groups for venue hire charges.  

Table three: Hire fee charges recommended for Howick War Memorial Hall from 1 July 2024

2.        

Casual one-off hire

Regular hire: 20%discount (10+ annual bookings)

Local board priority: 50%discount (Community groups)

Peak

$25/ hour

$20/ hour

$12.50/ hour

Off-peak

$20/ hour

$16/ hour

$10/ hour

 

27.       The benefit to the wider community, which includes the EOI applicants, is a level of certainty regarding how the hall will be operated into the future. A decision to permanently shift the hall into the venue hire model also allows for the official closure of the EOI process and for the applicants to be formally thanked for their effort and notified that the hall will continue to be operated by council.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.       Local community services and venues create a stronger sense of place and foster localism and place-based approaches. This has a positive impact on resilience to climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.       A number of staff are currently involved with the delivery of services at the hall. Connected Communities manages the relationships and contracts with arts and community partners and have explored the potential of a community-led model. Parks and Community Facilities provide of Venue Hire services for the space. Teams from these departments have worked together to develop this advice.

30.       Potential future investment to increase capacity or condition of the hall is a matter for the local board to progress with Parks and Community Facilities in subsequent financial years.

31.       Subject to local board decisions, staff will work with Specialist Operations to manage implications for council owned assets, including making contact with regular users to communicate any changes and apply any charges. Staff will work with Local Board Services to ensure changes are incorporated into the Howick Local Board work programme and Local Board Agreement 2024/2025.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.       The 2022 report to select a community provider failed for want of a mover or seconder.

33.       There has likely been an impact on EOI applicants in that they undertook a significant amount of work over a lengthy period without receiving a clear outcome for their efforts. Officially designating the hall as a venue for hire location allows the EOI process to be finalised and provides closure for applicants.

34.       Applying fees and charges may impact some regular users of the hall who currently rely on the space being free for their activities. Therefore, staff recommend providing regular users with as much notice as practicably possible ahead of applying fees and charges.

35.       Implementing fees as outlined in the Hire Fee Framework provides a considered, fair and transparent framework for all those who wish to use the facility.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.       Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

37.       These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan 2050, the 10-year Budget Plan 2021-2031 (Long-term Plan), the Auckland Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, the council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.  

38.       Partner-led arts and community services enable locally responsive activities, promoting participation, inclusion, and connection for all Aucklanders, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.       Applying fees and charges to the space brings the hall in line with the Hire Fee Framework already adopted by the local board.

40.       Formally moving the hall to a venue for hire delivery model with relevant fees and charges attached, will have the benefit of generating a modest revenue. Based on current bookings at a community rate this is approximately $22,000 for the financial year 2024/202

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Regular users of hall surprised at change

Contact regular users ahead of change to inform them

Reputational risk to local board for having kept EOI open and unresolved

Contact EOI applicants to explain local board decisions, thank them for their time and effort.

Hall has low capacity (15 pax) which limits its use for community

Capex investment to increase building capacity

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.       Subject to local board decisions, changes to the Howick War Memorial Hall delivery model would be implemented from 1 July 2024 as part of 2024/2025 work programme delivery.

42.       Current regular users of the hall will be contacted and informed of new the fees and charges to be applied for financial year 2024/2025.

43.       Staff will contact Expression of Interest (EOI) applicants to inform them the EOI process is officially closed, thank them for their time and effort, and communicate the new fee structure for the hall.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lisa Waldner - Place & Partner Specialist

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Head of Community Delivery

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Howick Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2024/04825

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to add an additional meeting to the 2022-2025 Howick Local Board meeting schedule, so the local board can review public feedback on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 before providing formal views.

2.       To withdraw the 20 June business meeting from the 2022-2025 Howick Local Board meeting schedule.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Howick Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Thursday, 8 December 2022 (HW/2022/199).

4.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to the delivery of the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has affected the delivery of the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

5.       Public engagement data on the RLTP will not be available to local boards until 24 June 2024. Local boards must provide their formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines. These timeframes are outside the local board’s normal meeting cycle.

6.       To enable local boards to consider public engagement data before providing formal views, this report recommends the local board approve an additional or extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Howick Local Board meeting schedule

7.       There are three business meetings scheduled in June, including the proposed additional meeting in this report. Therefore, staff recommend withdrawing the 20 June business meeting from the 2022-2025 Howick Local Board meeting schedule. The proposed additional meeting on 27 June 2024 will become the ordinary, monthly business meeting for the Howick Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the addition of one meeting at 12.00pm on 27 June 2024 at Howick Local Board office to the 2022-2025 Howick Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate providing formal views on the Regional Land Transport Plan after reviewing public feedback.

b)      whakaae / approve the withdrawal of the business meeting scheduled for 12.00pm on 20 June 2024 at Howick Local Board Office from the 2022-2025 Howick Local Board meeting schedule.

c)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that the meeting at 12.00pm on 27 June 2024 will now become the ordinary, monthly business meeting for the Howick Local Board.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

9.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

10.     The Howick Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 meeting schedule on Thursday, 8 December 2022 (HW/2022/199).

