I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manurewa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 May 2024

1.30pm

Manurewa Local Board Office
7 Hill Road
Manurewa

 

Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Matt Winiata

 

Deputy Chairperson

Glenn Murphy

 

Members

Joseph Allan

 

 

Heather Andrew

 

 

Anne Candy

 

 

Angela Cunningham-Marino

 

 

Andrew Lesa

 

 

Rangi McLean

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rohin Patel

Democracy Advisor

 

10 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 021 914 618

Email: rohin.patel@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                           5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                            5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                        5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                               5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                        5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                    5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                          6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                               6

11        Governing Body Members' Update                                              7

12        Chairperson's Update                                                                    9

13        Indicative Business Case for a community hub in Manurewa                                                                                                        11

14        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025                                                                    31

15        Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents                                                                                    49

16        Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum                                                                          67

17        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                                   75

18        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule                                                                                      123

19        Urgent decision: Manurewa Local Board input to the Auckland Council submission on central government’s Fast-track Approvals Bill                                                                   127

20        Resolutions Pending Action - May 2024                                 131

21        Manurewa Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar - May 2024                                         135

22        Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records                           139

23        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

24        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                                                        151

C1       Manurewa Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model                                                                           151

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)           whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 2 May 2024, and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 9 May 2024, as true and correct.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Manurewa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 


 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Governing Body Members' Update

File No.: CP2024/05069

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for the ward area Governing Body members to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive verbal or written updates from Councillors Angela Dalton and Daniel Newman.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Chairperson's Update

File No.: CP2024/05071

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on activities since the last business meeting undertaken in their capacity as Chairperson.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Manurewa Local Board Chairperson will update the local board on their activities as Chairperson since the last business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal report from the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Indicative Business Case for a community hub in Manurewa

File No.: CP2024/05009

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To endorse recommendations in the indicative business case for investment in a community hub in the Manurewa town centre, and the progression to a detailed business case.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Staff have undertaken an investigation and produced an indicative business case to enable a decision regarding council’s investment in a community hub for Manurewa. This is in response to approved work programme item 1465 on the Manurewa Local Board Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2022/2023 (resolution number MR/2022/79).

3.      The work programme item has a capital budget of $2.6 million allocated in the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan (LTP) for a new community centre in Manurewa. This budget has been carried over each LTP and has not been utilised.

4.      A strategic assessment has confirmed that investment in a community hub, aligns with council’s key strategies and with the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023.

5.      The investigation confirmed a need for the increased provision of the council’s community-use space and community centre services in the Manurewa town centre area.

6.      A robust analysis and assessment process of sixteen options, to address the community need, took place. Option D – Fit (community centre and library) within existing North Building library and Citizens Advice Bureau space is the option with the highest benefit to the community.

7.      Option D has the greatest potential to address the need for community-use space / community centre services in the Manurewa town centre area. This would involve a redesign of the current Manurewa Library and Citizens Advice Bureau space, within the existing space of approximately 1310m2, into a community hub that would provide integrated library and community centre services.  

8.      Option D has been assessed as the best value for investment as it is the only short-listed option where the implementation will not require additional operational budget over status quo. The indicative capital cost to implement Option D is approximately $5.3 million.

9.      Staff recommend that Option D is investigated further through the development of a detailed business case.

10.    The next steps of developing a detailed business case include:

·    identification of initial capital investment funding sources (such as potential service property optimisation)

·    production of detailed designs for the reconfigured space in the North Building, and getting the designs professionally costed. 

11.    The detailed business case will include the costs of implementing/constructing the final design and how it will be funded. The detailed business case must be approved by appropriate council departments and the local board prior to construction taking place.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)   whakaae / accept the findings of the indicative business case which confirms the need for council’s community centre services in the Manurewa town centre area 

b)   whakaae / accept that there is a robust strategic case for investment in a community hub for Manurewa

c)   ohia / endorse the development of a detailed business case for the provision of a community hub in the Manurewa town centre based on:

i)     the preferred option, Option D Fit (community centre and library) within existing North Building library and Citizens Advice Bureau space. This includes redesigning the space to provide integrated library and community centre services as a new community hub for central Manurewa residents

ii)    an indicative capital funding investment of approximately $5.3 million to implement Option D which could be done in stages

iii)   identification of additional funding sources to fill the initial capital investment funding gap

iv)   further investigation of potential service property optimisation sites (to determine capital investment opportunities for funding the implementation of Option D).   

v)    a co-design approach to be undertaken with current library staff, mana whenua, key stakeholders and representatives of the community

vi)   the current exclusive operating space of the Manurewa Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) in the North Building (approximately 176m2) becomes part of the redesign and the CAB is provided with an alternative operating space within the new hub

vii)  consultation with young people during the hub design process to identify the services and spaces required in the hub to meet their needs.   

 

Horopaki

Context

Capital budget allocation

12.    A capital budget of $2.6 million for a new community centre in Manurewa was allocated in the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan (LTP) for financial year 2019/2020. This budget has been carried over each year and has not been utilised.

A need for more community space / services in Manurewa 

13.    A 2016 report titled Manurewa and Manukau central: Community Needs Assessment was undertaken by council’s Community and Social Policy department. The report identified gaps in council’s community space provision for residents in the central Manurewa area. 

14.    The 2016 report also identified the high need for space where youth can come together for specific activities after school and during the weekends or school holidays. 

A community hub is high priority for the local board

15.    Item 1465 of the approved Manurewa Local Board Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2022/2023 (resolution number MR/2022/79), adopted on 16 June 2022, proposes the development of a business case for a community centre in Manurewa stating:

Manurewa community centre indicative business case – Develop a case for investment for a new community hub in Manurewa to ensure that facility provision meets the current and future needs of the community and network.

ātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The research area and relevant demographics

16.    The indicative business case investigation has focused on the Manurewa town centre and residential areas within a 15-minute walking distance from it. This is where gaps were identified in the 2016 community needs assessment research. It is also in accordance with the provision guidelines of the council’s Community Facilities Network Plan.

17.    The total population in the research/catchment area, which the proposed new hub would serve, is approximately 13,728 residents. The unique demographics of this population include: 

·      84 per cent of residents are living in high deprivation (compared to 30 per cent of the Auckland regions’ population)

·      the median annual income of residents is $6000 less on average than the median annual income for the Auckland region

·      young people (under the age of 29 years), make up a larger proportion of the population (50 per cent) compared to the rest of Auckland (43 per cent)

·      the majority of the young people are of Pacific ethnicity

·      future projections show a higher proportion of residents to be under 15 years of age (estimated to be 18 per cent), compared to the Auckland region (estimated to be 14 per cent).  

The need for a community centre / hub in the area is confirmed  

18.    The investigation confirmed that there is a need for increased provision of the council’s community-use space and community centre services in the Manurewa town centre area.  The current market and venue-for-hire spaces located in the area are not meeting the need of local area residents. 

A strong strategic case is made for investment and identifying options

19.    A strategic assessment has confirmed that investment in a community hub, aligns with the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023 and council’s key strategies.

·      Auckland Plan 20250

·      Ngā Hapori Momoho – Thriving Communities Strategy

·      Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau

·      Community Facilities Network Plan.

20.    Staff identified 16 potential options (some asset-based and some not) to address the gap in community-use space / community centre services in the Manurewa town centre area. These options were assessed against 15 criteria derived from the council’s key strategies. Those with the highest strategic alignment rating became the short-listed options for further investigation.   

Options to address the community space need for central Manurewa residents

21.    Each of the short-listed options refers to a relationship between the North Building and the South Building. Both of these buildings are located at 7 Hill Road, Manurewa. The map below is provided for reference and identifies the current use of each building.

Map 1: The North and South Buildings at the 7 Hill Road, Manurewa site

Aerial view of a city

Description automatically generated

22.    The six short-listed options that were further assessed are identified in the following table.

Table 1: The six short-listed options    

  Short-listed options

OPTION A

Manurewa Library -- Auckland LibrariesStatus quo / renewals (minimum upgrades of library)

·    No additional community-use space provided for the public

·    Library services would remain as status quo

·    Standard renewals would be used for up-keep of library

OPTION B

All in the South Building (community centre and library)

·    Approximately 861m2 for both services

·    Would require a reconfiguration of library services to operate in a much smaller space than currently (e.g. approximately 1134m2 )

 

OPTION C

Split across North and South Buildings (library in current location in North Building, community centre in South Building)

·    Would not provide an integrated service for the local community

·    Standard renewals would be used for up-keep of library

·    Significant additional long-term operating and capital investment would be required for community centre service delivery

 

 

 

  Short-listed options

OPTION D

Fit (community centre and library) within existing North Building library and CAB space

·    Approximately 1310mtotal space would be reconfigured

·    No additional operational budget would be required

·    Would provide integrated library and community centre services (e.g. a community hub) for the local community

·    Offers flexibility and opportunities for future expansion to provide additional community space and services in order to address the changing needs of the community

 

OPTION E

Expand across the whole North Building for library and community centre

·      Approximately 2012mtotal space

·      Would displace current commercial leases (café, dentist, doctor’s office and pharmacy) resulting in loss of revenue for the local board

·      Significant additional long-term operating investment would be required

 

OPTION H

Build a new hub facility at the 7 Hill Road location

·      Would displace current commercial leases (café, dentist, doctor’s office and pharmacy) resulting in loss of revenue for the local board

·      Significant additional long-term operating and potential long-term capital investment would be required

 

A robust investigation and assessment of options took place

23.    A building condition report was conducted of the North Building, and indicative implementation costs were generated on each of the six short-listed options by a quantity surveyor. This information contributed to staff’s assessment of the six short-listed options.

24.    Table 2 below summarises the assessment of each option against critical success factors and the council’s investment objectives.

25.    The New Zealand Treasury’s Quadruple Bottom Line (QBL) framework was used to evaluate the impacts of the options against the four outcome areas of social, cultural, environmental and monetary. The results are incorporated and shown in Table 2 below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 2: Assessment results of the short-listed options  

26.    The assessment results identify Option D with the highest rating and with the greatest potential to address the need for community-use space / community centre services in Manurewa. 

27.    Option D also has the most even distribution of scores in the QBL categories of cultural, social, environmental and monetary as indicators of community well-being, compared to other options that fluctuate between outcome areas. This is demonstrated in the graph below.

 

 

 

 

 

Graph 1: QBL results in a bar graph

A graph of different colored bars

Description automatically generated

Option D is the preferred option

28.    The assessment process identified Option D – Fit (community centre and library) within existing North Building library and CAB space, as the preferred option. 

29.    There are many benefits of implementing Option D over the other options:

·    it would provide a community centre and improved library services for local residents

·    minimal or no additional operating budget would be required for increased services to the community

·    it has the best value for money indicators than the other options

·    the local board would retain the current commercial lease revenue as part of their budget

·    it provides an opportunity to expand the hub’s footprint to accommodate a change in services if needed in the future

·    it would use the expertise of current staff to make the ‘full service’ hub successful

·    multiple activities, programmes and drop-in services could be happening in the same place and at the same time, which helps to build community cohesion. 

Staff recommend the development of a detailed business case on Option D

30.    Option D has the greatest potential to address the needs of the Manurewa town centre residents. This option will provide a new community hub that integrates the council’s community centre and library services.   

31.    Staff recommend that further investigation is undertaken on the best way to implement Option D through the development and production of a detailed business case.

32.    The actions / steps required to develop a detailed business case are outlined in the Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps section of this agenda report.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.    The recommended option will improve and extend the services provided to the community by using an existing council asset.

34.    Reuse is increasingly seen as an alternative to building new because of its closer alignment to sustainability, a circular economy, and sustainable urban environments.

35.    The recommended option will provide flexible and multi-purpose spaces. It will be designed to be fit-for-purpose, as well as allowing adaptations of space to accommodate the changing needs of the community in the future. This in turn will reduce use of resources compared to those of separate facilities.

36.    The proposed community hub will be located in the Manurewa town centre precinct, within easy access to public transport, and walking and cycling for the residents it will serve. Therefore, investment in the hub will support council’s commitment to carbon reduction.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.    A cross-council, multi-disciplinary project team undertook this investigation and the development of the indicative business case. The project team was made up of representatives from Regional Services and Strategy, Connected Communities, Financial and Business Performance, Local Board Services and Parks and Community Facilities.  

38.    If the necessary approvals are received to proceed with the detailed business case, representatives from the same departments will contribute to its development.

39.    In addition to the core project team, a project reference group of approximately 22 representatives from across council were provided with fortnightly, on-line project updates. The updates were available for specialist contribution to the investigation and the development of the indicative business case. 

40.    Members of the reference group included representation from Corporate Property, Local Board Services, Eke Panuku, Māori Outcomes and the Community Innovation and Library Services units of Connected Communities. 

41.    The indicative business case supports an improvement in the Manurewa Library service provision. It supports having a more adaptable and fit-for-purpose space to provide the services. The provision of more flexible space will positively impact on how library services can be delivered to a growing and changing local population.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.    Manurewa Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) will be the most impacted by this proposal with the loss of their current exclusive operating space (approximately 176m2) that becomes part of the redesign to create a community hub. 

43.    Staff have discussed the recommendation with the Auckland Regional CAB Board Chair, the Manurewa CAB Chair and the manager of the Manurewa CAB who were receptive to being included in the new hub with an alternative operating space that facilitates integrated, whole of service delivery for Manurewa residents. 

44.    Regular workshops about this investigation and the development of the indicative business case were held with the Manurewa Local Board on the following dates:

·      7 July 2022

·      11 August 2022

·      23 March 2023

·      26 October 2023

·      14 December 2023

·      22 February 2024. 

45.    When scoping the project in 2022, some local board members expressed their preference for the community centre to be located in the South Building. This would take place along with the relocation of the Manurewa Local Board office. This preference was taken into consideration by staff. In subsequent workshops this option was discussed with members when the results of the options assessment process identified Option D as the recommended option.    

46.    At the 14 December 2023 local board workshop, members expressed their desire that the South Building be used for community, as opposed to commercial outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.    Over a quarter of Manurewa’s population identify as Māori, making it the highest proportion of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau out of all local board areas. 

48.    According to the New Zealand Census 2018, Manurewa had the biggest increase in the number of Māori residents, 30 per cent from 2013 to 2018. This is in comparison to any other local board area in Tāmaki Makaurau.