11.     At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to delivering the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has impacted Auckland Transport’s timeframes on delivering the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

12.     Public engagement on the draft RLTP will run from 17 May 2024 until mid-June 2024. Auckland Transport will provide a summary of public feedback to local boards on 24 June 2024.

13.     Local boards must provide formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines.

14.     Local boards expect to see public feedback before providing their formal views. Therefore, it is recommended that local boards resolve their formal views on the RLTP after 24 June and before 3 July. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meeting as an addition to the 2022-2025 meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

16.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the RLTP timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

17.     For option two, only the specific topic on the RLTP may be considered for which the meeting is being held.

18.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

19.     An additional business meeting on 13 June 2024 was added to cover Annual Budget requirements (HW/2023/206). In order to avoid three business meetings in a row, staff recommend withdrawing the 20 June 2024 business meeting from the 2022-2025 Howick Local Board meeting schedule, which allows the proposed 27 June 2024 additional meeting to become the ordinary, monthly meeting of the Howick Local Board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     There is no specific impact to mana whenua or mataawaka from this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a risk that local board views on the RLTP will not be informed by public feedback. This risk is mitigated if the local board resolves to add an additional or extraordinary meeting after the public feedback data is made available on 24 June 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Staff will implement the preferred process when preparing the business meeting schedule.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Ian Milnes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/05942

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Howick Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Howick Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       Overall operating results for the nine months of the year is two per cent above the budget due to lower operating revenue and higher expenditure. Revenue is below budget due to lower user charges from Howick and Lloyd Elsmore Leisure centres. Overall expenditure is above budget by two per cent in asset-based services. Capital expenditure delivery is 126 per cent of the budget year to date.

5.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Youth: Howick Youth Council (ID 204)

·        LB event – Kiwi Anthems music concert (ID 215)

·        Business East Tamaki BID – support for East Auckland Business Awards (ID 1347)

6.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status this quarter.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Howick Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        External Partnerships;

·        Local Economic Development;

·        Plans and Places;

·        Auckland Emergency Management;

8.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu                         

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

9.       The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

10.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

11.     Youth: Howick Youth Council (ID 204). The new leadership team of the Howick Youth Council is in place now and they have successfully completed the induction and work plan development with all the teams. They have organised and delivered a Meet and Greet with the Howick local board members and also a Principals' Breakfast.

12.     LB event – Kiwi Anthems music concert (ID 215). The 2024 Kiwi Anthems event was successfully delivered on Sunday 10 March at Lloyd Elsmore Park to an estimated audience of 2,300.

13.     Business East Tamaki BID – support for East Auckland Business Awards (ID 1347). All grant funding was paid and planning underway for the inaugural East Auckland Business Awards night to be held on 20 March 2024. The awards night was a great success with six category winning businesses and one supreme winner celebrated on the night.

Activities with significant issues

14.     Howick Village Centre Plan Implementation (ID 1293) – Project has been reported as Red when it should be reported as Grey – cancelled.

Activities on hold

15.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·    Howick - renew signage - Te Kete Rukuruku - Māori naming of parks and places (ID 36484). The board confirmed the locations of the parks/reserves to be given local iwi names, which is to be approved through a business meeting in March 2024. Confirmed with the naming lead that the naming process will take from six months up to two years, which means no signage will be able to be renewed within FY24. Next steps: Place project on hold for the FY24 work programme year.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

16.     These activities are deferred from the current work programme into future years:

·        Local civic events Howick. No activity occurred as no civic events were scheduled in 2023/2024.

·        Howick Celebrated Citizens. Event not to be held in 2023/2024.

Cancelled activities

17.     These activities are cancelled:

·        Howick LDI – Heritage – Install interpretive signage (ID 17864) – Project cancelled as it was no longer required.

 

18.     The following work programmes activities have been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and they were made by staff under delegation.

Table 2: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

40322

 

Parks and Community Facilities

Howick -remediate 2023 storm and cyclone damaged assets

 

Regional funding outside of local board ABS renewals was secured by Parks and Community Facilities to repair Hattaway Bridge. The actual cost of $142,212.60 to carry out all work required to open the bridge and stabilize the watercourse will be journaled to this funding source and local renewals funding returned. Once this is completed the project line 40322 will be closed and the budget returned to the local board ABS renewals.