49.    Māori in Manurewa are the youngest in Tāmaki, with a median age of 23.3 years. This compares to 24.9 years for all Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau, and 29.5 years for all ethnicities in the Manurewa Local Board area.

50.    The redesign of the Manurewa Library into a community hub provides opportunities to celebrate mana whenua significance.

51.    Māori will benefit from the opportunities to incorporate Te Ao Māori through the new integrated facility of improved library and community centre services. 

52.    Mana whenua and mataawaka will be consulted through the development of the detailed business case.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.    The following table provides an organisational overview of the estimated whole-of-life/long-term costs over thirty years of each short-listed option. It also includes an indication of the increase in total investment required over a thirty-year period, beyond what the expected costs of maintaining status quo would be (as identified in Option A – Status quo/renewal).


 

Table 3: Comparing whole-of-life costs of each short-listed option over a thirty-year period

54.    As demonstrated above, Option D has the most closely aligned estimated net operational cost over a thirty-year period to Option A - Status quo/renewal than any other option.

55.    A financial advantage of Option D is that, if implemented, it is not expected to increase current annual net operational (OPEX) or renewal capital (CAPEX) costs above what is currently expended. 

56.    A capital budget of $2.6 million has been allocated in the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan (LTP) for a new community centre in Manurewa.  This has not been utilised to date. A renewal budget for the Manurewa Library of $300,000 is scheduled for FY25. This provides a total capital budget of $2.9 currently available to implement Option D leaving an initial capital investment funding gap of approximately $2.4 million.

57.    The next step of developing a detailed business case will determine actual costs of implementation and identify options for filling the initial capital investment gap. This will include considering and assessing potential service property optimisation sites. The cost to develop the detailed business case will be met by existing budget.   

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.    The primary risks associated with the progression of a detailed business case for community centre services, are identified in the table below, along with the proposed mitigation.

Table 4: Risks and mitigations associated with the recommendations in this report

Type of risk

Risk

Risk level

Mitigation

Organisational

If there is a lack of staff resource available within critical council departments to pursue the development of the detailed business case, then there will be a loss of momentum and subject-matter expertise to deliver a significant and efficient community outcome within a short period of time. 

Medium

This risk is mitigated by confirming with management of the relevant departments that project staff are available to continue involvement in this project.

Organisational

If there is difficulty in procuring an appropriate architect to develop the redesign, then the delay in pursuing the detailed business case would have financial implications.

Low

This risk is mitigated by starting the procurement process for an architect as soon as possible.

Financial

If there is a delay in initiating the next steps or in producing the final detailed designs beyond the estimated six months, then it is likely that the costs to implement this recommendation will be considerably higher than estimated in the indicative business case, due to the increasing rise in construction costs.

High

This risk is mitigated by initiating the next steps towards developing a detailed business case as soon as possible.

Reputational

If communication is not clear and regular to the local board with progress updates then the local board may feel isolated and lose trust in the project staff to deliver the project.

Low

This risk is mitigated by establishing clear lines of communication so the local board is provided with regular project updates.

Financial

If funding sources are not found or secured to fill the initial capital investment funding gap then it is likely the detailed business case will not be approved for construction.

Medium

This risk can be mitigated by redesigning the space so construction could be undertaken in stages based on when funding would become available.

Financial

If there is significant movement in pricing due to the current buoyant construction market then higher costs can be expected.

Medium

This risk is mitigated by obtaining detailed costings from a quantity surveyor and including a construction contingency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.    The next steps towards implementing the preferred option, through the development of a detailed business case, is provided in the figure below.

60.    An investigation of funding sources will be explored to augment the LTP budget allocated to this project. This will include but not be limited to further investigation of potential service property optimisation sites to determine prospective capital investment opportunities. 

61.    It is recommended that a co-design process to redesign the interior space of the Manurewa Library and Citizens Advice Bureau would take place. The parties involved in the co-design process would be mana whenua, library staff, key stakeholders and community representatives. This is to make sure that the space is fit-for-purpose in providing library and community centre services that meet the needs of the local community now and into the future. It is anticipated that it would take four to six months to achieve detailed design. 

62.    Upon the local board’s approval of the final detailed design, it will be costed to determine the actual costs of implementation.

63.    The detailed business case will include the costs of implementing/constructing the final design and how it will be funded.

64.    The process of developing a detailed business case is expected to take approximately six to twelve months.

65.    The detailed business case must be approved by the appropriate council departments and the local board prior to construction taking place.

 

Figure 1: The next steps towards implementing the recommended option

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of the Indicative Business Case for a community hub in Manurewa

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kimberly Rees - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services & Strategy

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 









Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/01201

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      This report confirms Business Improvement District (BID) annual compliance against the Auckland Council BID Policy (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) as of 10 March 2024.

2.      The BID Policy includes a total of 23 requirements, of which 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report.

3.      This report considers whether the local board should recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Manurewa and Wiri Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

BID-operating business associations within the local board area

4.      Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are programmes where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

5.      The BID Policy includes a total of 23 requirements, 19 of which are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report. As part of the 19 requirements, the BIDs are required to provide annual accountability reports which are due 10 March each year.

6.      The BID annual accountability reports on public funds received by the BID within the local board area for the 2022/2023 financial year and has a direct link to council’s Long-Term Plan 2024-2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process to strike the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

7.      Manurewa Local Board has two BIDs operating in their local area:

Table One: shows the amount of targeted rate each BID is seeking in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Met BID Policy annual reporting requirements.

(9,11 & 18)

Manurewa Business Association

$363,825.00

ü

Wiri Business Association

$755,425.00

ü

8.      Staff recommend the local board approve Manurewa and Wiri BIDs to receive their targeted rate grant for 2024/2025.

Regional summary across all 51 BIDs for this reporting period

9.      Of the 51 BID-operating business associations in Tāmaki Makaurau, 92 per cent (47 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

10.    36 BIDs (70.5 per cent) increased their targeted rates between 2 per cent to 50 per cent for 2024/2025, while 15 BIDs maintained the fiscal status quo.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i)        $363,825.00 for Manurewa BID

ii)       $755,425.00 for Wiri BID.

 

Horopaki

Context

Auckland Council Business Improvement District (BID) Policy and BID targeted rate grant agreement.

 

11.    Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2022) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the BID-operating business association and inform this annual report. The policy is provided as Attachment A.

12.    The remaining four BID Policy Requirements set out the process for establishing, expanding, and discontinuing a BID programme, and determines rating mechanisms. These will be covered within individual BID local board reports.

13.    The BID Policy does not prescribe or measure standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff therefore cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

14.    The BID Policy is supported by a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement, a three-year agreement signed by both Auckland Council and each BID-operating business association’s executive committee. The agreement sets out the relationship between the parties, how payment will be made and that compliance with the BID Policy is mandatory. The agreement confirms the business associations’ independence from Auckland Council. All 51 BIDs have signed a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement for period 1 December 2022 to 30 December 2025.

15.    This report updates the local board on compliance with the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID, with a focus on the BID’s annual accountability reporting (BID Policy Requirement 9, 11 and 18) relating to public funds received by the BID for the 2022/2023 financial year.

16.    This report includes a copy of the individual BID’s Governance Summary documents, as provided in Attachments B, and C. These documents include the full resolution detailing the amount of BID targeted rate grant approved by association members at their 2023 Annual General Meeting (AGM) for the 2024/2025 financial year. The Chair also agrees, by signing this document, to advise council of any perceived or real/current issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

BID Programmes

17.    Local BID programmes should provide value to the collective business community by delivering a suite of economic activities that respond to local needs and opportunities and are agreed by the local business community. BID programmes also provide the opportunity to work with the council group and engage with local boards.

18.   The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

19.   Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its AGM when members vote to approve a detailed income and expenditure operational budget and business plan for the following financial year.

20.   Responsibility for delivery and outcomes of the BID programme sits with the individual BID-operating business association executive committee (provision of reporting information) and members (reviewing information provided to them by the executive committee).

21.   BID-operating business associations operate as independent Incorporated Societies. All BIDs are registered incorporated societies and need to be aware of the requirement to re-register by April 2026 under the updated Incorporated Societies Act 2022. 

Manurewa Local Board BID Targeted Rates 2024/2025

22.    Manurewa Local Board has two BIDs operating in their local board area. Table two shows the amount of targeted rate each BID had approved at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 and linked to the council’s Long-term Plan 2024-2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process.

Table Two: Amount of targeted rate for each BID in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Change from previous year dollars/ percentage

Last year target rate amount was increased

Manurewa Business Association

$363,825.00

 

5%

2023

Wiri Business Association

$755,425.00

 

0%

2021

Decision making

Auckland Council

23.    The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

24.    In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Local Boards

25.    Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional overview

26.    The BID Policy has been in place in Tāmaki Makaurau since 2022 and applies to 51 BIDs across the ā-rohe, up from 50 BIDs reported in the 2023 report to local boards.

27.    Across all 51 BID-operating business associations 92 per cent (47 out of 51 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

28.    Annual accountability reporting is a requirement of the BID Policy (Requirement 11). This has meant the BID Team deviated from the BID Policy Requirement providing an extension to the due date to enable BIDs to achieve sufficient compliance for 2024/2025.

29.    The BID team observed this year BIDs have paid less attention to providing the required annual accountability documents by the 10 March 2024 due date, compared with the previous year.

Summary of BIDs meeting BID Policy Requirements

30.    51 per cent (26) of BIDs successfully completed their annual accountability reporting by the due date of 10 March 2024.

31.    41 per cent (21) received notification that they had missing information or documents and were provided an extension to the 10 March deadline. 

32.    4 BIDs failed to meet BID Policy Requirement 11 and the 10 March deadline and the provided extension to this deadline.

33.    BID targeted rate grants 2024/2025 - 36 increased their targeted rates between 2 per cent to 50 per cent for 2024/2025, while 15 maintained the fiscal status quo.

34.    Of the 11 BIDs with income under $120,000 (BID Policy Requirement 4), two BIDs now met this requirement as of 10 March 2024.

35.    Of the remaining nine BIDs, three have made no comment to increase their income. Five BIDs have increased their BID Targeted rate grant and are on track to meet this requirement by 1 July 2028 and one has indicated interest in a BID expansion project.

Regional BID Programme Growth

36.    This section provides an overview of BID programme growth across the region.

37.    Onehunga BID achieved a successful expansion ballot in February 2024. This will see them evolve from a retail focused BID into a BID encompassing retail, plus commercial and industrial areas, with a significant growth in target rate commencing 1 July 2024.

38.    Kingsland BID has confirmed at their 2023 AGM they would implement a BID expansion project in 2024/2025.

39.    Grey Lynn Business Association will be holding a ballot later this year towards establishing as a new BID from 1 July 2025.

40.    Takanini Business Association is on track to progress their BID establishment project aiming to become a new BID from 1 July 2026.

BID Team: 2024 Accountability Reporting process overview.

41.    Upon receipt of individual BID annual accountability documents, staff follow a set process that includes:

·    Reviewing the accountability reporting of the previous accountability period (10 March 2023) to understand if any recommendations or feedback had been made.

·    Review the documents provided for 10 March 2024.

·    Discussion regarding observations relevant to that BID (knowledge, actions taken etc).

·    Communication with the BID (information missing, more information required, completion of reporting).

42.    Generic observations from year 10 March 2024 accountability include:

·    Acceptance that limited local board discretionary funding was available which led to BIDS having a greater focus on efficiencies in their own BID budgets.

·    The improving quality of annual discussions between local boards and BID-operating business associations. Less emphasis on operational aspects and more discussion on how they could collaborate.

BID Policy – Requirements 9, 11 and 18

43.    Requirements 9 and 18 of the BID Policy are focused on BID affiliates having access to BID programme information and the BID targeted rate spend. It specifies a range of information BIDs must ensure are easily and freely accessible on a suitable online platform.

44.    This year a one-off ‘Website Check List’ was added to the annual accountablity reporting.  This document confirms compliance against BID Policy, Requirements 9 and 18 relating to the transparency of BID information on a public platform.

45.    The BID Policy, requirement 11 sets out the documents that form the annual accountability reporting documents for each BID. These documents confirm membership decision-making has taken place regarding the BID programme at the 2023 AGM.

46.    Other reporting requirements such as the filing of annual financial statements with the Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act are included in this reporting.

Manurewa Local Board BIDs

47.    The table below sets out the documents required by 10 March 2024 under BID Policy Requirement 11.

Table Three: Business associations compliance with the BID Policy Requirement 11, 9 and 18

BID Policy Requirement 11

Business Associations – documents submitted

Manurewa Business Association Incorporated

Wiri Business Association Incorporated

Statement of financial/ performance reporting 2022/2023

ü

ü

Audited report/review 2022/2023

ü

ü

Audit Management Letter 2022/2023

ü

ü

Chairs report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Treasurers report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Manager’s report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

Approved business plan for 18 months 2024/2025

ü

ü

Income and expenditure budget 2024/2025

ü

ü

Draft Minutes 2023 AGM

ü

ü

Financial/Audit reports posted to Companies Office website

ü

ü

Mandatory Management Summary – signed by manager

ü

ü

Mandatory Governance Summary – signed by Chair

ü

ü

Strategic Plan *

2020-2025

2023-2028

Website Check List

ü

ü

 Note: * Current strategic 3–5-year plans to be available upon request.

Table Four: Business associations compliance with other BID Policy Requirements

Business Associations

 

BID Policy requirements

Manurewa  Business Association Incorporated

Wiri Business Association

Requirement 3: Increase BID income to $120,000 by 1 July 2028

N/A

N/A

Requirement 10: Other Council Funding – accountability reporting*

Baseline to be established year ending 2025.

 

N/A

N/A

Requirement 12: Clear separation between BID governance and management Measure- BID Team advised of issue within BID. Year ending 10 March 2024

Nil

Nil

Note – BID Policy Requirement 10: * Funding agreements between the BID and local board (or any other part of council) set out the contractual obligations for funds received. These other funds are in addition to the BID targeted rate funding and are not covered in this report.

Manurewa Local Board: observations on BID Operating business associations within the area

·    Manurewa –. important there remains a focus on securing the minimum number of executive committee members to maintain quorums.

·    Wiri  – nothing noted.