30575

Parks and Community Facilities

Lloyd Elsmore Park - renew skate park

Majority of FY24 renewals capex budget no longer required as delivery will be deferred to FY25. Therefore, a total savings of $291,417.53 declared and this has been distributed across to more projects in need, as described below.

30540

Parks and Community Facilities

Barry Curtis Park - renew Chapel Road carpark

FY24 renewals capex savings of $50,000 declared due to delay of works cause by Auckland Transport raising an issue of vehicle crossing location. This has been transferred to #23996 Highland Park Library - comprehensive renewal as furniture and fixtures of the library are also being renewed.

23996

Parks and Community Facilities

Highland Park Library - comprehensive renewal

FY24 renewals capex budget has been increased via a transfer of $50,000 from #30540 Barry Curtis Park - renew Chapel Road carpark. A further increase of $31,885.85 transferred here from #20383 Howick Domain - renew facilities. Project manager delivery forecast indicating the need accordingly

31832

Parks and Community Facilities

Howick - renew built spaces 2023/2024 to 2025/2026

FY24 renewals capex budget has been increased via a transfer of $70,000 from #30575 Lloyd Elsmore Park - renew skate park. Project manager delivery forecast indicating the need accordingly.

30569

Parks and Community Facilities

Barry Curtis Park - renew play facilities

FY24 renewals capex budget has been increased via a transfer of $109,943.06 from #30575 Lloyd Elsmore Park - renew skate park. Project manager delivery forecast indicating the need accordingly.

31836

Parks and Community Facilities

Howick - renew toilets and changing rooms 2023/2024 to 2025/2026

FY24 renewals capex budget has been increased via a transfer of $92,455 from #30575 Lloyd Elsmore Park - renew skate park. Project manager delivery forecast indicating the need accordingly.

15592

Parks and Community Facilities

Marine Parade Esp - renew structure and furniture

FY24 renewals capex budget has been increased via a transfer of $9,466.84 from #30575 Lloyd Elsmore Park - renew skate park. This transfer will accommodate for the overspend highlighted in the project as well as remaining commitments.

18650

Parks and Community Facilities

Howick - renew walkways and pathways 2020/2021 to 2023/2024

FY24 renewals capex budget has been increased via a transfer of $953.88 from #30575 Lloyd Elsmore Park - renew skate park. This transfer will accommodate for the small overspend highlighted in the project.

20663

Parks and Community Facilities

Rogers Park – renew playground

FY24 renewals capex savings of $17,824.05 declared as this project will be put on hold to prioritise works for Clydesdale Park. The savings has been transferred to #30553 Howick - renew Community lease facilities to accommodate for project manager delivery forecast.

30553

Parks and Community Facilities

Howick - renew Community lease facilities

FY24 renewals capex budget has been increased via a transfer of $18,544.81 from #30575 Lloyd Elsmore Park - renew skate park; and $17,824.05 from #20663 Rogers Park – renew playground. Project manager delivery forecast indicating the need accordingly.

20383

Parks and Community Facilities

Howick Domain - renew facilities

FY24 renewals capex savings of $31,885.85 declared due to the project facing delays on the development discussions and thus the work required at Howick Domain. The savings has been transferred to #23996 Highland Park Library - comprehensive renewal to accommodate for project manager delivery forecast.

26473

Parks and Community Facilities

Nixon Centennial Park - renew carparks

FY24 renewals capex savings of $85,990.26 declared as the physical works for this project will be deferred. $70,000 of the realised savings has been transferred to #31832 Howick - renew built spaces 2023/2024 to 2025/2026 to accommodate for project manager delivery forecast.

31832

Parks and Community Facilities

Howick - renew built spaces 2023/2024 to 2025/2026

FY24 renewals capex budget has been increased via a transfer of $70,000 from #26473 Nixon Centennial Park - renew carparks. This transfer will accommodate for a heat pump renewal at Nixon Park community hall, as well as Te Whare Taonga museum hand rail renewal.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

20.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This report informs the Howick Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Māori Engagement: Improving responsiveness to local Māori (ID 199). Staff have signed funding agreements with Te Tahawai Marae and with the Owairoa Marae to support their education programmes and increase their capacity to run these programmes.

24.     Howick Local Board - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche One (ID 3497). Tranche one sites for naming were resolved this quarter and iwi have been invited to name them. Hui will be held with iwi in Q4 to resolve their shared interests. This normally takes 6-12 months so may carry over into the next financial year.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     This report is provided to enable the Howick Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programme. There are no financial implications associated with this report

Financial Performance

26.     Financial comments:

·        Revenue at $3.7 million is $59,000 below the budget. The Howick fitness centre has potential for increased membership and a targeted campaign was ran in March 2024.