48.    Using the documents and information submitted, the BID Team is satisfied that Manurewa and Wiri BIDs have sufficiently met the BID Policy Requirements and the BID Policy for setting of the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

49.    Staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for 2024/2025 as set out in Table One.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.    Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and can facilitate environmental sustainability programmes and climate response where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.    Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations that operate a BID programme. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

52.    BIDs work across several Council Controlled Organisations including Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.    The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

54.    Manurewa and Wiri BID programmes best align with the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2023, Outcome: Our Economy

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

55.    Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Manurewa and Wiri business associations means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.    The BID Policy and the annual accountability process does not prescribe or report on individual BID programme’s effectiveness, outcomes, or impacts. However individual BIDs may include this level of detail in other reports provided to their members. This localised project reporting is not a requirement of the BID Policy and is not part of the BID Policy annual accountability reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.    There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

58.    The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

59.    To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, the BID Policy sets out a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

60.    For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, it requires the BIDs to fully complete all annual accountability reporting and the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID. 

61.    The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy throughout the year including responding to queries and issues raised by council staff, members of the BID, the public and elected members.

62.    We actively grow relationships with council departments that interact with BID programmes to ensure a consistent approach is applied for the programme.

63.    The role of the local board representative is a key link between the parties involved in the BID programme in terms of communication and feedback. Local board representatives on BID programmes are strongly encouraged to contact the BID Team if they have any queries or concerns.

64.    This report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds. It provides an annual update that the BIDs operating within the local board area are compliant with the BID Policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.    If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 including the annual budget 2024/2025.

66.    After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2024 to the Manurewa and Wiri BIDs.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID Policy 2022 - all requirements and responsibilities for accountability

41

b

Manurewa BID - Governance Summary

45

c

Wiri BID - Governance Summary

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 




Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2024/05605

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·    alphabetical order of surname;

·    pseudo-random order; or

·    random order.

3.      Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.      Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.      The overseas findings on ballot order effects is controversial[1] and based on elections that differ to local government elections in New Zealand. Auckland Council has based its decisions in the past on its own statistical analysis of previous election results.

6.      The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 Auckland Council elections. From 2016, prior to each election a statistical analysis was conducted by RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit on the results of previous elections which each time has concluded that there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The focus was on whether there was any advantage to being listed first.

7.      RIMU extended the scope of the statistical analysis this time to include list positions other than first, and also the effects of “race[2] length”. This takes into account the number of candidates standing for a particular election race. The analysis confirms previous results in terms of candidates listed first but has found that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages. The full analysis is attached as Attachment A.

8.      This effect would be remedied by all names on the voting document being in random order. The disadvantage of random order is that it creates some friction for voters. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout.

9.      Nevertheless, since the evidence is clear that in some cases alphabetical order creates a disadvantage, staff recommend that the order of names on Auckland Council voting documents for 2025 be random order.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to the Governing Body on whether candidate names on voting documents should be in random order given the statistical evidence that being lower on the list in certain types of election race appears to confer significant disadvantages.

 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

10.    Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)     The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)     Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)     If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)     If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)     In this regulation,—

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where —

(a) the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b) all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

11.    In 2013, the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names, a consideration being an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology, however the council has chosen to use alphabetical order of names in past elections on the basis that statistical research did not indicate a compelling case to change to random order. 


 

12.    For the 2022 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and city councils whose data was available, with random order being used by 19 out of the 22 councils other than Auckland:

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Random

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Random

Manawatū-Whanganui Regional Council

Random

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Random

Southland Regional Council

Random

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council (2024)

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2025

Pseudo-random order and true random order

13.    Random order printing removes name order bias, whereas the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. For example, any first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

14.    A disadvantage to both the random printing options is that they create friction for the voter. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout if the friction deters any voters.

Alphabetical order

15.    The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

16.    It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

17.    The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is now evidence from a statistical analysis of council’s previous election results, that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race confers significant disadvantages.

Analysis of previous election results

18.    An analysis[3] of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 is contained in Attachment A.

19.    Again, the analysis found no compelling evidence that candidates who were listed first were more likely to be elected in the last five Auckland Council elections.

20.    This time the analysis introduced consideration of positions other than first, and also of ‘election race length’ (for example, how many candidates were in each local board or ward race) and also added linear interpolation modelling.

21.    This extended analysis has found that comparing actual votes received proportional to the expected share, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages.

Conclusion

22.    A decision about the order of names on voting documents is made by resolution of the council under clause 31 of the Local Electoral Regulations 2001. Such regulations are provided for in section 139 of the Local Electoral Act 2001.

23.    Section 4 of the Local Electoral Act 2001 requires local authorities, when making decisions under the Act, to take into account the principles set out in section 4. These principles are:

(1)    The principles that this Act is designed to implement are the following:

(aa)   representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls:

(a)     fair and effective representation for individuals and communities:

(b)     all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to—

(i)    cast an informed vote:

(ii)    nominate 1 or more candidates:

(iii)   accept nomination as a candidate:

(c)     public confidence in, and public understanding of, local electoral processes through—

(i)      the provision of a regular election cycle:

(ii)     the provision of elections that are managed independently from the elected body:

(iii)     protection of the freedom of choice of voters and the secrecy of the vote:

(iv)    the provision of transparent electoral systems and voting methods and the adoption of procedures that produce certainty in electoral outcomes:

(v)     the provision of impartial mechanisms for resolving disputed elections and polls.

24.    The principles include substantial participation in the elections and public confidence in electoral processes. They also include a principle that all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to accept nomination as a candidate. This implies a candidate should not be disadvantaged by virtue of their surname.

25.    While alphabetical ordering of names facilitates participation (supporting one of these principles), there is now evidence that this could disadvantage some candidates if they appear lower on the candidate list (compromising the principle that all persons have an equal opportunity to stand).

26.    In terms of public confidence, for the 2022 elections a website[4] criticised the council’s decision to use alphabetical order. This is the only known criticism however the council needs to be seen to be making this decision in a robust manner.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.    The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.    The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.    Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.    The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order.  Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.    There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.    Given the widespread adoption of random order of names on voting documents among regional and city councils, if names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of public criticism of the council’s decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.    The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Analysis of order of candidate names on election outcomes

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 













Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum

File No.: CP2024/05584

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To make appointments for participation in a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, coordinated by Auckland Emergency Management.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The role that local board members play during an emergency is becoming an increasingly important element of emergency management.

3.      To support this role, a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is proposed.

4.      The terms of reference, in Attachment A, show that the forum will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision will be “local board members with an interest in emergency management working together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response.”

5.      The forum will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about readiness and response in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for readiness and response measures, and to provide informal guidance to staff on related issues.

6.      After local boards make their appointments, an initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July.

7.      Staff recommend the forum meet three times a year. Additional meetings can be arranged if there is urgent content that requires discussion between scheduled forum sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.      Following the weather events of January and February 2023, Auckland Emergency Management was subject to several reviews and various recommendations.

9.      Part of the implementation of the recommendations included the establishment of a Planning Unit and an associated Community Planning and Readiness Manager, with a team of seven Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors, to support readiness and preparedness at the local level.

10.    The Head of Planning Unit commenced 15 January 2024, and appointments to the Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisor roles were made in late 2023, with the last Senior Advisor commencing their role early February 2024.

11.    All local boards have expressed a desire to be more involved in readiness and response, and to be upskilled in advance of another catastrophic weather event.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.    Local board members are passionate about ensuring the best outcomes for their communities before, during, and following an emergency.