·        Expenditure of $24.8 million is above the budget by $425,000. In asset-based services, expenditure is above budget by $725,000. The main expenditure is for  repairs and maintenance of all assets across buildings, sports fields, parks and streetscape. Locally Driven Initiatives expenditure of $1.4 million is $307,000 below the budget. There are two further grants round before year end and payments are still being processed for some activities that was completed in this quarter.

·        Capital delivery of $2.6 million is above budget by $540,000. The main expenditure is on the local asset renewals programme $2.1 million, Auckland Transport funded project $297,00 and coastal asset renewals $126,000.

·        The Howick Local Board Financial Performance report is in Appendix B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

28.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

29.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2024).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme update FY24 Q3

 

b

Financial Performance Report FY24 Q3

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ian Milnes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum

File No.: CP2024/05905

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, coordinated by Auckland Emergency Management.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The role that local board members play during an emergency is becoming an increasingly important element of emergency management.

3.       To support this role, a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is proposed.

4.       The terms of reference (Attachment A) show that the forum will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision will be “local board members with an interest in emergency management working together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response.”

5.       The forum will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about readiness and response in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for readiness and response measures, and to provide informal guidance to staff on related issues.

6.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July.

7.       Staff recommend the forum meet three times a year. Additional meetings can be arranged if there is urgent content that requires discussion between scheduled forum sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Following the weather events of January and February 2023, Auckland Emergency Management was subject to several reviews and various recommendations.

9.       Part of the implementation of the recommendations included the establishment of a Planning Unit and an associated Community Planning and Readiness Manager, with a team of seven Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors, to support readiness and preparedness at the local level.

10.     The Head of Planning Unit commenced 15 January 2024, and appointments to the Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisor roles were made in late 2023, with the last Senior Advisor commencing their role early February 2024.

11.     All local boards have expressed a desire to be more involved in readiness and response, and to be upskilled in advance of another catastrophic weather event.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local board members are passionate about ensuring the best outcomes for their communities before, during, and following an emergency.

13.     A number of gaps have been identified where, during an emergency, local board members did not have the information they needed to best support their communities and the emergency response. Recent events also highlighted the importance of community readiness, and the role that people played to support each other during a response.

14.     In response to this, the Auckland Emergency Management Planning Manager has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of an Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·    learn more about emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant knowledge with other local board members and with their communities

·    improve connections between participants at a governance level

·    encourage collaboration between local boards to support emergency readiness and response outcomes

·    provide informal guidance to staff in regard to emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

15.     The vision of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is “local board members with an interest in emergency management work together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response”.

16.     Boards are invited to appoint up to three members to the forum. Participation is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes and be able to watch recording of forum meetings.

17.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

18.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum and provide further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet three times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed in consultation with the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The formation and operation of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum has no direct climate impact, particularly as the group will meet online only.

20.     The impacts of climate change on weather patterns mean that catastrophic weather events are likely to become more frequent. Response and readiness will form a significant part of ensuring that impacts on our communities are mitigated where possible.

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be administered by staff from the council’s Auckland Emergency Management team, with support from kaimahi in the Local Board Services department.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors have been meeting with local boards during Q3 to build relationships and develop Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Plans.

23.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum responds to requests from local board members to increase activity in this space and enables development and upskilling that is likely to have a positive impact on the final response plans that are produced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Auckland Emergency Management are working with marae to provide support in emergency preparedness activities and to identify marae that may be able to provide support to communities in response.

25.     Potential topics for 2024 Readiness and Response Forum include mana whenua engagement and suggestions for improving iwi involvement at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There is a risk that local board members who become members of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum expect that they will play a central role in emergency response in the event of another weather event.

28.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is an information-sharing forum, and the Terms of Reference are intended to clarify this, ensuring participants have a realistic expectation of the roles and responsibilities of membership.

29.     The Emergency Management Elected Members’ Guide (July 2023) is a key guiding document for elected members, providing detailed information on the role of elected members in emergency reduction, readiness, response and recovery activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

31.     An initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Readiness and Response Forum

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Wallace - Head of Planning Auckland Emergency Management

Authorisers

Adam Maggs - General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Oliver Roberts - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/01198

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report confirms Business Improvement District (BID) annual compliance against the Auckland Council BID Policy (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) as of 10 March 2024.

2.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report.

3.       This report considers whether the local board should recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Howick and Business East Tāmaki Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

BID-operating business associations within the local board area

4.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are programmes where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

5.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report. As part of the 19 Requirements, the BIDs are required to provide annual accountability reports which are due 10 March each year.

6.       The BID annual accountability reports on public funds received by the BID within the local board area for the 2022/2023 financial year and has a direct link to council’s Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process to strike the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

7.       Howick Local Board has two BIDs operating in their local area:

Table One: shows the amount of targeted rate each BID is seeking in 2024/2025.

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Met BID Policy annual reporting requirements.

(9,11 & 18)

Howick Village Association

$201,545.66

 

ü

Business East Tāmaki

$600,372.00

ü

 

8.       Staff recommend that the local board approve Howick and Business East Tāmaki BIDs to receive their targeted rate grant for 2024/2025.

 

Regional summary across all 51 BIDs for this reporting period

9.       Of the 51 BID-operating business associations in Tāmaki Makaurau, 92% (47 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

10.     36 BIDs (70.5%) increased their targeted rates between 2% to 50% for 2024/2025, while 15 BIDs maintained the fiscal status quo.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i.        $201,545.66 for Howick BID

ii.       $600,372.00 for Business East Tāmaki  

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Auckland Council Business Improvement District (BID) Policy and BID targeted rate grant agreement.

 

11.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2022) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the BID-operating business association and inform this annual report. (Attachment A).

12.     The remaining four BID Policy Requirements set out the process for establishing, expanding, and discontinuing a BID programme; and determines rating mechanisms. These will be covered within individual BID local board reports.

13.     The BID Policy does not prescribe or measure standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

14.     The BID Policy is supported by a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement, a three-year agreement signed by both Auckland Council and each BID-operating business association’s executive committee. The agreement sets out the relationship between the parties, how payment will be made and that compliance with the BID Policy is mandatory. The agreement confirms the business associations independence from Auckland Council. All 51 BIDs have signed a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement for period 1 December 2022 to 30 December 2025.

15.     This report updates the local board on compliance with the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID), with a focus on the BIDs annual accountability reporting (BID Policy Requirement 9, 11 and 18) relating to public funds received by the BID for the 2022/2023 financial year.

16.     This report includes a copy of the individual BIDs Governance Summary documents, Attachment B, and C. These documents include the full resolution detailing the amount of BID targeted rate grant approved by association members at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 financial year. The Chair also agrees, by signing this document, to advise council of any perceived or real/current issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

 

 

BID Programmes

17.     Local BID programmes should provide value to the collective business community by delivering a suite of economic activities that respond to local needs and opportunities and are agreed by the local business community. BID programmes also provide the opportunity to work with the council group and engage with local boards.

18.   The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

19.   Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve a detailed income and expenditure operational budget and business plan for the following financial year.

20.   Responsibility for delivery and outcomes of the BID programme sits with the individual BID-operating business association executive committee (provision of reporting information) and members (reviewing information provided to them by the executive committee).

21.   BID-operating business associations operate as independent Incorporated Societies. All BIDs are registered incorporated societies and need to be aware of the requirement to re-register by April 2026 under the updated Incorporated Societies Act 2022. 

Howick Local Board BID Targeted Rates 2024/2025

22.     Howick Local Board has two BIDs operating in their local board area. Table 2 shows the amount of targeted rate each BID had approved at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 and linked to the council’s Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process.

 

Table Two: Amount of targeted rate for each BID in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Change from previous year dollars/ percentage

Last year target rate amount was increased

Howick Village Association

$201,545.66

5%

2021

Business East Tāmaki

$600,372.00

2%

2020

 

Decision making

Auckland Council

23.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

24.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Local Boards

25.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional overview

26.     The BID Policy has been in place in Tāmaki Makaurau since 2022 and applies to 51 BIDs across the ā-rohe, up from 50 BIDs reported in the 2023 report to local boards.

27.     Across all 51 BID-operating business associations 92% (47 out of 51 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

28.     Annual accountability reporting is a requirement of the BID Policy (Requirement 11). This has meant the BID Team deviated from the BID Policy Requirement providing an extension to the due date to enable BIDs to achieve sufficient compliance for 2024/2025.

29.     The BID team observed this year BIDs have paid less attention to providing the required annual accountability documents by the 10 March 2024 due date, compared with the previous year.

Summary of BIDs meeting BID Policy Requirements

30.     51% (26) of BIDs successfully completed their annual accountability reporting by the due date of 10 March 2024.

31.     41% (21) received notification that they had missing information or documents and were provided an extension to the 10 March deadline. 

32.     4 BIDs failed to meet BID Policy Requirement 11 and the 10 March deadline and the provided extension to this deadline.

33.     BID targeted rate grants 2024/2025 - 36 increased their targeted rates between 2% to 50% for 2024/2025, while 15 maintained the fiscal status quo.