13.    A number of gaps have been identified where, during an emergency, local board members did not have the information they needed to best support their communities and the emergency response. Recent events also highlighted the importance of community readiness, and the role that people played to support each other during a response.

14.    In response to this, the Auckland Emergency Management has written terms of reference, provided as Attachment A, to set out the parameters of an Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·    learn more about emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant knowledge with other local board members and with their communities

·    improve connections between participants at a governance level

·    encourage collaboration between local boards to support emergency readiness and response outcomes

·    provide informal guidance to staff in regard to emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

15.    The vision of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is “local board members with an interest in emergency management work together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response”.

16.    Boards are invited to appoint up to three members to the forum. Participation is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes and be able to watch recording of forum meetings.

17.    The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

18.    The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum and provide further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet three times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed in consultation with the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.    The formation and operation of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum has no direct climate impact, particularly as the group will meet online only.

20.    The impacts of climate change on weather patterns mean that catastrophic weather events are likely to become more frequent. Response and readiness will form a significant part of ensuring that impacts on our communities are mitigated where possible.

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.    The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be administered by staff from the council’s Auckland Emergency Management team, with support from kaimahi in the Local Board Services department.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.    Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors have been meeting with local boards during Q3 to build relationships and develop Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Plans.

23.    The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum responds to requests from local board members to increase activity in this space and enables development and upskilling that is likely to have a positive impact on the final response plans that are produced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.    Auckland Emergency Management are working with marae to provide support in emergency preparedness activities and to identify marae that may be able to provide support to communities in response.

25.    Potential topics for 2024 Readiness and Response Forum include mana whenua engagement and suggestions for improving iwi involvement at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.    The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.    There is a risk that local board members who become members of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum expect that they will play a central role in emergency response in the event of another weather event.

28.    The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is an information-sharing forum, and the Terms of Reference are intended to clarify this, ensuring participants have a realistic expectation of the roles and responsibilities of membership.

29.    The Emergency Management Elected Members’ Guide (July 2023) is a key guiding document for elected members, providing detailed information on the role of elected members in emergency reduction, readiness, response and recovery activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.    Local boards that wish to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

31.    An initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July 2024.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Readiness and Response Forum

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Wallace - Head of Planning Auckland Emergency Management

Authorisers

Adam Maggs - General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Oliver Roberts - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 




Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/04365

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide the Manurewa Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2024.

2.      To approve a retrospective allocation for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) of $2,000 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

4.      The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the 2020 Manurewa Local Board Plan outcomes.

5.      All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed), grey (cancelled, deferred or merged) or a red status (behind delivery, significant risk).

6.      Of the 105 work lines within the agreed work programme 96 are green, four are amber, four are grey and one is red.

7.      The following activity is reported with a red status:

·        Citizens Advice Bureau (#3783) - Departments are exploring a future service delivery model aligned with the Long-term Plan (LTP) 2024-2034. In the interim, existing agreements will hold over on a month-by-month basis.

8.      The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        The 2024 Jazz at Nathan Homestead event took place (Jazz at Nathan Homestead #279)

·        Manurewa Marae delivered 12 te reo workshops at Manurewa library (Support Māori led aspirations #270)

·        Free access to Manurewa Pool and Leisure Centre was provided to 8,783 visitors (Manurewa Pools - access for targeted groups #34)

·        Brown Pride worked with eight Pasifika rangatahi from Manurewa to get them into employment or a positive training pathway (Youth Economy #1338)

·        Two community events around illegal dumping were hosted and organised by E Tu Rakau in Randwick Park and Rata Vine (Waste Minimisation #608)

·        A site investigation has determined that the Weymouth Community Hall is generally in good condition and therefore staff are recommending the upgrade be cancelled and funding reallocated to other works (Weymouth Community Hall - upgrade the interior and exterior of the facility #36812).

9.      There are underspends in three work programme lines and reallocation of the underspent budget is recommended.

10.    Funds were set aside for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) following the drafting of the 2023/2024 work programme. However, due to changes at Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (TAU), formal approval of the budget was not possible at the time the board adopted its work programme in June 2023 as a budget holding department was unavailable. At the time staff confirmed with the local board that the board will support the delivery of the YES programme by the Auckland Chamber of Commerce, although it wasn’t part of the board’s adopted work programme. The funds were held in a reserve fund for formal approval during the financial year. Auckland Council Grants team has now taken on this work. This report provides the opportunity for the local board to approve the Young Enterprise Scheme (MN) (#1266) and associated budget of $2,000 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

11.    Net operating performance for Manurewa Local Board is six per cent below budget for the nine months ending 31 March 2024. Operating expenditure is seven per cent below budget, and operating revenue is 13 per cent below budget. Capital expenditure is 21 per cent below budget year to date with storm and flood funds to be used in the next financial year.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2024

b)      whakaae / approve the allocation of $2,000 from unallocated locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget to Young Enterprise Scheme (MN) (#1266) in the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme

c)      whakaae / approve the cancellation of the Weymouth Community Hall - upgrade the interior and exterior of the facility (#36812) work programme line as the upgrade is no longer required

d)      whakaae / approve the reallocation of $50,000 from Weymouth Community Hall - upgrade the interior and exterior of the facility (#36812) to Manurewa - general renewals of community centre and open space buildings (#36815)

e)      whakaae / approve the reallocation of $300,000 from Weymouth Community Hall - upgrade the interior and exterior of the facility (#36812) to Mountfort Park (Counties Manukau Cricket Association) - renew interior and exterior of the building (#47589)

f)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the following underspends available for reallocation:

i)        $15,000 underspend in the Event partnership fund Manurewa (#280) line, which was  noted in the quarter two report

ii)       an additional $20,000 in the Event partnership fund Manurewa (#280)

iii)      $8,000 underspend in the Local civic events Manurewa (#278) line

iv)      $1,017.19 underspend in the Local Board event - Jazz at Nathan Homestead (#279) line

g)      whakaae / approve the reallocation of $44,017.19 underspent budget.

 

Horopaki

Context

12.    The Manurewa Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Auckland Emergency Management

·        Local Governance.

13.    The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet the Manurewa Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

14.    The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).


 

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

15.    The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

16.    The following are key activity updates from quarter two. These are aligned to outcomes in the Manurewa Local Board Plan.

Our communities are inclusive, vibrant, healthy and connected

17.    Jazz at Nathan Homestead (#279): The 2024 Jazz at Nathan Homestead event was delivered on Saturday 27 January to an estimated audience of 200.

18.    Community safety initiatives investment (#267): Decorative lighting for the Manurewa Transport Interchange covered canopy and raised pedestrian crossing has been approved by Auckland Transport and work is scheduled to start next quarter. 75 – 100 coffees were given out through Coffee with a Cop.

19.    Local civic events (#278): No activity has occurred this quarter and this budget is no longer required for this financial year. The budget of $8,000 is available for reallocation.

20.    Event partnership fund (#280): The underspend highlighted in the quarter two report is still available for reallocation. The $20,000 contingency fund has not been used and is also available for reallocation.

21.    Jazz at Nathan Homestead (#279): There was an underspend in the promotion funding for this event which has resulted in an underspend of $1,017.19, which is available for reallocation.

We are proud of our strong Māori identity and thriving Māori community

22.    Support Māori led aspirations (#270): Manurewa Marae delivered 12 te reo workshops in Manurewa library. The Matariki and Bilingual Hikoi collective committees have collaborated to deliver a Matariki and Bilingual Hikoi technology project next quarter.

Our people enjoy a choice of quality community spaces and use them often

23.    Tōtara Park Pool (summer) operations (#26): This quarter saw a 166 per cent increase in visitor numbers compared to the same time last year. This is partially due to the pool operating for the entire period without early closure, as there was sufficient staffing.

24.    Manurewa Leisure Centre operations (#27): There was a 145 per cent increase in visitor numbers in comparison to the same period last year.

25.    Manurewa Pools - access for targeted groups (#34): This quarter, free access to Manurewa Pool and Leisure Centre was provided to: 4,667 seniors, 4,061 adults supervising children and 55 people with disabilities.

Our safe and accessible network provides transport options to meet community needs

26.    Local crime prevention fund, safety initiatives investment (#3989): Organisations continue to deliver youth interventions and crime prevention programmes focussed on improving social well-being with positive activities, cultural connection and alternative justice and education engagement.

Our prosperous local economy supports local people

27.    Youth Economy (#1338): Brown Pride worked with 16 Pasifika rangatahi, eight from Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and eight from Manurewa, to get them into employment or a positive training pathway. Five went into jobs paying on or above the living wage, six went into self-employment and the remaining five are in study or about to move into study.

Our natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced

28.    Waste Minimisation (#608): Two community events around illegal dumping were hosted and organised by E Tu Rakau in Randwick Park and Rata Vine, engaging 290 locals in education and litter clean ups.

29.    Papakura Stream Restoration programme (#617): Conservation Volunteers NZ have been preparing for the 2024 planting season across the Papakura Stream, including Beaumonts Park in Manurewa. Funding has been secured for over 35,000 plants to be planted across the catchment, and site preparation has been completed.

30.    Manurewa Ecological and environmental volunteers programme (#1408): 789 volunteer hours were recorded for this quarter. The Eye on Nature Event was held at the Botanic Gardens over three days with 12 schools and 360 kids in attendance.

Activities with significant issues

31.    Citizens Advice Bureau – Manurewa (#3783): Auckland CABs receive funding from Auckland Council each year. As part of the funding requirements Connected Communities are exploring a future service delivery model aligned with council’s Long-term Plan (LTP) 2024-2034. New leases will be progressed in conjunction with this piece of work. In the interim, existing agreements will hold over on a month-by-month basis.

Activities on hold

32.    The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        Manurewa Library - comprehensive building refit (#24189): Project is on hold until October 2024.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

33.    Tātou Belonging - we bring communities together (#1206): This line was cancelled last financial year due to budget cuts. A system error has resulted in this work programme item still showing in this financial year.

34.    Weymouth Community Hall - upgrade the interior and exterior of the facility (#36812): After conducting a site investigation, it has been determined that the current building is generally in good condition. Therefore, staff recommend that the project is cancelled, and funding is reallocated to other projects in the work programme.

Activities with changes

35.    Staff are recommending the local board reallocate $350,000 from Weymouth Community Hall - upgrade the interior and exterior of the facility (#36812) to the following projects:

·        $50,000 to Manurewa - general renewals of community centre and open space buildings (#36815. Staff are intending to utilise this funding in this financial year to mitigate heat-related issues at the Holmes Road Depot (Beautification Trust).

·        $300,000 to the renewal of the interior and exterior of Mountfort Park (Counties Manukau Cricket Association) (#47589). This is a new project for next financial year (FY25) based on the building condition report, which infers the Counties Manukau Cricket Association building is in a poor state.

Young Enterprise Scheme (YES)

36.    The Manurewa Local Board has previously funded the Young Enterprise Scheme (MN) (#1266) as part of Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s (TAU) 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years’ work programme.

37.    Due to changes at TAU, the approval of the Young Enterprise Scheme (MN) (#1266) in financial year 2023/2024 work programmes was delayed while an alternative team to manage the activity was agreed upon. Staff confirmed with the local board that the board will continue to support the delivery of this project while a new budget holder was found. An amount of $2,000 was held in a reserve fund for future approval by the board.

38.    The responsibility within the council for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) has now been re-allocated from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited to Auckland Council Grants team.

39.    The YES event was delivered by the Auckland Business Chamber on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust in quarter three.

40.    The proposed budget for the Young Enterprise Scheme (MN) (#1266) was $2,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount remains unallocated and can be accommodated from within the local board’s total budget for 2023/2024.

41.    This report seeks the formal (retrospective) approval of $2,000 to the Young Enterprise Scheme (MN) (#1266) in the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.    Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

43.    Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is already underway. Should any significant changes to projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

44.    The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.    When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.    This report informs the Manurewa Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.    The local board is committed to supporting work that contributes to outcomes for Māori. This includes seeking opportunities for collaboration and early engagement with mana whenua.

48.    The board funds several work programme items that have a significant Māori focus or outcome, including the Tuia programme and other Māori youth initiatives, Māori-led social initiatives, Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming and associated storytelling of parks and places) and working with local iwi and marae to enable increased participation and engagement with the local board and its projects.

49.    The 2020 Local Board Plan has an outcome dedicated to Māori: We are proud of our strong Māori identity and thriving Māori community. Under this outcome the local board works to ensure Māori heritage and storytelling is visible, te reo Māori is seen, spoken and heard throughout the community, and Māori share in local prosperity and take part in local decision-making.

50.    Manurewa Local Board is also part of Ara Kōtui, a joint mana whenua and southern local boards initiative that explores and supports opportunities that enable mana whenua involvement in local board decision-making. Currently up to 12 mana whenua are involved in this initiative.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.    This report is provided to enable the Manurewa Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programme.

52.    There is a recommendation to reallocate Locally Driven Initiative Operating Expenditure (LDI Opex) budgets from work programme items: #280, #278, and #279. The reallocation recommendation has no financial impact on the overall LDI Opex budget.

53.    The proposed budget for the Young Enterprise Scheme (MN) (#1266) is $2,000 and can be funded from the local board’s available locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget 2023/2024.

Financial Performance

54.    Operating expenditure of $13.2 million is $988,000 below budget.

55.    For ABS (Asset Based Services) operating expenditure, the underspend in maintenance costs is $334,000, consequential opex and depreciation costs are $394,000 below budget and increased facility security costs are $60,000 over budget. The Early Childhood Education (ECE) expenses are $167,000 below budget following the decision to close this service.

56.    LDI (Locally Driven Initiatives) operating expenditure is overall $219,000 behind budget for the year to date, however it is forecast to be close to budget by year end. There are no identified financial implications.

57.    Operating revenue of $2.3 million is $344,000 below budget mainly due to the closure of the Early Childhood Education (ECE) service.

58.    Capital Expenditure of $1.8 million is 21 per cent behind budget spend for the year in renewals. Also, funds recently allocated to the Parks and Community Facilities (PCF) work programme for storm and flood damage will be carried into next year.

59.    The financial report for the year ended 31 March 2024 for Manurewa Local Board area is attached as Attachment B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.    While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (for example, building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

61.    The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

62.    Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.    The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2024).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Q3 work programme update

85

b

Financial summary - Q3

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Abbot - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

































Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 






Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2024/04684

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval to add an additional or extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule, so the local board can review public feedback on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 before providing formal views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to the delivery of the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has affected the delivery of the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

3.      Public engagement data on the RLTP will not be available to local boards until 24 June 2024. Local boards must provide their formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines. These timeframes are outside the local board’s normal meeting cycle.