34.     Of the 11 BIDs with income under $120,000 (BID Policy Requirement 4), two BIDs now met this requirement as of 10 March 2024.

35.     Of the remaining nine BIDs, three have made no comment to increase their income. Five BIDs have increased their BID Targeted rate grant and are on track to meet this requirement by 1 July 2028 and one has indicated interest in a BID expansion project.

Regional BID Programme Growth

36.     This section provides an overview of BID programme growth across the region.

37.     Onehunga BID achieved a successful expansion ballot in February 2024. This will see them evolve from a retail focused BID into a BID encompassing retail, plus commercial and industrial areas, with a significant growth in target rate commencing 1 July 2024.

38.     Kingsland BID has confirmed at their 2023 AGM they would implement a BID expansion project in 2024/2025.

39.     Grey Lynn Business Association will be holding a ballot later this year towards establishing as a new BID from 1 July 2025.

40.     Takanini Business Association is on track to progress their BID establishment project aiming to become a new BID from 1 July 2026

BID Team: 2024 Accountability Reporting process overview.

41.     Upon receipt of individual BID annual accountability documents, staff follow a set process that includes:

·    Reviewing the accountability reporting of the previous accountability period (10 March 2023) to understand if any recommendations or feedback had been made.

·    Review the documents provided for 10 March 2024.

·    Discussion regarding observations relevant to that BID (knowledge, actions taken etc.)

·    Communicate to BID (information missing, more information required, completion of reporting).

42.     Generic observations from year 10 March 2024 accountability include:

·    Acceptance that limited local board discretionary funding was available which led to BIDS having a greater focus on efficiencies in their own BID budgets.

·    The improving quality of annual discussions between local boards and BID-operating business associations. Less emphasis on operational aspects and more discussion on how they could collaborate.

BID Policy – Requirements 9, 11 and 18

43.     Requirements 9 and 18 of the BID Policy are focused on BID affiliates having access to BID programme information and the BID targeted rate spend. It specifies a range of information BIDs must ensure are easily and freely accessible on a suitable online platform.

44.     This year a one-off ‘Website Check List’ was added to the annual accountablity reporting.  This document confirms complance against BID Policy, Requirements 9 and 18 relating to the transparency of BID information on a public platform.

45.     The BID Policy, requirement 11 sets out the documents that form the annual accountability reporting documents for each BID. These documents confirm membership decision-making has taken place regarding the BID programme at the 2023 AGM.

46.     Other reporting requirements such as the filing of annual financial statements with the Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act are included in this reporting.

Howick Local Board BIDs

47.     The table below sets out the documents required by 10 March 2024 under BID Policy Requirement 11.

Table Three: Business associations compliance with the BID Policy Requirement 11, 9 and 18.

BID Policy Requirement 11

Business Associations – documents submitted

Howick Village Association

Business East Tāmaki (previously called Greater East Tamaki (GETBA))

Statement of financial/ performance reporting 2022/2023

ü

ü

Audited report/review 2022/2023

ü

ü

Audit Management Letter 2022/2023

ü

ü

Chairs report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Treasurers report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Manager’s report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Approved business plan for 18 months 2024/2025

ü

ü

Income and expenditure budget 2024/2025

ü

ü

Draft Minutes 2023 AGM

ü

ü

Financial/Audit reports posted to Companies Office website

ü

ü

Mandatory Management Summary – signed by manager

ü

ü

Mandatory Governance Summary – signed by Chair

ü

ü

Strategic Plan *

2022-2027

2021-2026

Website Check List

ü

ü

 Note: * Current strategic 3–5-year plans to be available upon request.

 

Table Four: Business associations compliance with other BID Policy Requirements.

Business Associations

 

BID Policy Requirements

 Howick Village Association

Business East Tāmaki

Requirement 3: Increase BID income to $120,000 by 1 July 2028

N/A

N/A

Requirement 10: Other Council Funding – accountability reporting* Baseline to be established year ending 2025.

 

N/A

N/A

Requirement 12: Clear separation between BID governance and management Measure- BID Team advised of issue within BID. Year ending 10 March 2024

Nil

Nil

Note – BID Policy Requirement 10: * Funding agreements between the BID and local board (or any other part of council) set out the contractual obligations for funds received. These other funds are in addition to the BID targeted rate funding and are not covered in this report.

 

Howick Local Board: observations on BID Operating business associations within the area

·    Howick – nothing noted.

·    Business East Tāmaki – nothing noted.

48.     Using the documents and information submitted, the BID Team is satisfied that Howick and Business East Tāmaki BIDs have sufficiently met the BID Policy Requirements and the BID Policy for setting of the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

49.     Staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for 2024/2025 as set out in Table One.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and can facilitate environmental sustainability programmes and climate response where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations that operate a BID programme. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

52.     BIDs work across several Council Controlled Organisations including Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

54.     Howick and Business East Tāmaki BID programmes best align with the Howick Local Board Plan 2023, Outcome: Our Economy

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

55.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Howick and Business East Tāmaki business associations means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     The BID Policy and the annual accountability process does not prescribe or report on individual BID programme’s effectiveness, outcomes, or impacts. However individual BIDs may include this level of detail in other reports provided to their members. This localised project reporting is not a requirement of the BID Policy and is not part of the BID Policy annual accountability reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

58.  The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

59.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, the BID Policy sets out a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

60.     For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, it requires the BIDs to fully complete all annual accountability reporting and the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID. 

61.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy throughout the year including responding to queries and issues raised by council staff, members of the BID, the public and elected members.

62.     We actively grow relationships with council departments that interact with BID programmes to ensure a consistent approach is applied for the programme.

63.     The role of the local board representative is a key link between the parties involved in the BID programme in terms of communication and feedback.  Local Board representatives on BID programmes are strongly encouraged to contact the BID Team if they have any queries or concerns.

64.     This report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds. It provides an annual update that the BIDs operating within the local board area are compliant with the BID Policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 including the annual budget 2024/2025.

66.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2024 to Howick and Business East Tāmaki BIDs.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID Policy reporting requirements

 

b

Governance Summary - Howick BID

 

c

Governance Summary - Business East Tamaki

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Urgent Decision of the Howick Local Board to Formalise Input into Auckland Council's Submission on the Fast Track Approvals Bill

File No.: CP2024/04651

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note that an urgent decision was made to formalise the Howick Local Board’s input into Auckland Council's submission on the Fast Track Approvals Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 17 November 2022 the Howick Local Board resolved (HW/2022/178) the following in relation to urgent decision-making:

That the Howick Local Board:

a)    delegate authority to Chairperson Damian Light and Deputy Chairperson Bo Burns, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board, if the local board is unable to meet

b)    confirm that the Local Area Manager, chairperson, and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the use of the local board’s urgent decision mechanism by approving the request for an urgent decision in writing

c)    note that all urgent decisions made, including written advice which supported these decisions, will be included on the agenda of the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

3.       Local boards had the opportunity to provide input into Auckland Council's submission on the Fast Track Approvals Bill.

4.       An urgent decision was required as the deadline for feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission was 12 April 2024, and the deadline for feedback to be appended to the submission was 17 April 2024. The Howick Local Board’s next scheduled business meeting was on 18 April 2024.

5.       The urgent decision memo was not ready in time for the publication of the 18 April business meeting agenda and will therefore be noted at the Board’s 16 May business meeting.

6.       The urgent decision memo is included in this agenda report as Attachment A. This includes the original Council memo on the Fast Track Approvals Bill and the urgent decision itself.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision made on 12 April 2024 to formalise the Howick Local Board’s input into Auckland Council's submission on the Fast Track Approvals Bill.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

16 May 2024, Howick Local Board: Urgent Decision of the Howick Local Board to Formalise Input into Auckland Council's Submission on the Fast Track Approvals Bill - Copy of the Urgent Decision Memo

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Matt Fletcher – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2024/05904

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·    alphabetical order of surname;

·    pseudo-random order; or

·    random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The overseas findings on ballot order effects is controversial[1] and based on elections that differ to local government elections in New Zealand. Auckland Council has based its decisions in the past on its own statistical analysis of previous election results.

6.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 Auckland Council elections. From 2016, prior to each election a statistical analysis was conducted by RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit on the results of previous elections which each time has concluded that there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The focus was on whether there was any advantage to being listed first.

7.       RIMU extended the scope of the statistical analysis this time to include list positions other than first, and also the effects of “race[2] length”. This takes into account the number of candidates standing for a particular election race. The analysis confirms previous results in terms of candidates listed first but has found that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages. The full analysis is attached as Attachment A.

8.       This effect would be remedied by all names on the voting document being in random order. The disadvantage of random order is that it creates some friction for voters. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout.

9.       Nevertheless, since the evidence is clear that in some cases alphabetical order creates a disadvantage, staff recommend that the order of names on Auckland Council voting documents for 2025 be random order.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to the Governing Body on whether candidate names on voting documents should be in random order given the statistical evidence that being lower on the list in certain types of election race appears to confer significant disadvantages.

 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

10.     Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)     The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)     Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)     If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)     If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)     In this regulation,—

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where —

(a) the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b) all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

11.     In 2013, the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names, a consideration being an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology, however the council has chosen to use alphabetical order of names in past elections on the basis that statistical research did not indicate a compelling case to change to random order. 