4.      To enable local boards to consider public engagement data before providing formal views, this report recommends the local board approve an additional or extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the addition of one meeting at 1.30pm on 27 June 2024 at Manurewa Local Board office to the 2022-2025 Manurewa Local Board meeting schedule to provide formal views on the Regional Land Transport Plan after reviewing public feedback.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.      In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.      The Manurewa Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its 17 November 2022 business meeting.

8.      At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to delivering the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has impacted Auckland Transport’s timeframes on delivering the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

9.      Public engagement on the draft RLTP will run from 17 May 2024 until mid-June 2024. Auckland Transport will provide a summary of public feedback to local boards on 24 June 2024.

10.    Local boards must provide formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines.

11.    Local boards expect to see public feedback before providing their formal views. Therefore, it is recommended that local boards resolve their formal views on the RLTP after 24 June and before 3 July. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.    The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meeting as an addition to the 2022-2025 meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

13.    For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the RLTP timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

14.    For option two, only the specific topic on the RLTP may be considered for which the meeting is being held.

15.    Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.    This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.    There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.    This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.    There is no specific impact to mana whenua or mataawaka from this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.    There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.    There is a risk that local board views on the RLTP will not be informed by public feedback. This risk is mitigated if the local board resolves to add an additional or extraordinary meeting after the public feedback data is made available on 24 June 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.    Staff will implement the preferred process when preparing the business meeting schedule.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Urgent decision: Manurewa Local Board input to the Auckland Council submission on central government’s Fast-track Approvals Bill

File No.: CP2024/05123

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the Manurewa Local Board feedback into the Auckland Council’s submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill made under urgent decision.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      At its meeting on 17 November 2022 the Manurewa Local Board resolved (MR/2022/169) the following:

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board, if the local board is unable to meet

b)      confirm that the Local Area Manager, chairperson, and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the use of the local board’s urgent decision mechanism by approving the request for an urgent decision in writing

c)      note that all urgent decisions made, including written advice which supported these decisions, will be included on the agenda of the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

3.      Auckland Council was given the opportunity to contribute to the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

4.      Local board input into that submission was sought with a deadline of 17 April 2024.

5.      The next Manurewa Local Board business meeting was on Thursday 18 April 2024 and therefore the opportunity for the local board to formalise its feedback by resolution fell outside of the scheduled business meeting times, and an urgent decision was required.

6.      The board’s draft feedback was circulated to all members for comment before being approved and submitted.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Manurewa Local Board urgent decision dated 17 April 2024 providing local board feedback on the Fast-track Approvals Bill in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board feedback on Fast Track Approvals Bill

129

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Abbot - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

 

 

Urgent Decision of the Manurewa Local Board input to the Auckland Council

submission on central government’s Fast-track Approvals Bill

This decision has been made under delegated authority as per resolution MR/2022/169 by: Matt Winiata (Acting Chairperson) and Anne Candy (Acting Deputy Chairperson) on 17 April 2024.

The use of the Urgent Decisions delegation was authorised by the Chairperson, Deputy Chairperson and Manoj Ragupathy, Local Area Manager. The authorisers are satisfied that the decision is required urgently and it is not practicable in the circumstances to call an extraordinary or emergency meeting of the local board.

The following information was provided to the decision-makers to inform their decision:

Attachment 1: Fast-track Approvals Bill

 

Subject: Manurewa Local Board Input to the Auckland Council submission on central government’s Fast-track Approvals Bill

The Manurewa Local Board:

a)         provide the following input to the Auckland Council submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill:

i)          Do not support stopping expert panels from seeking input from the public and advocacy groups. Transparency and accountability should be an integral part of this process and people affected should be able to have their say.

ii)         Note that to understand the full implications and scope of this change, projects that are being considered to go through this process, should have been given.

iii)        Do not support projects that were previously rejected being able to be fast-tracked with less scrutiny than before.

iv)        Do not support allowing projects that are inconsistent with RMA national direction to be approved.

v)         Do not support this Bill overriding other legislation and plans, including the Auckland Unitary Plan and the Future Development Strategy 2023.

vi)        Note the potential lack of impartiality through Ministers, rather than a panel, acting as the decision-makers.

vii)       Note the environmental implications of this bill are of concern and there is little mitigation offered to protect the environment, especially conservation land.

viii)       Note there is likely to be an impact on infrastructure in Auckland and as a result, the Bill should allow for a development contribution regime to be implemented where applications that require bulk infrastructure are proposed.

 

 

 

 

_____________________________

Manoj Ragupathy

Local Area Manager

Franklin, Manurewa and Papakura Local Boards

 

 

                                                                  

                                                                                                                                      

Matt Winiata                                                                 Anne Candy

Chairperson (Acting)                                                 Deputy Chairperson (Acting)

Manurewa Local Board                                             Manurewa Local Board

 

Date:  17 April 2024


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action - May 2024

File No.: CP2024/05094

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide the Manurewa Local Board with an opportunity to track progress of local board resolutions requesting response and advice from staff.

2.      The Resolutions Pending Action report in Attachment A updates progress on resolutions pending, from November 2023 to May 2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

 

a)         tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Resolutions Pending Action report May 2024 in Attachment A.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board: Resolutions pending report November 2023 to May 2024

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar - May 2024

File No.: CP2024/05072

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To present to the Manurewa Local Board the three-month Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next three months. The Governance Forward Work Calendar for the Manurewa Local Board is included in Attachment A.

3.      The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

i)    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)   clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)  clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.      The calendar will be updated every month, be included on the agenda for business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

5.      The Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar is also shared with mana whenua iwi organisations, along with an invitation to contact the local board through Local Board Services Department in liaison with the Local Board Chair, should mana whenua representatives wish to attend a business meeting or workshop on particular subjects of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance Forward Work Calendar - May 2024

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2024/05073

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the Manurewa Local Board’s records for the workshops held on 4, 11 and 18 April 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Under Standing Order 12.1.1 the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.      Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

4.      This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Manurewa Local Board workshop records from:

i)        4 April 2024

ii)       11 April 2024

iii)      18 April 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

4 April 2024: Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

141

b

11 April 2024: Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

145

c

18 April 2024: Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

147

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 





Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

 


 

 


Manurewa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Manurewa Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Manurewa Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report relates to ongoing contract negotiations and should remain confidential until August, to ensure the awarding of contracts has been completed prior.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] See, for example, “How Much is Enough? The Ballot Order Effect and the Use of Social Science Research in Election Law Disputes”, R. Michael Alvarez and Betsy Sinclair, https://web.archive.org/web/20100615182629id_/http://home.uchicago.edu/~betsy/papers/eljalvarez.pdf

[2] In this analysis a ‘race’ refers to an election in a particular ward or local board in a particular year.

[3] By Ross Wilson in the RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit in 2023. It is noted that the RIMU research did not (and could not) separate out the effects of alphabetical order on the ballot slip, from the effects of alphabetical ordering of the directory of candidate profile statements. The candidate booklet cannot be randomised.

[4] https://thefacts.nz/all/alpha-bias-surnames-in-the-top-3-won-50-of-elections/