12.     For the 2022 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and city councils whose data was available, with random order being used by 19 out of the 22 councils other than Auckland:

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Random

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Random

Manawatū-Whanganui Regional Council

Random

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Random

Southland Regional Council

Random

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council (2024)

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2025

Pseudo-random order and true random order

13.     Random order printing removes name order bias, whereas the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. For example, any first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

14.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is that they create friction for the voter. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout if the friction deters any voters.

Alphabetical order

15.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

16.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

17.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is now evidence from a statistical analysis of council’s previous election results, that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race confers significant disadvantages.

 

Analysis of previous election results

18.     An analysis[3] of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 is contained in Attachment A.

19.     Again, the analysis found no compelling evidence that candidates who were listed first were more likely to be elected in the last five Auckland Council elections.

20.     This time the analysis introduced consideration of positions other than first, and also of ‘election race length’ (for example, how many candidates were in each local board or ward race) and also added linear interpolation modelling.

21.     This extended analysis has found that comparing actual votes received proportional to the expected share, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages.

Conclusion

22.     A decision about the order of names on voting documents is made by resolution of the council under clause 31 of the Local Electoral Regulations 2001. Such regulations are provided for in section 139 of the Local Electoral Act 2001.

23.     Section 4 of the Local Electoral Act 2001 requires local authorities, when making decisions under the Act, to take into account the principles set out in section 4. These principles are:

(1)    The principles that this Act is designed to implement are the following:

(aa)   representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls:

(a)     fair and effective representation for individuals and communities:

(b)     all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to—

(i)     cast an informed vote:

(ii)    nominate 1 or more candidates:

(iii)   accept nomination as a candidate:

(c)     public confidence in, and public understanding of, local electoral processes through—

(i)      the provision of a regular election cycle:

(ii)      the provision of elections that are managed independently from the elected body:

(iii)     protection of the freedom of choice of voters and the secrecy of the vote:

(iv)     the provision of transparent electoral systems and voting methods and the adoption of procedures that produce certainty in electoral outcomes:

(v)     the provision of impartial mechanisms for resolving disputed elections and polls.

24.     The principles include substantial participation in the elections and public confidence in electoral processes. They also include a principle that all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to accept nomination as a candidate. This implies a candidate should not be disadvantaged by virtue of their surname.

25.     While alphabetical ordering of names facilitates participation (supporting one of these principles), there is now evidence that this could disadvantage some candidates if they appear lower on the candidate list (compromising the principle that all persons have an equal opportunity to stand).

26.     In terms of public confidence, for the 2022 elections a website[4] criticised the council’s decision to use alphabetical order. This is the only known criticism however the council needs to be seen to be making this decision in a robust manner.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order.  Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Given the widespread adoption of random order of names on voting documents among regional and city councils, if names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of public criticism of the council’s decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Analysis of order of candidate names on election outcomes

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Howick Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2024/04691

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item attaches the workshop records taken for the period stated below.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1 workshop records shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed, or decisions reached but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

3.       This report attaches the workshop records for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the workshop records for the workshops held on 18 April, 2 and 9 May.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

16 May 2024, Howick Local Board - Howick Local Board Workshop Records - 18 April 2024 Record of Workshop

 

b

16 May 2024, Howick Local Board - Howick Local Board Workshop Records - 2 May 2024 Record of Workshop

 

c

16 May 2024, Howick Local Board - Howick Local Board Workshop Records - 9 May 2024 Record of Workshop

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Bews - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa | Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2024/04698

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Howick Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa for the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendars was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is expected and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga                                                                        

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Hōtaka Kaupapa included as Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

16 May 2024, Howick Local Board - Hōtaka Kaupapa | Governance Forward Work Calendar - Copy of the Hōtaka Kaupapa

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Bews - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


 

 


Howick Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Howick Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Howick Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains on going contractural negotations.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] See, for example, “How Much is Enough? The Ballot Order Effect and the Use of Social Science Research in Election Law Disputes”, R. Michael Alvarez and Betsy Sinclair, https://web.archive.org/web/20100615182629id_/http://home.uchicago.edu/~betsy/papers/eljalvarez.pdf

[2] In this analysis a ‘race’ refers to an election in a particular ward or local board in a particular year.

[3] By Ross Wilson in the RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit in 2023. It is noted that the RIMU research did not (and could not) separate out the effects of alphabetical order on the ballot slip, from the effects of alphabetical ordering of the directory of candidate profile statements. The candidate booklet cannot be randomised.

[4] https://thefacts.nz/all/alpha-bias-surnames-in-the-top-3-won-50-of-elections/